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Saturday, 06 Feb 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Titlesort icon Author Replies Last Post
Story Could Oracle stifle the open-source movement? srlinuxx 18/02/2006 - 2:54am
Story Croatian policy encourages open source adoption Roy Schestowitz 28/08/2015 - 9:51am
Story DemocracyOS promotes civic engagement on both sides Roy Schestowitz 18/08/2014 - 10:44am
Story DevOps principles resonate with student Linux program Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2015 - 3:22pm
Story Did You Know You Can Try BSD With VirtualBSD? srlinuxx 29/04/2011 - 1:47am
Story Diversity in open source highlights from 2015 Roy Schestowitz 21/12/2015 - 5:33pm
Story Do you need programming skills to learn Linux? Roy Schestowitz 09/12/2014 - 11:12am
Story Docker security in the future Rianne Schestowitz 20/03/2015 - 1:30am
Story Docker security with SELinux Roy Schestowitz 22/07/2014 - 4:27pm
Story Dynamic Ubuntu Theme srlinuxx 16/03/2010 - 1:58am

Kolab and Collabora team up to take on Google Apps and Office 365

Filed under
OSS

Collabora Productivity, a UK-based consulting firm that offers LibreOffice for enterprises, and Kolab Systems, a Switzerland-based provider of open source groupware solutions, have partnered to offer Collabora’s CloudSuite as an integrated component of Kolab.

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I bought my mom a Chromebook Pixel and everything is so much better now

Filed under
Linux
Google

The problem: most of the Chromebooks on the market feel cheap. They're generally marketed as secondary computers, so they're made to be inexpensive, and that means almost all of them are made of cheap-feeling plastic. There's nothing wrong with that, but I needed to pass the sleek test. The only viable option was Google's own Chromebook Pixel, which is an amazingly beautiful machine that's ridiculously expensive by most normal standards, because it's a thousand-dollar computer that just runs Chrome. It sounds insane: most tech products that cost a thousand dollars do many, many more things than simply running a web browser. I spent weeks tossing the idea around every chance I got, just to see if it would ever sound less like I was slowly going crazy.

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Ubuntu Linux 32-bit ISO , Images of Meizu Pro 5 With Ubuntu Touch

Filed under
Ubuntu

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Monday
  • Your Smartphone Can Be Hacked Due To A Backdoor In Your Processor

    A new security vulnerability has been reported in the smartphones which use MediaTek Processors. MediaTek company is a Taiwan-based company which manufacturers processors for the budget range smartphones. The security bug was found because a debug feature was not closed on the smartphone after testing.

    A new bug has surfaced lately on the Android smartphones or tablets which use a MediaTek processor. These devices are vulnerable to remote hacking via a backdoor. This security vulnerability was discovered by a security researcher, Justin Case. The MediaTek company has been informed about the flaw. This security vulnerability is apparently due to a debug tool which was left open by MediaTek in the shipped devices.

  • Using IPv6 with Linux? You’ve likely been visited by Shodan and other scanners
  • Trojanized Android games hide malicious code inside images

    Over 60 Android games hosted on Google Play had Trojan-like functionality that allowed them to download and execute malicious code hidden inside images.

    The rogue apps were discovered by researchers from Russian antivirus vendor Doctor Web and were reported to Google last week. The researchers dubbed the new threat Android.Xiny.19.origin.

  • Google fixes multiple Wi-Fi flaws, mediaserver bugs in Android
  • On WebKit Security Updates

    Major desktop browsers push automatic security updates directly to users on a regular basis, so most users don’t have to worry about security updates. But Linux users are dependent on their distributions to release updates. Apple fixed over 100 vulnerabilities in WebKit last year, so getting updates out to users is critical.

GTK+ 3.19.8 Out Now with New Radio and Check Implementation, Bugfixes

Filed under
GNOME

Just a few days ago we announced the release of the seventh maintenance build for the stable GTK+ 3.18 series of the GNOME 3.18 desktop environment, but now the hard working devs behind the project released a brand-new development version.

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Zenwalk 8 Beta Led Me Down a Rocky Road

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

I am willing to chalk up the unfriendly nature of the Zenwalk 8 beta to its transitional state awaiting the final release. But if Zenwalk 8 stumbles with the same difficulties present in the beta release, the distro will continue to miss its mark.

My impression last year was praise for the philosophy behind Zenwalk but disappointment with its ho-hum desktop environment. I am holding out hope that what comes next changes my first and second impressions.

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Arch Linux 2016.02.01 Is Available to Download, Still Powered by Linux Kernel 4.3

Filed under
Linux

It's the first day of February, so guess what? A new ISO image for the powerful and highly customizable Arch Linux operating system is now available for download via the official channels.

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Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) Now Officially Powered by Linux Kernel 4.4 LTS

Filed under
Ubuntu

It's finally here! We know that we've told you so many times about the fact that the upcoming Ubuntu 16.04 LTS operating system will get the long-term supported Linux 4.4 kernel someday, but that day is today, February 1, 2016.

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Leftovers: Gaming (Tropico 5, Master of Orion, Superhot)

Filed under
Gaming

Phoronix on Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • R9 Fury Performance Gains With Linux 4.5-rc2? I'm Not So Lucky

    When reading this morning of "double or quadruple the framerates that I got with RC1" for an R9 Fury owned by a Phoronix reader, I immediately set out to run some R9 Fury benchmarks on Linux 4.5-rc2 compared to my 4.5-rc1 results last week and compared to Catalyst. I also did the same for an R9 285 Tonga on AMDGPU as well for reference purposes.

  • AMDGPU ACP Support Called For Merging Still Into Linux 4.5

    While the Linux 4.5 kernel's merge window ended more than one week ago, it looks like the AMDGPU driver may get a late feature arrival: ACP support.

    ACP is the Audo Co-Processor support found in new AMD APUs/SoCs. AMD developers had been working on the support for several months while the audio and power management related ACP code landed during the Linux 4.5 merge window. With that code now mainlined, AMD's Alex Deucher is looking to land the ACP driver support into the AMDGPU DRM driver.

  • The Intel Mesa Driver Has Gotten Faster Since Switching To NIR

    Eduardo Lima of Igalia spoke this weekend at FOSDEM about the work done over the past year on switching the Mesa Intel i965 back-end to using the NIR intermediate representation.

    The presentation by this developer covered GLSL IR vs. NIR, the Intel shader pipeline, what NIR is all about, and more. NIR is the new Mesa intermediate representation that was initially designed by a high school student. Besides Intel's interest in NIR, Freedreno and VC4 Gallium3D drivers have also been actively interested in this IR.

Leftovers: OSS (UNICEF, Google, and 'Cloud')

Filed under
OSS

UNICEF

  • UNICEF Innovation Fund to invest in open source technology start-ups

    To qualify for funding, projects must be open source and have a working prototype. They can involve developing a new technology, or expanding or improving an already existing one.

  • UNICEF launches Innovation Fund for open-source investment

    The United Nations has announced that it will provide some 60 start-ups with more than $9 million in funding to develop open-source technologies to improve the lives of children in developing countries.

  • UNICEF Aims to Drive Open Source Innovation that Helps Children

    The One Laptop per Child project -- which aims to empower children worldwide through technology -- didn't end up being fully open source. But starting this week, UNICEF hopes to leverage open source code for the benefit of children once again by funding select open source projects.

    On Monday, UNICEF announced that it would award funding from the UNICEF Innovation Fund to support software projects that are creating or improving technologies designed to help children (or any "youth under 25"). To qualify, the projects must be open source.

  • UN invests $9m in 'open source' tech to save children's lives

    The United Nations will fund 60 startups to create open source technologies to improve the lives of children in developing countries.

    Unicef, the children's charity run by the UN, will channel more than $9 million into startups baed on venture capital style investing. But it isn't concerned if the companies fail.

Google

  • Google spotlights Go language with new open source load balancer

    Most of Google's open source releases have centered on infrastructure-building projects, like Kubernetes, that stem from the company's work with its public cloud infrastructure. But Google's latest open source project -- a load-balancing technology called Seesaw -- instead comes from work done for the company's corporate, in-house infrastructure.

'Cloud'

  • ownCloud Hits New Milestones: How You Can Get Going With It

    The ever popular ownCloud open source file-sharing and storage platform for building private clouds has reached some remarkable new milestones. You can move beyond what services such as Dropbox and Box offer by leveraging ownCloud, and you don't have to have your files sitting on servers that you don't choose, governed by people you don't know.

    Now, ownCloud Inc. has announced that is has achieved 100% year-over-year growth in 2015 with its open source platform, and is on track to double that growth again in 2016. "For 2016, ownCloud is already on track to double bookings to more than $16 million," the company reports. "Today, it has more than 300 customers across 47 countries, with downloads of the community and enterprise edition in 193 countries supporting more than 8 million users." Here are more details, and info on how you can leverage ownCloud.

  • Free Hadoop and Spark Training Offerings Arrive

    These training programs promise to make a difference. According to Nick Heudecker and Lisa Kart, research directors, Gartner Inc., “As more organizations invest in big data, the shortage of available skills and capabilities will become more acute. Instead of facing a difficult recruiting market, organizations should focus on adapting available skills and engaging with established service providers to fill the skills gap.”

BSD Impact: LLVM, Haiku OS

Filed under
BSD
  • LLVM Continues To Dominate Across Many Operating Systems, Software Projects

    LLVM gets GPU exposure via NVIDIA's CUDA, Mesa LLVMpipe, LunarGLASS, the AMDGPU open-source driver stack, SPIR / SPIR-V, and a majority of the OpenCL implementations in the world. Web projects around LLVM include Google's Portable Native Client (PNaCl), WebKit FTL JIT, EmScripten, and WebAssembly, among others.

  • Haiku OS Powered By BSD? It's A Possibility

    François Revol presented at FOSDEM this weekend about the prospects of Haiku OS ever becoming a BSD distribution. Haiku OS, the well known BeOS re-implementation, does currently rely upon some BSD components but more integration is possible.

    Haiku OS is the project that continues to be developed for more than the past decade as a open-source operating system compatible with BeOS.

Linux and FOSS Events (LCA 2016, OpenStack Summit Austin)

  • Spring 2016 ‘Big Tent’ Linux and FOSS Conferences

    Today linux.conf.au 2016 gets cranked up for a five day run in the land down under for a big tent show where registration is sold out. This comes on the heels of another big show which folded its tent last night, FOSDEM 2016, the two day event that ran this weekend in Brussels. Both of these came after the most hyped SCALE ever — and evidently rightfully so. The first-of-the-year Linux and FOSS lovefest vacated the Pasadena Convention center a little over a week ago, not to return until March 2-5, 2017, a very late date for that event.

  • OpenStack Summit Austin: CFS period extended

    Just a small update on the Call for Speakers for the OpenStack Austin summit.

Mozilla News (Dr. Karim Lakhani, Caribou Digital)

Filed under
Moz/FF

Linux Kernel in Ubuntu LTS, 3.14.60 LTS Released

Filed under
Linux
  • Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) Now Officially Powered by Linux Kernel 4.4 LTS

    It's finally here! We know that we've told you so many times about the fact that the upcoming Ubuntu 16.04 LTS operating system will get the long-term supported Linux 4.4 kernel someday, but that day is today, February 1, 2016.

    Just a few minutes ago, Canonical pushed the final Linux kernel 4.4 LTS packages into the stable repositories of the upcoming distribution for early adopters like us to upgrade and replace the old Linux 4.3 kernel from the Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf) released.

  • Linux Kernel 3.14.60 LTS Released with PowerPC and AArch64 Improvements

    After announcing the release of Linux kernel 4.4.1 LTS and Linux kernel 3.10.96 LTS, kernel maintainer and developer Greg Kroah-Hartman published details about the availability of the sixtieth maintenance build of the Linux 3.14 LTS kernel series.

    Changing 65 files, with 375 insertions and 154 deletions, Linux kernel 3.14.60 LTS is here to add various improvements to the PowerPC (PPC), AArch64 (ARM64), x86, OpenRISC, and MN10300 hardware architectures, as well as to update several drivers, especially for things like PA-RISC, USB, Xen, ISDN, HID, connector, and networking (PPP, bonding, and Serial Line Internet Protocol (SLIP)).

Celebrating 15 Years of SELinux

Filed under
Red Hat
Security

On Dec. 22, 2000, the NSA released their code to the wider open source world in the form of SELinux, and in doing so forever changed the security landscape of not just Linux, but the technology world at large. A combination of policies and security frameworks, SELinux is one of the most widely-used Linux security modules. Without these innovations, Common Criteria, a crucial government security certification, would likely not exist for Linux.

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SMARC COM runs Linux or Android on quad core AM437x

Filed under
Android
Linux

Embedian’s “SMARC-T4378” module runs Linux or Android on TI’s Cortex-A9 AM437x SoC, and features up to 1GB RAM, 4GB eMMC, dual GbE, and an optional carrier.

The SMARC-T4378 appears to be the first SMARC form-factor computer-on-module to be based on the Texas Instruments Sitara AM4378 system-on-chip. The 82 x 50mm Embedian COM joins AM437x-based modules in various other sizes from CompuLab, Variscite, and MYIR that were introduced over the past year, and follows Embedian’s SMARC-compatible SMARC-T335X, which runs on the Cortex-A8 based Sitara AM3354. The Cortex-A9-based AM4378 is clocked to 1GHz instead of the AM3354’s 600MHz.

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6 Benefits of Using Open Source Software in Government (Industry Perspective)

Filed under
OSS

Open source software thrives in government and is in some ways a technical expression of democracy: engineers building common ground and forging a more open and free future for all.

But it’s also often misunderstood in parts of the public sector, seen as a time-consuming and unsupported solution. So if you’re on the fence about open source, keep reading to learn about benefits, evaluation methods, support tools and a few packages to consider right away.

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GPIO Zero and Raspberry Pi programming starter projects

Filed under
Linux

One of the most exciting starter activities to do with a Raspberry Pi is something you can't do on your regular PC or laptop—make something happen in the real world, such as flash an LED or control a motor. If you've done anything like this before, you probably did it with Python using the RPi.GPIO library, which has been used in countless projects. There's now an even simpler way to interact with physical components: a new friendly Python API called GPIO Zero.

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Mozilla Pushes Firefox 45 Into Beta, Promises GTK3 Integration for Linux, Again

Filed under
Moz/FF

Now that we're all enjoying the new features of the Firefox 44.0 web browser on our personal computer, the time has come for Mozilla developers to concentrate their efforts on the next major release.

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