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Thursday, 25 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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today's howtos

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HowTos

Linux Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Intel Skylake Multi-Screen Issues On Linux Still Happening
  • Skylake EDAC Driver Is A Late Addition To Linux 4.8 Kernel
  • AMD Launches Open Source Ray Traced VR Audio Tech “TrueAudio Next”

    AMD has announced TrueAudio Next a “scalable” physics-based audio rendering engine for generating environmentally accurate, GPU accelerated audio for virtual reality.

    AMD has announced a set of key technologies to bolster its open source technology arsenal represented by GPUOpen, this time in the field of immersive VR audio. TrueAudio Next, AMD claim, provides “real-time dynamic physics-based audio acoustics rendering” and that any soundscape can now be modelled physically, taking into account reflection and occlusion.

    With GPUOpen and LiquidVR, AMD continues to pitch its tent in the open source camp, a reaction to its main rival NVIDIA’s approach which focuses largely on proprietary, GPU hardware and driver locked Gameworks VR (now known as VRWorks) initiatives and technologies – i.e. things that will only work if you develop for and buy their graphics cards.

Open Hardware

Filed under
Hardware
OSS
  • Open Source Hardware Comes of Age

    Most people have at least heard of the term “open source” but the wide popularity of open source has been in software rather than hardware. Open source software is well known. Home computer users recognize it in downloads like Office Libre, GIMP, and the VLC media player. More serious computer users realize that much of the Internet itself was built on open source technologies like Linux and the Apache Web Server. Open source software can quickly be defined as source code that anyone can inspect, modify, and enhance.

  • The Opposite of the EOMA-68 Modular Laptop

    In the photos of the laptop that David exposed and is keeping functional, the complexity of the design is clearly apparent. Huge heat sinks and heat pipes, a densely populated and really quite large PCB on both sides (which is costly to manufacture). Chances of repair and ongoing maintenance: absolutely zero. The only reason that David is even considering keeping this machine going is down to years of experience with computers - something that most people simply do not have time to do.

    By contrast, the EOMA68 Laptop Housing is kept to a bare minimum out of pure necessity: it’s a simpler design that’s been made using tools that the average electronics engineer could conceivably imagine owning… so that they can make or repair these devices, for themselves, or for other people.

    The main PCB (PCB1) is only 6” square with a small extension for the USB ports, and is approximately only 30% populated with components, only on one side. PCB2 (for the keyboard and mouse) is very small and has around 30 components on it, and PCB3 likewise. Here are some pictures taken last year: the first shows the 3 PCBs wired together and assembled in the 3D-printed case, whilst the second is a partially-populated PCB (USB2 connectors in the top left corner to give an idea of scale).

  • Earth-friendly EOMA68 Computing Devices

Linux Kernel 3.14.77 LTS Has Updated Radeon and InfiniBand Drivers, CIFS Fixes

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Linux

Immediately after announcing the release of Linux kernel 4.7.2, renowned kernel developer Greg Kroah-Hartman informed the community about the immediate availability of Linux kernel 3.14.77 LTS.

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GNU Software

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GNU
  • GNU Parallel 20160822 ('Og Nomekop') released
  • Second release of eiffel-iup

    I’m glad to announce the second release of eiffel-iup. A wrapper that allow create graphical applications with Liberty Eiffel using the IUP toolkit. This second version add flat buttons and fix some errors. The main changes are in the names of some features, which now have names in the eiffel style. This is enough mature to create graphical interfaces. The package contains examples that show how use eiiffel-iup. So let me know if you have problems and Happy hacking!

  • diffutils-3.5 released [stable]

Chakra GNU/Linux Users Receive KDE Applications 16.08, VirtualBox 5.1.4, More

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GNU
Linux

Neofytos Kolokotronis from the Chakra GNU/Linux team announced a few moments ago the availability of the latest KDE technologies in the main software repositories of the distribution.

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Lubuntu Team Needs Your Feedback on the Size of the Lubuntu Linux ISO Images

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Ubuntu

Simon Quigley from the Lubuntu team published recently a new blog post on the distribution's website to ask for community's input on Lubuntu Linux operating system's Live ISO image sizes.

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5 reasons professors should encourage students to get involved in open source projects

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OSS

I've been supporting student participation in humanitarian free and open source software (HFOSS) projects for over a decade. I've seen students get motivated and excited by working in a professional community while they learn and mature professionally. Out of the many reasons for supporting student participation in open source, here are five of the most compelling reasons.

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Linux 4.8-rc3

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Linux

After last weeks somewhat unusual patch statistics (only 1/6th
drivers), we're not back to the normal programming with rc3, and we
have the usual situation with roughly ~60% of the patch being driver
updates. It's spread out, but most of it tends to be networking, GPU,
USB and a new EDAC driver. But all of it is fairly small.

Outside of the driver department, we've got core networking, some
filesystem updates (mainly xfs, although in the diffstat afs shows up
too, but that's really from the networking changes) and a smattering
of updates all over: documentation, scheduler, some miinor arch
updates etc.

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Also: Linus Torvalds Announces a Fairly Small Third Linux Kernel 4.8 Release Candidate

Linux 4.8-rc3 Kernel Is Out

10 Linux Distros You Should Know About

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Linux

These distributions prove that the Linux community is still full of creativity and good ideas, and prepared for whatever the future might bring. There are many more similar projects worth checking out, such as Trenta OS and the Clear Linux Project.

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Intel's New Joule IoT Development Board Is Powered by Snappy Ubuntu Core

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Development
Ubuntu

Canonical, through Amrisha Prashar, has had the pleasure of announcing that their popular Snappy Ubuntu Core operating system is now available for Intel's recently launched Joule development board.

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SparkyLinux 4.4 "Tyche" Arrives Powered by Linux Kernel 4.6.4, Debian Testing

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Linux

The SparkyLinux developers are announcing the release and general availability of the SparkyLinux 4.4 GNU/Linux operating system for personal computers as the latest stable and most advanced version of the project.

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10-Way Radeon/AMDGPU Benchmarks On Linux 4.8 + Mesa 12.1 Git

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Continuing off from the fresh open-source AMDGPU test data from yesterday's AMDGPU-PRO vs. open-source Polaris + Fiji comparison, here are more AMD graphics cards tested from the Linux 4.8 development code paired with Mesa 12.1 Git.

The GPUs tested for this weekend benchmarking fun were the Radeon HD 6870. HD 7950. R7 260X. R9 270X, R9 285, R7 370, R9 Fury, RX 460, RX 470, and RX 480. All tests happened from Mesa 12.1-dev via the Padoka PPA this week on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS paired with the Linux 4.8 kernel from 18 August. Note that with Mesa Git on pre-GCN GPUs there is only OpenGL 4.4 support for the Radeon HD 5800/6900 series while all other cards such as the HD 6870 are still currently bound to OpenGL 3.3 due to lacking FP64 emulation support.

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4MRescueKit 19.0 Enters Beta, Gets Antivirus Live CD 19.0-0.99.2 & 4MParted 19.0

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Development

Softpedia was informed by 4MLinux developer Zbigniew Konojacki about the availability for public beta testing of the Beta build of his upcoming 4MRescueKit 19.0 system rescue Live CD project.

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Linux Kernel 4.7.2 Is a Big Update with Numerous AMDGPU and ARM64 Improvements

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Linux

Linux kernel developer and maintainer of several kernel branches, Greg Kroah-Hartman, announced the release of the second maintenance update for the Linux kernel 4.7 series.

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Linux Event

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GNU
Linux

Linux Kernel

Filed under
Linux
  • Bus1: a new Linux interprocess communication proposal

    It is early days yet for bus1. Though it has been under development for a least eight months (based on Git history) and is based on even older ideas, there has been little public discussion. The follow-up comments on the kernel-summit email thread primarily involved people indicating their interest rather than commenting on the design. From my limited perspective, though, it is looking positive. The quality of the code and documentation is excellent. The design takes the best of binder, which is a practical success as a core part of the Android platform, and improves on it. And the development team appears to be motivated towards healthy informed community discussion prior to any acceptance. The tea-leaves tell me there are good things in store for bus1.

  • [Older] Open vSwitch Moves to the Linux Foundation

    Open Source usage and participation has increased across the industry in the last few years, driving the spotlight towards the technology powering the future of open collaboration. Similarly, with the rise of software defined networking (SDN) and network function virtualization (NFV), networking is going through its own star studded moment. As an early pioneer in the SDN space, Open vSwitch has been at the forefront of both of these trends, and has helped pioneer not only the concepts we all understand as SDN, but in the open cloud platform as well. Open vSwitch enables developers to easily connect and move between separate cloud environments. We at IBM have contributed heavily to Open vSwitch as part of our dedication to building the cloud as an open, accessible foundation for innovation – not a destination in and of itself.

  • Kernel 4.4.19 Has Been Released

    Kernel 4.4.19 has been released, bringing an impressive number of fixes.

Security News

Filed under
Security
  • Security and reproducible-build progress in Guix 0.11

    The GNU Guix package-manager project recently released version 0.11, bringing with it support for several hundred new packages, a range of new tools, and some significant progress toward making an entire operating system (OS) installable using reproducible builds.

    Guix is a "functional" package manager, built on many of the same ideas found in the Nix package manager. As the Nix site explains it, the functional paradigm means that packages are treated like values in a functional programming language—Haskell in Nix's case, Scheme in Guix's. The functions that build and install packages do so without side effects, so the system can easily offer nice features like atomic transactions, rollbacks, and the ability for individual users to build and install separate copies of a package without fear that they will interfere. Part of making such a system reliable is to ensure that builds are "reproducible"—meaning that two corresponding copies of a binary built on different systems at different times will be bit-for-bit identical.

  • VeraCrypt Audit Under Way; Email Mystery Cleared Up

    To say the VeraCrypt audit, which begins today, got off to an inauspicious start would be an understatement.

    On Sunday, two weeks after the announcement that the open source file and disk encryption software would be formally scrutinized for security vulnerabilities, executives at one of the firms funding the audit posted a notice that four emails between the parties involved had been intercepted.

  • Cryptocurrency Mining Virus Targets Linux Machines
  • Why The Windows Secure Boot Hack Is a Good Thing

    Most coverage of the subject has been written in that panicky, alarmist prose that makes for exciting news, but the problem is that the invalidation of Secure Boot is a very positive development for everyone concerned, except for Microsoft. Yes, it shows why backdoors for “the good guys” are a terrible idea — yes, it even has far-reaching implications for every piece of computing technology using the UEFI standard. However, I maintain that it will have a positive influence on the direction of security and tech standards moving forward.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • mutt 1.7.0 released
  • Vim 8 pre-announcement

    Work on Vim 8.0 is coming close to an end. I hope version 8.0 can be released in about two weeks.

    This is a last chance to modify new features in a way that is not backwards compatible. Once 8.0 is out we can’t make changes that would break plugins.

  • digiKam 5.x Photography Application Available For Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    digiKam is digital photo management application for specially designed for KDE desktop environment. Digital photo management program designed to import, organize, enhance, search and export your digital images to and from your computer. It provides a simple interface which makes importing and organizing digital photographs a "snap". The photos are organized in albums which can be sorted chronologically, by folder layout or by custom collections. digiKam enables you to manage large numbers of digital photographs in albums and to organize these photographs for easy retrieval using tags (keywords), captions, collections, dates, geolocation and searches. It has many features for viewing, organizing, processing and sharing your images. Thus, digiKam is a formidable digital asset management (DAM) software including powerful image editing functions. An easy-to-use camera interface is provided, that will connect to your digital camera and download photographs directly into digiKam albums. More than 1000 digital cameras are supported by the gphoto2 library. Of course, any media or card reader supported by your operating system will interface with digiKam.

  • 5 Tools for Monitoring Disk Activity in Linux
  • What is BPF and why is it taking over Linux Performance Analysis?

    The newest tool for observing the Linux operating system is the “Berkeley Packet Filter” (BPF). BPF allows users to run a small piece of code quickly and safely inside the operating system. Originally used for packet filtering, it has since been enhanced from its eponymous use-case to support dynamic tracing of the Linux operating system. For example, it is possible to write a small BPF program that prints every time a particular file was accessed by a user.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.3 Beta Adds NVDIMM Support, Improves Security

Today, August 25, 2016, Red Hat announced that version 7.3 of its powerful Red Hat Enterprise Linux operating system is now in development, and a Beta build is available for download and testing. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.3 Beta brings lots of improvements and innovations, support for new hardware devices, and improves the overall security of the Linux kernel-based operating system used by some of the biggest enterprises and organizations around the globe. Among some of the major new features implemented in the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.3 release, we can mention important networking improvements, and support for Non-Volatile Dual In-line Memory Modules (NVDIMMs). Read more Also: CentOS 6 Linux OS Receives Important Kernel Security Update from Red Hat Release of Red Hat Virtualization 4 Offers New Functionality for Workloads

Ubuntu 16.10 Beta 1 Released, Available to Download Now

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Games for GNU/Linux

PC-BSD Becomes TrueOS, FreeBSD 11.0 Reaches RC2

  • More Details On PC-BSD's Rebranding As TrueOS
    Most Phoronix readers know PC-BSD as the BSD operating system derived from FreeBSD that aims to be user-friendly on the desktop side and they've done a fairly good job at that over the years. However, the OS has been in the process of re-branding itself as TrueOS. PC-BSD has been offering "TrueOS Server" for a while now as their FreeBSD-based server offering. But around the upcoming FreeBSD 11.0 release they are looking to re-brand their primary desktop download too now as TrueOS.
  • FreeBSD 11.0-RC2 Arrives With Fixes
    The second release candidate to the upcoming FreeBSD 11 is now available for testing. FreeBSD 11.0-RC2 ships with various bug fixes, several networking related changes, Clang compiler fixes, and other updates. FreeBSD 11.0 is bringing updated KMS drivers, Linux binary compatibility layer improvements, UEFI improvements, Bhyve virtualization improvements, and a plethora of other work. Those not yet familiar with FreeBSD 11 can see the what's new guide.