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Sunday, 23 Jul 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Security Features in Next Linux

Filed under
Linux
Security
  • It Didn't Make It For Linux 4.13, But A New Random Number Generator Still In The Works

    Frequent Phoronix readers may recall that for more than one year a new Linux Random Number Generator has been in-development and today marked the 12th version of these patches being released.

    This new random number generator, LRNG, aims to provide sufficient entropy during the boot time and in virtual environments as well as when using SSDs or DM targets. LRNG has been in development by Stephan Müller.

  • Unix: How random is random?
  • AMD Secure Memory Encryption Patches Updated For Linux

    Adding to the list of changes/features you will not find in Linux 4.13 is AMD's Secure Memory Encryption as supported by the new EPYC processors.

    AMD has been posting Secure Memory Encryption patches for the Linux kernel going back to last year, but so far have not been merged to mainline. The code continues to be updated and published today was the tenth version of these patches.

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat

Linux Devices: Tizen, Android-Based Remix OS, and Google Wifi Router

Filed under
Linux

OSS Leftovers: Yandex, India, Talend, ZFS, Sharing, and Go

Filed under
OSS
  • Yandex open sources CatBoost, a gradient boosting machine learning library

    Artificial intelligence is now powering a growing number of computing functions, and today the developer community today is getting another AI boost, courtesy of Yandex. Today, the Russian search giant — which, like its US counterpart Google, has extended into a myriad of other business lines, from mobile to maps and more — announced the the launch of CatBoost, an open source machine learning library based on gradient boosting — the branch of ML that is specifically designed to help “teach” systems when you have a very sparse amount of data, and especially when the data may not all be sensorial (such as audio, text or imagery), but includes transactional or historical data, too.

  • A design firm is on a quest to create contemporary, open-source fonts for Indian scripts

    Besides providing a drastically different aesthetic experience from website to website, it can also help readers identify the brands they trust, and the news they can rely on. But in an online world overwhelmingly dominated by the English language, India’s many regional languages make up a miniscule part of the available content. So, their scripts rarely receive the kind of attention that the English script does.

  • Digitization puts the focus back on open source solutions, says Talend

    With a rising volume of data arising from mobile, social, cloud and IoT sources, the demand for real-time data integration solutions is growing worldwide and India is no different. Digital transformation is another interesting phenomenon that has made business prioritize the data-driven insights more than ever before.

    [...]

    The company projects itself as a next generation open source alternative to the incumbent proprietary solutions vendors such as Informatica, Oracle, SAP and IBM. It offers enterprises open source integration solutions that are either free to download and use under GPL or Apache open source licenses or subscription-based.

  • ZFS Is the Best Filesystem (For Now…)

    ZFS should have been great, but I kind of hate it: ZFS seems to be trapped in the past, before it was sidelined it as the cool storage project of choice; it’s inflexible; it lacks modern flash integration; and it’s not directly supported by most operating systems. But I put all my valuable data on ZFS because it simply offers the best level of data protection in a small office/home office (SOHO) environment. Here’s why.

  • Big Pharma Buys Into Crowdsourcing for Drug Discovery

    Huntington’s disease is brutal in its simplicity. The disorder, which slowly bulldozes your ability to control your body, starts with just a single mutation, in the gene for huntingtin protein. That tweak tacks an unwelcome glob of glutamines—extra amino acids—onto the protein, turning it into a destroyer that attacks neurons.

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  • Jisc futures: does business struggle with the concept of open access?

    Openness should be the defining characteristic for collaboration in the 21st century, and the values and practices underlying successful business-university-government collaboration should be shot through with collaborative principles.

    The underlying platform is obvious: the internet, worldwide web, 5G, unlimited data, and artificial intelligence (AI) are meshing together at speed to create unprecedented capacity for openness. But there is a serious glitch in the technology, a persistent snag in the force, a cacophonous noise in the system. Namely, the creators of openness are habituated to closedness. They are tribal and insular creatures: they are us. And we must be overcome.

  • New models for quality journalism from Wikitribune to crypto tokens

    Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales is embarking on a new online venture that the rest of us can only hope succeeds: Creating a new business model for quality journalism.

    To counter the flood of digital fake news, Wales, whose founding of the online encyclopedia Wikipedia stands as one of the shining successes of the Internet era, has announced plans for a for-profit, crowdfunded news website offering stories by journalists and volunteers working together.

  • Design and produce 3D printed, custom breast prosthetics

    As the market for 3D printers has moved from sophisticated, experienced designers into the mass consumer market, individuals are saving substantial money with pre-designed, DIY products made on 3D printers. These opportunities are poised to increase due to the Free Open Source 3D Customizer, a libre, 3D model customizer that anyone can use to create their own 3D printed designs.

    To demonstrate how the software works and the possibilities that it creates, I'll show how breast cancer survivors and others can use the Free Open Source 3D Customizer to design and produce 3D-printable external breast prosthetics.

    But first, a recent history lesson.

  • Go language soars to new heights in popularity

    Go, Google’s open source, concurrency-friendly programming language, has soared to new heights with developers, cracking the top 10 in the Tiobe index of language popularity for the first time.

    With an all-time high rating of 2.363 percent, Go ranks as the 10th most popular programming language in this month’s index, ahead of languages such as Perl, Swift, Ruby, and Visual Basic. The Tiobe Programming Community index assesses language popularity using a formula based on frequency of searches for the languages in popular search engines such as Google, Bing, Baidu, and Wikipedia.

UBports Working Lately on Ubuntu Touch Port for Nexus 5, Based on Ubuntu 16.04

Filed under
Ubuntu

UBports announced today on Twitter that they managed to successfully run their modification of Canonical's deprecated Ubuntu Touch mobile operating system on the Nexus 5 smartphone.

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Top 4 reasons I use dwm for my Linux window manager

Filed under
Linux

I like minimalistic views. If I could run everything in a terminal I would. It's free from shiny stuff that hogs my resources and distracts my feeble mind. I also grow tired of resizing and moving windows, never getting them to align perfectly.

On my quest for minimalism, I grew fond of Xfce and used it as my main desktop environment for years on my Linux computers. Then, one day I came across a video of Bryan Lunduke talking about the awesome window manager he used called Awesome. It neatly arranges all of your windows for you, and so, sounded like just what I wanted. I tried it out but didn't get the hang of the configuration needed to tweak it into my liking. So, I moved on and discovered xmonad, but I had a similar result. It worked fine but I couldn't get around the Haskell part to really turn it into my perfect desktop.

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Raspberry Pi: How I built an OctaPi-style computing cluster

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

The inspiration for this post (and this project) came from something that I recently read in the Raspberry Pi blog. I would like to start out by saying if you are interested in computers, programming, DIY electronics, space exploration, or just technology in general, you are very likely to find the Raspberry Pi blog interesting and entertaining.

Read more

Apache discontinues use of Facebook code libraries

Filed under
OSS
Legal
  • Apache discontinues use of Facebook code libraries

    San Francisco, July 18 (IANS) US-based open-source community Apache Foundation has said it will not use Facebook’s ‘BSD-licensed’ code for any of its new software projects for legal reasons.

    The foundation banned the use of libraries, frameworks and tools covered by Facebook’s open-source ‘BSD-plus-Patents’ license in any new projects, The Register reported on Tuesday.

    “No new project, sub-project or codebase, which has not used Facebook’s ‘BSD-plus-Patents’ licensed jars are allowed to use them,” Chris Mattmann, Legal Affairs Director, Apache Foundation, was quoted as saying.

  • Apache says 'no' to Facebook code libraries

    The Apache Foundation has declared that none of its new software projects can include Facebook's booby-trapped BSD-licensed code.

    The foundation's legal affairs director, Chris Mattmann, said over the weekend that libraries, frameworks and tools covered by Facebook's open-source-ish BSD-plus-Patents license should not be absorbed into any new projects.

    "No new project, sub-project or codebase, which has not used Facebook BSD+Patents licensed jars (or similar), are allowed to use them," Mattmann wrote. "In other words, if you haven't been using them, you aren't allowed to start. It is Cat‑X."

  • Apache Bans Facebook’s License Combo

BSD: OPNsense RC1, TrueNAS X10, LLVM and More

Filed under
BSD

SharkLinux OS Is Destined for Success

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

SharkLinux OS is a cool display of innovation and design. The developer boasts that he never used a physical keyboard in making his distro. Petit developed it exclusively in a cloud environment accessed from his Samsung Galaxy Android smartphone.

Even if you do not have a big commitment to cloud services, SharkLinux OS offers an excellent computing platform for everyday tasks. It is an easy rival to other Linux distros.

Instead of versioning its releases, SharkLinux offers a base system that you can upgrade or convert. The base includes primarily standard Ubuntu releases with all upstream software being offered by way of optional installs and upgrades.

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LinuxAndUbuntu Distro Review Of The Week - NeptuneOS

Filed under
OS
Reviews

We want a nice looking distro, don’t we? We want a distro that does the best work when it comes to stability. Don’t we? Here we come across NeptuneOS, a Linux distro based on Debian with KDE desktop environment. As we all know when it comes to stability, there are a lot of fewer distros that can match Debian. Also being based on Debian, the number of compatible software increase a lot.

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Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) Needs Some Testing, Here's How You Can Help

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical's Alan Pope invites the Ubuntu community today to download and test out the latest daily build ISO images of the upcoming Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system to report if things are working correctly or not on their PCs.

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Alexa-ready digital alarm clock radio runs on hackable Chip Pro

Filed under
Linux

PAI’s “Sandman Doppler” is an Alexa-enabled smart alarm clock and music streamer that runs Linux on the Chip Pro COM, and offers 6x USB charging ports.

Palo Alto Innovation (PAI) had a troubled first-time Kickstarter launch with its original Sandman Clock, but the company fulfilled all its orders and moved on to a next generation model, the Sandman Doppler. This larger, more capable digital alarm clock and smart speaker adds Amazon Alexa voice controls, dual speakers, and two more USB charging ports, among other features. The Linux-driven device is built on the Next Thing’s open spec Chip Pro module, and lets you hack the COM via its micro-USB port (see farther below).

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A brief history of GnuPG: vital to online security but free and underfunded

Filed under
GNU
Security

Most people have never heard of the software that makes up the machinery of the internet. Outside developer circles, its authors receive little reward for their efforts, in terms of either money or public recognition.

One example is the encryption software GNU Privacy Guard (also known as GnuPG and GPG), and its authors are regularly forced to fundraise to continue the project.

GnuPG is part of the GNU collection of free and open source software, but its story is an interesting one, and it begins with software engineer Phil Zimmermann.

We do not know exactly what Zimmermann felt on January 11, 1996, but relief is probably a good guess. The United States government had just ended its investigation into him and his encryption software, PGP or “Pretty Good Privacy”.

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Remix OS, the Android Desktop OS, Is Discontinued

Filed under
Android
Linux

Despite plenty of hype and potential around it, today brings word that Remix OS is discontinued.

This desktop-orientated version of Android was designed to be used like a regular desktop OS and could be freely installed on Intel PCs and Macs. A variety of conventional desktop features were plumped in to make the OS more “desktop friendly”, including a task bar, a start menu, a system tray, and the ability to run multiple Android apps in resizable windows.

Remix OS for PC, which is based on the work of the Android x86 project, also boasts full local installation, UEFI support, and (until now) OTA updates.

But it seems the project won’t migrate out of beta.

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​The ultimate Linux workstation: The Dell 5720 AIO

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Want a cheap Linux desktop? Look elsewhere. But, if you want a kick-rump-and-take-names desktop for serious graphics or development work, you want the Dell 5720 AIO workstation.

This take-no-prisoners workstation starts at $1,699, but the model I looked at costs over $3,200. It's worth it.

This model came with a Quad Core 3.8Ghz Intel Xeon Processor E3-1275. In a word, it's fast.

It also comes with 64GB of 2133MHz DDR4 ECC RAM. That's fast, too. The main memory is backed by a 512GB M.2 PCIe SSD and a pair of 1TB 2.5-inch SATA (7,200 RPM) hard drives. Yes, they're really fast, too.

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Red Hat: New Talk by Lennart Poettering, Presence at Southeast Linux Fest (SELF), and Financial News

Filed under
Red Hat

Microsoft Marketing (Proprietary) in "Linux" Clothing

Filed under
Microsoft
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More in Tux Machines

Debian GNU/Linux 9.1 "Stretch" Live & Installable ISOs Now Available to Download

As we reported the other day, the Debian Project unveiled the first point release of the Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system, but no installation or live ISOs were made available to download. That changes today, July 23, 2017, as the Debian CD team lead by Steve McIntyre has prepared the new installation images of Debian GNU/Linux 9.1 "Stretch" for 64-bit (amd64), 32-bit (i386), PowerPC 64-bit Little Endian (ppc64el), ARM64 (AArch64), ARMhf, Armel, MIPS, MIPS 64-bit Little Endian (mips64el), MIPSEL, and IBM System z (s390x) hardware architectures. Multi-arch images supporting both 32-bit and 64-bit (i386 and amd64) PCs are also available for download, along with a set of twelve source ISO images. On the other hand, the Debian GNU/Linux 9.1 "Stretch" Live ISOs come in the usual flavors with the GNOME, KDE, Xfce, LXDE, MATE, and Cinnamon desktop environments, supporting both 32-bit and 64-bit architectures. Read more Also: Debian 9.1 GNU/Linux Released With 26 Security Fixes

4MLinux 23.0 BETA released.

4MLinux 23.0 BETA is ready for testing. Basically, at this stage of development, 4MLinux BETA has the same features as 4MLinux STABLE, but it provides a huge number of updated packages, including a major change in the core of the system, which now uses the GNU C Library 2.25. Read more Also: 4MLinux 23 Slated for Release in November 2017, to Be Supported Until July 2018

Review: Calculate Linux 17.6 KDE

Calculate Linux is a Gentoo-based distribution. The project's slogan is "Easy Linux from the source," which refers to the fact that Calculate is relatively easy to use but still benefits from Gentoo's powerful and flexible source-based Portage package manager. Calculate recently celebrated its tenth birthday and released Calculate Linux 17.6. The distro comes in four flavours; apart from a desktop and server edition there's Calculate Scratch ("for those who want to build a customized system that works for them") and Calculate Media Center ("for your home multimedia center"). Each version is available for the x86_64 and i686 architectures and uses SysV init rather than systemd. The desktop edition has ISOs for the KDE, Cinnamon, MATE and Xfce desktop environments - GNOME is presumably not available because of its dependency on systemd. I opted for the 64-bit KDE version, which is just over 2GB in size. Read more

Linux 4.13 RC2

  • Linux 4.13-rc2
    Things are chugging along, and we actually had a reasonably active rc2. Normally rc2 is really small because people are taking a breaher and haven't started finding bugs yet, but this time around we have a bigger-than-average rc2. We'll just have to see how that translates to the rest of the release cycle, but I suspect it's just the normal variability in this thing (and because I released -rc1 one day early, I guess rc2 was one day longer than usual despite the normal Sunday release). Changes all over, although the diffstat is dominated by the new vboxvideo staging driver. I shouldn't have let it through, but Greg, as we all know, is "special". Also, Quod licet Iovi, and all that jazz - Greg gets to occasionally break some rules. If you just ignore that new staging driver, the remainder is still about half driver patches (networking, rdma, scsi, usb). The rest looks normal too: architecture updates (x86, sparc, powerpc), filesystem (nfs, overlayfs, misc), networking and core kernel. And some new bpf testcode. Time for some more testing, people. You know the drill. Linus
  • Linux 4.13-rc2 Released, A "Reasonably Active" Update
    The second release candidate of the Linux 4.13 kernel is now available for testing.
  • The Kernel Put On Some Weight With Linux 4.13
    Here are some numbers about how much weight the kernel gained during the Linux 4.13 merge window that closed last week.