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Thursday, 19 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Titlesort icon Author Replies Last Post
Story Bringing new security features to Docker Roy Schestowitz 03/09/2014 - 12:39pm
Story Bringing Raspberry Pi to schools in Tanzania Roy Schestowitz 16/06/2016 - 9:03am
Story Can India break the pattern and do open source right? Roy Schestowitz 18/11/2014 - 4:58pm
Story Can this free software company secure the future of Linux for the city of Munich? Roy Schestowitz 04/09/2014 - 4:29pm
Story Change is brutal, even in an open organization Roy Schestowitz 11/06/2015 - 11:12pm
Story Charting new licensing territories with the Open Definition standard Roy Schestowitz 24/10/2014 - 11:30am
Story Chief Architect of Cloudera on growth of Hadoop Roy Schestowitz 20/10/2014 - 7:12pm
Story City of Vienna increasingly turns to open source Roy Schestowitz 26/05/2014 - 2:13pm
Story Collaborative robotics software development Roy Schestowitz 16/04/2015 - 9:49am
Story Confessions of a systems librarian Roy Schestowitz 28/01/2015 - 5:53pm

Debian GNU/Linux 8.7 "Jessie" Live & Installable ISOs Now Available for Download

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Debian

We reported the other day that the Debian Project released Debian GNU/Linux 8.7 "Jessie," which is the seventh maintenance update to the current Debian Stable series of Linux-based computer operating systems.

As promised, we told you then that installation mediums aren't yet available for download, nor Live ISO images, which help users install the latest, most up-to-date version of Debian Linux on their PCs or laptops without having download hundreds of updates from the official software repositories.

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GIMP Roadmap

Filed under
GNU
Software
  • GIMP's Progress In 2016, What's Ahead For 2017

    GIMP contributor Alexandre Prokoudine published a lengthy blog post today looking back at what were the accomplishments for this open-source image manipulation program in 2016 and some of what's ahead for the program this year.

    [...]

    Among the work still being done before GIMP 2.10 is released includes cleaning up libgimp, changing linear/gamma-corrected workflows, and 16/32-bit per color channel support, a new color management implementation, and more. GIMP 2.10 will hopefully ship later in 2017.

  • How To Install The Latest GIMP 2.9 Development Build on Ubuntu
  • What To Expect In GIMP 2.10

    The GIMP is our favorite image editing app for Linux, and this year it’s set to get even better. The development team behind the hugely popular open-source project this week shared word about ‘what’s next for GIMP‘ in 2017.

Linux 4.10-rc4

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 4.10-rc4

    Things are still looking fairly normal, and this is the usual weekly
    Sunday rc release. We're up to rc4, and people are clearly starting to
    find the regressions. Good, good.

    it's a slightly more random collection of fixes from last week: the
    bulk of it is still drivers (gpu, net, sound, usb stand out), and
    there's the usual architecture work (but mostly just x86 this time
    around), but there's a fair amount of fixes all over. Filesystems
    (xfs, btrfs, some core vfs), tooling (mostly perf), core mm,
    networking etc etc.

    This is also the point where I start hoping that the rc's start
    shrinking. We'll see how the tiny rc2 affects things - this may
    technically be rc4, but with that one almost dead week, it feels like
    rc3. But I'm crossing my fingers that we'll have less next week.

    Regardless, go out and test. This was not a huge merge window, I think
    we're in pretty good shape for people to dive in..

    Linus

  • Linux 4.10-rc4 Kernel Released

    The fourth weekly test release of the Linux 4.10 kernel is now available.

    For those not up to speed on Linux 4.10, see our Linux 4.10 feature overview. There is a lot of great work included like Nouveau atomic mode-setting, Nouveau boost support, AMD Zen/Ryzen work, new ARM board/platform support, EXT4/XFS DAX iomap support, ATA command priority support, Intel Turbo Boost Max 3.0, and much more.

  • Linus Torvalds Announces Fourth Linux 4.10 Kernel Release Candidate, Get It Now

    It's Sunday evening, again, and Linus Torvalds just made his weekly announcement to inform the community about the immediate availability for download of a new Release Candidate of the upcoming Linux 4.10 kernel.

    One more week has passed in our lives, but the development of the Linux kernel never stops, and we're now seeing the release of fourth RC (Release Candidate) build of Linux kernel 4.10, which appears to be fairly normal, yet again, bringing only a collection of assorted bug fixes and improvements from last week.

Android Leftovers

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Android

Debian from 10,000 feet and First Release Candidate of Installer

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Debian
  • Debian from 10,000 feet

    Many of you are big fans of S.W.O.T analysis, I am sure of that! Smile Technical competence is our strongest suit, but we have reached a size and sphere of influence which requires an increase in organisation.

    We all love our project and want to make sure Debian still shines in the next decades (and centuries!). One way to secure that goal is to identify elements/events/things which could put that goal at risk. To this end, we've organized a short S.W.O.T analysis session at DebConf16. Minutes of the meeting can be found here. I believe it is an interesting read and is useful for Debian old-timers as well as newcomers. It helps to convey a better understanding of the project's status. For each item, we've tried to identify an action.

  • Debian Outs First Release Candidate of Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" Installer

    Work on the upcoming Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system is ongoing, and Debian Project's Cyril Brulebois announced today the availability of the first Release Candidate of the Debian Installer for Stretch.

    A lot of things have been implemented since the eight, and last Alpha development release of the Debian Stretch Installer, but the most important changes outlined in the announcement for the RC1 build are the revert of the switch to merged-/usr as default setting for debootstrap and disablement of Debian Pure Blends support.

  • Debian Installer Stretch RC 1 release

    The Debian Installer team[1] is pleased to announce the first release candidate of the installer for Debian 9 "Stretch".

  • Debian Installer Stretch RC 1 Arrives, The /usr Merge Has Been Postponed

    The Debian Installer is getting ready for the 9.0 "Stretch" release.

MATE 1.16 Desktop Now Available for Ubuntu MATE 16.04, Here's How to Install It

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Ubuntu

The wait is finally over, as the MATE 1.16 desktop environment is now available for those who use the Ubuntu MATE 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system or later versions, such as 16.04.1.

After thoroughly testing them, Martin Wimpress and his team updated the PPA (Personal Package Archive) containing the MATE desktop packages for Ubuntu MATE 16.04 LTS, a long-term supported version of the officially recognized Ubuntu flavor built around the lightweight and customizable MATE desktop environment, to version 1.16.

MATE 1.16.1 is, in fact, the current version of the desktop environment included in said PPA for Ubuntu MATE 16.04 LTS users, which they can install as we speak by using the installation instructions provided in the next paragraphs, and it looks like it was derived from those prepared for the upcoming Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" release.

Read more

Also: Intel Haswell GPUs Now Support OpenGL 4.2 for Ubuntu Gamers in Padoka/Oibaf PPAs<

Can RISC-V - Linux of Microprocessors - Start an Open Hardware Renaissance?

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Linux
Hardware

I share the hope with many people that we will soon have access to modern, capable devices powered by both open hardware AND software. There have been advancements in recent years and more hardware is being opened up, but the microprocessors in our pc's and other devices are stuck running one of the dominant, closed Instruction Set Architectures. RISC-V aims to fix this.

Read more

via DMT/Linux Blog

Tails 2.10 Will Upgrade to Linux Kernel 4.8 and Tor 0.2.9, Add exFAT Support

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Security

A new stable release of Tails, the beloved anonymous Live CD that helps you stay hidden online when navigating various websites on the Internet, is being prepared.

Linux 4.9.4

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Linux

I'm announcing the release of the 4.9.4 kernel.

All users of the 4.9 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 4.9.y git tree can be found at:
git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.9.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st...

Read more

Also: Linux 4.4.43

Ultimate Edition 5.1 Linux OS Is Out, Based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Kernel 4.4

Filed under
OS
Ubuntu

After announcing the release of Ultimate Edition 5.0 Gamers Edition, an Ubuntu-based operating system designed for Linux gamers, last week, TheeMahn is now releasing Ultimate Edition 5.1.

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4MParted 21 Disk Partitioning Live CD Gets Beta Release, Based on GParted 0.26.1

4MLinux developer Zbigniew Konojacki is informing Softpedia today about the Beta release of his upcoming 4MParted 21.0 distribution, a small Live CD that you can use to partition disk drives without having to install any software application or script.

Read more

Calligra 3.0

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KDE
  • Calligra 3.0 released

    A new wonderful era for the Calligra Suite has begun with the release of version 3.0.

    We have chosen to cut back on the number of applications. Krita has left us to be independent and although it was emotional it was also done with complete support from both sides. We are saying goodbye to Author, which never differentiated itself from Words. We also removed Brainstorm the purpose of which will be better fitted by a new application (nothing planned from our side). Flow and Stage has gone in this release but we intend to bring them back in the future.

  • Calligra 3.0 Officially Announced, Drops Some Apps, Ports To KF5/Qt5

    This six-year-old split from KOffice is finally living in the KDE Frameworks 5 and Qt5 world with the Calligra 3.0 release. Besides the porting to KF5/Qt5, Calligra 3.0 does away with Krita since it's moved onto releasing as its own project, the Author e-book application was dropped since it never became much different from Words, and the Brainstorm note-taking app was droped. The Flow flowchart software and Stage presentation program were also dropped from Calligra 3.0 but they are expected to be brought back in the future, such as when fully-ported to KF5/Qt5.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Some improbable 2017 predictions [Older, no longer behind paywall]

    Another important single point of failure is Android. It has brought a lot of freedom to the mobile device world, but it is still a company-controlled project that is not entirely free and, by some measures at least, is becoming less free over time. A shift of emphasis at Google could easily push Android more in the proprietary direction. Meanwhile, the end of CyanogenMod has, temporarily, brought about the loss of our most successful community-oriented Android derivative.

    The good news is that the efforts to bring vendor kernels closer to the mainline will bear some fruit this year, making it easier to run systems that, if not fully free, are more free than before. Lineage OS, rising from the ashes of CyanogenMod, should help to ensure the availability of alternative Android builds. But it seems likely that efforts to provide free software at the higher levels of the stack (microG, for example) will languish.

  • A Web Service Written in Pure Bash.

    The service itself is currently running on a Ubuntu 16.10 droplet on DigitalOcean. To expose my service I needed to open a connection with the outside world and initially played with netcat as it’s preinstalled on most *nix machines. This task wasn’t familiar to me at all, but I couldn’t read the incoming request and I couldn’t handle two users connecting at the same time. I explored inetd which lacked of documentation beyond the man page. Continuing with my research I found xinetd which is a more secure version of inetd. I also found a lot more sufficient documentation and user guides on creating a service. After installing xinetd I began building a primitive version of my pure bash service called beeroclock.

  • Deloitte Blockchain Lab Opens in NYC

    Here's another sign that blockchain is becoming big business.

    Deloitte today announced the formation of a blockchain lab in the heart of New York City's financial district in what the global audit and consultancy firm expects will be a "make or break" year the technology. The lab is home to more than 20 developers and designers and will work with Deloitte teams abroad as well as over a dozen of the company's technology partners.

    Open now and dubbed the Americas Blockchain Lab at Deloitte, the new practice will help drive the development of blockchains solutions for financial services firms, from proofs of concepts to ready-to-integrate solutions, stated the company.

    "Financial institutions have the power and ability to move blockchain to the next level," said Eric Piscini, a principal with Deloitte Consulting, in a statement. "To get there, companies will need to move away from churning out proofs of concept and begin producing and implementing solutions."

  • $0.39 EPS Expected For Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) In Quarter
  • Asking for help with koji builds
  • Debian 8.7 released

    This update adds corrections for security problems to the stable release, along with adjustments for serious problems.

  • Debian GNU/Linux 8.7 Released

    The Debian Project has released the seventh update of Debian 8 Jessie. This release ships with tons of security updates, bug fixes, and updated packages. The existing users of Debian 8 need to point the apt package tool to one of the updated Debian mirrors and get the update. The new installation media and ISO images are yet to be published.

  • Debian GNU/Linux 8.7 Released With New Features and 85 Security Updates

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
  • Linux market-share on Steam dropped 0.08% in December 2016

    Why is this important to know? Well, it's highly likely the amount of Linux users on Steam is growing, but it's probably dwarfed by Windows (and likely Mac too) growth at the same time so it brings down our market-share.

    Nothing to worry about, so if anyone writes about it like it's Linux gaming doomsday, don't believe them. It would be something to worry about if developers started coming along noticing a drop in sales from Linux, but not a single developer has said so.

    Keep buying Linux games, keep playing them on Linux and keep going. 2017 is going to be fun!

  • Streets of Rogue development build updated with NAT punch-through and automatic port forwarding
  • Setting up a retro gaming console at home

    Commodore 64 was the first computer I ever saw in 1989. Twice in a year I used to visit my grandparents’ house in Kolkata, I used to get one or two hours to play with it. I remember, after a few years how I tried to read a book on Basic, with the help of an English-to-Bengali dictionary. In 1993, my mother went for a year-long course for her job. I somehow managed to convince my father to buy me an Indian clone of NES (Little Master) in the same year. That was also a life event for me. I had only one game cartridge, only after 1996 the Chinese NES clones entered our village market.

  • Tasbot does Tasblock - Awesome Games Done Quick 2017 - Part 170 [Ed: NES mini uses Linux]

    This speedrun was recorded live at Awesome Games Done Quick 2017, a weeklong charity speedrun marathon raising money for Prevent Cancer Foundation. Awesome Games Done Quick 2017 is just one of the many charity marathons put on by Games Done Quick.

  • Wine 2.0-rc5 release, moving towards a final stable version

Phones: Ubuntu, ZeroPhone, Tizen, and Android

Filed under
Android
Linux
Ubuntu

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • Baidu released artificial intelligence operating system DuerOS

    At this year’s CES show, Baidu released its artificial intelligence operating system system DuerOS, also announced at home with small fish to reach cooperation, small fish at home is the first equipped with Baidu DuerOS artificial intelligence manufacturers. Baidu said that this is the first time the introduction of dialogue type artificial intelligence operating system, Baidu is an important strategic product of artificial intelligence. DuerOS emphasizes the interactive nature of voice conversations through natural language. At the same time with the cloud of the brain, can always learn evolution, become more intelligent.

  • Intel Open-Sources BigDL, Distributed Deep Learning Library for Apache Spark

    Intel open-sources BigDL, a distributed deep learning library that runs on Apache Spark. It leverages existing Spark clusters to run deep learning computations and simplifies the data loading from big datasets stored in Hadoop.

    Tests show a significant speedup performance running on Xeon servers compared to other open source frameworks Caffe, Torch or TensorFlow. The speed is comparable with a mainstream GPU and BigDL is able to scale to tens of Xeon servers.

  • New Port for RISC-V

    We'd like to submit for inclusion in GCC a port for the RISC-V architecture. The port suffices to build a substantial body of software (including Linux and some 2,000 Fedora packages) and passes most of the gcc and g++ test suites; so, while it is doubtlessly not complete, we think it is far enough along to start the upstreaming process. It is our understanding that it is OK to submit this port during stage 3 because it does not touch any shared code. Our binutils port has already been accepted for the 2.28 release, and we plan on submitting glibc and Linux patch sets soon.

  • [Older] Twenty-four new GNU releases in December
  • Getting Election Data, and Why Open Data is Important

    Back in 2012, I got interested in fiddling around with election data as a way to learn about data analysis in Python. So I went searching for results data on the presidential election. And got a surprise: it wasn't available anywhere in the US. After many hours of searching, the only source I ever found was at the UK newspaper, The Guardian.

    Surely in 2016, we're better off, right? But when I went looking, I found otherwise. There's still no official source for US election results data; there isn't even a source as reliable as The Guardian this time.

    You might think Data.gov would be the place to go for official election results, but no: searching for 2016 election on Data.gov yields nothing remotely useful.

    The Federal Election Commission has an election results page, but it only goes up to 2014 and only includes the Senate and House, not presidential elections. Archives.gov has popular vote totals for the 2012 election but not the current one. Maybe in four years, they'll have some data.

  • Renault To Release Twizy Hardware / Platform As An Open Source EV

    However for the US and most other places ‘not Europe’, it would be an opportunity to at least be able to own one, or a reasonable likeness to it.

  • Security Through Transparency

    Encryption is a foundational technology for the web. We’ve spent a lot of time working through the intricacies of making encrypted apps easy to use and in the process, realized that a generic, secure way to discover a recipient's public keys for addressing messages correctly is important. Not only would such a thing be beneficial across many applications, but nothing like this exists as a generic technology.

  • Patch your FreeBSD server for openssh vulnerabilities [11/Jan/2017]

Audiocast/Videos

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Movies

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • 'TimeKpr' A Parental Control Application for Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    Parental Control application for Linux is bit hard to find, if you encounter any then it may be outdated or just don't work as per your wish, they just restrict internet access or sort of stuff. If someone uses your computer or you let your kids use your computer. You can restrict access for them as you want, from now you don't have to say your kids to leave computer, Timekpr will do it better. You can call Timekpr restriction application or parental control application, whatever you like to call it.

  • VidCutter: A Quick And Easy Way To Trim And Merge Videos in Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    VidCutter is a free video trimming application, it is written in Python3 and PyQt5 Gui framework and it's cross-platform available for Linux and Windows, based on Qt5 and uses FFmpeg on the backend to perform quick and easy video trimming/splitting/clipping and merging/joining. VidCutter is a small program does exactly what is says, with no frills or extras. It supports most of the common video formats such as: AVI, MP4, MPEG 1/2, WMV, MP3, MOV, 3GP, FLV and so on, it exports in the same format as source file. Simply open a video file, wait for it to load and then choose the part of the video you want using the start and stop markers. The only downside currently there is no export settings available and other formats.

  • A List of Privacy Measures

    This aims to document everything I use to maintain a degree of privacy in my digital life, along with a few comments. It is targeted at intermediate Linux users who can get everything setup without any hand holding. I had wanted to write tutorials on what follows, but that would make the post unbearably long. Instead, I shall try to link to pages that are good starting points.

  • Variety 0.6.3 Rich Features Wallpaper Manager Available For Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    Variety 0.6.3 Rich Features Wallpaper Manager Available For Ubuntu/Linux Mint There are many wallpaper manager applications available which offers many features but Variety has its own way to get things done. It can display wallpapers from local sources or lots of various online sources, allows user to change wallpaper on a regular interval, and provides easy ways to separate the great images from the junk.

  • uGet 2.0.8 Download Manager Released For Ubuntu/Linux Mint Via PPA

    uGet (formerly called urlgfe) is a download manager. uGet is a very Powerful & Lightweight download manager application with a large inventory of features. uGet is an Open Source download manager application for GNU/Linux developed with GTK+. It allows you to classify download, and allows you to import download from HTML files. Every category has an independent configuration that can be inherited by each download in that category. uGet uses very few resources while at the same time packs an unparalleled powerful feature set. These features include a Queue, Pause/Resume, Multi-Connection (with adaptive segment management), Mirrors (multi-source), Multi-Protocol, Advanced Categorization, Clipboard Monitor, Batch Downloads, Individualized Category Default Settings, Speed Limiting, Total Active Downloads Control, and so much more!

  • Telegram Desktop reaches version 1.0 – and it's BEAUTIFUL

    Telegram was available for desktops and laptops since 2013. Today it finally graduates to version 1.0 with a fabulous new design.

    Consistent material design, great animations, and support for custom themes make Telegram for Windows, Mac, and Linux the tool for messaging from your Mac or PC.

  • A look at darktable 2.2.0

    In what is becoming its annual tradition, the darktable project released a new stable version of its image-editing system at the end of December. The new 2.2 release incorporates several new photo-correction features of note, including automatic repair of distorted perspectives and the ability to reconstruct highlights that are washed out in some color channels but not all—a type of overexposure that other editors can miss. There is a new image-warping tool that lets users edit image pixels (a first for darktable, which has historically focused on image-wide tasks like color correction). And there is at least one new tool that may prove intriguing even to users who prefer editing images in some other program: a utility for inspecting and editing color-mapping look-up tables.

    Source code bundles are available for download through the project's GitHub repository and binary packages are already available for a wide variety of popular Linux distributions. Users of the 2.0 series should note, however, that opening existing darktable edit files with the 2.2 release will automatically migrate them to the newer format and render them subsequently unopenable with darktable 2.0.

  • Moving on from net-tools

    Old habits die hard, even when support for the tools required by those habits ended over a decade ago. It is not surprising for users to cling to the tools they learned early in their careers, even when they are told that it is time to move on. A recent discussion on the Debian development list showed the sort of stress that this kind of inertia can put on a distribution and explored the options that distributors have to try to nudge their users toward more supportable solutions.

    The package in question is net-tools, the home for many familiar network-configuration utilities. If you are accustomed to using commands like ifconfig, arp, netstat, or route to make network changes, you are a net-tools user. Many of these tools have a long pedigree, at least in spirit, having originally been written before the first Linux kernel. Anybody who has been administering Unix-like systems for any period of time will certainly have learned how to use the net-tools utilities to get things done.

KDE Leftovers

Filed under
KDE
  • Google Code-in draws to a close -- students finish your final task by January 16, 2017 at 09:00 (PST)

    Mentors, you have until January 18, 2017 at 09:00 (PST) to evaluate your student's work. Please get that done before the deadline, so that admins don't have to judge the student work.

  • Mycroft Plasmoid for KDE Plasma 5
  • Plasma 5.9 Beta Kicks off 2017 in Style.

    Thursday, 12 January 2017. Today KDE releases the beta of this year’s first Plasma feature update, Plasma 5.9. While this release brings many exciting new features to your desktop, we'll continue to provide bugfixes to Plasma 5.8 LTS.

  • The hype is great: WikiToLearn India Conf2017 is almost here!

    In less than two weeks WikiToLearn India Conf2017 is about to happen. We are extremely happy because this is the first big international event entirely dedicated to WikiToLearn. We have to thank the members of our community who are working hard to provide you this amazing event. For sure, the best thing about this conference is the great variety of speakers: Ruphy is flying from Italy to India to attend the conference and give a talk about WTL. For this event we have speakers lined up from Mediawiki, KDE and Mozilla Community. Several projects and ideas will meet at WTL India Conf2017 and this is simply amazing for us! The entire event will be recorded and videos will be uploaded online: you won’t miss any talk!

  • Fixing old stuff

    On FreeBSD, Qt4 is still a thing — for instance, for the KDE4 desktop that is still the latest full-KDE experience you can get from the official packages. And although that software is pretty old, the base system still evolves. FreeBSD 9 has been put to rest, and with it all the GCC-based FreeBSD systems. That frees us from having to deal with GCC and Clang at the same time, and we can generally patch things in just one way (usually towards more-modern C++). But the base system also evolves “out from under” older software. There’s an effort to update the base system compiler (for FreeBSD 12) to Clang 4.0 (sometime soon-ish), and that means that our older C++ code is being exposed to a newer, pickier, compiler.

today's howtos

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HowTos
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More in Tux Machines

Canonical Patches Nvidia Graphics Drivers Vulnerability in All Ubuntu Releases

It's time to update your Ubuntu Linux operating system if you have a Nvidia graphics card running the Nvidia Legacy 340 or 304 binary X.Org drivers provided on the official software repositories. Read more

Long-term Embedded Linux Maintenance andd New Device From CompuLab

  • Long-term Embedded Linux Maintenance Made Easier
    The good old days when security breaches only happened to Windows folk are fading fast. Malware hackers and denial of service specialists are increasingly targeting out of date embedded Linux devices, and fixing Linux security vulnerabilities was the topic of several presentations at the Embedded Linux Conference Europe (ELCE) in October. One of the best attended was “Long-Term Maintenance, or How to (Mis-)Manage Embedded Systems for 10+ Years” by Pengutronix kernel hacker Jan Lübbe. After summarizing the growing security threats in embedded Linux, Lübbe laid out a plan to keep long-life devices secure and fully functional. “We need to move to newer, more stable kernels and do continuous maintenance to fix critical vulnerabilities,” said Lübbe. “We need to do the upstreaming and automate processes, and put in place a sustainable workflow. We don’t have any more excuses for leaving systems in the field with outdated software.”
  • CompuLab Has Upgraded Their Small Form Factor "IPC" Line To Kabylake
    HARDWARE -- Our friends and Linux-friendly PC vendor, CompuLab, have announced a new "IPC" line-up of their small form factor computers now with Intel Kabylake processors. In the past on Phoronix we tested CompuLab's Intense-PC (IPC) and then the IPC2 with Haswell processors, among other innovative PCs from CompuLab. Now they are rolling out the IPC3 with Intel's latest Kabylake processors.
  • Fanless mini-PC runs Linux Mint on Kaby Lake
    Compulab launched a rugged “IPC3” mini-PC that runs Linux on dual-core, 7th Gen Core i7/i5 CPUs, and also debuted three GbE-equipped FACE expansion modules. Compulab has opened pre-orders starting at $693 for the first mini-PCs we’ve seen to offer the latest, 14nm-fabricated 7th Generation Intel Core “Kaby Lake” processors. The passively cooled, 190 x 160 x 40mm IPC3 (Intense PC 3), which is available in up to industrial temperature ranges, follows two generations of similarly sized IPC2 mini-PCs. There’s the still available, 4th Gen “Haswell” based IPC2 from 2014 and the apparently discontinued 5th Gen “Broadwell” equipped IPC2 from 2015.
  • Compulab IPC3 is a tiny, fanless PC with Intel Kaby Lake CPU
    Compulab is an Israeli company that makes small, fanless computers for home or commercial use. The company’s latest mini PC aimed at enterprise/industrial usage is called the IPC3, and it has a die-cast aluminum case with built-in heat sinks for passive cooling and measures about 7.4″ x 6.3″ x 1.6″.

Games for GNU/Linux

  • Imperium Galactica II: Alliances released for Linux & SteamOS, seems native too
    Imperium Galactica II: Alliances [GOG, Steam] just released for Linux & SteamOS and it looks like it's a native version. Note: My friends at GOG sent over a copy, so big thanks to them. There's no sign of DOSBox or Wine and I had no idea this game had ever been ported to Linux. Pretty awesome really for a game like this to get a proper Linux build when it gets a new release.
  • Nearly five years after the Kickstarter, Carmageddon still isn’t on Linux despite the stretch goal being reached
    The problem here, for me, is that they later did a revamp of the title called Carmageddon: Max Damage. This was to fix some problems, boost sales again and port it to consoles. Carmageddon: Max Damage also never made it to Linux. Fun fact, they actually released a trailer where they just run over a ton of penguins, make from that what you will: Not saying this was trolling the entire Linux gaming community, but it sure felt like it after their previous trolling attempts directed at our official Twitter account.
  • Valve Rolls Out New Steam Client Stable Update with Promised Linux Changes, More
    Today Valve announced the availability of a new stable update of the Steam Client for all supported platforms, including the company's SteamOS operating system for Steam Machines, as well as GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows. Bringing all the new features during the Beta stages of development, the new Steam Client update improves the interaction between the Steam runtime and your GNU/Linux distribution's libraries. This is a huge and long-anticipated milestone for the Steam Client, which, unfortunately, did not work out-of-the-box on all Linux-based operating systems.

Robolinux 8.7.1 Linux OS Is Out and It's Based on Debian GNU/Linux 8.7 "Jessie"

The developers of the Robolinux GNU/Linux distribution have announced today, January 18, 2017, the release and immediate availability of a new stable update based on the latest Debian GNU/Linux 8 "Jessie" operating system series. Still offering a free installer, the Robolinux 8.7.1 "Raptor" edition is now available for download with the usual Cinnamon, MATE 3D, Xfce 3D, and LXDE flavors. It's based on the recently released Debian GNU/Linux 8.7.1 "Jessie" operating system, which means that it ships with its newest Linux 3.16 kernel and over 170 bug fixes and security patches. The GRUB bootloader and login screens have been refreshed too. Read more