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Saturday, 22 Nov 14 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Titlesort icon Author Replies Last Post
Story Open source accelerating the pace of software Roy Schestowitz 11/11/2014 - 8:26pm
Story Open source all the tasks Roy Schestowitz 16/09/2014 - 7:47am
Story Open source as second nature to this project leader Roy Schestowitz 06/10/2014 - 12:08pm
Story Open source history, present day, and licensing Roy Schestowitz 01/10/2014 - 3:20pm
Story Open source love at first commit Roy Schestowitz 28/07/2014 - 9:55am
Story Open source more about process than licensing Roy Schestowitz 02/10/2014 - 12:42pm
Story Open source not just software at Red Hat Roy Schestowitz 03/09/2014 - 8:47am
Story Open source tools help kids discover digital creativity Rianne Schestowitz 26/09/2014 - 8:34pm
Story Optimize your Linux rig for top-notch writing Roy Schestowitz 27/08/2014 - 12:53pm
Story Oracle Doesn't Get Open Source srlinuxx 23/11/2010 - 8:17pm

Pigs Flying, Popular Licenses, and LibreOffice 4.3.4

Filed under
-s

Jon maddog Hall today said that it'd be "when pigs fly" when Microsoft really embraces Open Source. In other news, Rob Zwetsloot is back with Part 2 of his top 10 Linux desktops and Jim Lynch reviewed Trisquel 7.0. LibreOffice 4.3.4 was released and Stephen O'Grady looks at the most popular Open Source licenses. Phoronix is reporting that Ubuntu will probably adopt systemd next release and Carla Schroder has some tips for KDE 4 productivity.

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Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

New Wine

Filed under
Microsoft
Software

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
HowTos

As open source goes mainstream, institutions collaborate differently

Filed under
OSS

Earlier this week, I saw what the future of building government services may look like when I stumbled upon a simple dashboard of projects-in-progress. The dashboard is hosted by 18F, the new development unit within the US General Services Administration.

18F, which explicitly seeks to tap into the success of the UK's Government Digital Services unit, is pursuing a similar strategy, trying to lure developers from Silicon Valley and the ranks of civic developers all over the country with a daunting mission: change how federal technology gets done, at a time when bad government websites now damage public faith in government. Behind the dashboard is 18F's GitHub account, which exemplifies a quietly revolutionary idea that the UK has been pursuing with great success: build beautiful digital services for the public, in public.

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Ten operating systems for the Raspberry Pi

Filed under
Linux

The Raspberry Pi single board computer has become incredibly popular with hobbyists, academics, educators and OEMs. It’s tiny, it’s cheap, it has great performance and it’s extremely versatile. Even better, you have a surprisingly wide choice of operating systems to help you tackle whatever project you take on. What? You thought there was only Raspbian? If so, read on. We’ll look at Raspbian first, but wait to you see what else you can run …

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DragonFlyBSD 4.0 RC3 Is Out, Faster DRM Drivers Coming

Filed under
BSD

The third release candidate is out for the upcoming DragonFlyBSD 4.0 operating system release.

DragonFlyBSD 4.0 has been in an RC state since last month and uploaded last night was now the third release candidate that brings more updates to the popular BSD derivative.

DragonFlyBSD 4.0 RC2 was released just earlier this week to add procctl() support. The RC3 release has just a few changes around the procctl() system call, a segmentation fault fix, and updating time zone data.

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KDE4 Productivity Tips and Tricks

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KDE

Time is money, so I set up my main PC for maximum productivity. Everything I use the most is no more than a click away, and I have a batch of fave useful CLI and keyboard shortcuts and commands. Life is too short to wade through inefficient GUIs. I like all Linux graphical environments, and the one I keep coming back to the most is KDE. I loved it when it was pixely and not very pretty and had tons of customizability, and now it is sleek and gorgeous and has tons of customizability.

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Ubuntu Developers Devise New Terminal & Calculator Apps

Filed under
Ubuntu

Among the "Ubuntu Apps" being discussed for development today during the final day of this first Ubuntu 15.04 Online Summit is the planned improvements to the calculator and terminal applications.

While an Ubuntu Tablet could come next month and Ubuntu Phones are coming soon too, Ubuntu developers still have a long way to go to mature their default applications that ship for Ubuntu Touch as part of the Unity 8 user experience. On Wednesday I wrote about the many improvements needed to the Ubuntu File Manager and being discussed today were improvements still needed to their new terminal and calculator apps. Like the file manager, the calculator and terminal are being custom written for Unity 8 in Qt/QML and to fit in with Canonical's converged vision with these apps ultimately hitting the desktop -- likely in Ubuntu 16.04 LTS.

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Ubuntu Governance: Reboot?

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Ubuntu

The vast majority of these boards are populated by predominantly non-Canonical folks. I think this is a true testament to the openness and accessibility of governance in Ubuntu. There is no “Canonical needs to have people on half the board” shenanigans…if you are a good leader in the Ubuntu community, you could be on these boards if you work hard.

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Intel Sends In More Graphics Code For Linux 3.19

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Intel has sent in another round of graphics driver changes to be queued up in DRM-Next for the Linux 3.19 kernel.

The Intel DRM driver for Linux 3.19 already has initial Intel Skylake graphics support and numerous other changes. Daniel Vetter today sent in yet another drm-next pull request and he says the Intel team will have one more pull request in the coming days once it clears their QA/validation process.

Today's "drm-intel-next-2014-11-07" pull request has Skylake watermark code, reworked audio codec/ELD handling code, Skylake force-wake support, Cherryview support improvements, golden context support for Skylake, and tons of other fixes and improvements.

Find out the full list of these exciting Intel open-source Linux kernel graphics driver improvements via the mailing list pull request. The Linux 3.19 kernel cycle will get underway officially next month once Linux 3.18 has been christened.

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LibreOffice 4.3.4 Released With 60 Bug Fixes, v4.4 Shaping Up Nicely

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LibO

LibreOffice 4.3.4, the fourth such minor release in the ‘fresh’ series, is composed solely of bug fixes, which is par for the course in these point releases.

Adding to the sense of deja vu is the number of bugs the foundation say have been caught in the developers’ butterfly net: around 60 or so.

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Fedora Looks To Make /usr World-Readable

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Red Hat

Fedora developers are looking at requiring all files that be placed in /usr world-readable.

Developers are seeking a mandate that all Fedora packages must not install any non-world-readable files within /usr. Right now some Fedora packages do not honor this and restrict permissions to certain files/directories. Stakeholders are after making the user directory world-readable since containerized copies of Fedora can have the directory bind-mounted into the container, support for virtualization use-cases, and for better systemd handling.

The discussion around this packaging mandate can be found via this FPC ticket.

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Ubuntu For Cars? It's A Possibility

Filed under
Ubuntu

Another interesting session today during the final day of this week's Ubuntu 15.04 Online Summit was about the prospects of bringing Ubuntu to cars.

In particular, being discussed was Ubuntu as the in-vehicle infotainment (IVI) system similar to the focus of Tizen and other Linux platforms for running within automobiles. GENIVI's community manager talked about how car companies and suppliers are moving to open-source software to power the IVI systems. The talk was mainly geared at gauging interest as Ubuntu for an IVI system. There is NOT any actual plans or commitments (at least not publicly) for getting Ubuntu used in IVI systems but this is just what's being talked about. It also doesn't appear this is an avenue that Canonical is passionately exploring right now compared to Ubuntu Touch/Phone or the seemingly forgotten Ubuntu TV.

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Top 10 Linux desktops part 2

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Linux

The Linux desktop is one of the most important things about your Linux experience, aiding or supporting your workflow and tasks in many ways. We look at the top ten available for various distros right now to try and help you decide.

The first part can be found on our website.

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How the new lock screen works on Android 5.0 Lollipop

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Android

Google's latest mobile operating is now making its way to a variety of smartphones and tablets. Android 5.0 Lollipop completely revamps the look and feel of the operating system, and includes a number of new features and enhancements. One of the first things you will notice is an updated lock screen.

Notifications are now displayed front and center on the screen. They can be swiped either to the left or to the right to be dismissed, or you can double tap them to jump right into an app. A simple swipe up from the bottom will unlock your stock Android device, while sliding your finger from left to right will open the phone app and a swipe from right to left will open the camera.

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CyanogenMod 11 M12

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Android

Taking a breather from all the work on L, we snuck in another M release yesterday against the CM 11.0 (KitKat) branch. This release is less heavy on features, instead focussing on stability for various device trees and security fixes.

Notably on the security topic, this release incorporates the upstream Google patches against last months POODLE vulnerability in SSLv3. You can read more about the POODLE vulnerability on Google’s Security Blog. Users are strongly encouraged to update to the latest available build to keep in line with the latest security patches.

Multi-sim users should also see added improvements throughout the OS experience, and there has been similar polishes of improvements and features throughout the system as we look towards sunsetting CM11; CM12 looms over the horizon.

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Jolla Begins Teasing Possible New Device, Announcement Next Week

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

It looks like next week there will be a new Sailfish device announcement from Jolla.

Jolla, the Finnish phone company behind the MeeGo-derived, Wayland-using, Linux-based Sailfish OS mobile Linux platform, tweeted today, "The countdown to something big begins now. Sign up at http://jolla.com #jolla #unlike."

Embedded below is the teaser picture accompanying this tweet.

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First Firefox OS Smartphones Available in the Philippines

Filed under
OS
Moz/FF

Mozilla, the mission-based organization dedicated to promoting openness, innovation and opportunity on the Web, is happy to announce that Cherry Mobile will launch the first Firefox OS smartphone in the Philippines in the coming days. Cherry Mobile will offer the customizable and affordable Firefox OS smartphone – ACE – to their customers providing unique Web experiences through its open source mobile OS. Moreover, key app providers including Easy Taxi and OLX will partner with Mozilla to enrich Firefox Marketplace and expand the Firefox OS ecosystem in the Philippines.

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Linux Mint 17.1 RC "Rebecca" to Land in a Couple of Days

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Linux

The Mint devs have been working very hard on the upgrade for Linux Mint and it really shows. It will feature the latest Cinnamon 2.4, which packs a ton of improvements, but it will also come with some of it's own changes. In any case, from what the developers have revealed until now, it's likely that very few people will choose not to upgrade to the new release.

In fact, some users might say that there are enough changes for a brand new release, not just a simple point update. We have to keep in mind that most of the updates released so for Linux Mint have been rather consistent, so this new one is not all that surprising.

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