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Wednesday, 04 May 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Titlesort icon Author Replies Last Post
Story Chief Architect of Cloudera on growth of Hadoop Roy Schestowitz 20/10/2014 - 7:12pm
Story City of Vienna increasingly turns to open source Roy Schestowitz 26/05/2014 - 2:13pm
Story Collaborative robotics software development Roy Schestowitz 16/04/2015 - 9:49am
Story Confessions of a systems librarian Roy Schestowitz 28/01/2015 - 5:53pm
Story Could Oracle stifle the open-source movement? srlinuxx 18/02/2006 - 2:54am
Story Croatian policy encourages open source adoption Roy Schestowitz 28/08/2015 - 9:51am
Story DemocracyOS promotes civic engagement on both sides Roy Schestowitz 18/08/2014 - 10:44am
Story DevOps principles resonate with student Linux program Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2015 - 3:22pm
Story Did You Know You Can Try BSD With VirtualBSD? srlinuxx 29/04/2011 - 1:47am
Story Diversity in open source highlights from 2015 Roy Schestowitz 21/12/2015 - 5:33pm

Gabriele Trombini: How do you Fedora?

Filed under
Red Hat
Interviews

Gabriele is a Fedora Ambassador who works both locally and internationally. He is most impressed by the jovial and warm atmosphere within the project. Everyone can share suggestions, opinions and information in a friendly, collaborative environment. Trombini stresses that respect and the willingness to change are necessary to keep the Fedora Community strong. “Let’s try something, and if it doesn’t return the expected results, we should be ready to change our way,” says Trombini.

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Development News

Filed under
Development
  • PHP version 5.5.35, 5.6.21 and 7.0.6
  • Learn Perl Online for Free
  • Top Ten Programmers of All Time

    3. Linus Torvalds

    The man who created Linux Kernel. Linux operating system is a clone to the Unix operating system, written originally by Linus Torvalds and a loosely knit team of programmers all around the world.

    [...]

    5. Richard Stallman

    He founded the Free Software Foundation, developed the GNU Compiler Collection(GCC). Richard Stallman is the prophet of the free software movement. He understood the dangers of software patents years ago. Now that this has become a crucial issue in the world. He has hugely successful efforts to establish the idea of “Free Software”.

RMS Receives Award (and more GNU news)

Filed under
GNU
  • ACM RECOGNIZES MAJOR TECHNICAL CONTRIBUTIONS THAT HAVE ADVANCED THE COMPUTING FIELD

    Richard Stallman, recipient of the ACM Software System Award for the development and leadership of GCC (GNU Compiler Collection), which has enabled extensive software and hardware innovation, and has been a lynchpin of the free software movement. A compiler is a computer program that takes the source code of another program and translates it into machine code that a computer can run directly. GCC compiles code in various programming languages, including Ada, C, C++, Cobol, Java, and FORTRAN. It produces machine code for many kinds of computers, and can run on Unix and GNU/Linux systems as well as others.

    GCC was developed for the GNU operating system, which includes thousands of programs from various projects, including applications, libraries, tools such as GCC, and even games. Most importantly, the GNU system is entirely free (libre) software, which means users are free to run all these programs, to study and change their source code, and to redistribute copies with or without changes. GNU is usually used with the kernel, Linux. Stallman has previously been recognized with ACM’s Grace Murray Hopper Award.

  • Friday Free Software Directory IRC meetup: April 29th
  • Tumbleweed gets glibc 2.23

    There has not been a new snapshot for openSUSE Tumbleweed for the past week, and it has been a couple weeks since the last time it was discussed on news.opensuse.org.

    A new snapshot of Tumbleweed arrived today and the reason for not having one the past week is that the entire rolling release distribution was rebuilt on the Open Build Service and thoroughly tested by openQA.

Fairphone's Google-free open source OS is now available to download

Filed under
Android

Phone manufacturer Fairphone is all about making smartphones that are as accessible and ethical as possible. This includes trying to find conflict-free minerals for use in their phones' construction, but also the software that lives on these devices. Yesterday, the company released its own open source Fairphone OS — an Android-based operating system that doesn't include Google services. This means users will have to find their own apps for email, maps, and a browser, but in exchange they get more control over their software.

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Fedora 24 Delayed, Linus the Tops, New openSUSE Team

Filed under
-s

Fedora Program Manager Jan Kuřík today announced a delay in Fedora 24, both the upcoming Beta and Final. Elsewhere openSUSE announced a new community release team, a group of volunteers to help with the release tasks. Linus Torvalds and Richard Stallman both appeared on a "top 10 programmers of all time" list and a Windows 10 upgrade screen has gone viral.

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elementary OS 0.4 "Loki" to Be Based on Ubuntu 16.04, Promises Big New Features

Filed under
Linux

A year ago, we were bold enough to predict that the next release of the elementary OS distribution would be version 0.4, dubbed Loki and based on the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS operating system.

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Debian-Based SparkyLinux 4.3 "Tyche" Distro Launches with Linux Kernel 4.5.1

Filed under
Debian

Today, April 29, 2016, the SparkyLinux development team was proud to announce the release of the SparkyLinux 4.3 "Tyche" operating system, which has been in development for the past few months.

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Why and how I became a software engineer

Filed under
OSS

Throughout my experiences, the fascinating weeks I'd spent writing out DOS commands remained a prominent influence, bleeding into little side projects and occupying valuable study time. As soon as Geocities became available to all Yahoo! Users, I created a website where I published blurry pictures that I'd taken on a tiny digital camera. I created websites for free, helped friends and family fix issues they had with their computers, and created a library database for a church.

This meant that I was always researching and trying to find more information about how things could be made better. The Internet gods blessed me and open source fell into my lap. Suddenly, 30-day trials and restrictive licenses became a ghost of computing past. I could continue to create using GIMP, Inkscape, and OpenOffice.

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Linux Kernel 3.18.32 LTS Released with Btrfs, EXT4, ARM, x86, and PA-RISC Fixes

Filed under
Linux

Immediately after announcing today the release of Linux kernel 4.1.23 LTS, and after informing us yesterday about the availability of Linux kernel 3.12.59 LTS, kernel developer Sasha Levin now published details about Linux kernel 3.18.32 LTS.

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Linux greybeards release beta of systemd-free Debian fork

Filed under
Linux
Debian

The effort to create a systemd-free Debian fork has borne fruit, with a beta of “Devuan Jessie” appearing in the wild.

Devuan came into being after a rebellion by a self-described “Veteran Unix Admin collective” argued that Debian had betrayed its roots and was becoming too desktop-oriented. The item to which they objected most vigorously was the inclusion of the systemd bootloader. The rebels therefore decided to fork Debian and “preserve Init freedom”. The group renamed itself and its distribution “Devuan” and got work, promising a fork that looked, felt, and quacked like Debian in all regards other than imposing systemd as the default Init option.

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GNOME Builder 3.20.2 Arrives with LLVM 3.8, FreeBSD and OpenBSD Support

Filed under
GNOME

The developers behind the GNOME Builder IDE (Integrated Development Environment) pushed earlier to updates of the software to the stable and devel channels, GNOME Build 3.20.2 and 3.21.1.

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Nautilus 3.20.1 File Manager Out Now, Lets Users Move Items to Network Locations

Filed under
GNOME

The GNOME 3.20.1 desktop environment was released two weeks ago with numerous updated components, but it looks like some of them are yet to receive their first point releases.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Fresh Mesa 11.3-devel RadeonSI Tests On Ubuntu 16.04 vs. NVIDIA's 364.19 Driver

    For some end-of-month benchmarks and while having a number of graphics cards out prior to being let down by Tomb Raider's Linux benchmark, here is a fresh round of OpenGL tests while using the newest Mesa 11.3-devel code on RadeonSI with AMDGPU/Radeon DRM from Ubuntu 16.04 and then compared to various Kepler/Maxwell graphics cards with the newest NVIDIA Linux driver.

  • Oracle Releases VirtualBox 5.0.20 with Fixes for Linux Kernel 4.5, Small Changes

    Today, April 28, 2016, Oracle has announced the release of VirtualBox 5.0.20, yet another maintenance version of its acclaimed open-source and cross-platform virtualization software.

  • pcp+grafana scripted dashboards

    Our previous work gluing Performance Co-Pilot and Grafana together has made it possible to look at a networkful of systems' performance stats and histories with just a few clicks on a web browser, and no auxiliary software (databases, web servers, etc.) other than PCP itself.

    Many people probably stopped at the most basic use of the technology: with the grafana dashboards provided.

  • How to build your own IRC Server with InspIRCd and Anope
  • How To Install Linux Mint Alongside Windows 10 (UEFI)
  • Tails 2.3 Screenshot Tour
  • openSUSE announces Community Release Team

    The openSUSE Board announced today a call to action for a Community Release Team to assist with tasks associated to the development of the next Leap version 42.2.

  • Mele introduces a $70 Ubuntu stick PC

    The Meizu Pro 5U smartphone puts Ubuntu in your pocket, but you can’t use it as a desktop computer. Fortunately you’ve got other pockets, and you can stuff the Mele PCG02U into one them.

    The PCG02U is an HDMI stick PC, and if you hadn’t guessed from the U at the end of its name or that unmistakable orange color (or, more obviously, the title of this post) it is indeed powered by Ubuntu — Ubuntu 14.04 to be precise. It’s on sale now, and you can pick one up for just $70.

  • Samsung Unveils New Artik Module Tools for IoT Developers

    A new Artik IDE development environment and the Artik Cloud give developers new capabilities with Artik modules.
    Samsung has given Internet of things developers several new tools to create and grow their ideas for new devices and concepts, including the Samsung Artik IDE (integrated development environment) and an IoT-focused Samsung Artik Cloud where developers can collect, store and access their data from any device or other cloud.

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • The road to hell is paved with SAML Assertions

    A vulnerability in Microsoft Office 365 SAML Service Provider implementation allowed for cross domain authentication bypass affecting all federated domains. An attacker exploiting this vulnerability could gain unrestricted access to a victim's Office 365 account, including access to their email, files stored in OneDrive etc.

  • Cisco Finds Backdoor Installed on 12 Million PCs

    Cisco started analyzing Tuto4PC’s OneSoftPerDay application after its systems detected an increase in “Generic Trojans” (i.e. threats not associate with any known family). An investigation uncovered roughly 7,000 unique samples with names containing the string “Wizz,” including “Wizzupdater.exe,” “Wizzremote.exe” and “WizzInstaller.exe.” The string also showed up in some of the domains the samples had been communicating with.

  • The "Wizzards" of Adware [Ed: unsurprisingly Windows]
  • All About Fraud: How Crooks Get the CVV

    A longtime reader recently asked: “How do online fraudsters get the 3-digit card verification value (CVV or CVV2) code printed on the back of customer cards if merchants are forbidden from storing this information? The answer: If not via phishing, probably by installing a Web-based keylogger at an online merchant so that all data that customers submit to the site is copied and sent to the attacker’s server.

  • Why We Should Be Worried About Ancient Viruses Infecting Power Plants [Ed: unsurprisingly Windows again]

    The reasons these patients are vulnerable to viruses like W32.Ramnit and Conficker is because they run legacy systems that haven’t been patched or updated for a decade. And that’s fine as long as the operators of the plant keep them isolated and assume they are insecure, hopefully keeping the more critical parts of the network away safer.

  • Magical Thinking in Internet Security

    Increased complexity without corresponding increases in understanding would be a net loss to a buyer. At scale, it's been a net loss to the world economy.

  • Edward Snowden: The Internet Is Broken

    In 2013, a now-infamous government contractor named Edward Snowden shined a stark light on our vulnerable communications infrastructure by leaking 10,000 classified U.S. documents to the world.

    One by one, they detailed a mass surveillance program in which the National Security Administration and others gathered information on citizens — via phone tracking and tapping undersea Internet cables.

    Three years after igniting a controversy over personal privacy, public security, and online rights that he is still very much a part of, Snowden spoke with Popular Science in December 2015 and shared his thoughts on what's still wrong and how to fix it.

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

GNOME News

Filed under
GNOME
  • A little update on transit routing in Maps

    I talked a bit with Mattias Bengtsson before, and since he had been contemplating using OpenTripPlanner (OTP) for his GSoC project a couple of year ago and found it didn't scale too well for general turn-based routing, he was quite excited about my idea of combing GraphHopper and OTP, using OTP with just transit data (loaded from GTFS feeds).

  • GNOME Software Update That Fixes Installing Third-Party Deb Files Lands In Ubuntu 16.04 Proposed Repository

    A GNOME Software update that fixes the issue with installing third-party deb files was pushed to the Ubuntu 16.04 Proposed repository a few minutes ago.

  • Introducing GNOME Software

    GNOME Software is a new software center ('add/remove programs' application) for any GNU/Linux system using GNOME desktop environment. At this time, there are just a few third-party reviews about GNOME Software. This article is a general beginner guide about how to use GNOME Software. For this purpose we use the GNOME Software in Ubuntu 16.04 Xenial Xerus. Thanks to the developers who created GNOME Software. We hope this article helps new users.

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • 1º Computer Science Week 2016

    And since the beginning, I had tried to bring the most of the content about Free Software ideology. And this time next week, it will start the 1º Computer Science Week, and what is more amazing is that this edition is bringing people from more there 14 cities around the state of Rio de Janeiro, for watch the talks. I didn’t expect that.

  • OpenDaylight as an NFV Controller

    In discussing our use cases, we’ve noticed that a key domain for OpenDaylight (ODL) is Cloud and NFV. ODL is closely tied to NFV and accordingly works very closely with the Open Platform for NFV (OPNFV), a related project with the Linux Foundation that concentrates on providing a carrier-grade, integrated, open source platform to accelerate the introduction of new NFV products and services.

  • Open, available & interoperable: How open source is transforming the data centre industry

    Analysis: From commercial to enterprise hubs, from smaller to bigger players, open source is gearing up to be the future of the data centre.

    The use of open source to design, build and deploy software and even hardware infrastructure in the data centre seems to be an accelerating trend amongst companies in the hosting space.

    Open source software revenues worldwide are expected to go beyond the $50bn barrier this year for the first time, according to Statista. By 2020, that value will rise to $57.3bn.

  • ​OwnCloud founder resigns from his cloud company

    Frank Karlitschek, ownCloud's founder and CTO, has resigned from his company. OwnCloud is a popular do-it-yourself infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS) cloud.

  • 7 science projects powered by open source GIS

    Next week, FOSS4G North America is coming to Raleigh, NC. FOSS4G is a conference celebrating all of the ways that free and open source software are changing the world of geographic and geospatial information science (GIS).

    These days, with ever-expanding technologies for collecting geographic data, sensor networks and the Internet of Things are driving larger and larger quantities of data that must be stored, processed, visualized, and interpreted. Practically every type of industry imaginable is increasing the types and quantities of geographic data they utilize. And the traditional closed source tools of the olden days can no longer keep up.

    Many of the applications of geographic tools are scientific in nature, from biology to oceanography to geology to climatology. Here are seven applications for geographic science that I'm excited about hearing talks on next week.

Plasma 5.6.3 and Applications 16.04.0 by KDE now available

Filed under
KDE

The latest updates for KDE's Plasma and Applications series are now available to all Chakra users, together with other package updates. A manual intervention is needed for this upgrade, due to a preexisting file that was dropped and now reintroduced in the kde-runtime package. To properly perfom this update please follow these instructions:

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Android Leftovers

Leftovers: OSS

Ubuntu 16.04 Review: What’s New for Desktop Users

Ubuntu is a tricky distribution. As much as I love it on my home server, my desktop is a different ballgame. In my experience, releases between LTS versions have many new technologies that may or may not survive in the next LTS. There were many technologies or features that Canonical thought were ambitious -- HUD, experimenting with menus, online dash search, Ubuntu Software Center, etc. -- but they were abandoned. So, if I were to use Ubuntu on my desktop, I would still choose LTS. Read more

Workflow and efficiency geek talks Drush and Drupal

I started using Drupal because I needed an open source content management system (CMS) to use in several community projects. One of the projects I was involved with was just getting started and had narrowed its CMS selection down to either Drupal or Joomla. At the time I was using a different framework, but I had considered Drupal in the past and knew that I liked it a lot better than Joomla. I convinced them to go with the new Drupal 6 release and converted all of my other projects for consistency. I started working with Drush because I wanted a unified mechanism to work with local and remote sites. My first major contribution to Drush was site aliases and sql-sync in Drush 3. Read more