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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 22 Jul 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Titlesort icon Author Replies Last Post
Story Linux goes to Wall Street, puts on a show srlinuxx 22/04/2007 - 2:22pm
Story Linux going big time and prime time against Windows, UNIX (WSJ) srlinuxx 20/06/2007 - 9:35pm
Story Linux golden age threatened by bug army Rianne Schestowitz 12/10/2015 - 10:09am
Story Linux Good for Environment and Bottom Line srlinuxx 2 12/03/2007 - 3:44am
Story Linux Google Chrome Shines srlinuxx 05/10/2009 - 5:57pm
Story Linux gOS Space 2.9: A personal review srlinuxx 04/06/2008 - 8:04pm
Story Linux Got Game! srlinuxx 5 24/08/2009 - 2:46pm
Story Linux Got Game: Alien Arena 2007 Review srlinuxx 12/02/2008 - 11:09am
Story Linux Got Game: Blob Wars ( Blob And Conquer) srlinuxx 24/11/2009 - 5:05pm
Story Linux Got Game: Nexuiz 2.4 Review srlinuxx 05/04/2008 - 5:19pm

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MyahOS 1.2 Gaming Edition Screenshots

Filed under
Linux

Myah is a simple and easy to use Operating System for standard Intel or AMD powered computers. Jeremiah has provided us with a whole trainload of screenshots for your viewing pleasure. He states, "I bring you a Linux OS that has 115 bad ass games. I'm not talking kde games. I'm talking 115 of the best linux games available and a couple that were not ever release on linux."

Blown Away @ Open Source Business Conference

Filed under
OSS

Coming in to the Open Source Business Conference, I was obviously expecting a lot of suits. And I certainly got them. But what I have been completely blown away by was the sheer amount of buzz generated at this show.

Nexuiz v1.5 Screenshots

Nexuiz, one of the popular open-source first person shooter games available for Microsoft Windows as well as Linux on both x86 and x86_64 platforms, has released v1.5 today. Unlike some of the past releases, many of the features in this release are prominent from a new instant action mode to improved artificial intelligence and completely new menus! In addition, there is now smoother net-code, engine optimizations, redone sound effects, all new character skins, new game-modes, new maps, and new characters. For the open-source enthusiast, Nexuiz v1.5 is definitely worth checking out!

Windows to Linux: a corporate success story

Filed under
Linux

The mere suggestion of migrating to Linux, directed at those CIOs, is enough to trigger a bunch of emotional responses on them. “Our users won’t go along”, “We depend too much on Office to make the switch”, “Linux costs more in the end” are common responses.

Today, I’ll be telling the story of our own migration to Linux. As you can probably infer from the title of this story, it’s been a success.

Mark Shuttleworth: Absolutely no truth to the rumour…

Filed under
Google
Ubuntu

I keep getting asked about Google’s “distribution of Ubuntu”, so perhaps this is a good place for me to say that as far as I’m aware there is absolutely no truth to the rumour that Google plans to distribute a derivative of Ubuntu as a Google OS.

Book Review: Intrusion Prevention Fundamentals

Filed under
Reviews

Intrusion Prevention Fundamentals focuses on how Intrusion Prevention Systems (IPS) technologies can be used to manage the network and keep intruders out. IPS are any monitoring systems that examine all network traffic and then act as forwarding devices for approved traffic (dropping unapproved traffic or forwarding it elsewhere for further/separate action).

Also: Book Review: Penetration Testing and Network Defense

Sun GPLs latest UltraSPARC

Filed under
Misc

Jonathan Schwartz, president of Sun Microsystems Inc., announced that Sun is releasing its UltraSPARC Architecture 2005 and HyperVisor API specifications to open-source under the GPL.

Sun is making this move to help jumpstart the porting of Linux, BSD, and other operating systems, middleware, and applications to its UltraSPARC T1 processor.

Lockheed Martin Selects Concurrent's RedHawk Linux

Filed under
Linux

Concurrent, a leading provider of time-critical Linux operating systems for mission-critical applications, today announced that Lockheed Martin has selected Concurrent's RedHawk Linux operating system and NightStar development tools for the Navy's Cruiser Modernization COTS Refresh 2 program.

PalmOS goes Linux - again

Filed under
Linux

PalmSource today unveiled its future OS as the Access Linux Platform (ALP), and this time it really means it.

Gentoo Linux founder quits Microsoft

Filed under
Gentoo

Daniel Robbins, the founder and former chief architect of the Gentoo Linux project, has quit his job at Microsoft after only eight months, the software giant has confirmed.

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My desktop OS: Mandriva PowerPack 2006

Filed under
MDV

I like life simple, and I despise discovering hidden complexities behind mundane tasks. I want minimal effort to yield huge impact -- and that's what I get from the Mandriva PowerPack 2006. I can perform installation, setup, update management, and routine tasks without having to fiddle, tweak, or even think.

Nexuiz 1.5 released

Filed under
Gaming

The Nexuiz team released another update to their cross-platform, free, open-sourced multiplayer deathmatch game Nexuiz.

Free software working for human rights

Filed under
Software

Monitoring human rights abuses around the world can be a risky proposition with data collectors, reporters and community members at constant risk of discovery. The Martus project pits the best of the open source software world against abusers to create a safe and secure environment in which human rights activists can record and store data on abuses without fear.

Maddog bites Microsoft

Filed under
Linux

In the past 30 years, Linux legend Jon "maddog" Hall has worked at more technical jobs and taught more students about the technical aspects of IT than he probably cares to remember. One thing he does remember, however, is his nickname, given to him by his students at Hartford State Technical College, in Connecticut. It's a name the ageing, bearded guru has come to enjoy.

Shuffle your music the smart way

Filed under
HowTos

Think of all the ways you interact with a computer each day. Any action you take, or even don't take, conveys some meaning. For example, when listening to your music collection, you might sometimes skip songs. What does that mean? There are a number of possibilities. Maybe you do not like the song that was playing, or it does not suit your current mood, or, possibly, you've listened to this song too much and would rather it be played less often. Is it possible to build a system that uses this information to learn which music you prefer and play it more often?

SCALE: When Everyone Wins

Filed under
Linux

On the second day of SCALE yesterday, the first keynote was delivered by Dan Kegel of Google. The presentation was entitled "Why Won't Johnny Run Linux?"

Also: Call issued for more mobile Linux apps

Automated distributed backups for laptops

Filed under
HowTos

This document will describe the setup I made for automating the backup tasks for all laptops here in the house. My servers use the same backup server and infrastructure, but right now they don't have the checks and scripts because they are online 24/7 and my backup server is triggering the backup process. This is however not true at all for the laptops.

Linux Rare at Legal Firms, Except for Security

Filed under
Linux

In the increasingly Microsoft-dominated land of law firms, Linux deployments remain just about nil, but security appliances are starting to stand out as one exception, according to attorneys and IT folks attending LegalTech.

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More in Tux Machines

OSS and Sharing Leftovers

  • Crowdfunding for extension management in GIMP (and other improvements)
    Well that’s the big question! Let’s be clear: currently security of plug-ins in GIMP sucks. So the first thing is that our upload website should make basic file type checks and compare them with the metadata listing. If your metadata announces you ship brushes, and we find executables in there, we would block it. Also all executables (i.e. plug-ins or scripts) would be held for manual review. That also means we’ll need to find people in the community to do the review. I predict that it will require some time for things to set up smoothly and the road may be bumpy at first. Finally we won’t accept built-files immediately. If code is being compiled, we would need to compile it ourselves on our servers. This is obviously a whole new layer of complexity (even more because GIMP can run on Linux, Windows, macOS, BSDs…). So at first, we will probably not allow C and C++ extensions on our repository. But WAIT! I know that some very famous and well-maintained extensions exist and are compiled. We all think of G’Mic of course! We may make exceptions for trustworthy plug-in creators (with a well-known track record), to allow them to upload their compiled plug-ins as extensions. But these will be really exceptional. Obviously this will be a difficult path. We all know how security is a big deal, and GIMP is not so good here. At some point, we should even run every extension in a sandbox for instance. Well some say: the trip is long, but the way is clear.
  • Python's founder steps down, India's new net neutrality regulations, and more open source news
    The head of one of the most popular free software/open source software projects is stepping down. Guido van Rossum announced that he's giving up leadership of the project he founded, effective immediately. van Rossum, affectionately known as Python's "benevolent dictator for life," made the move after the bruising process of approving a recent enhancement proposal to the scripting language. He also cited some undisclosed medical problems as another factor in his resignation. van Rossum stated that he "doesn't want to think as hard about his creation and is switching to being an 'ordinary core developer'," according to The Inquirer. van Rossum, who "has confirmed he won't be involved in appointing his replacement. In fact, it sounds very much like he doesn't think there should be one," believes that Python's group of committers can do his job.
  • FLIR Creates Open-Source Dataset for Driving Assistance
    Sensor systems developer FLIR Systems Inc. has announced an open-source machine learning thermal dataset designed for advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) and self-driving vehicle researchers, developers, and auto manufacturers, featuring a compilation of more than 10,000 annotated thermal images of day and nighttime scenarios. The first of its kind to include annotations for cars, other vehicles, people, bicycles, and dogs, the starter thermal dataset enables developers to begin testing and evolving convolutional neural networks with the FLIR Automotive Development Kit (ADKTM). The dataset empowers the automotive community to quickly evaluate thermal sensors on next-generation algorithms. When combined with visible light cameras, lidar, and radar, thermal sensor data paired with machine learning helps create a more comprehensive and redundant system for identifying and classifying roadway objects, especially pedestrians and other living things.
  • Open-source map of accessible restaurants in Calgary growing into something beautiful
    A call on Twitter for a list of accessible restaurants has led to an online mapping movement to plot out user-friendly restaurants around the city. On Monday, Calgary-based tech entrepreneur Travis Martin saw a tweet from Natasha Gibson (@ktash) asking Councillor Druh Farrell if she knew of some accessible restaurants for her senior parents.
  • Universities in Germany and Sweden Lose Access to Elsevier Journals [iophk: "sci-hub to the rescue"]

    This month, approximately 300 academic institutions in Germany and Sweden lost access to new papers published in Elsevier’s journals due to a standstill in negotiations for nationwide subscription contracts. While Elsevier’s papers remain inaccessible, academics are turning to alternative means of obtaining them, such as using inter-library loan services, emailing authors, finding earlier versions on preprint servers, or buying individual papers.

  • Open Source Laboratory Rocker is Super Smooth
    Lab equipment is often expensive, but budgets can be tight and not always up to getting small labs or researchers what they need. That’s why [akshay_d21] designed an Open Source Lab Rocker with a modular tray that uses commonly available hardware and 3D printed parts. The device generates precisely controlled, smooth motion to perform automated mild to moderately aggressive mixing of samples by tilting the attached tray in a see-saw motion. It can accommodate either a beaker or test tubes, but since the tray is modular, different trays can be designed to fit specific needs.
  • Update on our planned move from Azure to Google Cloud Platform
    Improving the performance and reliability of GitLab.com has been a top priority for us. On this front we've made some incremental gains while we've been planning for a large change with the potential to net significant results: running GitLab as a cloud native application on Kubernetes. The next incremental step on our cloud native journey is a big one: migrating from Azure to Google Cloud Platform (GCP). While Azure has been a great provider for us, GCP has the best Kubernetes support and we believe will the best provider for our long-term plans. In the short term, our users will see some immediate benefits once we cut over from Azure to GCP including encrypted data at rest on by default and faster caching due to GCP's tight integration with our existing CDN.

Openwashing Examples

  • Ripple’s Evan Schwartz says Codius might pave the way for open-source services
    The Creator of Codius, Evan Schwartz, spoke about the technology recently at CSAIL Initiative Launch. Codius is a smart contract and distributed applications hosting platform developed jointly by Stefan Thomas, the Founder of Coil, and Evan Schwartz. Schwartz started off by saying that Codius is much more flexible in hosting decentralized applications when compared to the blockchain. The reason for many developers to choose the blockchain is mainly security and redundancy.
  • Nish Tech Simplifies eCommerce Integrations With the Launch of Open-Source Framework for Sitecore Commerce
    Nish Tech, a leader in Sitecore and eCommerce implementations, released a framework to the user community to accelerate and simplify development and integration for ecommerce sites. Nish Tech, a Gold Sitecore Implementation Partner with a specialization in eCommerce, initially unveiled a preview at the European Sitecore User Group summit in Berlin, Germany earlier this year. Today marks the official launch of this framework. In most online ecommerce implementations, integration with backend systems like ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning) and PIM (Product Information Management) play an important role. Most companies spend significant time/effort building connections to these systems. Customers using a modern ecommerce platform, like Sitecore Experience Commerce in the digital commerce space need a communication link to the backend systems to complete ecommerce transactions.
  • Appareo offers open source on fourth-generation Stratus receiver
    Appareo released a new addition to its Stratus family of pilot-friendly affordable avionics this week. Stratus 3 is the latest model in the line of industry-leading ADS-B receivers first introduced in 2012. The company will exhibit Stratus 3 as part of its full line of Stratus products next week at the annual EAA AirVenture Oshkosh 2018 fly-in and expo.

KDE Applications 18.08 Software Suite Enters Beta, Adds Apple Wallet Pass Reader

With KDE Applications 18.04 reached end of life with the third and last point release, the KDE Project started working earlier this month on the next release of their open-source software suite, KDE Applications 18.08. KDE Applications is an open-source software suite designed as part of the KDE ecosystem, but can also be used independently on any Linux-based operating system. To fully enjoy the KDE Plasma desktop environment, users will also need to install various of the apps that are distributed as part of the KDE Applications initiative. KDE Applications 18.08 is the next major version of the open-source software suite slated for release on August 16, 2018. As of yesterday, July 20, the KDE Applications 18.08 software suite entered beta testing as version 18.07.80, introducing two new libraries, KPkPass and KItinerary. Read more

NetBSD 8.0 Released

  • Announcing NetBSD 8.0
    The NetBSD Project is pleased to announce NetBSD 8.0, the sixteenth major release of the NetBSD operating system.
  • NetBSD 8.0 Officially Released With USB3 Support, Security Improvements & UEFI
    While it's been on mirrors for a few days, NetBSD 8.0 was officially released this weekend. NetBSD 8.0 represents this BSD operating system project's 16th major release and introduces USB 3.0 support, an in-kernel audio mixer, a new socket layer, Meltdown/Spectre mitigation, eager FPU support, SMAP support, UEFI boot-loader support for x86/x86_64 hardware, and a variety of long sought after improvements -- many of which are improving the security of NetBSD.
  • NetBSD 8.0 Released with Spectre V2/V4, Meltdown, and Lazy FPU Mitigations
    The NetBSD open-source operating system has been updated this week to version 8.0, a major release that finally brings mitigations for all the Spectre variants, Meltdown, and Lazy FPU security vulnerabilities, as well as many stability improvements and bug fixes. Coming seven months after the first and last point release of the NetBSD 7 series, NetBSD 8.0 is here with mitigations for both the Spectre Variant 2 (CVE-2017-5715) and Spectre Variant 4 (CVE-2018-3639) security vulnerabilities, as well as for the Meltdown (CVE-2017-5754) and Lazy FPU State Save/Restore (CVE-2018-3665) vulnerabilities.