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Friday, 24 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Titlesort icon Author Replies Last Post
Story 5 open source tools for taming text Roy Schestowitz 09/07/2015 - 12:04pm
Story 5 specialized Linux distributions for computer repair Rianne Schestowitz 26/02/2015 - 1:05am
Story 5 tips every open source project manager should consider Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2016 - 10:25am
Story 6 essential non-coding careers in open source Roy Schestowitz 01/03/2016 - 10:40am
Story 6 new things Fedora 21 brings to the open source cloud Roy Schestowitz 10/01/2015 - 10:02am
Story 6 tips for adopting open source Roy Schestowitz 24/11/2014 - 10:02pm
Story 7 local governments announced to build with Code for America Roy Schestowitz 25/09/2014 - 4:11pm
Story 8 ways to contribute to open source without writing code Roy Schestowitz 01/12/2014 - 10:16pm
Story 9 reasons to use KDE Roy Schestowitz 14/04/2015 - 2:31pm
Story A beautiful, super-thin laptop that makes Fedora shine Roy Schestowitz 14/08/2015 - 11:33am

Huawei and SUSE Announce SUSE Linux Enterprise Server Support for KunLun RAS 2.0

Filed under
SUSE
  • Huawei and SUSE Announce SUSE Linux Enterprise Server Support for KunLun RAS 2.0

    Huawei and SUSE have announced SUSE Linux Enterprise Server as the preferred standard operating system (OS) for Huawei’s KunLun RAS 2.0. Based on SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 Service Pack 2, the OS supports the unique Reliability, Availability, and Serviceability (RAS 2.0) features of Huawei’s KunLun Mission Critical Server.

    The RAS 2.0 features enable customers to add or remove CPU and memory resources without shutting down the system. These features combine to make KunLun ‘Always Online’. SUSE Linux Enterprise Server provides broad support for mission-critical workloads such as databases and middleware.

  • Huawei and SUSE Announce SUSE Linux Enterprise Server Support for KunLun RAS 2.0

    Huawei and SUSE today announced SUSE Linux Enterprise Server as the preferred standard operating system (OS) for Huawei's KunLun RAS 2.0. Based on SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 Service Pack 2, the OS supports the unique Reliability, Availability, and Serviceability (RAS 2.0) features of Huawei's KunLun Mission Critical Server. The RAS 2.0 features enable customers to add or remove CPU and memory resources without shutting down the system. These features combine to make KunLun "Always Online." SUSE Linux Enterprise Server provides broad support for mission-critical workloads such as databases and middleware.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • The time of the year…

    Shotwell 0.26.0 “Aachen” was released. No “grand” new features, more slashing of papercuts and internal reworks. I removed a big chunk of deprecated functions from it, with more to come for 0.28 on our way to GTK+4 and laid the groundworks for better integration into desktop online account systems such as UOA and GOA.

  • Stellarium 0.15.2 Open-Source Astronomical Observatory App Has over 100 Changes

    Stellarium developer Alexander Wolf was proud to announce the release of the second maintenance update to the stable Stellarium 0.15 series of the open-source and cross-platform astronomical observatory application.

    Coming approximately three months after the release of version 0.15.1, Stellarium 0.15.2 is here with over 100 improvements and bug fixes, along with a bunch of new exciting features like an algorithm for DeltaT, orbit visualization data for asteroids, an option for the InfoString group, support for calculating extincted magnitudes of satellites, and sednoids, a new type of Solar system objects.

  • Linux-using mates gone AWOL? Netflix just added Linux support

    If your Linux-using mates suddenly disappear for a day or two, we can explain why: Netflix has just revealed it's fully and formally available on the OS.

    As the streamer points out, Chrome's worked for in-browser playback since 2014. But not officially.

    As of Tuesday, however, “users of Firefox can also enjoy Netflix on Linux.”

    Netflix reckons this is “a huge milestone for us and our partners, including Google, Microsoft, Apple, and Mozilla that helped make it possible.”

  • LibreOffice 5.3.1 is out

    Last week, LibreOffice released version 5.3.1. This seems to be an incremental release over 5.3 and doesn't seem to change the new user interface in any noticeable way.

    This is both good and bad news for me. As you know, I have been experimenting with LibreOffice 5.3 since LibreOffice updated the user interface. Version 5.3 introduced the "MUFFIN" interface. MUFFIN stands for My User Friendly Flexible INterface. Because someone clearly wanted that acronym to spell "MUFFIN." The new interface is still experimental, so you'll need to activate it through Settings→Advanced. When you restart LibreOffice, you can use the View menu to change modes.

  • anytime 0.2.2

    A bugfix release of the anytime package arrived at CRAN earlier today. This is tenth release since the inaugural version late last summer, and the second (bugfix / feature) release this year.

  • Tools for PDF modification on Fedora

    There are many options in the Fedora repositories for quickly modifying the page order of a PDF document. In Fedora, two of the easiest-to-use GUI tools for modifying PDFs are PDFMod and PDFShuffler. While GUI tools are well suited to this task, if you need a command line tool, the pdfseparate and pdfunite commands provided by the poppler-utils package can modify PDFs directly from your Terminal. All These tools allow you to remove, add, and rearrange pages and export it to a new document.

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Vulkan News

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Yaakuro shows off SteamVR on Unreal Engine 4 using Vulkan on Linux

    Previously Yaakuro worked to make Unreal Engine 4 work with SteamVR using OpenGL on Linux, but now he's moved onto making it work with Vulkan!

  • Unreal Engine 4 Making Progress On Linux With Vulkan & SteamVR

    Thanks to the work of community UE4 developer Yaakuro, Unreal Engine 4 on Linux with SteamVR support is advancing and can now be used with Vulkan rendering.

    Earlier this month the developer got UE4 with SteamVR on Linux running but using the OpenGL renderer. But today he's shared a video showing off UE4 on Linux SteamVR with Vulkan.

  • Khronos Clarifies That Vulkan Multi-GPU Isn't Limited To Windows 10

    With the big Vulkan 1.0.42 update came a number of new extensions, including for Vulkan multi-GPU/device support. There was some confusion by some that Vulkan's multi-GPU support was limited to Windows 10, but that is not at all the case.

    It appears some confusion came up about Vulkan's multi-GPU support when some Game Developers Conference (GDC17) slides had referenced the Windows Display Driver Model (WDDM). Thus some thought the Vulkan multi-device capabilities were somehow tied to using Windows' WDDM.

Linux Kernel News

Filed under
Linux
  • Performance analysis in Linux

    Dynamic profilers are tools to collect data statistics about applications while they are running, with minimal intrusion on the application being observed.

    The kind of data that can be collected by profilers varies deeply, depending on the requirements of the user. For instance, one may be interested in the amount of memory used by a specific application, or maybe the number of cycles the program executed, or even how long the CPU was stuck waiting for data to be fetched from the disks. All this information is valuable when tracking performance issues, allowing the programmer to identify bottlenecks in the code, or even to learn how to tune an application to a specific environment or workload.

    In fact, maximizing performance or even understanding what is slowing down your application is a real challenge on modern computer systems. A modern CPU carries so many hardware techniques to optimize performance for the most common usage case, that if an application doesn't intentionally exploit them, or worse, if it accidentally lies in the special uncommon case, it may end up experiencing terrible results without doing anything apparently wrong.

  • New Corsair Mice & Keyboards Supported By The Linux 4.11 Kernel

    Coming in late to the Linux 4.11 kernel are support for a few more Corsair gaming peripherals.

More on Radeon Vega

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Radeon Vega Changes For Libdrm, Plans For Merging Prior To Kernel Support

    The latest in the hardware enablement work for adding support for the upcoming Radeon RX Vega to the open-source Linux graphics driver are the patches to libdrm for this Mesa DRM library that sits between the DRM kernel drivers and Mesa / xf86-video / other user-space graphics code.

  • More Radeon Vega Work Lands For LLVM 5.0

    Yesterday we saw 100 patches adding Vega support to the Radeon DRM driver as well as 140 patches adding Vega support to RadeonSI Gallium3D. The other big piece of the open-source Linux driver stack for Vega is the AMDGPU LLVM changes.

Kodi 17.1 “Krypton” is Released

Filed under
Movies
OSS
  • Kodi v17.1 “Krypton”

    This is the bugfix release for v17.1 “Krypton” which contains our continuous effort to further improve the v17 release. Our team tried to tackle as much of the reported problems as possible with the limited resources we have. We do want to note that since we are just a small team some of the reported bugs might not get fixed due to lack of developers or time. As such we would certainly welcome any developer who has the ability to help us out to try and fix the bugs he or she encounters and submit it to our code base for review. We sure would like to thank every one involved with either development, testing or simply helping out others with answering their questions.

  • Kodi 17 "Krypton" Gets First Point Release, Estuary and Estouchy Skins Improved

    Kodi's Martijn Kaijser announced today the general and immediate availability for download of the first point release to the Kodi 17 "Krypton" open-source and multi-platform media center.

    Kodi 17.1 is here about three weeks after the release of the major Kodi 17 "Krypton" series, and it only addresses some of the issues that users reported since then. The most important change is an update to both the Estuary and Estouchy skins, to which some of the users still need to adjust. However, this maintenance update also improves various other components of the popular media center (see below for details).

Two open source secure email services

Filed under
OSS

As much we all complain about email, for most of us, email is still our primary conduit for online communication. That said, numerous hacks and revelations about government surveillance have made it clear that email is also one of the most vulnerable of those conduits.

What you send via email is your business and yours alone. Besides you and the recipient, no one else should be reading that message. Not hackers, not government agencies, and definitely not nosy siblings or friends.

Read more

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.9 Is the Last in the Series, Enhances Security

Filed under
Red Hat

Today, March 21, 2017, Red Hat Inc. announced the general availability of the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.9 maintenance update as the last one for the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 operating system series.

Read more

Also: Red Hat releases the last of the RHEL 6.x line

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.9 Launches With Improved Security

Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) Final Beta Lands Late Tomorrow, Freeze Now in Effect

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical Adam Conrad announced that the forthcoming Final Beta release of the Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) operating system is now in freeze until its launch late on March 23, 2017.

Read more

Ubuntu's Mir Finally Supports Drag & Drop

Filed under
Ubuntu

With Mir 1.0 expected to be coming soon, the developers working on this display server for Ubuntu Linux are tackling the remaining work items, some are larger than others.

Besides still working on Vulkan support, Mir today picked up another important feature: support for drag and drop.

Read more

KDE Plasma 5.9.4 Brings Improvements for Plasma Desktop, Workspace and Discover

Filed under
KDE

KDE released today the fourth maintenance update to the KDE Plasma 5.9 desktop environment series, which some of you are using on your Linux-based operating systems.

Read more

Zorin OS 12 Downloaded over Half a Million Times, 60% Are Windows and Mac Users

Filed under
OS

Believe it or not, the Zorin OS 12 open-source operating system passed the half million downloads mark today, as the development team proudly announced the milestone on the official Twitter account of the project.

Read more

Linux on Servers

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server
OSS
  • DevOps still very much a work in progress, survey suggests

    That's the key takeaway from a recent survey of 2,045 IT managers and professionals, released by Quali, an IT automation solutions provider. While most people in enterprises would say at this point that they have DevOps underway in some shape or form, achieving agility is another story.

  • IBM chases Google, Microsoft with Kubernetes in the cloud

    It's only a matter of time before every major cloud vendor offers a version of Kubernetes as a service. Now it’s IBM’s turn.

  • In The Virtualization Space, Containers Are Making A Move

    Wow has it been a whirlwind over the last ten years in the virtualization space. Where once Xen and then KVM sat on the pedestal, the baton has been passed to the projects revolved around containers. Names like Docker, Kubernetes and Mesos are most often mentioned. As is generally the case in the FLOSS arena, evolution is a constant. Therefore, if one is in the DevOps arena, it is time to familiarize yourself with containers if you have not already done so.

  • The DOE and NSA Construct Doomsday Scenario for American HPC

    One last point. The Chinese economy continues to expand faster than that of the US, and, depending on who you talk to, will reach the size of the US sometime between 2018 and 2028. Such an economy would be expected to field an HPC capability on par with that of the US. Furthermore, China and the US should both be able to maintain an indigenous and self-sustaining HPC capability for their own use, and it’s unreasonable to think either could prevent the other from doing so. In such a world, the US may no longer enjoy technological supremacy, but it can surely have the wherewithal to control its own future in HPC.

  • [Older] Getting Down To Bare Metal On The Cloud

    When you think of the public cloud, the tendency is to focus on the big ones, like Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure, or Google Cloud Platform. They’re massive, dominating the public cloud skyline with huge datacenters filled with thousands of highly virtualized servers, not to mention virtualized storage and networking. Capacity is divvied up among corporate customers that are increasingly looking to run and store their workloads on someone else’s infrastructure, hardware that they don’t have to set up, deploy, manage or maintain themselves.

  • Avoid complex infrastructure when building simple things

    For local development, go crazy. For real production use.. I think you should avoid this until you’re the size of business that someone else will do this for you. If this seems controversial do the math: include backing it up, patching it, keeping it highly available, the time spent not working on your differentiating features etc. There are plenty of datastore services available that will do all this for you and let you focus your limited time on your app, and they’re really very cheap when you consider the actual cost of running a production database. Write your app so that the cost of moving to your own database later if you need to is unlikely to be high. Managing a simple web app instead of managing a web app, a production database, a message queue etc is a big win.

  • DebConf17 welcomes its first eighteen sponsors!

    DebConf17 will take place in Montreal, Canada in August 2017. We are working hard to provide fuel for hearts and minds, to make this conference once again a fertile soil for the Debian Project flourishing. Please join us and support this landmark in the Free Software calendar.

  • [OT] Smartphone App: Retro Recorder and Call Recorder for your Tizen mobile

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Buku – A Powerful Command-line Bookmark Manager for Linux

    I can damn sure, managing bookmarks is one of the major/important tasks to everyone now a days. Everyone have different requirement and holding bunch of URL’s for their needs and keeping those in bookmarks.

    We all knows about bookmarks, usage, and how to do in web browser, especially in GUI mode. What about command-line? Most of us doesn’t know about this awesome utility which used to create bookmarks in command-line.

  • Indicator DOOM Gives Your Ubuntu Desktop the Badass CPU Monitor It Deserves

    Say hello to the flat-out coolest way to keep and eye on your desktop’s CPU load.

    Because as handy as tools like Indicator Multiload are, they lack a certain …badassery.

    Indicator DOOM is a CPU load indicator for Ubuntu that displays processor load using Doomguy‘s face from the iconic DOOM video game.

  • PiCluster 1.7 – Efficient Container Management

    I am pleased to announce PiCluster v1.7. In this release, I wanted to make PiCluster easier to use by having the Web Console handle most of the common configuration file changes. Not everyone enjoys editing json files including myself. Now let’s go over what is new in this release.

  • Command-line document conversion tools for writers

    Today, we have ample tools available for editing memos, letters, essays, books, presentation slides, and other documents on our computers. This can be both an advantage and a disadvantage: on the one hand, if you don't like a piece of software, you can simply move on to another one any time; on the other hand, a lot of these tools, especially proprietary software, are fully compatible with their own formats only. As a consequence, the more documents you have created with such a program, the less likely switching over to another solution will be possible without investing significant time, energy, and even money. This phenomenon is called vendor lock-in.

Graphics in Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Porting Mesa/Libdrm's Build System To Meson Brings Up Controversy

    Last week an independent developer proposed replacing the build system of libdrm -- the DRM library that sits between Mesa and the Linux kernel DRM -- to using the Meson build system as a potential replacement to using Autotools. That has led to another colorful discussion around build systems.

    Dylan Baker's RFC patches can be found on the dri-devel list and the discussion that ensued. He argues that the build system with Meson would be better since it's written in Python, Meson makes use of Ninja rather than CMake, its syntax is arguably simpler, and it's quicker. Dylan found that his build times dropped from 26 seconds to 13 seconds when going from Autotools to Meson. When making use of ccache, the build times dropped from 13 seconds to 2 seconds. He also mentioned he's planning on porting Mesa's Autotools/CMake build system over to Meson.

  • AMD’s Linux GPU patches seven Vega 10s

    These 100 patches add up to 40,000 lines of code and have been sent out today for review. The idea is that AMD will use them as the basis to provide "Vega 10" support within the Linux AMDGPU DRM driver.

  • Seven AMD Vega GPU IDs have appeared in the latest Linux driver release

    More than forty thousand lines of updated code have been sent out with 100 little patches for AMD’s Linux graphics drivers so they can deliver Vega GPU support when the new architecture launches. Inside the latest drivers have appeared seven discrete Vega 10 device IDs.

  • AMD Linux Driver Team Releases Over 100 ADMGPU Driver Patches Including Vega 10, Polaris 12 Support

    More than 100 patches for ADMGPU driver, including some much talked about support for Vega 10, were released by AMD’s Linux driver team yesterday.

Linux Foundation News

Filed under
Linux
  • The Linux Foundation's Arpit Joshipura to Host Open Networking Q&A on Twitter [Ed: If you do not join (i.e. give data to) surveillance and censorship platform Twitter you can't speak to the Linux Foundation now?]

    On Friday, March 31, The Linux Foundation will kick off a new initiative. No, it’s not a new project, event, or training course, although there are plenty of those in store. Instead, the foundation will begin a monthly Twitter chat, called #AskLF, with leaders at the organization.

  • CoreOS Donates its rkt Container Technology to CNCF

    At the same time that Docker offered to donate its containerd technology to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), CoreOS did the same with its competing rkt.

  • The Linux Foundation Appoints Eileen Evans to Board of Directors

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit advancing professional open source management for mass collaboration, today announced that Eileen Evans, Vice President and Deputy General Counsel for Software and Open Source at Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE), has joined The Linux Foundation Board of Directors as an At-Large director. Ms. Evans had represented HP and then HPE from 2012 through 2016 on the Board as a Platinum director.

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More in Tux Machines

Games and CrossOver

Red Hat and Fedora

Android Leftovers

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • CoreOS Tectonic Now Installs Kubernetes on OpenStack
    CoreOS and OpenStack have a somewhat intertwined history, which is why it's somewhat surprising it took until today for CoreOS's Tectonic Kubernetes distribution to provide an installer that targets OpenStack cloud deployments.
  • Docker and Core OS plan to donate their container technologies to CNCF
    Containers have become a critical component of modern cloud, and Docker Inc. controls the heart of containers, the container runtime. There has been a growing demand that this critical piece of technology should be under control of a neutral, third party so that the community can invest in it freely.
  • How Blockchain Is Helping China Go Greener
    Blockchain has near-universal applicability as a distributed transaction platform for securely authenticating exchanges of data, goods, and services. IBM and the Beijing-based Energy-Blockchain Labs are even using it to help reduce carbon emissions in air-polluted China.
  • An efficient approach to continuous documentation
  • The peril in counting source lines on an OSS project
    There seems to be a phase that OSS projects go through where as they mature and gain traction. As they do it becomes increasingly important for vendors to point to their contributions to credibly say they are the ‘xyz’ company. Heptio is one such vendor operating in the OSS space, and this isn’t lost on us. :) It helps during a sales cycle to be able to say “we are the a big contributor to this project, look at the percentage of code and PRs we submitted”. While transparency is important as is recognizing the contributions that key vendors, focus on a single metric in isolation (and LoC in particular) creates a perverse incentive structure. Taken to its extreme it becomes detrimental to project health.
  • An Open Source Unicycle Motor
    And something to ponder. The company that sells this electric unicycle could choose to use a motor with open firmware or one with closed firmware. To many consumers, that difference might not be so significant. To this consumer, though, that’s a vital difference. To me, I fully own the product I bought when the firmware is open. I explain to others that they ought to choose that level of full ownership whenever they get a chance. And if they join a local makerspace, they will likely meet others with similar values. If you don’t yet have a makerspace in your community, inquire around to see if anyone is in the process of forming one. Then find ways to offer them support. That’s how we do things in the FOSS community.
  • The A/V guy’s take on PyCon Pune
    “This is crazy!”, that was my reaction at some point in PyCon Pune. This is one of my first conference where I participated in a lot of things starting from the website to audio/video and of course being the speaker. I saw a lot of aspects of how a conference works and where what can go wrong. I met some amazing people, people who impacted my life , people who I will never forget. I received so much of love and affection that I can never express in words. So before writing anything else I want to thank each and everyone of you , “Thank you!”.
  • Azure Service Fabric takes first tentative steps toward open source [Ed: Microsoft Peter is openwashing a patent trap with back doors]
  • Simulate the Internet with Flashback, a New WebDev Test Tool from LinkedIn
  • Mashape Raises $18M for API Gateway Tech
    Casado sees Mashape's Kong API gateway in particular as being a particularly well positioned technology. Kong is an open-source API gateway and microservice management technology.
  • PrismTech to Demonstrate Open Source FACE 2.1 Transport Services Segment (TSS) Reference Implementation at Air Force FACE Technical Interchange Meeting
    PrismTech’s TSS reference implementation is being made available under GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL) v3 open source license terms.
  • How Open-Source Robotics Hardware Is Accelerating Research and Innovation

    The latest issue of the IEEE Robotics & Automation Magazine features a special report on open-source robotics hardware and its impact in the field.