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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 29 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Titlesort icon Author Replies Last Post
Story KDE Telepathy Sprint Rianne Schestowitz 29/04/2014 - 8:06pm
Story KDE Thanks Rob Levin srlinuxx 19/09/2006 - 1:58pm
Story KDE TimeVault Progress Update srlinuxx 14/12/2009 - 10:57pm
Story KDE tip - speed up KDE launch time srlinuxx 15/05/2007 - 9:21pm
Story KDE tip - taking screenshots srlinuxx 09/05/2007 - 8:16pm
Story KDE Tip for SLED10 srlinuxx 30/07/2006 - 1:17am
Story KDE to Appear at SCALE 6x srlinuxx 05/01/2008 - 6:38pm
Story KDE to Attend Freedesktop Summit 2014 Rianne Schestowitz 28/03/2014 - 9:41pm
Story KDE to be at Linuxtag 2007 srlinuxx 28/05/2007 - 6:36pm
Story kde to be default on opensuse? srlinuxx 03/08/2009 - 3:16pm

Review: Ubuntu 7.10 Gutsy Gibbon (beta)

Filed under
Ubuntu

seopher: While I may be taking Seopher.com away from being completely Linux oriented, it's impossible for the impending release of Ubuntu 7.10 to be completely overlooked. Let's take a look at the newly released Gutsy Gibbon Beta to see quite how big a splash the Gibbon is going to make.

Capturing your screen with Istanbul

Filed under
HowTos

FOSSwire: Making video recordings of your screen can be very useful. If you’re trying to demo something to someone or just want to record something on your desktop, it can be an invaluable tool. One such program for recording your Linux (or other X11-based) desktop is Istanbul.

Also: Short Tip: Get file extension in Shell script

Applet Browser in libplasma

Filed under
KDE

Ivan Čukić: The Plasma Applet Browser is now integrated into the libplasma and it will be available in the next Beta that is going to be published on Wednesday. I’ve replaced the old drag-and-drop with a bit fancier stuff.

Also: Gallium3D, Shaders and LLVM

101 (36) reasons why Linux is better than Windows

Filed under
Linux

cityblogger.com: Many a times Windows users talk about what Windows can do but Linux can’t. To be fair, they need to know what Linux can do but Windows can’t.

UBIFS Writeback

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: UBIFS is described as, "a new flash file system which is designed to work on top of UBI." It has replaced the JFFS3 project, a choice explained on the project webpage, "we have realized that creating a scalable flash file system on top of bare flash is a difficult task, just because the flash media is so problematic (wear-leveling, bad eraseblocks).

Smolt towards other distributions; KnetworkManager devel version 0.7

Filed under
Software

liquidat: Smolt got a new project home page outside the Fedora project, making a step further towards other distributions. Also, KNetworkManager, the KDE tool for NetworkManager, was released in a new development branch which works with the new NM 0.7.

Open Source Software for Corporate IT

Filed under
OSS

opensource.sys-con.com: Selecting open source software is often bewildering for corporate IT departments accustomed to commercial closed source software. Of all the choices, which ones are likely to meet business and technology requirements? The Enterprise Open Source Directory (www.eosdirectory.com) helps companies find the gems they need.

New Release of Zonbu imminent

Filed under
Linux

mrzonbu.wordpress: Great news - a MAJOR new Zonbu OS release should be arriving any day now and I’ve been playing with an early preview. It’s full of lots of changes and improvements.

The Progress Of The RadeonHD Driver

Filed under
Software

phoronix: It's going on two weeks since the RadeonHD driver was made available, which is AMD's sanctioned open-source driver for the Radeon X1000 (R500) and Radeon HD 2000 (R600) series (as well as future generations of AMD GPUs). In this time, we have seen some great progress made with this open-source driver and have a few additional remarks to share about its status and the first bits of this driver's roadmap.

Linux and Me, Part 1: Distros and life beyond Windows

Filed under
Linux

carsonspost.wordpress: A year ago I had the frightening Windows realization that between Anti-Virus, Firewall and Defender (what does it do?) software, my PC was still not secure. I had a couple of days of stress as I tried to unload some ugly spyware. I found this really upsetting, unbelievably frustrating and that was the point where I no longer trusted Windows.

Taoism of open source

Filed under
OSS

linux.com: Confucius say, "Lao-tzu has passed us the Tao. In his mouth, there are no teeth but only a tongue. The hard ones (teeth) died, but the soft one (the tongue) lives; the soft power is stronger than the hard power. That's the Tao!" Open source is such a soft power.

Merging the iwlwifi Wireless Driver

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: "It doesn't seem to pull any dependency nor affect any other external piece of code unless I'm missing something, so it's a perfect example of what we've been discussing back then: there is just no point not merging it at any time right ? :-)"

Also: Out of Memory Notification

Skype dev plans: GUI-less Skype for Linux and more

Filed under
Software

zdnet blogs: Last night at the Skype Developer Open House in San Jose, Skype presented the public roadmap for its API (Application Programming Interface) which outlines plans for a Web service API for Skype and the open sourcing of Skype4Com.

Customized spins of Fedora

Filed under
Linux

Red Hat Mag: When Fedora 7 was released, one of the big features that we talked about was the idea of customized spins of the distribution. Now that Fedora 8 is on the way, it’s useful to look and see how we have done, and what sort of custom spins have been created.

Liquid rescale feature now available as a GIMP plugin

Filed under
Software

All About Linux: One month back I had written about a content aware image rescaling technology. And I hoped that this technology will be incorporated in Gimp in the future. Well we didn't have to wait that long.

Does this script work for you?

Filed under
Software

SearchEnterpriseLinux blog: The script “survf” monitors a file so you can check whether this file is growing (e.g. during ftp transfer). If you link it to the name “survp,” it monitors a running process… when the process terminates it sounds a bell and terminates.

Ubuntu Gutsy Upgrade

Filed under
Ubuntu

the crumb: Tonight I updated my Ubuntu install to the latest Gutsy beta (7.10). So far so good. This is the first upgrade I’ve done where it correctly set my widescreen monitor resolution.

Need for security driving open-source use

Filed under
OSS

inquirer.net: Security is the number one reason why end-users deploy open-source software, according to a recent survey by research analyst IDC. Results suggest end-users in India and China deploy more open-source more than in Australia and Korea.

Also: IT Survival Guide: Exercise Caution Amid Open Source Options
And: Open source test successful

Kopete Onions

Filed under
KDE

Jucato’s blog: I have a somewhat indifferent attitude towards Kopete. I use it just because it happens to be the only viable one among its peers, but it most probably wouldn’t be my messaging client of choice if I were to find a better KDE alternative. But a few days ago, someone gave me a reason to love Kopete a bit more. Introducing Onion 75!

Also: Who wants to be a Kopete developer?

A Microsoft Windows / Linux Conspiracy Theory

Filed under
OS

Chris Pirillo: I think Microsoft has given up on Vista behind the scenes. I’m sending this via email because well, I know it sounds like tinfoil hat time, but I think there’s some validity to it.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

  • Anonymous Open Source Projects
    He made it clear he is not advocating for this view, just a thought experiment. I had, well, a few thoughts on this. I tend to think of open source projects in three broad buckets. Firstly, we have the overall workflow in which the community works together to build things. This is your code review processes, issue management, translations workflow, event strategy, governance, and other pieces. Secondly, there are the individual contributions. This is how we assess what we want to build, what quality looks like, how we build modularity, and other elements. Thirdly, there is identity which covers the identity of the project and the individuals who contribute to it. Solomon taps into this third component.
  • Ostatic and Archphile Are Dead
    I’ve been meaning to write about the demise of Ostatic for a month or so now, but it’s not easy to put together an article when you have absolutely no facts. I first noticed the site was gone a month or so back, when an attempt to reach it turned up one of those “this site can’t be reached” error messages. With a little checking, I was able to verify that the site has indeed gone dark, with writers for the site evidently losing access to their content without notice. Other than that, I’ve been able to find out nothing. Even the site’s ownership is shrouded in mystery. The domain name is registered to OStatic Inc, but with absolutely no information about who’s behind the corporation, which has a listed address of 500 Beale Street in San Francisco. I made an attempt to reach someone using the telephone number included in the results of a “whois” search, but have never received a reply from the voicemail message I left. Back in the days when FOSS Force was first getting cranked up, Ostatic was something of a goto site for news and commentary on Linux and open source. This hasn’t been so true lately, although Susan Linton — the original publisher of Tux Machines — continued to post her informative and entertaining news roundup column on the site until early February — presumably until the end. I’ve reached out to Ms. Linton, hoping to find out more about the demise of Ostatic, but haven’t received a reply. Her column will certainly be missed.
  • This Week In Creative Commons History
    Since I'm here at the Creative Commons 2017 Global Summit this weekend, I want to take a break from our usual Techdirt history posts and highlight the new State Of The Commons report that has been released. These annual reports are a key part of the CC community — here at Techdirt, most of our readers already understand the importance of the free culture licensing options that CC provides to creators, but it's important to step back and look at just how much content is being created and shared thanks to this system. It also provides some good insight into exactly how people are using CC licenses, through both data and (moreso than in previous years) close-up case studies. In the coming week we'll be taking a deeper dive into some of the specifics of the report and this year's summit, but for now I want to highlight a few key points — and encourage you to check out the full report for yourself.
  • ASU’s open-source 'library of the stars' to be enhanced by NSF grant
  • ASU wins record 14 NSF career awards
    Arizona State University has earned 14 National Science Foundation early career faculty awards, ranking second among all university recipients for 2017 and setting an ASU record. The awards total $7 million in funding for the ASU researchers over five years.

R1Soft's Backup Backport, TrustZone CryptoCell in Linux

  • CloudLinux 6 Gets New Beta Kernel to Backport a Fix for R1Soft's Backup Solution
    After announcing earlier this week the availability of a new Beta kernel for CloudLinux 7 and CloudLinux 6 Hybrid users, CloudLinux's Mykola Naugolnyi is now informing us about the release of a Beta kernel for CloudLinux 6 users. The updated CloudLinux 6 Beta kernel is tagged as build 2.6.32-673.26.1.lve1.4.26 and it's here to replace kernel 2.6.32-673.26.1.lve1.4.25. It is available right now for download from CloudLinux's updates-testing repository and backports a fix (CKSIX-109) for R1Soft's backup solution from CloudLinux 7's kernel.
  • Linux 4.12 To Begin Supporting TrustZone CryptoCell
    The upcoming Linux 4.12 kernel cycle plans to introduce support for CryptoCell hardware within ARM's TrustZone.

Lakka 2.0 stable release!

After 6 months of community testing, we are proud to announce Lakka 2.0! This new version of Lakka is based on LibreELEC instead of OpenELEC. Almost every package has been updated! We are now using RetroArch 1.5.0, which includes so many changes that listing everything in a single blogpost is rather difficult. Read more Also: LibreELEC-Based Lakka 2.0 Officially Released with Raspberry Pi Zero W Support

Leftovers: Gaming