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Thursday, 22 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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First look: OpenSUSE 11.1 beta 3 very promising

Filed under
SUSE

arstechnica.com: OpenSUSE 11.1 beta 3 offers some nice improvements and comes with the latest versions of popular open source software programs.

On the wife’s computer - Ubuntu does it again

Filed under
Ubuntu

education.zdnet: As you probably remember, an increasingly kludgy Vista Home Premium install finally irritated us enough that I installed OpenSUSE. The install went fine, but without a lot of fiddling, the Broadcom wireless card just wasn’t going to do its thing. Then I couldn’t resist pulling out the Ubuntu CD.

Linux Gaming Console Coming in November

ostatic.com: Envizions Computer Entertainment announced recently that the Linux-based EVO gaming console will be available for sale November 18. If anything, this release will heat up the "Linux isn't an operating system for gaming" chorus.

Is Linux really worth USD $10 billion?

Filed under
Linux

openSUSE 11.1 Beta 3 My first shot

Filed under
SUSE

benkevan.com: As you may have read, openSUSE 11.1 was realeased and was shipped with KDE 4.1.2. My installation was simple, I actually did a sudo zypper dup From openSUSE 11.0. I ran it a few times, and after a while all was updated.

Open Movie Editor: Linux Video Editor with Plot Twists

Filed under
Software

ostatic.com: A common lament from home videographers is that Linux lacks video editors. It's not exactly true. There's another alternative for those needing a basic video editor. Open Movie Editor seems plain compared to Kino, but works with more file formats (with fewer hassles).

Drizzle: Ahead of the Storm

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Software

redmonk.com: So Tim is sold on Drizzle. Well, to paraphrase Shrek, “join the club, we’ve got jackets.” For a while now, I’ve been keeping tabs on the progress of the MySQL fork, because it could be argued that it’s the most interesting - and important - project going.

Ubuntu explains OpenOffice.org 3.0 decision

Filed under
Interviews
OOo
Ubuntu

tectonic.co.za: The Ubuntu team has decided that instead of OpenOffice.org 3.0, released last week, the default version of the office suite in the Ubuntu 8.10 release will be OpenOffice.org 2.4.1. It’s not a decision that many Ubuntu fans are happy with.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • KOffice 2.0 Beta 2 Released

  • Qt Gets Prettied Up
  • First look: Mozilla's mobile Fennec browser
  • Bill Gates founds a new tech company
  • Pidgin 2.5.1 (GNOME)
  • Open Source to the Rescue
  • Support the Free Software Foundation’s high-priority list campaign
  • On Opera patch day, a new zero-day flaw
  • Hands on: Toshiba NB100 netbook review
  • Van Dam Iron Works vacillates between Linux and Windows
  • Memory issues: Firefox 3.0.2 and Mandriva 2008.1
  • Screencast: gnome-do v0.5 for Fedora 10
  • Open Source Gets Into Wall St. Back Office
  • SilverStone Sugo SG04 (pc case)
  • Open shop on GNOME 3.0 planning
  • Straightening Out Some Silly Stuff Being Written About Apple v. Psystar

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Hands-on Hadoop for cluster computing

  • How to Convert .FLAC to .MP3 In Ubuntu
  • Awesome-menu in Awesome Window Manager
  • Multiple keyboard layouts in XFCE... and outside it
  • Performance tuning with System Control (sysctl) in Ubuntu
  • Adjust the fan speed on you NVida graphics card
  • Using bootchart to capture your boot process openSUSE 11
  • HOWTO : Penguinzilla (DRBL) on Ubuntu 8.04.1
  • Kubuntu Intrepid Dual Monitor Blinking
  • Changing Default OS On Dual-Boot System (Ubuntu)

Microsoft's global anti-user day

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Microsoft

fsf.org/blogs: Software companies like Microsoft often refer to copying they don't approve of as "piracy." They suggest that such copying is ethically equivalent to murder and robbery. Even these far-fetched analogies are not enough for Microsoft, who in their press release yesterday updated the comparison to draw a connection between such copying and organized crime.

The compelling economics of Linux: What it means for the future of computing

Filed under
Linux

Jim Zemlin: Today the Linux Foundation issued a report looking at the value of the Linux platform in terms of code. Although it wasn’t specifically covered in this paper it is also worth applying the economics of Linux to one of the fastest growing segments of technology; mobile devices, consumer electronics and low cost netbooks. This is the future of Linux.

Intrepid Gets Ready with Two More System Tools

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Ubuntu

quicktweaks.com: Canonical, the distributor of Ubuntu OS, is often blamed for not listening the community such as ignoring the request for changing/improving default appearance. But not this time. Ever since they launched brainstorm.ubuntu.com, they have been very responsive about what the Ubuntu fans want. As a result of this Intrepid Ibex, which is due to release on 30th of this month, will be packed with two very useful system tools.

7 Linux Tools For A Better Google Experience

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Software

hehe2.net: Google has changed our lives permanently, no one can deny it. The amount of innovation it brings to the table is almost dizzying. Here you will find some great apps and tools that will generally improve your experience on your preferred Linux desktop.

Linux.conf.au hits domain disaster

Filed under
Linux
Web

zdnet.com.au: The website of Australia's annual Linux conference has become temporarily inaccessible scant months before the event because of policy confusion over whether or not it is allowed to use its long-standing domain name.

Netbook runs Debian on China-made CPU

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

linuxdevices.com: A Chinese vendor of microprocessors and computer systems will reportedly soon ship a low-cost "netbook" with an 8.9-inch display, Debian Linux-based software, and a Chinese-made processor.

Enhance Your Clipboard with a Clipboard Manager

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Software

tombuntu.com: The clipboard system in Linux (X11 to be more specific) recives complaints from users who expect it to work differently when applications are closed. The problem is that when content is copied from an application and the application is closed, the clipboard item will be cleared. I ran into this problem recently.

Intrepid Lands On My Workstation

Filed under
Ubuntu

thelinuxlink.net: Yeah, I know it is still a few days off from official release, but true to form, I grabbed it for my workstation at work before the rush. I simply changed my /etc/apt/source.list to point from hardy to intrepid, sudo aptitude update, sudo aptitude dist-upgrade and about an hour later I was rebooting.

Think Firefox 3 is fast? Try Firefox Minefield

Filed under
Moz/FF

news.cnet: A colleague today showed me a cool, new browser that he's been using to browse the web at blisteringly fast speeds. The browser? Minefield. The author of the code? Mozilla.

Simply Mepis 8 Keeps Getting Better

Filed under
Linux

preacherpen.wordpress: Linux powers both of my computers, and Simply Mepis is the distribution of choice for many reasons. I have been using Simply Mepis several years, and and have no desire to even test other distros; there were some brief stints with Linux Mint and PCLOS, but Mepis is my OS.

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More in Tux Machines

Events: FOSDEM Samba Talks, USENIX Enigma, LCA (linux.conf.au) and FAST18

  • Authentication and authorization in Samba 4
    Volker Lendecke is one of the first contributors to Samba, having submitted his first patches in 1994. In addition to developing other important file-sharing tools, he's heavily involved in development of the winbind service, which is implemented in winbindd. Although the core Active Directory (AD) domain controller (DC) code was written by his colleague Stefan Metzmacher, winbind is a crucial component of Samba's AD functionality. In his information-packed talk at FOSDEM 2018, Lendecke said he aimed to give a high-level overview of what AD and Samba authentication is, and in particular the communication pathways and trust relationships between the parts of Samba that authenticate a Samba user in an AD environment.
  • Two FOSDEM talks on Samba 4
    Much as some of us would love never to have to deal with Windows, it exists. It wants to authenticate its users and share resources like files and printers over the network. Although many enterprises use Microsoft tools to do this, there is a free alternative, in the form of Samba. While Samba 3 has been happily providing authentication along with file and print sharing to Windows clients for many years, the Microsoft world has been slowly moving toward Active Directory (AD). Meanwhile, Samba 4, which adds a free reimplementation of AD on Linux, has been increasingly ready for deployment. Three short talks at FOSDEM 2018 provided three different views of Samba 4, also known as Samba-AD, and left behind a pretty clear picture that Samba 4 is truly ready for use. I will cover the first two talks in this article, and the third in a later one.
  • A report from the Enigma conference
    The 2018 USENIX Enigma conference was held for the third time in January. Among many interesting talks, three presentations dealing with human security behaviors stood out. This article covers the key messages of these talks, namely the finding that humans are social in their security behaviors: their decision to adopt a good security practice is hardly ever an isolated decision. Security conferences tend to be dominated by security researchers demonstrating their latest exploits. The talks are attack-oriented, they keep a narrow focus, and usually they close with a dark outlook. The security industry has been doing security conferences like this for twenty years and seems to prefer this format. Yet, if you are tired of this style, the annual USENIX Enigma conference is a welcome change of pace. Most of the talks are defense-oriented, they have a horizon going far beyond technology alone, and they are generally focused on successful solutions.
  • DIY biology
    A scientist with a rather unusual name, Meow-Ludo Meow-Meow, gave a talk at linux.conf.au 2018 about the current trends in "do it yourself" (DIY) biology or "biohacking". He is perhaps most famous for being prosecuted for implanting an Opal card RFID chip into his hand; the Opal card is used for public transportation fares in Sydney. He gave more details about his implant as well as describing some other biohacking projects in an engaging presentation. Meow-Meow is a politician with the Australian Science Party, he said by way of introduction; he has run in the last two elections. He founded BioFoundry, which is "Australia's first open-access molecular biology lab"; there are now two such labs in the country. He is also speaks frequently as "an emerging technology evangelist" for biology as well as other topics.
  • Notes from FAST18

    I attended the technical sessions of Usenix's File And Storage Technology conference this week. Below the fold, notes on the papers that caught my attention.

Security: Vista10 and uTorrent Holes Found by Google

  • Google drops new Edge zero-day as Microsoft misses 90-day deadline

    Google originally shared details of the flaw with Microsoft on 17 November 2017, but Microsoft wasn’t able to come up with a patch within Google’s non-negotiable “you have 90 days to do this” period.

  • Google Goes Public with Another Major Windows 10 Bug
    After revealing an Edge browser vulnerability that Microsoft failed to fix, Google is now back with another disclosure, this time aimed at Windows 10 Fall Creators Update (version 1709), but potentially affecting other Windows versions as well. James Forshaw, a security researcher that’s part of Google’s Project Zero program, says the elevation of privilege vulnerability can be exploited because of the way the operating system handles calls to Advanced Local Procedure Call (ALPC). This means a standard user could obtain administrator privileges on a Windows 10 computer, which in the case of an attack, could eventually lead to full control over the impacted system. But as Neowin noted, this is the second bug discovered in the same function, and both of them, labeled as 1427 and 1428, were reported to Microsoft on November 10, 2017. Microsoft said it fixed them with the release of the February 2018 Patch Tuesday updates, yet as it turns out, only issue 1427 was addressed.
  • uTorrent bugs let websites control your computer and steal your downloads

    The vulnerabilities, according to Project Zero, make it possible for any website a user visits to control key functions in both the uTorrent desktop app for Windows and in uTorrent Web, an alternative to desktop BitTorrent apps that uses a web interface and is controlled by a browser. The biggest threat is posed by malicious sites that could exploit the flaw to download malicious code into the Windows startup folder, where it will be automatically run the next time the computer boots up. Any site a user visits can also access downloaded files and browse download histories.

  • BitTorrent Client uTorrent Suffers Security Vulnerability (Updated)

    BitTorrent client uTorrent is suffering from an as yet undisclosed vulnerability. The security flaw was discovered by Google security researcher Tavis Ormandy, who previously said he would reveal a series of "remote code execution flaws" in torrent clients. BitTorrent Inc. has rolled out a 'patch' in the latest Beta release and hopes to fix the stable uTorrent client later this week.

Red Hat introduces updated decision management platform

Troubleshoot a network? No problem. Write a 3,000 word article on Kubernetes cloud container management? When do you want it. Talk to a few hundred people about Linux's history? Been there, done that. Manage a business's delivery routing and shift scheduling? I'll break out in a cold sweat. If you too find the nuts and bolts of business processing management a nightmare, you'll want to check out Red Hat's latest program: Red Hat Decision Manager 7. Read more

KDE Says Its Next Plasma Desktop Release Will Start a Full Second Faster

According to the developer, the upcoming KDE Plasma 5.13 desktop environment release will start a full second faster than previous versions because of the removal of the QmlObjectIncubationController component, which apparently slowed down the entire desktop, and promises to let users pin apps on the panel that contain spaces in their desktop file names. Goodies are also coming to the upcoming KDE Applications 18.04 software suite this spring, which makes creating of new files with the Dolphin file manager instantaneous, improves drag-and-drop support from Spectacle to Chromium, and lets users configure the Gwenview image viewer to no longer display the image action buttons on thumbnails when they hover with the mouse cursor over them. Read more