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Monday, 29 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 21/05/2015 - 8:33pm
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Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 02/06/2015 - 1:10pm

Why Linux STILL runs faster than Windows

Filed under
Linux

The difference between the two operating systems and what really makes the hair split is the underlying design philosophy that went into creating these essential parts of our computing experience.

is GNU/Linux for you? Probably not

Filed under
Linux

From time to time, it is not uncommon to encounter a confession on the net, a bleating essay that says "I can't run Linux, though I'd love to", and advances a host of assorted "reasons" for this act of commission.

Linux Gazette March 2007 (#136) Issue Ready

Filed under
Linux

This month's Linux Gazette is online and ready to read. Some highlights include A Beginner's Guide to Dual Booting Linux Mint and Windows XP, Interview: Orv Beach, and Keymap and IOCTLs.

The Road to KDE 4: Dolphin and Konqueror

Filed under
KDE

As some of you who monitor the KDE news sphere may have noticed, there has been a recent addition to the kdebase module. The Dolphin File Manager has been added to complement Konqueror's browsing capabilities. Read on for more information about this new File Manager and its relationship to Konqueror and the rest of KDE.

Pimp My Boot Process

Filed under
HowTos

A few weeks ago I tried to improve the visual appearance of my boot process using usplash and a matching grub splash theme. Since creating usplash themes is rather tricky and not really suitable for the average user I decided to switch to splashy. So here is my current solution for a nice bootup:

How to build a live Fedora CD using Kadischi

Filed under
HowTos

Kadischi was created in 2005 by Darko Ilic specifically for creating Fedora based Live CDs. Although it is still in active early development, it is still quite usable. What this means to the average user, is that there currently are not any RPMs for Kadischi; it is only downloadable from CVS. Fear not, this is covered below, and it’s quite easy to build.

Novell has loss, missing Wall Street target

Filed under
SUSE

Novell Inc. reported a quarterly loss on Thursday, missing Wall Street forecasts as the business software maker's sales fell and it took a charge for a consulting unit that it aims to sell.

Why console apps still rock

Filed under
Software

I know there’s a portion of Ubuntu (and other distro) users who resent six virtual consoles running at a time, in addition to the X desktop in a default Ubuntu setup. I would agree that six is probably overkill, but removing them completely would be nuts.

Playing Classic Games

Filed under
Gaming

Many of us do still remember the Alley Cat and Mario and Contra and other classic games we used to play whether on Nintendo NES or DOS or SNES, these games were simple compared to todays games but were very entertaining nonetheless. In this article i describe how to play these games on your Ubuntu box.

Any objections? For Open XML standard, yes (still)

Filed under
Microsoft

Microsoft Corp.’s Open XML file format cleared a small hurdle Wednesday, after documents released by the International Organisation for Standardization (ISO) showed fewer countries harboring strong objections than had been expected.

Fosdem Slides Highlight New openSUSE Features

Filed under
SUSE

Andreas Jaeger presented slides at Fosdem 2007 on highlights of the major new features of openSUSE 10.3. One idea is to provide a minimal install of a base system and complete the remaining over the network to reduce downloading and media waste. Other key areas are performance improvements and early KDE 4 adoption.

Allowing Limited Sudo Access With Visudo

Filed under
HowTos

If you’ve used your Ubuntu machine for more than a week you’ve probably run into the sudo command. Now what happens when you have another user on that machine that needs certain superuser privileges but you don’t want to give them FULL access?

Fedora cleans its repositories, considers move to Free Software

Filed under
Linux

The Red Hat-sponsored Fedora project is undergoing several changes before the release of its next version. In preparation for Fedora 7, which will fuse the Core and Extra software repositories, Fedora's developers are auditing the repositories for non-free and non-open software that doesn't meet the project's guidelines. Eventually, the project may change its package guidelines to only allow Free Software.

Choice or Chaos? The High Cost of Linux Fragmentation

Filed under
Linux

Freedom of choice is one of the great benefits of Open Source Software in general and Linux in particular. However, a couple of announcements this week seem to indicate that market value of freedom of choice has dipped considerably. The biggest hurdle Linux adoption faced this week wasn't Microsoft, it was an enemy from within: Linux fragmentation.

Don’t Use Yum To Update To Fedora 7!

Filed under
Linux

The update from one Fedora version to the next by yum was never officially supported - however, given that you were brave enough it could work out. However, for the next Fedora version you shouldn’t try it because you might even make your system unbootable!

PCLinuxOS Magazine March 2007 Issue 7 Released!

Filed under
PCLOS

It is my privilege to announce on behalf of the team members of the PCLinuxOS Magazine Project sponsored by MyPCLinuxOS.com, the March 2007 issue (#7)  is available for download!  Our previous issues can also be downloaded.

Mozilla Firefox Wins Anti-Spam Award

Filed under
Moz/FF

Mozilla Firefox, a free, open-source web browser for Windows, Linux and Mac OS X, has long had a loyal cult following. Now Datamation’s readers have taken notice, choosing Firefox – narrowly – to win its Product of the Year award in the Anti-Spam category.

Eric Raymond: Yes, "open source" is still meaningful

Filed under
OSS

Writing in O'Reilly's Radar, Nat Torkington argues that the term "open source" is becoming meaningless. He points to SugarCRM's badgeware, through which, he claims, only two-thirds of their code is downloadable, and rPath and MontaVista, which "sell software that works on Linux but the software itself isn't actually open source."

Using squidGuard for content filtering

Filed under
HowTos

Content filtering for the Web can be a messy proposition. A business may need to block only the most objectionable Web sites, while schools may be required by law to follow a more thorough process. Whatever your needs, you can build a solution with only open source pieces: squid, squidGuard, and blacklists.

Dell censors IdeaStorm Linux dissent

Filed under
Linux

It seems pointless seeking ideas and feedback if you’re going to ignore and delete the ones you don’t like. That’s exactly what Dell is doing with its IdeaStorm web site, which has been set up by the company to solicit ideas and feedback.

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More in Tux Machines

Avidemux 2.6.13 Open-Source Video Editor Gets AAC/ADTS Import and Export

The developers of the Avidemux open-source and cross-platform video editor software have announced a new maintenance update in the 2.6 series, bringing multiple improvements, bug fixes, and a handful of new features. Read more

5 Best Linux Distros for Security

Security is nothing new to Linux distributions. Linux distros have always emphasized security and related matters like firewalls, penetration testing, anonymity, and privacy. So it is hardly surprising that security conscious distributions are common place. For instance, Distrowatch lists sixteen distros that specialize in firewalls, and four for privacy. Most of these specialty security distributions, however, share the same drawback: they are tools for experts, not average users. Only recently have security distributions tried to make security features generally accessible for desktop users. Read more

Linux Foundation and Linux

  • How IoTivity and AllJoyn Could Combine
    At the Embedded Linux Conference in April, Open Connectivity Foundation (OCF) Executive Director Mike Richmond concluded his keynote on the potential for interoperability between the OCF’s IoTivity IoT framework and the AllSeen Alliance’s AllJoyn spec by inviting to the stage Greg Burns, the chief architect of AllJoyn. Burns briefly shared his opinion that not only was there no major technical obstacle to combining these two major open source IoT specs, but that by taking the best of both standards, a hybrid could emerge that improves upon both. Later in the day, Burns gave a technical overview of how such a hybrid could be crafted in “Evolving a Best-of-Breed IoT Framework.” (See video below.) Burns stated in both talks that his opinions in no way reflect the official position of OCF or the AllSeen Alliance. At the time of the ELC talk in April, Burns had recently left his job as VP of Engineering at Qualcomm and Chair of the Technical Steering Committee at the AllSeen Alliance to take on the position of Chief IoT Software Technologist in the Open Source Technology Center at Intel Corp.
  • ​Linus Torvalds' love-hate relationship with the GPL
    Linux's founder appreciates what the GNU General Public License has given Linux, but he doesn't appreciate how some open-source lawyers are trying to enforce it in court.
  • Linus Torvalds reflects on 25 years of Linux
    LinuxCon North America concluded in Toronto, Canada on August 25th, the day Linux was celebrating its 25th anniversary. Linus Torvalds, the creator of Linux, and Dirk Hohndel, VP and chief of open source at VMware, sat down for a conversation at the event and reflected upon the past 25 years. Here are some of the highlights of that conversation.
  • 6 things you should know from Linux's first 25 years
    Red Hat was founded in 1993, two years after Linux was announced and the company has been one of the top contributors to Linux. There is a symbiotic relationship between the company and the project. Whitehurst pointed out that it’s hard to talk about the history of Red Hat without talking about Linux and vice versa.
  • There Is Talk Of Resuming OpenChrome VIA KMS/DRM Driver Development
    Two or so years back or so it was looking hopeful that the mainline Linux kernel would finally have a proper VIA DRM/KMS driver for the unfortunate ones still have VIA x86 hardware and using the integrated graphics. However, that work was ultimately abandoned but there is talk of it being restored.

Security News

  • New FairWare Ransomware targeting Linux Computers [Ed: probably just a side effect of keeping servers unpatched]
    A new attack called FaireWare Ransomware is targeting Linux users where the attackers hack a Linux server, delete the web folder, and then demand a ransom payment of two bitcoins to get their files back. In this attack, the attackers most likely do not encrypt the files, and if they do retain the files, probably just upload it to a server under their control.
  • How do we explain email to an "expert"?
    This has been a pretty wild week, more wild than usual I think we can all agree. The topic I found the most interesting wasn't about one of the countless 0day flaws, it was a story from Slate titled: In Praise of the Private Email Server The TL;DR says running your own email server is a great idea. Almost everyone came out proclaiming it a terrible idea. I agree it's a terrible idea, but this also got me thinking. How do you explain this to someone who doesn't really understand what's going on? There are three primary groups of people. 1) People who know they know nothing 2) People who think they're experts 3) People who are actually experts
  • Why the term “zero day” needs to be in your brand’s cybersecurity vocabulary
    Linux is “open source” which means anyone can look at the code and point out flaws. In that sense, I’d say Linus Torvalds doesn’t have to be as omniscient as Tim Cook. Linux source code isn’t hidden behind closed doors. My understanding is, all the Linux code is out there for anyone to see, naked for anyone to scrutinize, which is why certain countries feel safer using it–there’s no hidden agenda or secret “back door” lurking in the shadows. Does that mean Android phones are safer? That’s up for debate.