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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 24 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Titlesort icon Author Replies Last Post
Story How To Utilize Your New Multimedia Keyboard Under Linux srlinuxx 1 27/04/2007 - 6:47pm
Story How To Utilize Your New Multimedia Keyboard Under Linux srlinuxx 06/07/2007 - 3:00pm
Story How to Watch Free TV Shows on Ubuntu srlinuxx 19/06/2012 - 6:05pm
Story How To Write a Good Howto srlinuxx 29/09/2006 - 4:41pm
Story How to write into NTFS partition srlinuxx 03/09/2007 - 5:19pm
Story How to write SD cards for the Raspberry Pi Rianne Schestowitz 15/03/2017 - 9:03pm
Story How to write your book using Linux srlinuxx 05/11/2013 - 7:21pm
Story How To: Back up your DVDs in Ubuntu srlinuxx 28/03/2006 - 5:13am
Story How To: Burn DVD’s from the command line srlinuxx 04/06/2006 - 12:37am
Story HOW TO: choose the best version of Linux srlinuxx 04/03/2009 - 11:27am

Popularity VS Usability

Filed under
Linux

linuxgeeksunited.blogspot: We see blog posts and articles everywhere. They proclaim that Distro X has the most users. Distro B has the most hits on a site that lists distros. Distro C is the top because Linus or some other "Geek God" prefers it.

Ubuntu: Understanding The Media Codec Problems

Filed under
Software
Ubuntu

doctormo.wordpress: My problem is how he is lumping MP3 encoding and decoding into the closed-source pile and this is something that frustrates me terribly.

Qimo does it right

Filed under
Linux

kmandla.wordpress: I finally gave Qimo a turn a day or two ago. Nicely done, and that’s really all that can be said.

Essential Linux tools for the PC technician

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Recently, I blogged that every good IT technician really needs Linux in their toolkit – even if you're strictly a Windows shop. Here are more good reasons why a bootable Linux CD can really save your bacon including indispensable tools you must have.

PCLinuxOS 2009.1 - a worthy successor

Filed under
PCLOS

wamukota.blogspot: As one might expect from PCLinuxOS, the LiveCD allows an easy HD install and within a matter of minutes, you have PCLinux2009.1 running.

ext4, application expectations and power management

Filed under
Software

advogato.org/mjg59: There's been a certain amount of discussion about behavioural differences between ext3 and ext4[1], most notably due to ext4's increased window of opportunity for files to end up empty due to both a longer commit window and delayed allocation of blocks in order to obtain a more pleasing on-disk layout.

fwbuilder: Manage Firewalls Professionally

Filed under
Software

debaday.debian.net: Everyone knows about netfilter/iptables. Unfortunately, managing a security policy with it remains a non-trivial task for several reasons. What is needed is a tool that lets an administrator define the security policy on a higher level of abstraction and hide the internal structure of the target firewall platform.

Why is Ubuntu the most popular distro?

Filed under
Ubuntu

manishtech.wordpress: I just came across a discussion on Reddit why Ubuntu is the most popular distro? Everyone who comes to know about Linux first hears about Ubuntu. Why is it so?

Using ATA Over Ethernet (AoE) On Debian Lenny (Initiator And Target)

Filed under
HowTos

some odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • NVIDIA Pushes Out New Driver With No Change-Log

  • SLED 11 RC 4 first glance
  • Create ODF documents without OpenOffice.org
  • Microsoft's Silverlight Gaffe
  • Wormux 0.8.3 released
  • Reason why people who work with computers have so much free time
  • Saving date and time to hardware clock manually
  • Interesting New Features in Ubuntu 9.04 Jaunty
  • Ubuntu Linux on Dell laptops
  • Install Chromium Browser on Arch Linux
  • We're Linux Video Contest Sad
  • Linux.com to Bring “Social Web” To Linux Geeks?
  • Vnc Configuration in Debian Etch/Lenny
  • Small tip - How to update / upgrade ArchLinux
  • FLOSS Weekly 60: BOINC
  • Converting avi files to dpg in Linux
  • Chromium on Ubuntu ! [HOW TO]

The Ill-Fated PCLinuxOS 2009.1 Experiment

Filed under
PCLOS

reddevil62-techhead.blogspot: PCLinuxOS 2009.1 was running beautifully. The installation from the live CD had retained the settings and I had completed all my usual post-install multimedia checks. So why, by all that's holy, did I think that switching on Compiz's 3D effects might be A Good Thing To Try?

Celebrating Linux's 15th birthday

Filed under
Linux

anarchangel.blogspot: The wife and I are celebrating the anniversary of Linux, by watching "RevolutionOS", streaming from Netflix to our TiVo.

Take the Linux Filesystem Tour

Filed under
Linux

tuxradar.com: Well, hello! Welcome to the Linux Filesystem Tour. My name is Manuel Page, and I will be your guide today. I and my bus driver, Hal D., are very pleased to have you on board.

PCLinuxOS: Radically simple and a bit boring for geeks

Filed under
PCLOS

osgeex.blogspot: Today I gave the new PCLinuxOS 2009.1 a spin and planned to write a review. The "Problem" with PCLinuxOS is: it actually is radically simple.

I love openSUSE

Filed under
SUSE

gogoboygo.com/blog: I’m a convert from Ubuntu, after several years with that distribution of Linux, and the difference between Ubuntu 8.10 and OpenSuse 11.1 is night and day.

Debian: Absence of a General Purpose installable CD or DVD Media

Filed under
Linux

pclinuxos2007.blogspot: Debian is the best, most stable, and the biggest community distro! No doubt about it. I liked its latest, Lenny very much. But all the way from downloading it and installing was not a joyride.

HackMy...phase II

For those of you who don't know, Hackmy... forums started out as a "advanced" forum for users of PCLinuxOS.

HackMy has moved to a new host and has a whole new look and goal though. Hackmy is now open to users of Linux, ANY distro.

First Look: PCLinuxOS 2009.1 GNOME

Filed under
PCLOS

news.softpedia.com: I used to be one of PCLinuxOS' fans and I especially enjoyed the GNOME flavor so hearing that the team was ready to finally launch a new version sparkled a lot of interest in me.

OzOS Linux - The Wizard or the Tinman?

Filed under
Linux

dedoimedo.com: I like exotic distributions. The promise of the beautiful E17 windows manager on top of the lightweight Xubuntu is what drew me to this little known distribution. Hence, this review.

15 Interesting Facts About the Linux Kernel

Filed under
Linux

junauza.com: Exactly 15 years ago, on March 1994, Linux kernel version 1.0.0 was humbly released for the world to tinker with. To celebrate the historic moment, I have collected some really interesting facts about the Linux kernel.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Foundation: New Members, Certifications and Microsoft Entryism

ETSI/GNU/Linux-based MANO

  • ETSI Open Source MANO announces Release FOUR, moving faster than ever
    ETSI is pleased to announce the availability of OSM Release FOUR. Bringing a large set of new features and enhancements, this version is the most ambitious and innovative OSM Release to date and constitutes a huge leap forward in terms of functionality, user experience and maturity. This new Release brings substantial progress thanks to a number of architectural improvements, which result in a more efficient behaviour and much leaner footprint – up to 75% less RAM consumption. Additionally, its new northbound interface, aligned with ETSI NFV work, and the brand-new cloud-native setup, facilitate OSM’s installation and operation, while making OSM more open and simpler to integrate with pluggable modules and external systems, such as the existing OSS.
  • Open Source MANO Release FOUR lands
    In monitoring, ETSI says OSM Release FOUR's alarm and metric settings are easier to use, and a new policy manager adds push notifications and reactive policy configuration, which the standards body says “opens the door to closed-loop operations”. The monitoring module uses Apache Kafka as its message passing bus, and the module also implements a flexible plugin model so sysadmins can BYO monitoring environment.

today's howtos part 2

Programming: GitLab, Security, Power and Jakarta EE

  • GitLab 10.8 open sources push mirroring
    GitLab 10.8 was released this week with the open sourcing of a highly requested feature. The company announced its push mirroring capability is now open sourced. Push mirroring was originally introduced as a paid feature, but GitLab says it is one of the most frequently requested to be moved into the open-source codebase. This move will add a few new use cases for GitLab Core users, such as freelance developers being able to mirror client repos and users migrating to GitLab being able to use push mirroring to ease the migration path.
  • How Security Can Bridge the Chasm with Development
    Enhancing the relationships between security and engineering is crucial for improving software security. These six steps will bring your teams together. There's always been a troublesome rift between enterprise security teams and software developers. While the friction is understandable, it's also a shame, because the chasm between these teams makes it all the more challenging to build quality applications that are both great to use and safe.
  • Which Programming Languages Use the Least Electricity?
    Can energy usage data tell us anything about the quality of our programming languages? Last year a team of six researchers in Portugal from three different universities decided to investigate this question, ultimately releasing a paper titled “Energy Efficiency Across Programming Languages.” They ran the solutions to 10 programming problems written in 27 different languages, while carefully monitoring how much electricity each one used — as well as its speed and memory usage.
  • How Java EE found new life as Jakarta EE
    The title of this post may seem strange, but if you look a bit into Java EE's recent history, it will make sense. Originally, Sun started and ran Java Enterprise Edition, and later Oracle took over after it acquired Sun. Specifications were driven by a Sun/Oracle-governed process. At more or less regular intervals, they made a new version of the specification available, which was implemented by the server vendors. Those vendors had to license the technology compatibility kits (TCKs) and brand from Oracle. Let's fast-forward a bit. In 2013, Java EE 7 was released, and Oracle began work on EE8, but it did not progress quickly. Meanwhile, new technologies like Docker and Kubernetes came along and changed the way applications run. Instead of running a single fat server process on a big machine, the software is now split into smaller, independent services that run in a (usually) Docker container orchestrated by Kubernetes.