Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Friday, 23 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Titlesort icon Author Replies Last Post
Story ​How to easily defeat Linux Encoder ransomware Roy Schestowitz 16/11/2015 - 6:40pm
Story This Album Is So Exclusive That Listeners Must Hack Linux To Hear It Roy Schestowitz 19/05/2014 - 6:42pm
Story Manjaro Linux 16.06 Preview Released Mohd Sohail 07/03/2016 - 4:31am
Story 10 projects to fork in 2016 Roy Schestowitz 29/12/2015 - 11:24am
Story 11 ways to get involved with Humanitarian FOSS Roy Schestowitz 18/02/2015 - 6:52pm
Story 12 open education videos for China Roy Schestowitz 18/09/2014 - 7:54am
Story 2014: Year of open source miracles Roy Schestowitz 25/11/2014 - 3:10pm
Story 2015: The year the UN resets the count Roy Schestowitz 07/01/2015 - 12:13pm
Story 3 Drupal education distros reviewed Roy Schestowitz 10/09/2014 - 7:10pm
Story 3 open source alternatives to Microsoft Publisher Roy Schestowitz 07/07/2016 - 8:34am

Red Hat News and New Fedora 27 Live ISOs

Filed under
Red Hat

Software: funny-manpages, Nginx, Cockpit and More

Filed under
Software
  • Have a Laugh With Funny Linux Man Pages

    There is a package unsurprisingly called funny-manpages and it adds some witty entries to the man pages.

  • HTTP/2 Server Push Directives Land in Nginx 1.13.9

    The open source Nginx 1.13.9 web server debuted today, providing support for a new HTTP/2 standard feature known as Server Push.

    The HTTP/2 web standard was completed three years ago in February 2015, with Nginx ahead of the curve in terms of HTTP/2 standard adoption. The NGINX Plus R7 release in September 2015 featured the first commercially supported enterprise-grade support provided by Nginx for HTTP/2.

  • Cockpit 162

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 162.

  • 6 Best Linux Music Players That Every User Must Try — (2018 Edition)

    Watching movies and playing music is one of the primary entertainment purposes served by our computers. So, when you move to a new operating system, it makes perfect sense if you look for useful media players. In the past, we’ve already told you about the best video players for Linux and, in this article, we’ll be telling you about the best music players for Linux-based operating systems. Let’s take a look at them:

  • CPod (formerly Cumulonimbus) – A Beautiful Podcast App

    Today, we introduce a somewhat new podcast application that is simple and yet delivers efficiently across all 3 desktop platforms.

    CPod, (formerly known as Cumulonimbus), is an electron-based podcast app player for audiobook and podcast lovers.

  • Apper 1.0.0 is out!

    Apper the package/apps manager based on PackageKit has got it’s 1.0.0 version on it’s 10th birthday!

  • VidCutter – Quickly Trim and Join Video Clips

    VidCutter is an open-source cross-platform video editor with which you can quickly trim and join video clips. It is Python and Qt5-based, uses FFmpeg for its encoding and decoding operations, and it supports all the popular video formats not excluding FLV, MP4, AVI, and MOV.

    VidCutter boasts a customizable User Interface that you can personalize using themes and a plethora of settings that you can tweak to make your video editing environment more appealing.

  • Weblate 2.19.1
  • Tusk Evernote Client Updated, Is Now Available as a Snap

    The Tusk Evernote client is now available as a Snap.

    We spotlighted the unofficial Evernote app last year, finding that it added to and improved on the standard Evernote web app in a number of ways.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

KDE: Calamares, Qt, KDE Bugzilla, Kdenlive, KWin

Filed under
KDE
  • A Day on Krypton

    It’s a bird! It’s a plane! No, it’s a shiny stable-yet-bleeding-edge KDE Plasma distro!

    Since Calamares has to run all over the place, and is used in derivatives of all of the “Big Five” Linux distributions, I regularly switch distro’s as a development platform. Also because I inevitably blow up the VM while running Calamares, or because an update renders the system useless. At FOSDEM I had the pleasure of chatting with the folks from the SUSE stand about OpenQA and OBS.

  • Exporting 3D content for Qt 3D with Blender

    At the heart of every 3D application is geometry. Qt 3D-based 3D applications are no different and require the user to either generate geometry or provide asset files for Qt 3D to load. This blog post demonstrates how Blender and its Python API could be used to write an exporter that generates geometry for Qt 3D.

  • KDE Receives Pineapple Fund Donation, Red Hat Decision Manager, Chef's InSpec 2.0 and More

    KDE has received a $200,000 donation from the Pineapple Fund: "With this donation, the Pineapple Fund recognizes that KDE as a community creates software which benefits the general public, advances the use of Free Software on all kinds of platforms, and protects users' privacy by putting first-class and easy to use tools in the hands of the people at zero cost."

  • KDAB’s City Lights Display with Qt 3D

    The City Lights demo is an example of Qt 3D being put to novel use to implement a deferred rendering pipeline.

  • It’s now much easier to be a bug triager

    We’ve just rolled out a significant and welcome policy change to KDE’s Bugzilla bug tracker: Everyone with an account may now edit any bug without prior permission. This means that every KDE Bugzilla user can now be a bug triager anytime they want!

  • New Kdenlive Beta is Available for Testing

    A new beta of Kdenlive the popular open source video editor is available for testing. The beta is based on a 'refactored' codebase and available as an App Image.

  • There's Experimental Work On A Vulkan Renderer For KDE's KWin

    There is an experimental branch of KDE's KWin window manager / compositor with support for Vulkan compositing.

    Over the past week Fredrik Höglund has begun work on KWin Vulkan support so this low-level, high-performance graphics API could be used for compositing rather than OpenGL. So far he charted out a lot of the fundamental Vulkan code and the necessary infrastructure work along with some basic features like for being able to render window shadows and porting some other window effects over to Vulkan.

KDE neon 5.12 review - Living on the edge

Filed under
KDE
Reviews

KDE neon 5.12 is a reasonable distro. It is MUCH better than Kubuntu Aardvark but not as sweet as my 2017 favorite, Zesty Zebra. That said, it had none of the horrible problems that I saw in the 17.10 release. It's fast, there were no real errors, you get multimedia playback out of the box, reasonable smartphone and network support, and the bleeding edge of what Plasma can deliver.

On the other hand, there are some really life-sapping annoyances in the system, which do not belong in year 2018, or even 2008 for that matter. Better hardware support is needed. The decorations need a cleanup. The software arsenal is thin. Discover needs a miracle. Overall, neon behaves like a developer-focused system, and it has that rough, test-commit feel about it. It does try to balance the best of all worlds - an LTS base combined with the latest Plasma, but that's no excuse for sloppy work or bugs.

It can do better, and we have the most splendid Kubuntu 17.04 as the golden benchmark from now on until the end of times, we few, we happy few, we band of geeks, for he who tests with me together, shall be my code brother, may his git ne'er be so vile, and the persons of all genders now in bed shall feel themselves accursed, and hold their VR sets cheap ... I think you get the idea. I got carried away. Let's summarize. KDE neon 5.12, fresh, cool, sleek, needs more apps, better package management, better overall peripheral support. But there's a lot of potential and hope, and I think we will see cool things in Plasma this year. 7.5/10. Worth checking.

Read more

More on GNU/Linux on Nintendo Switch

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Programming/Development: Rust, Google Summer Of Code 2018, COBOL, Python

Filed under
Development
  • Oxidizing Fedora: Try Rust and its applications today

    In recent years, it has become increasingly important to develop software that minimizes security vulnerabilities. Memory management bugs are a common cause of these vulnerabilities. To that end, the Mozilla community has spent the last several years building the Rust language and ecosystem which focuses primarily on eliminating those bugs. And Rust is available in Fedora today, along with a few applications in Fedora 27 and higher, as seen below.

  • This Week in Rust 222

    This is a weekly summary of its progress and community. Want something mentioned? Tweet us at @ThisWeekInRust or send us a pull request. Want to get involved? We love contributions.

  • Google Summer Of Code 2018 Larger Than Ever

    Google Summer of Code gives students an opportunity to make a substantive contribution to Open Source projects with the motto "Flip bits not burgers" has recruited more mentoring organizations than ever for its 13th year.

  • The Beauty of the COBOL Programming Language

    The first thing I needed in my journey to learn COBOL was an IDE. I am a big supporter of coding in an integrated development environment (IDE). I like being able to write, test and run code all in one place. Also, I find the support features that an IDE provides, such as visual code structure analysis, code completion and inline syntax checking, allow me to program and debug efficiently.

  • Clear Linux Is The Latest Distribution Figuring Out What To Do With Python 2

    While Python 3 has been around now for a decade, most Linux distributions are still working towards moving away from Python 2 and that includes Intel's Clear Linux distribution.

    Like with Ubuntu, Fedora, and others moving away their base packages from any Python 2 dependencies and moving them to Python 3, Clear Linux developers are working on the same. Arjan van de Ven of Intel provided an update on their Python 3 transitioning. By the end of 2018, but hopefully within the next six months, they hope to be at a point where their performance-oriented Linux distribution is "fully and only Python 3."

Graphics: Chai, Nouveau, Mesa and More

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Development On The Chai Mali T700 Open-Source GPU Driver To Resume

    Last year we covered the work on the project "Chai" as an open-source, reverse-engineered driver for Mali T700 series. After a hiatus, the lead developer is back working on the project.

    The developer on the project was previously just known as "Cafe Beverage", but this developer has come out today as Alyssa Rosenzweig.

  • Nouveau's NIR Support Inches Closer To TGSI Quality

    Longtime Nouveau contributor Karol Herbst joined Red Hat at the end of last year where his current task is on NIR intermediate representation support for Nouveau as part of bringing SPIR-V compute support to this open-source NVIDIA Linux driver.

  • Intel GLSL On-Disk Shader Cache Enabled By Default

    For Mesa 18.0 is the initial Intel shader cache support for archiving compiled GLSL shaders on-disk to speed up the load times of subsequent game loads and other benefits. For the Mesa 18.0 release the functionality isn't enabled by default but it will be for Mesa 18.1.

  • Xorgproto 2018.3 Brings RandR Leasing + Non-Desktop Monitors

    Xorgproto debuted earlier this month as a centralized package of all X.Org protocol headers that used to be versioned and developed independently. Given the slower development now of the xorg-server and lots of the protocols being intertwined, they are now all bundled together. Tuesday marked the 2018.3 release with the new additions for Keith Packard's SteamVR Linux infrastructure work.

    Xorgproto 2018.3 offers up the protocol changes for the X.Org Server work that Keith Packard has been doing on improving the virtual reality head-mounted display (VR HMD) support for Linux systems, particularly around SteamVR. The X.Org protocol changes needed are supporting RandR leasing of outputs and also non-desktop monitor handling, so the VR HMD won't be treated as a conventional display and the Linux desktop systems then attempt to make use of it thinking it's just another HDMI/DP display.

  • Even With AMDGPU DC, HDMI/DP Audio Isn't Working Out For All Radeon Linux Users

    While the newly-released Raven Ridge APUs could make for nice HTPC systems given the number of compatible mini-ITX/micro-ATX motherboards and these 65 Watt APUs offering Zen CPU cores with Vega graphics, besides the current problematic Raven Ridge graphics support, there are still some broader AMDGPU DC audio problems for newer graphics cards.

    Phoronix reader Fred wrote in today to call attention to the AMDGPU DC audio situation. While AMDGPU DC was merged in Linux 4.15 and provides HDMI/DP audio support to the past few generations of Radeon GPUs on this new display code stack, not all audio formats play nicely.

Open source RISC-V architecture is changing the game for IoT processors

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Over the past decade, open source software has been one of the biggest catalysts in the tech world. Today, the power of open source, the freedom it enables, and the communities that it generates are gaining traction in the hardware world too. For these reasons, RISC-V is gaining huge popularity. Here is an introduction to RISC-V and the opportunities it opens.

Read more

Also:

Security: Updates, Tesla, Chef, SafeRide and More

Filed under
Security

Games Leftovers

Filed under
Gaming

Archos announces Android 8.0 powered electric scooter

Filed under
Android

We’ve heard of Android in the car, but how about Android on a scooter? Well, a French company, Archos, which primarily focuses on urban mobility, has today announced the ‘world’s first Android-powered electric scooter’. Dubbed the Citee Connect, the new urban transportation option will have an Android phone embedded into its handlebars.

Read more

To capture more of the desktop market, Linux needs to target the average user

Filed under
Linux

I've been using Linux as my desktop operating system for 20 years now. When I first started using the open source operating system, pretty much everything was a challenge. Back then, I wore that as a badge of honor. I could use Linux! There was something special about saying that in a crowd of fellow geeks and nerds. It brought respect. Not only could I install the operating system, I could get it on line, and do just about anything I needed to do. Of course, back then, much of what had to be done began in the terminal window. Without that particular tool, I don't think I would have been able to function within Linux.

Read more

Ubuntu vs Linux Mint: Which distro is best for your business?

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Linux is attracting a growing number of users to its enormous selection of distribution systems. These 'distros' are operating systems with the Linux kernel at their foundation and a variety of software built on top to create a desktop environment tailored to the needs of users.

Ubuntu and Linux Mint are among the most popular flavours of these.

Ubuntu's name derives from a Southern Africa philosophy that can loosely be defined as "humanity to others", a spirit its founders wanted to harness in a complete operating system that is both free and highly customisable.

Linux Mint is based on Ubuntu and built as a user-friendly alternative with full out-of-the-box multimedia support. By some measures, Linux Mint has surpassed the popularity of its progenitor, but Ubuntu retains a loyal following of its own.

Read more

Ubuntu Core Embedded Linux Operating System Now Runs on Rigado’s IoT Gateways

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical has apparently partnered with Rigado, a private company that provides Bluetooth LE (Low Energy) modules and custom IoT gateways for them, as well as for Wi-Fi, LoRa, and Thread wireless technologies, to deploy its slimmed-down Ubuntu Core operating system across Rigado’s Edge Connectivity gateway solutions.

"Rigado’s enterprise-grade, easily configurable IoT gateways will offer Ubuntu Core’s secure and open architecture for companies globally to deploy and manage their commercial IoT applications, such as asset tracking and connected guest experiences," says Canonical.

Read more

Canonical's Unity 8 Desktop Revived by UBports with Support for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

Filed under
Ubuntu

As you are aware, last year Canonical decided to stop the development of its futuristic Unity 8 desktop for Ubuntu and the Ubuntu Touch mobile OS. Days after their sad announcement a few community members appeared interested in taking over the development of Unity 8, the most promising one being Yunit.

However, the Yunit project didn't manage to improve Unity 8 for desktops in the last few months as much as the community would have wanted, and, after a long battle, they decided to pass the baton to UBports team, which is announcing the initial build for devs and an official website for Unity 8.

Read more

Openwashing of AT&T by the Linux Foundation

Filed under
OSS

Plasma 5.12.2 bugfix updates for 17.10 backports and 18.04 development release

Filed under
Security

Users of Kubuntu 17.10 Artful Aardvark can now upgrade via our backports PPA to the 2nd bugfix release (5.12.2) of the Plasma 5.12 LTS release series from KDE.

Likewise, testers of our development release 18.04 Bionic Beaver will receive the update imminently.

The full changelog of fixes for 5.12.2 can be found here.

Read more

Create a wiki on your Linux desktop with Zim

Filed under
Linux

There's no denying the usefulness of a wiki, even to a non-geek. You can do so much with one—write notes and drafts, collaborate on projects, build complete websites. And so much more.

I've used more than a few wikis over the years, either for my own work or at various contract and full-time gigs I've held. While traditional wikis are fine, I really like the idea of desktop wikis. They're small, easy to install and maintain, and even easier to use. And, as you've probably guessed, there are a number a desktop wikis available for Linux.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

GNOME and Fedora

  • RFC: Integrating rsvg-rs into librsvg
    I have started an RFC to integrate rsvg-rs into librsvg. rsvg-rs is the Rust binding to librsvg. Like the gtk-rs bindings, it gets generated from a pre-built GIR file.
  • 1+ year of Fedora and GNOME hardware enablement
    A year and a couple of months ago, Christian Schaller asked me to pivot a little bit from working full time on Fleet Commander to manage a new team we were building to work on client hardware enablement for Fedora and GNOME with an emphasis on upstream. The idea was to fill the gap in the organization where nobody really owned the problem of bringing up new client hardware features vertically across the stack (from shell down to the kernel), or rather, ensure Fedora and GNOME both work great on modern laptops. Part of that deal was to take over the bootloader and start working closer to customers and hardware manufacturing parnters.
  • Fedora Atomic Workstation: Works on the beach
    My trip is getting really close, so I decided to upgrade my system to rawhide. Wait, what ? That is usually what everybody would tell you not to do. Rawhide has this reputation for frequent breakage, and who knows if my apps will work any given day. Not something you want to deal with while traveling.
  • 4 cool new projects to try in COPR for February

Why You Shouldn’t Use Firefox Forks (and Proprietary Opera)

  • Why You Shouldn’t Use Firefox Forks Like Waterfox, Pale Moon, or Basilisk
    Mozilla Firefox is an open source project, so anyone can take its code, modify it, and release a new browser. That’s what Waterfox, Pale Moon, and Basilisk are—alternative browsers based on the Firefox code. But we recommend against using any of them.
  • Opera Says Its Next Opera Release Will Have the Fastest Ad Blocker on the Block
    Opera Software promoted today its upcoming Opera 52 web browser to the beta channel claiming that it has the faster ad blocker on the market compared to previous Opera release and Google Chrome. One of the key highlights of the Opera 52 release will be the improved performance of the built-in ad blocker as Opera claims to have enhanced the string matching algorithm of the ad blocker to make it open web pages that contain ads much faster than before, and, apparently than other web browsers, such as Chrome.

Graphics: Glxinfo, ANV, SPIR-V

  • Glxinfo Gets Updated With OpenGL 4.6 Support, More vRAM Reporting
    The glxinfo utility is handy for Linux users in checking on their OpenGL driver in use by their system and related information. But it's not often that glxinfo itself gets updated, except that changed today with the release of mesa-demos-8.4.0 as the package providing this information utility. Mesa-demos is the collection of glxinfo, eglinfo, glxgears, and utilities related to Mesa. With the Mesa-demos 8.4.0 it is predominantly glxinfo updates.
  • Intel ANV Getting VK_KHR_16bit_storage Support Wrapped Up
    Igalia's Jose Maria Casanova Crespo sent out a set of patches today for fixes that allow for the enabling of the VK_KHR_16bit_storage extension within Intel's ANV Vulkan driver. The patches are here for those interested in 16-bit storage support in Vulkan. This flips on the features for storageBuffer16BitAccess, uniformAndStorageBuffer16BitAccess, storagePushConstant16 and the VK_KHR_16bit_storage extension. This support is present for Intel "Gen 8" Broadwell graphics and newer. Hopefully the work will be landing in Mesa Git soon.
  • SPIR-V Support For Gallium3D's Clover Is Closer To Reality
    It's been a busy past week for open-source GPU compute with Intel opening up their new NEO OpenCL stack, Karol Herbst at Red Hat posting the latest on Nouveau NIR support for SPIR-V compute, and now longtime Nouveau contributor Pierre Moreau has presented his latest for SPIR-V Clover support. Pierre has been spending about the past year adding SPIR-V support to Gallium3D's "Clover" OpenCL state tracker. SPIR-V, of course, is the intermediate representation used now by OpenCL and Vulkan.

Security: Updates, Tinder, FUD and KPTI Meltdown Mitigation

  • Security updates for Friday
  • Tinder vulnerability let hackers [sic] take over accounts with just a phone number

    The attack worked by exploiting two separate vulnerabilities: one in Tinder and another in Facebook’s Account Kit system, which Tinder uses to manage logins. The Account Kit vulnerability exposed users’ access tokens (also called an “aks” token), making them accessible through a simple API request with an associated phone number.

  • PSA: Improperly Secured Linux Servers Targeted with Chaos Backdoor [Ed: Drama queen once again (second time in a week almost) compares compromised GNU/Linux boxes to "back doors"]
    Hackers are using SSH brute-force attacks to take over Linux systems secured with weak passwords and are deploying a backdoor named Chaos. Attacks with this malware have been spotted since June, last year. They have been recently documented and broken down in a GoSecure report.
  • Another Potential Performance Optimization For KPTI Meltdown Mitigation
    Now that the dust is beginning to settle around the Meltdown and Spectre mitigation techniques on the major operating systems, in the weeks and months ahead we are likely to see more performance optimizations come to help offset the performance penalties incurred by mitigations like kernel page table isolation (KPTI) and Retpolines. This week a new patch series was published that may help with KPTI performance.