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Tuesday, 19 Mar 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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MATE 1.22 released

Filed under
GNU
Linux

After about a year of development, the MATE Desktop team have finally released MATE 1.22. A big thank you to all contributors who helped to make this happen.

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Also: MATE Desktop discussion forums are closing

Server: Bitcoin, ArcShell, Red Hat Summit , IBM, Kubernetes and More

Filed under
Server
  • What is BTCPay Server? Free & Open Source Bitcoin Payment Processor

    Bitcoin’s potential as a decentralized, P2P digital currency is, in many cases, limited by the extension of the application and design space around the legacy cryptocurrency. Particularly in regards to merchant adoption, legacy payment processing services remain much more straightforward to use.

    Bitcoin is an invention of money, not explicitly payments. However, furthering its adoption as a means of payment will go a long way in bolstering its prominence among the mainstream.

  • ArcShell offers modular automation development with Bash

    ArcShell is an open-source modular development framework for building automation solutions using Bash. It runs on most Unix and Linux hosts. It’s easy to install, easy to distribute, and easy to build upon. New capabilities are added every week, and the project is actively maintained.

    I am the founder of Arclogic Software and the developer of ArcShell. I have been building automation and monitoring solutions from scratch for two decades.

    I am frustrated by the lack of unified solutions to the kinds of problems everyone writing scripts encounters. The answers I find are often not up to date, portable, buggy, and generally not usable for one reason or another. In August of 2016, I left a long stint working in IT services to pursue the goal of solving that problem by building ArcShell.

  • Red Hat Summit Labs Highlights 2019

    Red Hat Summit is a fantastic opportunity to learn about technologies that impact your business, and to deepen your understanding of Red Hat’s products it’s hard to beat the labs at Red Hat Summit.

    Summit labs are two-hour, hands-on sessions that walk through specific products or solutions. Everything needed to complete the labs is provided by Red Hat, from laptop/workstation to content and remote access to a pre-built environment.

    Instructors help students walk through the labs step by step. Red Hat labs are proctored by Red Hat engineers, and are an opportunity to not only learn about technology, but also to meet some of the people building the technology.

  • Entry Power S812 Gets A New – But Still Short – Lease On Life

    Despite the fact that Moore’s Law increases in performance in CPUs have been slowing for years, for many customers, the growth in the throughput performance of processors as more cores and threads are added to a Power9 chip have outstripped the capacity growth requirements for many IBM i shops. For many of these customers, a single core Power7, Power7+, or even Power8 processor did the trick just fine, and is better suited to their needs than an entry Power9 machine with just one core running IBM i.

    We would argue – and have argued many times – that what IBM needs to do is make the Power chip cores and the IBM i and Linux licenses that run on them cheaper so more customers will consolidate X86 Linux workloads onto Linux partitions on Power and, wherever possible, port X86 Windows Server workloads to Linux on Power and pull these in, too. This would mop up all of that extra capacity, and provide a more integrated, hybrid system than is possible over the network, and give Power Systems a nice jolt in the arm, too.

  • The What and the Why of the Cluster API

    Early in the evolution of the Kubernetes project, there was a desire for configurability, as different environments had varying constraints. This flexibility gave way to a myriad of assertions, and opinions, that initially fragmented the community around installation paths. However, it was clear to the community that there were a set of common overlapping concerns, or a lowest common denominator. In order to address these specific concerns, kubeadm was born as a composable bootstrapping tool for Kubernetes clusters.

  • College student with 'visions of writing super-cool scripts' almost wipes out faculty's entire system

    Monday has once more reared its ugly head, but brings with it the charming face of Who, Me?, El Reg's weekly look at cringeworthy events of readers' pasts.

    This week, we meet "Ted", who tells us of a time many years ago when he was at a local college taking a course in computing.

    "At the time, we were one of the first to go through a new curriculum that combined both hardware and software engineering," Ted said.

Mozilla: Hiring a Vice President From Facebook, Homepage for the JavaScript Specification and More

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Welcome Lindsey Shepard, VP Product Marketing [Ed: Hiring from Facebook (under criminal investigation for privacy infringement crimes) for VP role. Worst Mozilla hire since it put a Microsoft person -- yes, the company that puts back doors in everything and is most cooperative with the NSA (started PRISM) -- in charge of "security".]

    Most recently, Lindsey headed up corporate-level marketing for Facebook Inc., including leading product marketing for Facebook’s core products: News Feed, News, Stories, Civic Engagement, Privacy and Safety. Before joining Facebook, Lindsey led marketing at GoldieBlox, a Bay Area start-up focused on bridging the gender gap in STEM.

  • A Homepage for the JavaScript Specification

    Ecma TC39, the JavaScript Standards Committee, is proud to announce that we have shipped a website for following updates to the JavaScript specification. This is the first part of a two-part project aimed at improving our information distribution and documentation. The website provides links to our most significant documents, as well as a list of proposals that are near completion. Our goal is to help people find the information they need in order to understand the specification and our process.

    While the website is currently an MVP and very simple, we have plans to expand it. These plans include a set of documentation about how we work. We will experiment with other features as the need arises.

    The website comes as part of work that began last year to better understand how the community was accessing information about the work around the JavaScript specification. We did a series of in-person interviews, followed by a widely distributed survey to better understand what people struggled with. One of the biggest requests was that we publish and maintain a website that helps people find the information they are looking for.

  • A look at Mozilla's data science tooling, Google's Season of Docs, and more news

    Mozilla released Iodide, a new tool for publishing data science. Still in very early alpha, Iodide is a tool designed to help scientists write interactive documents. It is similar, but not exactly equivalent to Jupyter Notebooks or R Markdown in RStudio. Brendan Colloran shares all the technical details in a post on the Mozilla Hacks blog.If you want explore Iodide yourself, Mozilla has a demo site available.

  • QMO

    We are happy to let you know that Friday, March 29th, we are organizing Firefox 67 Beta 6 Testday. We’ll be focusing our testing on: Anti-tracking (Fingerprinting and Cryptominers) and Media playback & support.

    Check out the detailed instructions via this etherpad.

Programming/Development: WadC, Rcpp, Django, Qt 3D, Python

Filed under
Development
  • WadC 3.0

    A couple of weeks ago I release version 3.0 of Wad Compiler, a lazy functional programming language and IDE for the construction of Doom maps.

    3.0 introduces more flexible randomness with rand; two new test maps (blockmap and bsp) that demonstrate approaches to random dungeon generation; some useful data structures in the library; better Hexen support and a bunch of other improvements.

  • Rcpp 1.0.1: Updates

    Following up on the 10th anniversary and the 1.0.0. release, we excited to share the news of the first update release 1.0.1 of Rcpp. package turned ten on Monday—and we used to opportunity to mark the current version as 1.0.0! It arrived at CRAN overnight, Windows binaries have already been built and I will follow up shortly with the Debian binary.

    We had four years of regular bi-monthly release leading up to 1.0.0, and having now taken four months since the big 1.0.0 one. Maybe three (or even just two) releases a year will establish itself a natural cadence. Time will tell.

  • Django 2.2 release candidate 1 released

    Django 2.2 release candidate 1 is the final opportunity for you to try out the salmagundi of new features before Django 2.2 is released.

    The release candidate stage marks the string freeze and the call for translators to submit translations. Provided no major bugs are discovered that can't be solved in the next two weeks, Django 2.2 will be released on or around April 1. Any delays will be communicated on the django-developers mailing list thread.

  • Qt 3D Pairs Nicely With Vulkan & NVIDIA RTX To Make A Beautiful Path Tracer

    Not to be confused with Apple's Quartz graphics layer, a new open-source project called Quartz by developer Michał Siejak is producing stunningly beautiful results while being powered by the Vulkan graphics API, making use of Qt 3D, and NVIDIA RTX support within this path tracer.

    Michał Siejak open-sourced his "Quartz" project this past week and it's the latest open-source Vulkan project catching our eyes. Quartz is a path tracer designed around NVIDIA RTX (and, yes, does require a NVIDIA GPU) and delivering stunning results as an open-source path tracer that works on Windows and Linux. Beyond that, it offers a JavaScript/ES7-like description language for interacting with this path tracing renderer. The ES7-based description language is based on Qt5's QML.

  • Plotting Absolute Price Oscillator (APO) Line with Python
  • Montreal Python User Group: Montréal-Python 74: Call for speakers - Virtual Echo
  • Wes McKinney's Career In Python For Data Analysis
  • How to Build a Python GUI Application With wxPython

Canonical Says Ubuntu 14.04 Extended Security Maintenance Begins April 25, 2019

Filed under
Ubuntu

Released five years ago on April 17th, 2014, the Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) operating system series will reach its end of life next month on April 30th. Following on the success of the Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin) operating system series, Canonical announced some time ago that it would offer its Extended Security Maintenance (ESM) commercial package to Ubuntu 14.04 LTS users as well.

Canonical said it would reveal more details about when the ESM (Extended Security Maintenance) offering is available for Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr), so the company now announced that users who want to continue using the operating system and still receive security updates after the April 30th end of life, can purchase the ESM package beginning April 25th, 2019.

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Geary 3.32 Released with New App Icon, GNOME 3.32 Support

Filed under
GNOME

A major new version of the Geary e-mail client is now available for Linux users to download.

Now, you’ll forgiven for feeling a sense of deja vu upon reading that as it’s only been a couple of weeks since the release of Geary 0.13 (itself the first update to the email app this year).

But there’s a reason why a new release has appeared so soon after the last…

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Forbes Says The Raspberry Pi Is Big Business

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Not that it’s something the average Hackaday reader is unaware of, but the Raspberry Pi is a rather popular device. While we don’t have hard numbers to back it up (extra credit for anyone who wishes to crunch the numbers), it certainly seems a day doesn’t go by that there isn’t a Raspberry Pi story on the front page. But given that a small, cheap, relatively powerful, Linux computer was something the hacking community had dreamed of for years, it’s hardly surprising.

[...]

So where has the Pi been seen punching a clock? At Sony, for a start. The consumer electronics giant has been installing Pis in several of their factories to monitor various pieces of equipment. They record everything from temperature to vibration and send that to a centralized server using an in-house developed protocol. Some of the Pis are even equipped with cameras which feed into computer vision systems to keep an eye out for anything unusual.

[Parmy] also describes how the Raspberry Pi is being used in Africa to monitor the level of trash inside of garbage bins and automatically dispatch a truck to come pick it up for collection. In Europe, they’re being used to monitor the health of fueling stations for hydrogen powered vehicles. All over the world, businesses are realizing they can build their own monitoring systems for as little as 1/10th the cost of turn-key systems; with managers occasionally paying for the diminutive Linux computers out of their own pocket.

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Graphics: NVIDIA, Nouveau and Vulkan

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • NVIDIA 418.49.04 Linux Driver Brings Host Query Reset & YCbCr Image Arrays

    NVIDIA has issued new Vulkan beta drivers leading up to the Game Developers Conference 2019 as well as this next week there being NVIDIA's GPU Technology Conference (GTC) nearby in California.

    The only publicly mentioned changes to this weekend's NVIDIA 418.49.04 Linux driver update (and 419.62 on the Windows side) is support for the VK_EXT_host_query_reset and VK_EXT_ycbcr_image_arrays extensions.

  • Nouveau NIR Support Lands In Mesa 19.1 Git

    It shouldn't come as any surprise, but landing today in Mesa 19.1 Git is the initial support for the Nouveau Gallium3D code to make use of the NIR intermediate representation as an alternative to Gallium's TGSI.

    The Nouveau NIR support is part of the lengthy effort by Red Hat developers on supporting this IR as part of their SPIR-V and compute upbringing. The NIR support is also a stepping stone towards a potential NVIDIA Vulkan driver in the future.

  • Vulkan 1.1.104 Brings Native HDR, Exclusive Fullscreen Extensions

    With the annual Game Developers' Conference (GDC) kicking off tomorrow in San Francisco, Khronos' Vulkan working group today released Vulkan 1.1.104 that comes with several noteworthy extensions.

    Vulkan 1.1.104 is the big update for GDC 2019 rather than say Vulkan 1.2, but it's quite a nice update as part of the working group's weekly/bi-weekly release regiment. In particular, Vulkan 1.1.104 is exciting for an AMD native HDR extension and also a full-screen exclusive extension.

  • Interested In FreeSync With The RADV Vulkan Driver? Testing Help Is Needed

    Since the long-awaited introduction of FreeSync support with the Linux 5.0 kernel, one of the missing elements has been this variable rate refresh support within the RADV Vulkan driver.

    When the FreeSync/VRR bits were merged into Linux 5.0, the RadeonSI Gallium3D support was quick to land for OpenGL games but RADV Vulkan support was not to be found. Of course, RADV is the unofficial Radeon open-source Vulkan driver not officially backed by AMD but is the more popular driver compared to their official AMDVLK driver or the official but closed driver in their Radeon Software PRO driver package (well, it's built from the same sources as AMDVLK but currently with their closed-source shader compiler rather than LLVM). So RADV support for FreeSync has been one of the features users have been quite curious about and eager to see.

New Screencasts: Xubuntu 18.04.2, Ubuntu MATE, and Rosa Fresh 11

Filed under
GNU
Linux

9 Admirable Graphical File Managers

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

Being able to navigate your local filesystem is an important function of personal computing. File managers have come a long way since early directory editors like DIRED. While they aren’t cutting-edge technology, they are essential software to manage any computer.

File management consists of creating, opening, renaming, moving / copying, deleting and searching for files. But file managers also frequently offer other functionality.

In the field of desktop environments, there are two desktops that dominate the open source landscape: KDE and GNOME. They are smart, stable, and generally stay out of the way. These use the widget toolkits Qt and GTK respectively. And there are many excellent Qt and GTK file managers available. We covered the finest in our Qt File Managers Roundup and GTK File Managers Roundup. But with Linux, you’re never short of alternatives.

There are many graphical non-Qt and non-Gtk file managers available. This article examines 9 such file managers. The quality is remarkably good.

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Slimbook & Kubuntu - Combat Report 6

Filed under
KDE

Here we are gathered, for another episode of drama, thrill and technological escapades in the land of Tux. Starring one Slimbook Pro2 in the main role, with a trusty sidekick called Bionic Beaver of the Kubuntu clan. We've had quite a few episodes so far, and they tell a rather colorful story of progress, beauty and bugs.

Over the past few months, I've detailed my usage of the laptop and its operating system in serious, real-life situations, with actual productivity needs and challenges. This isn't just a test, this is running the machine properly. Many things work well, but then, there are problems, too. Of course, you can read all about those in the previous articles, and again, for the sake of simplicity, I'm only going to link to only the last report here. If you're truly intrigued, I'm sure you can find your way around.

[..].

I believe the Slimbook - with its Kubuntu brains - is slowly settling down. The one thing that is certain is that system updates bring in small tweaks and fixes all the time, and it's a shame that we can't have that from the very first minute. On the other hand, the system is stable, robust, and there are no regressions. I am quite pleased.

But there are still many things that can improved. Small things. The nth-order fun that isn't immediate or obvious, and so people don't see it until they come across a non-trivial use case, and then things start falling apart. This is true for all operating system, it's only the matter of how much. Plasma has made great strides in becoming semi-pro, and I hope it will get better still. Onwards.

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Also: Krita Interview with Svetlana Rastegina

Security: Cult of the Dead Cow, Huawei, and LastPass

Filed under
Security
  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 137.5 - Holy cow Beto was in the cDc, this is awesome!

    Josh and Kurt talk about Beto being in the Cult of the Dead Cow (cDc). This is a pretty big deal in a very good way. We hit on some history, why it's a great thing, what we can probably expect from opponents. There's even some advice at the end how we can all help. We need more politicians with backgrounds like this.

  • Is Huawei a security threat? Seven experts weigh in

    Regardless of how the suit shakes out, it will hardly be the last volley in the ongoing battle. Is the US right to target Chinese equipment makers like Huawei, or has the company, as it maintains, been unfairly maligned? The Verge convened experts, from prominent China-watchers to Sen. Marco Rubio, to give their views.

  • Should you be concerned about LastPass uploading your passwords to its server? [Ed: Wladimir Palant says what I have been saying for years. Alas, it fell on some deaf ears. LastPass is a dangerous trap. Very bad, and not even for convenience. Faith-based security.]

    I’ve written a number of blog posts on LastPass security issues already. The latest one so far looked into the way the LastPass data is encrypted before it is transmitted to the server. The thing is: when your password manager uploads all data to its server backend, you normally want to be very certain that the data visible to the server is useless both to attackers who manage to compromise the server and company employees running that server. Early last year I reported a number of issues that allowed subverting LastPass encryption with comparably little effort. The most severe issues have been addressed, so all should be good now?

    Sadly, no. It is absolutely possible for a password manager to use a server for some functionality while not trusting it. However, LastPass has been designed in a way that makes taking this route very difficult. In particular, the decision to fall back to server-provided pages for parts of the LastPass browser extension functionality is highly problematic. For example, whenever you access Account Settings you leave the trusted browser extension and access a web interface presented to you by the LastPass server, something that the extension tries to hide from you. Some other extension functionality is implemented similarly.

Programming: RQuantLib, Python and Rust

Filed under
Development
  • RQuantLib 0.4.8: Small updates

    A new version 0.4.8 of RQuantLib reached CRAN and Debian. This release was triggered by a CRAN request for an update to the configure.ac script which was easy enough (and which, as it happens, did not result in changes in the configure script produced). I also belatedly updated the internals of RQuantLib to follow suit to an upstream change in QuantLib. We now seamlessly switch between shared_ptr<> from Boost and from C++11 – Luigi wrote about the how and why in an excellent blog post that is part of a larger (and also excellent) series of posts on QuantLib internals.

    QuantLib is a very comprehensice free/open-source library for quantitative finance, and RQuantLib connects it to the R environment and language.

  • 10 Python image manipulation tools

    Today's world is full of data, and images form a significant part of this data. However, before they can be used, these digital images must be processed—analyzed and manipulated in order to improve their quality or extract some information that can be put to use.

    Common image processing tasks include displays; basic manipulations like cropping, flipping, rotating, etc.; image segmentation, classification, and feature extractions; image restoration; and image recognition. Python is an excellent choice for these types of image processing tasks due to its growing popularity as a scientific programming language and the free availability of many state-of-the-art image processing tools in its ecosystem.

    This article looks at 10 of the most commonly used Python libraries for image manipulation tasks. These libraries provide an easy and intuitive way to transform images and make sense of the underlying data.

  • PyDev of the Week: Bruno Roche

    This week we welcome Bruno Roche (@rochacbruno) as our PyDev of the Week! Bruno works for Red Hat and participates in the Python, Flask and Rust communities.

  • HTTP Method and Accept headers

    Zato 3.1 includes new means to manage access to REST services based on input Method and Accept headers in HTTP requests - here is how they can be employed in practice.

  • Text Processing in Rust

    This article is about text processing in Rust, but it also contains a quick introduction to pattern matching, which can be very handy when working with text.

    Strings are a huge subject in Rust, which can be easily realized by the fact that Rust has two data types for representing strings as well as support for macros for formatting strings. However, all of this also proves how powerful Rust is in string and text processing.

    Apart from covering some theoretical topics, this article shows how to develop some handy yet easy-to-implement command-line utilities that let you work with plain-text files. If you have the time, it'd be great to experiment with the Rust code presented here, and maybe develop your own utilities.

  • Plotting the Chaikin AD line graph
  • Create a sports score application with python

Canonical Releases Important Linux Kernel Patch for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, Update Now

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

The new Linux kernel security update is here to address five security issues discovered by various security researchers in the Linux 4.4 kernel used in the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system series and official derivatives that aren't using the Linux 4.15 HWE (Hardware Enablement) kernel from Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver).

These include a flaw (CVE-2017-18241) in Linux kernel's F2FS file system implementation, which incorrectly handled the noflush_merge mount option, and multiple integer overflows (CVE-2018-7740) in the hugetlbfs implementation. Both issues could allow local attackers to crash the vulnerable system through a denial of service.

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2019 OSI Board Election Results

Filed under
OSS

The OSI recently held our 2019 Board elections to seat six Board Directors, two elected from the affiliate membership, and four from the individual membership. We would like to congratulate, Pamela Chestek (nominated by The Document Foundation), and Molly de Blanc (nominated by the Debian Project) who captured the most votes from OSI Affiliate Members. We would also like to congratulate, Elana Hashman, Hong Phuc Dang and Carol Smith for securing Individual Member seats on the Board. Due to a tie for the fourth Individual Member seat, between Christine Hall and Mariatta Wijaya, a run off election will be required to identify the final OSI Board Director.

[...]

Affiliate Member Election Results (two open seats)

29 Pamela Chestek (The Document Foundation)
28 Molly de Blanc (Debian Project)
18 Bruce Perens (Open Research Institute)
13 Charles-H. Schulz (Open Information Security Foundation)
12 Olawale Fabiyi (American International University West Africa)
12 Kate Stewart (Linux Foundation)
9 Lior Kaplan (Debian Project)
8 Frank Matranga (Rensselaer Center for Open Source)
7 Rowan Hoskyns-Abrahall (Joomla / Open Source Matters, Inc.)
3 Hugh Douglas-Smith (Joomla / Open Source Matters, Inc.)

Individual Member Election Results (four open seats)

199 Carol Smith
172 Elana Hashman
143 Hong Phuc Dang
104 Christine Hall*
104 Mariatta Wijaya*
92 Duane O'Brien
90 Chris Aniszczyk
81 Van Lindberg
77 Justin Colannino
76 Samson Goddy
64 Luke Faraone
55 Marc Jones
44 Ian Skerrett
33 Brendan Hickey
32 Gustavo G Marmol Alioto
23 Tobie Langel
17 Rakesh Ranjan Jena
16 Dave McAllister

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Fedora 29 Linux Gaming Report: The Nvidia, Radeon And Steam User Experience

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

Gaming on Linux. Depending on who you talk to, getting stuff like Steam up and running and graphics drivers installed can be a tedious exercise, or ridiculously straightforward. That's because people don't really game on Linux. They game on Fedora, Manjaro, Ubuntu, Deepin, Solus. They game on Debian-based distributions or Arch-based distributions. Each with their own philosophies on free (as in open source and freely distributed) versus non-free (Steam and proprietary Nvidia drivers) software. Each with their own approaches to stability, affecting which versions of drivers are available out of the box.

While there are certain procedures and best practices that persist across any distro, the variances can be daunting for new users. And that's the jumping-off point for this series.

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More in Tux Machines

Security: Updates, "US Huawei Blackballing Efforts" and Microsoft's Back Doors Keep Crackers Busy

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • US Huawei Blackballing Efforts Stall Due To Lack Of 'Actual Facts'
    During the Trump era, the US government has dramatically ramped up claims that Chinese hardware vendor Huawei is a nefarious spy for the Chinese government, blackballing it from the U.S. telecom market. From pressuring U.S. carriers to drop plans to sell Huawei phones to the FCC's decision to ban companies from using Huawei gear if they want to receive federal subsidies, this effort hasn't been subtle. While Huawei should never be confused with a saint (what telecom company would be?) there's several problems with the effort. The biggest being that despite a decade of hand-wringing and one eighteen month investigation by the US government, there's still no public evidence Huawei uses its network gear to spy on Americans. That's not sitting well with countries we've asked to join along in the fun.
  • Sorry, Linux. We know you want to be popular, but cyber-crooks are all about Microsoft for now
    Eight out of the ten most exploited vulnerabilities tracked by threat intelligence biz Recorded Future in 2018 targeted Microsoft products – though number two on its list was, surprise surprise, a Flash flaw. The most exploited vuln in the firm's hall of shame was a remote code execution flaw in Windows' VBScript engine that could pwn users who opened a booby-trapped web page with Internet Explorer. "Exploit kits associated with this vulnerability were noted to spread the malware Trickbot through phishing attacks," said Recorded Future in a report published today. The Flash vuln was none other than one exploited by North Korean state-backed hackers – first detected by South Korea's CERT, which discovered a flood of booby-trapped MS Office documents, web pages, spam messages and more.

Graphics and Games: NVIDIA, Orbital/Vulkan, Cataclysm and System Shock 3

  • NVIDIA Shows Off Quake II Path-Traced Using Vulkan RTX/Ray-Tracing
    ne of the demos NVIDIA is showing off this week at their GPU Technology Conference is Quake II being path-traced using a Vulkan port of the game and adapted to handle VK_NV_ray_tracing functionality paired with the latest GeForce RTX GPUs. Q2VKPT is a path-traced version of Quake II started by a former NVIDIA intern and is rendered using Vulkan and does support Linux.
  • Orbital: A PlayStation 4 Emulator That Is Emulating The PS4's AMD GPU Using Vulkan
    Orbital is an open-source project providing a virtualization-based PlayStation 4 emulator that is still in its early stages but what interests us is its technical details including the use of Vulkan/SPIR-V. Orbital leverages QEMU and other open-source components. At this stage it's not running any PS4 games but is able to boot into safe mode on PS4 5.xx kernels.
  • Cataclysm - Dark Days Ahead, a free and open source turn-based survival game had a huge update
    It occurred to me today, that no one here at GOL seems to have ever written about the free and open source turn-based survival game Cataclysm - Dark Days Ahead. Okay, so what is it? A classic roguelike with a survival theme, set in a post-apocalyptic procedurally generated world.
  • System Shock 3 may see Linux support, OtherSide still working on Underworld Ascendant for Linux
    OtherSide Entertainment have teased out a new short video of System Shock 3 and it may see Linux support. Not to be confused with the crowdfunded System Shock reboot that Nightdive Studios are currently working on. System Shock 3 is being made with some of the original team behind the first two games as well like Warren Spector, so it should remain faithful to the series while being a rather nice upgrade in visuals.

Stable kernels 5.0.3, 4.20.17, 4.19.30, 4.14.107 and 4.9.164

  • Linux 5.0.3
    I'm announcing the release of the 5.0.3 kernel. All users of the 5.0 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 5.0.y git tree can be found at: git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.0.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st...
  • Linux 4.20.17
  • Linux 4.19.30
  • Linux 4.14.107
  • Linux 4.9.164

Firefox 66 Released

Firefox now prevents websites from automatically playing sound. You can add individual sites to an exceptions list or turn blocking off. Read more Also: Firefox 66 Arrives - Blocks Auto-Playing Sounds, Hides Title Bar By Default For Linux