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Tuesday, 16 Oct 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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New Paper From Mark Shuttleworth and Eben Moglen

Filed under
Ubuntu
Legal
  • Automotive Software Governance and Copyleft

    The Software Freedom Law Center is proud to make available a whitepaper by Mark Shuttleworth, CEO of Canonical, Ltd., and Eben Moglen, Founding Director of the Software Freedom Law Center and Professor of Law at Columbia Law School. The whitepaper shows how new capabilities in the free and open source software stack enable highly regulated and sensitive industrial concerns to take advantage of the full spectrum of modern copyleft software.

    Software embedded in physical devices now determines how almost everything – from coffee pots and rice cookers to oil tankers and passenger airplanes – works. Safety and security, efficiency and repairability, fitness for purpose and adaptability to new conditions of all the physical products that we make and use now depend on our methods for developing, debugging, maintaining, securing and servicing the software embedded in them.

  • SFLC: Automotive Software Governance and Copyleft

    The Software Freedom Law Center has announced the availability of a whitepaper [PDF] about automotive software and copyleft, written by Mark Shuttleworth and Eben Moglen. At its core, it's an advertisement for Ubuntu and Snap, but it does look at some of the issues involved.

Automotive Grade Linux dips into telematics with 6.0 release

Filed under
Linux

The Automotive Grade Linux project has released Unified Code Base 6.0 in-vehicle infotainment stack with new software profiles for telematics and instrument cluster.

The Linux Foundation’s Automotive Grade Linux project version 6.0 (“Funky Flounder”) of its Unified Code Base 6.0 distribution is now available for download. The new release for the first time expands the open source in-vehicle infotainment (IVI) stack to support telematics hooks and instrument cluster displays.

“The addition of the telematics and instrument cluster profiles opens up new deployment possibilities for AGL,” stated Dan Cauchy, Executive Director of Automotive Grade Linux at the Linux Foundation. “Motorcycles, fleet services, rental car tracking, basic economy cars with good old-fashioned radios, essentially any vehicle without a head unit or infotainment display can now leverage the AGL Unified Code Base as a starting point for their products.”

Read more

Raspberry Pi based garden monitoring system supplies five sensors

Filed under
Linux

On Kickstarter: SwitchDoc Labs’ “Smart Garden System” is a Raspberry Pi and Grove-based environmental monitoring and plant watering system with sensors for soil moisture, sunlight, air quality, temperature, and humidity.

Spokane Valley, Wash. based SwitchDoc Labs (SDL) has launched a more advanced, up to nine plant Smart Garden System (SGS) kit version of its earlier SmartPlantPi kit. The Raspberry Pi based kit, which requires no soldering, is promoted as being an educational system for learning about gardening as well as the Raspberry Pi and IoT technology.

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Elementary OS 5.0 "Juno" Released For A Pleasant Linux Desktop Experience

Filed under
OS

Just ahead of Ubuntu 18.10, Solus 4, and Fedora 29 among other forthcoming Linux distribution releases, Elementary OS 5 "Juno" has been released for a polished desktop experience that aims to compete with macOS and Windows for desktop usability.

Elementary OS 5.0 "Juno" continues to be based upon Ubuntu for its package set but continues with its own Pantheon desktop environment and remains quite focused on delivering a polished desktop experience. With the 5.0 Juno release they focused on refining the user experience, improving productivity, and taking their developer platform to the next level.

Read more

Plasma 5.14.1

Filed under
KDE

Today KDE releases a Bugfix update to KDE Plasma 5, versioned 5.14.1. Plasma 5.14 was released in October with many feature refinements and new modules to complete the desktop experience.

Read more

Also: KDE Plasma 5.14 Desktop Environment Gets First Point Release, Update Now

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Update KB4468550 Fixes Audio Issues Caused In Windows 10 October Patch [Ed: Alternative (better) headline is, Microsoft admits breaking your machine]

    If your Windows is updated to the latest Windows 10 October 2018 update then there are chances that you might be facing audio problems , something along the lines of “No Audio Output Device is installed”.

    The October 2018 patch caused this issue on many machines running Windows 10 version 1803 or above. Many users tweeted about this problem almost instantly as it was happening on such a wide scale when they realized that they Windows has stopped giving them audio when they start playing games, or launch a video player all while the sounds on their browser as well as the system sounds were working perfectly fine.

  • Linux v4.18: Performance Goodies

    Linux v4.18 has been out a two months now; making this post a bit late, but still in time before the next release. Also so much drama in the CoC to care about performance topics Tongue As always comes with a series of performance enhancements and optimizations across subsystems.

  • Automotive Grade Linux Enables Telematics and Instrument Cluster Applications with Latest UCB 6.0 Release

     

    Developed through a joint effort by dozens of member companies, the AGL Unified Code Base (UCB) is an open source software platform that can serve as the de facto industry standard for infotainment, telematics and instrument cluster applications. Sharing a single software platform across the industry reduces fragmentation and accelerates time-to-market by encouraging the growth of a global ecosystem of developers and application providers that can build a product once and have it work for multiple automakers.

     

    [...]

     

    The AGL UCB 6.0 includes an operating system, middleware and application framework. Key features include: [...]

  • Install, install, install! The dance of panic!

    3. PicarOS Diego. My daughter's desktop dual-boots Mageia and PicarOS Diego, a great MiniNo GalpON respin for children. Since the game she likes is neither running with WINE on Mageia 6.1 nor with Windows Vista, I tried to run it on WINE in PicarOS. The packages were old, so I updated the system. Big mistake! In the end, I was left with an up-to-date MiniNo that removed all the special tweaks for children and, to add insult to injury, the game would not run at all!

AMD Dual EPYC 7601 Benchmarks - 9-Way AMD EPYC / Intel Xeon Tests On Ubuntu 18.10 Server

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Arriving earlier this month was a Dell PowerEdge R7425 server at Phoronix that was equipped with two AMD EPYC 7601 processors, 512GB of RAM, and 20 Samsung 860 EVO SSDs to make for a very interesting test platform and our first that is based on a dual EPYC design with our many other EPYC Linux benchmarks to date being 1P. Here is a look at the full performance capabilities of this 64-core / 128-thread server compared to a variety of other AMD EPYC and Intel Xeon processors while also doubling as an initial look at the performance of these server CPUs on Ubuntu 18.10.

Read more

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • New FIDO2 Security Key Will Be Open Source

    A new security key solution is poised to further extend the reach of the FIDO Alliance’s new FIDO2 authentication standard.

    Called “Solo”, the security key is currently in the works from San Francisco-based SoloKeys, which currently has a Kickstarter campaign underway to support the product. Like other prominent security key solutions, Solo is designed to plug into a computer or laptop’s USB port, allowing the user to confirm with an authenticating service that they are physically present at the device by pressing a button on the key.

  • IOTA (MIOTA) – Biilabs launches GDPR compliant open-source implementation of TangleID

    The rise of IOTA as a top DLT continues. Earlier this year, the city of Taipei announced that they were using the IOTA tangle in implementing their smart city project. The project has largely been a success in implementing a decentralized digital identity system that runs on the IOTA tangle. That’s a major plus towards the growth of the IOTA ecosystem, and gives a huge intrinsic value to the IOTA coin. However, the best news is that this system is now open source. This means that it can be applied to any other city all across the world.

  • Open Source Healthcare Journal Preview at the Connected Health Conference in Boston

    The debut issue of the Open Source Healthcare Journal, a magazine advocating innovative open-source solutions in health, will be available for preview by over 2,000 technology innovators and healthcare providers at the Connected Health Conference at the Seaport World Trade Center in Boston, October 17-19. The Open Source Healthcare Journal's forward-looking point of view is the perfect match for the industry-leading conference, known for provocative discussions on the future of tech-enabled health. The first issue of the journal — published by GoInvo, a healthcare design studio located in Arlington, Massachusetts — features a Q&A with digital health leader and best-selling author Eric Topol, MD as well as articles by Jane Sarasohn-Kahn of HealthcareDIY and Juhan Sonin of MIT and GoInvo.

  • Hedera Hashgraph releases open source SDK

    Hedera Hashgraph, the public distributed ledger that enables globally decentralized applications recently announced the public release of the Hedera SDK in Java.

    The SDK is open source under an Apache 2 license. With the SDK, developers can now begin to develop Hedera-based applications for use on the Hedera platform.

  • 4 [free] open-source network monitoring tools

    Just as with commercial, for-pay monitoring software, there are open-source options that have varying features, and the goal of an enterprise is to find the best fit for its environment.

    That’s where this downloadable PDF package of reviews can help. It evaluates four popular free, open-source network-monitoring platforms – Icinga, Nagios, Observium and Zabbix – highlighting pros and cons and giving enough context that this bundle can serve as a guide for IT pros seeking advice.

  • Open Source MANO Needs a Reality Check

    So what's next? Another ONAP update is due soon (in November, dubbed Dublin) but that will only cover up some of the cracks.

    But you know what -- that's OK! No one actually expects an open source development comprising millions of lines of code to be made useful in a blink of an eye, or even a few months. Iterative progress and a very clear indication of the state of documentation, exactly which modules might be ready to be either used by an operator's team or considered for "industrialization" by a vendor and even highlighting areas where more community activity would all be useful and not at all damaging: Promoting ONAP as "ready to deploy" currently invites suspicion, because that suggests 100% readiness and that's very far from reality.

  • Is Open Source the Right Approach for NFV Orchestration?

    Once upon a time there was a maharaja who decided to raise a baby elephant as a pet (stick with me…). As the elephant grew, it became more and more expensive to feed and created such a mess that eventually the maharaja told his courtiers that he was gifting them the elephant out of the generosity of his heart. In return they would have to look after the elephant and bring it back to him when it was a bit more mature and stable enough for him to ride.

    Some might say that, in the context of NFV MANO (management and orchestration), the elephant is Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) and the maharaja is AT&T Inc. (NYSE: T). But that would be unfair. In reality there are two maharajas -- AT&T and China Mobile Ltd. (NYSE: CHL) -- and two elephants that have been merged into a six-legged Loxodonta with two tails and three tusks. (See MANO Marriage: ECOMP, OPEN-O Converge as ONAP.)

  • Nuclear Reactor Startup Transatomic Power going Open Source after Closure

    It seldom happens that certain circumstances do not allow one idea to prosper as planned. But Open Source can solve that issue, once the idea is shared with the world. Others can take on that work, build upon and keep improving it.

    This recently happened with Transatomic Power (founded by Mark Massie and Dr. Leslie Dewan in April 2011), a Nuclear Startup that introduced a brand new design of its own Nuclear Reactor that is a lot more efficient than conventional ones.

    As they haven’t been able to build it within their targeted timeframe, they announced suspending operations on September 25, 2018. But declaring their designs Open Source is certainly going to help change things for the better.

  • Play Your Favorite Old Web Games Now, Chrome 71 May Break Them

    hen Google rolled out Chrome 66 earlier this May, it offered a tweak that pleased almost everyone by muting sites that would play sound automatically. Unfortunately, it also ended up breaking several projects’ audio.

    This meant that a variety of different media, from popular web games to some of Google’s own projects effectively had their audio broken beyond repair. Users were understandably upset, and in response to an overwhelming amount of backlash, Google retained the browser alteration that blocked autoplaying video and audio, but decided to push back the feature’s application for games and web apps to Chrome 71, which is set to debut in December.

  • GCC Is Preparing To End Support For Solaris 10

    Solaris 10, what may will argue as the last "good" Solaris operating system release before Sun Microsystems fell under control of Oracle, may soon see its support deprecated by the GCC compiler stack.

    With upstream Solaris 10 soon reaching its end of life and an increasing number of failures/issues coming up when testing the GNU Compiler Collection on Solaris 10, the GNU toolchain developers are looking at obsoleting that support.

Servers: Nginx, Container, and Kubernetes on AWS

Filed under
Server
  • Nginx Updates Web Server Application Platform

    Nginx Inc. held its annual customer conference on Oct. 9-10, announcing a series of updates to its namesake Application Platform.

    While Nginx was originally best known for the open source nginx web server, Nginx Inc. has expanded in recent years to enable a larger set of web application capabilities, with a series of different products.

    Nginx first announced its Application Platform in September 2017, which includes the Nginx Plus Application service combined with the Nginx Controller management and Nginx Unit application server.

  • Container-native, it’s now ‘a thing’

    San Francisco headquartered software analytics company New Relic has acquired Belgian container and microservices monitoring firm CoScale.

    Neither firm is essentially open source in its core approach, but the technologies being interplayed here essentially are.

    CoScale’s expertise is in monitoring container and microservices environments, with a special focus on Kubernetes — the open source container orchestration system for automating deployment, scaling and management of containerized applications originally designed by Google.

  • Open source tool simplifies Kubernetes on AWS

    AWS Service Operator relies on the Kubernetes controller pattern, which packages various basic tasks, integrates disparate components and keeps an application in a desired state. This information is stored on a single API server for the Kubernetes and AWS assets, with AWS services defined as custom resources, and a user can potentially deploy the entire lifecycle process through a single YAML manifest.

    [...]

    Etc.io, a Dallas-based consulting firm, doesn't use any AWS container services at scale, and relies primarily on Google Container Engine. AWS Service Operator could make it more convenient to use Kubernetes on AWS, but it doesn't help organizations that want to move to a microservices architecture that doesn't rely on a single vendor, said E.T. Cook, managing partner at Etc.io.

Latest Openwashing Examples/News

Filed under
OSS

Security: NHS and Police With Windows

Filed under
Security
  • Wannacry ransomware cost the British National Health Service £92m ($121m)

    Among the most prominent ransomware victims were NHS facilities, including hospitals, across the UK. All told, the epidemic cost the cash-starved health system £92m (£19 in lost output, £73m in IT expenses in the aftermath).

  • WannaCry attack cost cash-strapped NHS an estimated £92m

    Until now, the financial damage caused by the sweeping cyber attack - which it's now been revealed affected 8 per cent of GP clinics and forced the NHS to cancel 19,000 appointments - has been unclear, but the DHSC estimates in a new report that the total figure cost in at £92m.

    WannaCry cost approximately £19 in lost output, while a whopping £73m was racked up in IT costs in the aftermath of the attack, according to the report. Some £72m was spent on restoring systems and data in the weeks after the attack struck.

  • [Old] Ethical [crackers] show that Windows 10 isn’t immune to WannaCry

    And secondly, the exploit they crafted only works against older versions of Windows 10 (pre-Anniversary Update), but that isn’t really the point. It’s about showing the lines along which these sort of exploits can evolve, and reminding folks not to sit back smugly even when the OS they’re running appears to be bulletproof to a new threat.

  • Police body cameras 'could be hacked' [sic] to access confidential data

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Linux Devices: ARM and La Frite

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Arm brings Intel, Arduino, myDevices into the Pelion IoT platform ecosystem

    Arm on Monday is announcing a series of new partnerships that will enhance Pelion, its Internet of Things platform, making it easier for customers to deploy and manage a wider range of IoT devices on the platform.

    First, the Peltion Platform can now be used to manage Intel Architecture (x86) platforms, in addition to Arm-based IoT devices and gateways. Next, Arm is partnering with myDevices to make it easier to quickly onboard a wider array of devices. Additionally, Arduino is partnering with Pelion Connectivity Management to enable developers to quickly create and scale cellular IoT designs.

  • ARM expands Pelion IoT platform to Intel, Linux ecosystems

    In addition, the company announced Mbed Linux OS, which builds on its Mbed OS for IoT devices based on Cortex-A. Mbed Linux OS is integrated with the Pelion IoT Platform and is designed to open up new classes of IoT devices with complex applications, such as those processing video or edge gateways. Developers can sign-up now for early access to the new software.

  • Raspberry Pi A+-sized $10 La Frite Linux board has better specs at half the price

    The La Frite board is a follow up to Libre Computing's $25 Le Potato board and is "loosely based" on the design of the Raspberry Pi A+ -- a smaller and cheaper Pi than the $35 Raspberry Pi B+ -- due to the 40-pin GPIO header setup.

    It's currently available to backers on the device's Kickstarter page and will be generally available in November.

Qt/KDE: Qt 5.12 Beta 2, Krita at the University of La Plata, LaKademy 2018

Filed under
KDE
  • Qt 5.12 beta2 released

    We have published Qt 5.12 beta2 today. As earlier you can get it via online installer. Delta to beta1 attached.

  • Qt 5.12 Beta 2 Brings Many Fixes

    Just two weeks after the Qt 5.12 beta release, a second beta is now available for testing of this forthcoming tool-kit update.

    The Qt 5.12 Beta 2 update is made up of bug fixes with changes ranging from build fixes for different platforms to disabling mouse tracking by default within the QtWebGLPlugin to fixed Ozone platform detection. There are more than 200 changes to Qt 5.12 that have been queued over the past two weeks.

    The complete list of the 200+ changes that are mostly fixes in Qt 5.12 Beta 2 can be found via today's release announcement with the attached change-log.

  • Krita at the University of La Plata

    Sebastian Labi ha sido invitado para presentar Krita en el Laboratorio de herramientas de software libre de la Universidad de La Plata. Hablará sobre ilustración digital y usará Krita para dar una demostración de cómo usar Krita para el campo de la Ilustración Digital.

    El SLAD- FBA (Software libre para Arte y diseño) es una nueva unidad de de investigación y formación en la Facultad de Bellas Artes que promueve el conocimiento y uso del software libre en la capacitación académica de la Universidad de La Plata.

  • LaKademy 2018 – Third and Fourth Days (October 13th and 14th)

    The third day of LaKademy 2018 was my last day participating on the event.

    During October 13th, we started the day with a promo reunion. This reunion was done to discuss about some plans and actions for the Latin American KDE community over the next year. Some decisions were made and topics were discussed involving KDE participation in some events, promotion of our own events in Latin America, including LaKademy 2019 and Kafé com Qt, and some details in general about our community.

BSD: DragonFlyBSD News and Fosdem 2019 BSD devroom CfP

Filed under
BSD
  • DragonFlyBSD Lands Another NUMA Optimization Helping AMD Threadripper 2 CPUs

    DragonFlyBSD lead developer Matthew Dillon has been quite impressed with AMD's Threadripper 2 processors particularly the Threadripper 2990WX with 32-cores / 64-threads. Dillon has made various optimizations to DragonFly for helping out this processor in past months and overnight he made another significant improvement.

  • Fosdem 2019: BSD devroom CfP

    The Fosdem is a free event for software hackers to meet, share ideas and collaborate. Every year 8000+ open source developers from all the world gather at the event in Brussels, Belgium. During the Fosdem, developer rooms (devrooms) are assigned to self organized open source groups and projects to meet together and showcase their projects.

Red Hat Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat

Events: Hacktoberfest 2018, Announcing Linux Autumn 2018

Filed under
OSS
  • Hacktoberfest 2018 - Celebrate Open Source!

    Hacktoberfest is an annual event sponsored by DigitalOcean in partnership with GitHub and Twilio and while "Hacktoberfest" might sound or give the impression of something doable only by very experienced hacker programmers, in essence, it's just a wrapper around having to submit 5 Pull Requests to any Github hosted repository and earn some swag in return.

  • Mangaluru: Sahyadri Open Source Community holds Hacktoberfest HackNight

    Sahyadri Open Source Community (SOSC) at Sahyadri hosted Hacktoberfest HackNight in association with K-Tech Innovation Hub on October 13 and 14 at Sahyadri to celebrate the month of open source with Hacktoberfest.

    The event was inaugurated by Shashank Krishna, Padma Shri 2019 (nominee) and director of Katmai Infotechnology Pvt Ltd, Bengaluru, followed by interaction with students regarding Smart India Hackathon. Dr R Srinivasa Rao Kunte, principal of Sahyadri College of Engineering and management, Prakhyath Rai, faculty coordinator, asst professor of Information Science, and Arjun Suvarna, chairperson of Sahyadri Open Source Community, addressed the crowd.

  • Announcing Linux Autumn 2018

    Linux Autumn is an annual meeting of Free Software and Linux enthusiast from Poland organized since 2003 which means this year it will be its 16th time. This year it will be organized in Ustroń in the southern Poland from 9 to 11 November. The town is the same as the last year but in a different hotel.

    As the place is located near the Czech and Slovak border we would like to invite more people, both speakers and attendees, from other countries. We are aware of strong presence of Fedora contributors in Brno and other nearby cities just across the border.

Openwashing: Asay, Saran and More

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS
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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Elementary OS 5.0 "Juno" Released For A Pleasant Linux Desktop Experience

Just ahead of Ubuntu 18.10, Solus 4, and Fedora 29 among other forthcoming Linux distribution releases, Elementary OS 5 "Juno" has been released for a polished desktop experience that aims to compete with macOS and Windows for desktop usability. Elementary OS 5.0 "Juno" continues to be based upon Ubuntu for its package set but continues with its own Pantheon desktop environment and remains quite focused on delivering a polished desktop experience. With the 5.0 Juno release they focused on refining the user experience, improving productivity, and taking their developer platform to the next level. Read more

Android Leftovers

Plasma 5.14.1

Today KDE releases a Bugfix update to KDE Plasma 5, versioned 5.14.1. Plasma 5.14 was released in October with many feature refinements and new modules to complete the desktop experience. Read more Also: KDE Plasma 5.14 Desktop Environment Gets First Point Release, Update Now