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Tuesday, 25 Sep 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Games: Release of PlayOnLinux 5.0 Alpha, Aspyr Media, Geneshift, GOG and DotLine

Filed under
Gaming
  • Release of PlayOnLinux 5.0 alpha 1

    I'm aware that it has been a while since the last time we gave news to you. Be reassured, the project is moving on and here we are to give you some news.

  • Aspyr Media have a big sale going on the Humble Store, some sweet deals to be had

    For those of you in the mood to start you week with some fun new games, Humble Store is doing an Aspyr Media sale.

  • Top-down shooter Geneshift is getting a Battle Royale mode and it sounds like a lot of fun

    Geneshift (also known as Mutant Factions or Subvein) is a top-down shooter with some seriously good action that's currently in Early Access and the developer has decided to add a Battle Royale mode.

    Initially, I thought this was a joke. However, it's very much a real thing.

  • GOG added two more Visual Novels with Linux support, Highway Blossoms and A Kiss For The Petals

    For those who love Visual Novels, you might want to know that GOG have expanded their collection a little again recently.

    The two titles are Highway Blossoms and A Kiss For The Petals - Maidens of Michael. Neither game is particularly new, although it's worth noting that A Kiss For The Petals - Maidens of Michael was removed from Steam so GOG is the easiest option to get it at the moment.

  • Challenging minimalist puzzle game 'DotLine' released with native Linux support

    DotLine from The Selenite Forge who also made Bionic Attack is a minimalist puzzle game that tries to challenge your brain, out now with native Linux support. Note: Key provided by the developer.

    The basic idea of the game is really simple. You have to guide a ball from start to end, the problem is the path it needs to take is all messed up and you've got the wonderful job of rotating everything into the correct position. What makes it challenging, is that as soon as you rotate the first piece, the ball will begin rolling and so it becomes a mad dash to get everything right. Even if you don't do anything, you only get two seconds before it starts.

Announcing Oracle Solaris 11.4 SRU1

Filed under
OS
  • Announcing Oracle Solaris 11.4 SRU1

    Today we're releasing the first SRU for Oracle Solaris 11.4! This is the next installment in our ongoing support train for Oracle Solaris 11 and there will be no further Oracle Solairs 11.3 SRUs delivered to the support repository. Due to the timing of our releases and some fixes being in Oracle Solaris 11.3 SRU35 but not in 11.4, not all customers on Oracle Solaris 11.3 SRU35 were able to update to Oracle Solaris 11.4 when it was released. SRU1 includes all these fixes and customers can now update to Oracle Solaris 11.4 SRU1 via 'pkg update' from the support repository or by downloading the SRU from My Oracle Support Doc ID 2433412.1.

  • Oracle Solaris 11.4 SRU1 Released

    It's been just under one month since Oracle's long-awaited debut of Solaris 11.4 and now its first stable release update has been issued.

    Solaris 11.4 SRU1 is mainly intended to fix some early bugs and those that didn't make the cut for getting in the initial 11.4 release. One new feature is support for "Memory Reservation Pools for Kernel Zones" to help systems with high levels of memory contention or fragmented memory by allowing memory to be reserved ahead of time.

Mozilla: Privacy, R.I.P., and Consent Management at Mozfest 2018

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Firefox collects data on you through hidden add-ons

    Mozilla, the organisation that produces the Firefox browser and makes a loud noise about its open source credentials, is quietly collecting telemetry data on its users by the use of hidden add-ons, even though publicly visible telemetry controls are not selected.

  • R.I.P., Charles W. Moore, a fine man who liked fine Macs

    A farewell and au revoir to a great gentleman in making the most of your old Mac, Charles W. Moore, who passed away at his home in rural Canada on September 16 after a long illness. Mr Moore was an early fan of TenFourFox, even back in the old bad Firefox 4 beta days, and he really made his famous Pismo PowerBook G3 systems work hard for it.

  • Consent management at Mozfest 2018

    Good news. It looks like we're having a consent management mini-conference as part of Mozfest next month. (I'm one of the organizers for the Global Consent Manager session, and plan to attend the others.)

LibreOffice: A history of document freedom

Filed under
LibO

My reminiscing led me to reach out to the Document Foundation, which governs LibreOffice, to learn more about the history of this open source productivity software.

The Document Foundation's team told me that "StarWriter, the ancestor of the LibreOffice suite, was developed as proprietary software by Marco Börries, a German student, to write his high school final thesis." He formed a company called Star Division to develop the software.

In 1999, Sun Microsystems bought Star Division for $73.5 million, changed the software's name to OpenOffice.org, and released the code as open source. Anyone could download the office suite at no charge for personal use. The Document Foundation told me, "For almost 10 years, the software was developed under Sun stewardship, from version 1.0 to version 3.2. It started with a dual license—LGPL and the proprietary SISSL (Sun Industry Standard Software License)—but it evolved to pure LGPL from version 2.0."

Read more

Learn the 37 most frequently used shortcuts in GIMP

Filed under
GIMP

GIMP is a fantastic artist's tool for editing digital images, especially with the bevy of impressive features in the recent release of version 2.10. Of course, like all creative applications, you can get working more quickly if you can make yourself familiar with the various keyboard shortcuts and hotkeys available. GIMP, of course, gives you the ability to customize these shortcuts to match what you're personally comfortable with. However, the default shortcuts that GIMP ships with are impressive and generally easy to get used to.

This cheat sheet is not an exhaustive list of all of the defaults GIMP has available. Instead, it covers the most frequently used shortcuts so you can get to work as fast as possible. Plus, there should be a few in here that make you aware of a few features that maybe you weren't aware of.

Read more

Red Hat and Fedora News

Filed under
Red Hat

Ubuntu 18.10 "Cosmic Cuttlefish" Prepares For Its Beta Release

Filed under
Ubuntu

This evening the "Cosmic Cuttlefish" embarked on its beta freeze ahead of the official Ubuntu 18.10 Beta due out later this week.

Ubuntu Release Team member Adam Conrad has announced the beta freeze with hopes of delivering the beta images on Thursday, 27 September.

If the beta preparations go as planned, the Ubuntu 18.10 kernel freeze based on the Linux 4.18 code-base is set to happen on 4 October. The final code freeze and release candidates are than due on 11 October. The official Ubuntu 18.10 release is penciled in for 18 October.

Read more

Also: Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 546

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • KITE conducts training on free and open source software applications

    In continuance with the Public Education Rejuvenation Mission of Kerala Government, a two-day sub-district wise training camp on Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) applications for the Little KITE members would be conducted by KITE (Kerala Infrastructure and Technology for Education).

    As part of the PERM initiative,the Little KITE clubs currently include 58,380 student members from 1901 schools and it would be the 14,000 students out of these who excelled in school level trainings, who have been included for the 2-day camp.
    Training centers have been arranged in each of the 163 sub districts for the 2-day camp, which would only make use of Free and Open Source Software.

  • 'Netflix for Open Source' Wants Developers to Get Paid

    Henry Zhu makes software that's crucial to websites you use every day, even if you’ve never heard of him or his software.

    Zhu manages a program called Babel, which translates code written in one version of the programming language JavaScript into code written for another version of the language. That might not sound like a big deal. But because not all browsers support the latest version of JavaScript, Babel lets programmers use JavaScript’s latest features without worrying about which browsers will run the code. It's useful enough that it's been adopted by companies like Facebook, Netflix, and Salesforce.

  • Does Open Source Resolve the Storage Dilemma?

    Today’s business IT landscape has grown and exceeded beyond the highest estimates, and storage growth is no exception. People and machines are consuming unstructured data more than ever, and businesses have to continually reinforce their storage capabilities to keep up with the challenges of storing large volumes of business data.

    For CIOs, storage systems that can provide greater flexibility and choice, as well as the capability to identify unstructured data better to categorize, utilize and automate the management of it throughout its lifecycle are seen as the ideal solution.

    One answer to solving the storage issue is software-defined storage (SDS) which separates the physical storage hardware (data plane) from the data storage management logic or ‘intelligence’ (control plane). Needing no proprietary hardware components, SDS is the perfect cost-effective solution for enterprises as IT can use off-the-shelf, low-cost commodity hardware which is robust and flexible.

  • French cybersecurity agency open sources security hardened CLIP OS

    After developing it internally for over 10 years, the National Cybersecurity Agency of France (ANSSI) has decided to open source CLIP OS, a Linux-based operating system developed “to meet the specific needs of the [French] administration,” and is asking outside coders to contribute to its development.

  • Knowledge Sharing in Software Projects

    We are extremely grateful to those who filled out the survey. We feel that our research can help create better environments at work, where team members can share knowledge and innovate.

    Purpose of the Study
    Our research is focused on knowledge sharing in ambiguous circumstances. Six Sigma is a method of quality control that should reduce ambiguity, given its structured approach. We ask whether the reduction in ambiguity is coupled with a reduction in knowledge sharing as well.

  • Five Talend Open Source Team Members to Speak at ApacheCon North America
  • Gnanavelkandan Kathirvel, Director Member Technical Staff, AT&T, Board of Directors at OpenStack, TSC Chair of Akraino Edge Stack [Ed: IDG has been reduced to "sponsored" (fake, ads) 'articles'.]
  • Deutsche Telekom and Aricent to Open-Source Edge Software Platform for 5G

Openwashing and FUD

Filed under
OSS

Open-source alt-droid wants to know if it's still leaking data to Google

Filed under
OS
Android

/e/, a Google-free fork of Android, reached a milestone this month with its initial ROM release. It's available for download, so you can kick the tires, with nightly builds delivered via OTA (over the air) updates.

El Reg interviewed the project's leader, Gael Duval, in the summer. Duval launched and led the Linux Mandrake project. Back then it was called "eelo", but has morphed into just /e/ – which autocorrect features won't try to turn into "eels".

The project is significant in that the European Commission recently noted how few people switch platforms. If you're on Apple or Android today, the chances are you will be on the same platform, plugged into the same "ecosystem" of peripherals and services, in 10 years. So it wants more variety and competition within the Android world.

/e/ derives from LineageOS, itself a fork of CynaogenMod, so it can run on around 30 phone models including the Samsung Galaxy S7, and several recent-ish OnePlus devices.

Read more

Why Linux users should try Rust

Filed under
Development
Linux

Rust is a fairly young and modern programming language with a lot of features that make it incredibly flexible and very secure. It's also becoming quite popular, having won first place for the "most loved programming language" in the Stack Overflow Developer Survey three years in a row — 2016, 2017, and 2018.

Rust is also an open-source language with a suite of special features that allow it to be adapted to many different programming projects. It grew out of what was a personal project of a Mozilla employee back in 2006, was picked up as a special project by Mozilla a few years later (2009), and then announced for public use in 2010.

Read more

Also: Perl for the Web: Mojolicious 8.0 Released

Redefining Security Technology in Zephyr and Fuchsia

Filed under
Linux
Security

If you’re the type of person who uses the word “vuln” as a shorthand for code vulnerabilities, you should check out the presentation from the recent Linux Security Summit called “Security in Zephyr and Fuchsia.” In the talk, two researchers from the National Security Agency discuss their contributions to the nascent security stacks of two open source OS projects: Zephyr and Fuchsia.

If you’re worried about the fact that Edward Snowden’s old employer is helping to write next generation OSes that could run our lives in 10 years, consider the upsides. First, since these are open source projects, any nefarious backdoors would be clearly visible. Second, the NSA knows a thing or two about security. Stephen Smalley and James Carter, who discussed security in Zephyr and Fuchsia, respectively, are computer security researchers at the NSA’s Information Assurance Research group, which developed and maintains the security-enhanced SELinux and SE Android distributions. Smalley leads the NSA's Security Enhancements (SE) for the Internet of Things project and is a kernel and userspace maintainer for SELinux.

Read more

Also: Intel IWD Makes Another Step Closer To Version 1.0

Graphics: Vulkan CoC, Mesa Release, and Wayland/Weston News

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Vulkan Adopts A Code Of Conduct [Ed: New way for Khronos Group to control the private lives of developers and get rid of people whom it doesn't like for nontechnical reasons]

    The latest open-source project now officially adopting a Code of Conduct is Vulkan.

    Added today to the Vulkan documentation repository is a Code of Conduct file for Vulkan.

    That Code of Conduct is referencing the main Khronos Group Contributor Code of Conduct.

  • mesa 18.1.9

    Hi List,

    Due to me just forgetting to send out the release on Friday Confused, it's one work day late. Mesa 18.1.9 is now available for general consumption, it is the last release in the 18.1.x series, consider upgrading to 18.2.x for further updates.

    This has been another busy cycle, with roughly 35 real patches (excluding maintainer patches). We've seen long standing bugs in util code fixed, patches to anv and radv, as well as fixes to the android build system, and a few patches here and there across the rest of the code.

    Now that 18.1.x is all wrapped up, I'd like to say I've appreciated working with y'all as the maintainer for this cycle, thank you for your patience as I tried to get the process figured out.

    Dylan

  • Mesa 18.1.9 Released As The Last Of The Series

    Mesa 18.1.9 is now available as the last planned point release of last quarter's release stream.

    With Mesa 18.2.1 having been released, users are encouraged to upgrade to the stable Mesa 18.2 series. But if you're holding off on upgrading for one reason or another, Mesa 18.1.9 is one last push for bug fixes.

  • Wayland's Weston Will Now Respect Your VR HMD

    Wayland's Weston compositor will no longer try to takeover your virtual reality (VR) head-mounted display.

    As was the case too with the X.Org Server up until some months back, Wayland's Weston compositor currently would try to take over VR HMDs like the HTC Vive as just another monitor output... But thanks to the work led by Keith Packard under contract for Valve to improve the X.Org and DRM components for better SteamVR handling on Linux, there is now the non-desktop bit plumbed through the Linux kernel's DRM infrastructure so VR HMDs will be treated as non-desktop display outputs. So user-space finally can know if a display output isn't intended as just another desktop display but for a special use-case like virtual reality.

Siemens Issues An Oktoberfest Release Of Jailhouse 0.10 Hypervisor

Filed under
Linux

The developers at Siemens AG working on the Jailhouse Linux hypervisor found it wise to issue their version 0.10 release prior to heading out to Oktoberfest.

"O'zapft is, so better release before going to the Wiesn: We are happy to announce a new version of the partitioning hypervisor Jailhouse," began their Jailhouse 0.10 release message -- for those not familiar with the wonderful Bavarian culture, Oktoberfest kicked off on Saturday with the annual "O'zapft is!" (tapping of the first keg) and the wiesn is where this best event of the world takes place each year. Sadly, no Phoronix Oktoberfest event this year, but the Siemens engineers decided to celebrate with their Jailhouse 0.10 release.

Read more

Security: Microsoft Holes, Nitrokey, YubiKey and Location Privacy With Geoclue2

Filed under
Security
  • Security Flaw Found In Microsoft JET Database Engine by ZDE – Patch Expected In Windows October Update

    Zero Day Initiative or ZDI, a division of the Japanese multinational cyber security and defense company recently found a serious security flaw in Microsoft’s JET Database Engine which is inculcated and used in various different Microsoft products.

    ZDI reported that this vulnerability will allow potential attackers to execute an arbitrary code in Microsoft’s JET Database Engine, which is an underlying component of a database, a collection of information stored on a computer in a systematic way, this acts as the groundwork for many of Microsoft’s product, including the most widely used Microsoft Office. ZDI stated this to be an “out-of-bounds (OOB)” write in the JET, “An attacker could leverage this vulnerability to execute code under the context of the current process, however it does require user interaction since the target would need to open a malicious file,” ZDI further added in their report.

  • The Librem Key Makes Tamper Detection Easy

    From the beginning we have had big plans for the Librem Key. When we first announced our partnership with Nitrokey to produce the Librem Key all we could talk about publicly was the standard USB security token features it would have and some of the integration possibilities between the Librem laptop and Librem Key that would make security easier for the average person. What we couldn’t say at the time was that we were also working toward making the Librem Key do something that doesn’t exist anywhere else–integrate it with the tamper-evident Heads BIOS to make it incredibly easy to tell whether your BIOS has been tampered with. In this post I’m going to talk about why we wanted to add this feature, some of the work that went into it, and dive into some of the technologies that are working behind the scenes to help you understand how it works.

  • YubiKey 5 Series Launched, Google Chrome's Recent Questionable Privacy Practice, PlayOnLinux Alpha Version 5 Released, Android Turns Ten, and Fedora 29 Atomic and Cloud Test Day

    Yubico announced the launch of the YubiKey 5 series this morning, which are the first multi-protocol security keys to support FIDO2/WebAuthn and allow you to replace "weak password-based authentication with strong hardware-based authentication". You can purchase them here for $45.

  • Yubico Launches YubiKey 5 Series, the Industry’s First Multi-Protocol Security Keys Supporting FIDO2

    Yubico, the leading provider of hardware authentication security keys, today announced the launch of the YubiKey 5 Series, the industry’s first multi-protocol security keys supporting FIDO2/WebAuthn. With this new addition, the YubiKey 5 Series has the capability to replace weak password-based authentication with strong hardware-based authentication.

  • Recently in Geoclue

    Since people's location is a very sensitive piece of information, security of this information had been the core part of Geoclue2 design. The idea was (and still is) to only allow apps access to user's location with their explicit permission (that they could easily revoke later). When Geoclue2 was designed and then developed, we didn't have Flatpak. Surely, people were talking about the need for something like Flatpak but even with those ideas, it wasn't clear how location access will be handled.

    Hence we decided for geoclue to handle this itself, through an external app authorizing agent and implemented such an agent in GNOME Shell. Since there is no reliable way to identify an app on Linux, there were mixed reactions to this approach. While some thought it's good to have something rather than nothing, others thought it's better to wait for the time when we've the infrastructure that allows us to reliably identify apps.

  • Why I’m done with Chrome

    When Google launched Chrome ten years ago, it seemed like one of those rare cases where everyone wins. In 2008, the browser market was dominated by Microsoft, a company with an ugly history of using browser dominance to crush their competitors. Worse, Microsoft was making noises about getting into the search business. This posed an existential threat to Google’s internet properties.

    In this setting, Chrome was a beautiful solution. Even if the browser never produced a scrap of revenue for Google, it served its purpose just by keeping the Internet open to Google’s other products. As a benefit, the Internet community would receive a terrific open source browser with the best development team money could buy. This might be kind of sad for Mozilla (who have paid a high price due to Chrome) but overall it would be a good thing for Internet standards.

Semantik – An Open-Source Mind-Mapping App for KDE

Filed under
KDE

Mindmap diagrams are a productive way to visually organize information using hierarchies and relationship links among pieces of the whole. Today, we have a mind-mapping tool ideal for students, teachers, and creative users and it goes by the name of Semantik.

Semantik (formerly kdissert) is a mind-mapping KDE software for efficiently creating documents including thesis, presentations, and reports.

The created maps are converted into “flat” documents such as reports and presentations via document generators which can be used from both the GUI and Command line. You can edit the maps in linear view (as flat trees) or in 2-D and associate map nodes with text, pictures, tables, or diagrams.

Semantik also features its own internal diagramming tool (semantik-d) and combines all of its features (search function, UML-like widgets, etc.) into a simple and organized GUI.

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

Mozilla: Privacy, R.I.P., and Consent Management at Mozfest 2018

  • Firefox collects data on you through hidden add-ons

    Mozilla, the organisation that produces the Firefox browser and makes a loud noise about its open source credentials, is quietly collecting telemetry data on its users by the use of hidden add-ons, even though publicly visible telemetry controls are not selected.

  • R.I.P., Charles W. Moore, a fine man who liked fine Macs
    A farewell and au revoir to a great gentleman in making the most of your old Mac, Charles W. Moore, who passed away at his home in rural Canada on September 16 after a long illness. Mr Moore was an early fan of TenFourFox, even back in the old bad Firefox 4 beta days, and he really made his famous Pismo PowerBook G3 systems work hard for it.
  • Consent management at Mozfest 2018
    Good news. It looks like we're having a consent management mini-conference as part of Mozfest next month. (I'm one of the organizers for the Global Consent Manager session, and plan to attend the others.)

Android Leftovers

LibreOffice: A history of document freedom

My reminiscing led me to reach out to the Document Foundation, which governs LibreOffice, to learn more about the history of this open source productivity software. The Document Foundation's team told me that "StarWriter, the ancestor of the LibreOffice suite, was developed as proprietary software by Marco Börries, a German student, to write his high school final thesis." He formed a company called Star Division to develop the software. In 1999, Sun Microsystems bought Star Division for $73.5 million, changed the software's name to OpenOffice.org, and released the code as open source. Anyone could download the office suite at no charge for personal use. The Document Foundation told me, "For almost 10 years, the software was developed under Sun stewardship, from version 1.0 to version 3.2. It started with a dual license—LGPL and the proprietary SISSL (Sun Industry Standard Software License)—but it evolved to pure LGPL from version 2.0." Read more

Learn the 37 most frequently used shortcuts in GIMP

GIMP is a fantastic artist's tool for editing digital images, especially with the bevy of impressive features in the recent release of version 2.10. Of course, like all creative applications, you can get working more quickly if you can make yourself familiar with the various keyboard shortcuts and hotkeys available. GIMP, of course, gives you the ability to customize these shortcuts to match what you're personally comfortable with. However, the default shortcuts that GIMP ships with are impressive and generally easy to get used to. This cheat sheet is not an exhaustive list of all of the defaults GIMP has available. Instead, it covers the most frequently used shortcuts so you can get to work as fast as possible. Plus, there should be a few in here that make you aware of a few features that maybe you weren't aware of. Read more