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Thursday, 15 Nov 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Authorsort icon Replies Last Post
Story 5 Ways Xoopit Extends Gmail adriantry 27/04/2009 - 10:27am
Story Audacity: The Versatile Audio Tool for Everyone adriantry 12/05/2009 - 10:03am
Forum topic Dialup dilemma afs 05/06/2008 - 5:40pm
Blog entry Distribution Release: EnGarde Secure Linux 3.0.21 akramshaikh 08/10/2008 - 7:55am
Blog entry 25 Cool & Beautiful Linux Wallpapers akramshaikh 31/08/2009 - 6:50pm
Blog entry Ubuntu 10.04 LTS Finally Released! akramshaikh 29/04/2010 - 7:18pm
Story Top 10 Addictive games on Linux alieneyes 06/03/2010 - 5:07pm
Blog entry “Can’t locate module” Error in Linux and Data Loss allen 06/10/2008 - 4:52am
Blog entry “No such file or directory” Error in Linux allen 15/10/2008 - 4:47am
Blog entry ‘attempt to access beyond end of device’ Linux Error allen 27/03/2009 - 6:45am

Games: Don't Starve, Long Dark and Hazelnut Bastille

Filed under
Gaming

The Performance Impact Of Spectre Mitigation On POWER9

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Over the past year we have looked extensively at the performance impact of Spectre mitigations on x86_64 CPUs but now with having the Raptor Talos II in our labs, here are some benchmarks to see the performance impact of IBM's varying levels of Spectre mitigation for POWER9.

By default, Raptor Computing Systems ships their system in the safest mode of providing full kernel and user-space protection against Spectre Variant Two. But by editing a file from the OpenBMC environment it's possible to control the Spectre protections on their libre hardware. Besides the full/user protection against Spectre there is also kernel-only protection that is more akin to the protection found on x86_64 CPUs. Additionally, there is the ability to completely disable the protection for yielding the greatest performance (or what would be considered standard pre-2018) but leaving your hardware vulnerable to Spectre. More details on controlling the Spectre protections on Talos II hardware can be found via the RaptorCS.com Wiki.

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Linux 4.20-rc2

Filed under
Linux

Fairly normal week, aside from me traveling.

Shortlog appended, but it all looks fine: about half drivers, wih the
rest being the usual architecture updates, tooling, networking, and
some filesystem updates.

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Also: Linux 4.20-rc2 Released With EXT4 Bug Fixes, New NVIDIA Turing USB-C Driver

DXVK 0.92

Filed under
Gaming
  • DXVK 0.92 is out with fixes for LA Noire, Shadow of the Tomb Raider and more

    DXVK, the excellent Vulkan-based D3D11 and D3D10 implementation used together with Wine that forms part of Valve's Steam Play has a fresh brew ready. The progress is amazing as always, that's the twenty-sixth release this year!

  • DXVK 0.92 Released With Fixes For Shadow of the Tomb Raider, Other Games

    DXVK 0.92 is the newly-minuted release and it adds support for bit-accurate clears for 11G11B10 UAVs in order to take care of an error message with the Shadow of the Tomb Raider game. DXVK 0.92 also has build issue fixes in conjunction with select versions of Meson, support for the DMOVC instruction that should help out some situations, rendering fixes for LA Noire, and visual issues have been resolved with Lords of the Fallen and The Surge.

Installing Vundle: The Plugin Manager For Vim

Filed under
Linux

Today, this guide will present a step-by-step guide of how to install and configure Vundle (Vim Bundle) from GitHub, and what issues you may face when installing Vundle. As many of you may know, vim is a console-based text editor that has numerous advanced features. One such feature is that its functionality can be extended and customized using plugins written by other people. Managing these plugins, however, can be rather tedious. Vundle attempts to assist users in managing these plugins for you by providing an interface.

Read<br />
more

Ubuntu 19.04 Daily Builds Available to Download

Filed under
Ubuntu

Prep a partition because Ubuntu 19.04 daily builds are now available to download.

A new “Disco Dingo” daily build will be produced each and every day from now until the Ubuntu 19.04 release date in April 2019.

For dedicated Ubuntu developers, testers, and community enthusiasts the arrival of daily builds is the horn blare that declares the development cycle well and truly open.

Furthermore, these images are the only way to sample the upcoming release before a solitary beta release pops out sometime in late March.

Do remember that Ubuntu daily build ISOs are intended for testing and development purposes only. Don’t run these images as the primary OS on mission critical machines — and yes, that includes your brother’s laptop — unless you really know what you’re doing and (more importantly) how you can undo it.

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Publishing Applications via F-Droid

Filed under
Android
HowTos

In 2016 I started working on a set of Python modules for reading and writing bytecode for the Dalvik virtual machine so that I could experiment with creating applications on Android without having to write them in Java. In the time since then, on and off, I have written a few small applications to learn about Android and explore the capabilities of the devices I own. Some of these were examples, demos and tests for the compiler framework, but others were intended to be useful to me. I could have just downloaded applications to perform the tasks I wanted to do, but I wanted minimal applications that I could understand and trust, so I wrote my own simple applications and was happy to install them locally on my phone.

In September I had the need to back up some data from a phone I no longer use, so I wrote a few small applications to dump data to the phone's storage area, allowing me to retrieve it using the adb tool on my desktop computer. I wondered if other people might find applications like these useful and asked on the FSFE's Android mailing list. In the discussion that followed it was suggested that I try to publish my applications via F-Droid.

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7 Best free & Open source Linux Mint & Ubuntu music player

Filed under
Linux
OSS
Ubuntu

Are you looking for a best Ubuntu Music player to listen to your favorite music while working on the Linux operating system, then there are dozens of Linux music payers. You just need to find out the right one for your taste. Although the Ubuntu already comes with the music app to play songs and other audio files, however, you can install additional one to get more features and experience.

To help you with this, we have created this list of top Linux music player those work on both Ubuntu and Linux Mint. If you like any of them then you can also see the installation article of that particular music player on Ubuntu, the link has given with each of them. So, without further delay let’s see the Top & Best free plus open-source Linux Mint and Ubuntu Music player.

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Kernel and Graphics: EXT4, AMDGPU and Mesa

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • EXT4 Getting Many Fixes In Linux 4.20, Including For Some Really Old Leaks

    Last month I reported on a number of fixes for really old bugs in the EXT4 code with some of the issues dating back to the Linux 2.6 days in the EXT3 file-system code that was carried over to the EXT4 driver. Those fixes are now working their way into the Linux 4.20 stable kernel. 

    Ted Ts'o sent out a fixes pull request today containing 18 patches. Sixteen of those patches are from Vasily Averin who was nailing these really old bugs/leaks. Of them, Ted noted, "A large number of ext4 bug fixes, mostly buffer and memory leaks on error return cleanup paths."

  • AMDGPU DRM-Next Driver Picks Up Support For Vega 20 "A1" Stepping

    Among the work queuing in the AMDGPU DRM-Next branch for what will in turn appear with the next kernel cycle (Linux 4.21) is support for Vega 20 A1 ASICs.

    The current Linux 4.20 cycle appears to have good support for Vega 20 GPUs at least from our tracking without having any access to the GPUs for now, but it looks like the production graphics cards will be on a new "A1" stepping rather than A0 that was used for the bring-up of this first 7nm Vega GPU.

  • Gallium D3D9 "Nine" Support Gets New Patches To Help Fight Lag Without Tearing

    While most Linux gamers these days are mesmerized by DXVK for mapping Direct3D 10/11 to Vulkan for better handling Windows games on Linux, for those with older Direct3D 9 era games there is still the Gallium Nine initiative for D3D9 implemented as a Mesa Gallium state tracker. A new patch series posted this weekend will make that Gallium Nine experience even better.

    Axel Davy who has been the lead developer on the Gallium D3D9 state tracker posted a set of two patches that allow the thread_submit=true option to be used with tearfree_discard=true option.

Wine and Games: Wine-Staging 3.20 and Virtual Reality at Valve

Filed under
Gaming
  • Wine-Staging 3.20 Released, Fixes A Four Year Old Rendering Bug

    Building off Friday's release of Wine 3.20 is now Wine-Staging 3.20 with minor work added into this testing/experimental blend of Wine that tends to particularly suit gamers better than the upstream code-base.

    Wine-Staging 3.20 still contains more than 850 patches on top of upstream Wine, but at least more patches are being deemed stable and trickling into upstream... Just weeks ago that patch count was closer to 900.

  • Reports: Valve making their own VR HMD and apparently a new VR Half-Life

    It appears Valve are truly getting more serious about Virtual Reality as they appear to be making their own headset. On top of that, apparently a new Half-Life VR game is coming.

    Leaked to an imgur album, which contains multiple shots of the new hardware. These includes shots clearly showing a Valve logo:

Sourcegraph: An Open-Source Source Code Search Engine

Filed under
Development

In a recent announcement, a Code Search and Navigation tool named Sourcegraph was declared Open Source. As it makes navigating through Source Code much more convenient, the tool itself going Open Source is definitely a big plus for developers!

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KDE Usability & Productivity, Belated Writeup About Akademy 2018 by Sandro Knauß

Filed under
KDE
  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 44

    Week 44 in Usability & Productivity is coming right up! This week was a bit lighter in terms of the number of bullet points, but we got some really great new features, and there’s a lot of cool stuff in progress that I hope to be able to blog about next week!

  • KDE Plasma Now Supports WireGuard, Alt-Tab Switching Improvements

    The WireGuard secure VPN tunnel is not in the mainline kernel yet but the KDE Plasma desktop is the latest project already adding support for it, which can be useful today if making use of WireGuard's DKMS kernel modules.

    KDE Plasma now supports WireGuard VPN tunnels if enabling the NetworkManager WireGuard plug-in. Previously KDE Plasma didn't play well with this plug-in but now it's all been fixed up to deliver a first-rate experience for this open-source VPN tech.

    This week KDE also received some alt+tab switching improvements for screen readers and supporting the use of the keyboard to switch between items. These alt+tab window switching and WireGuard VPN support will be part of the KDE Plasma 5.15 release.

  • Akademy 2018 Vienna

    You have probably read a lot about Akademy 2018 recently, and how great it was.

    For me it was a great experience too and this year I met a lot of KDE people, both old and new. This is always nice.
    I arrived on Thursday so I had one day to set everything up and had a little bit of time to get to know the city.

    On Friday evening I enjoyed the "Welcoming evening", but I was very surprised when Volker told me that I would be on stage the next day, talking about privacy.

    He told me that someone should have informed me several days before. The scheduled speaker, Sebastian, couldn't make it to Akademy.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • NeuroFedora update: week 45
  • After NLL: Moving from borrowed data and the sentinel pattern

    Continuing on with my “After NLL” series, I want to look at another common error that I see and its solution: today’s choice is about moves from borrowed data and the Sentinel Pattern that can be used to enable them.

  • LibreOffice Landing New Custom Widgets Theme, Powered By Cairo

    In an interesting flurry of commits since yesterday, a new custom widgets theme is landing inside this open-source office suite.

    Tomaž Vajngerl and Ashod Nakashian of Collabora has been working on these custom widgets for LibreOffice. The custom widgets are being rendered via Cairo, as an alternative to utilizing the standard GTK or Qt widgets, etc. It appears at least for now much of this custom widget work is intended for use with LibreOffice in its headless mode. At this point the work still appears to be in the very early stages but we'll see where it leads.

  • FDA releases open source code, open source software gets emotional, and more news

    In this edition of our open source news roundup, we take a look at two open source companies getting funding, the FDA open sources app code, Barcelona upping its open source investment, and more.

  •  

  • Supply-chain attack on cryptocurrency exchange gate.io

    On November 3, attackers successfully breached StatCounter, a leading web analytics platform. This service is used by many webmasters to gather statistics on their visitors – a service very similar to Google Analytics. To do so, webmasters usually add an external JavaScript tag incorporating a piece of code from StatCounter – www.statcounter[.]com/counter/counter.js – into each webpage. Thus, by compromising the StatCounter platform, attackers can inject JavaScript code in all websites that use StatCounter.

Servers: Red Hat and Kubernetes

Filed under
Red Hat
Server
  • Cloudy weather ahead for IBM and Red Hat?

    The world is buzzing about the software industry’s largest acquisition ever. This “game changing” IBM acquisition of Red Hat for $34 billion eclipses Microsoft’s $26.2 billion of LinkedIn, which set the previous record. And it’s the third largest tech acquisition in history behind Dell buying EMC for $64 billion in 2015 and Avago’s buyout of Broadcom for $37 billion the same year.

    Wall Street certainly gets nervous when it sees these lofty price tags. IBM’s stock was down 4.2 percent following the announcement, and there are probably more concerns over a broader IBM selloff around how much IBM is paying for Red Hat.

    This sets the stage for massive expectations on IBM to leverage this asset as a critical turning point in its history. Given that IBM’s Watson AI poster child has failed to create sustainable growth, could this be their best opportunity to right the ship once and for all? Or is this mega merger a complicated clash of cultures and products that will make it hard to realize the full potential?

  • A Slow Motion Strategic Train Wreck With The Color Blue

    IBM's high premium price for the Red Hat buyout places its stamp of approval on Linux cloud services while cheapening its own brand value.

  • Road to ansible-bender 0.2.0

    I’m pleased to announce that ansible-bender is now available in version 0.2.0.

    I would like to share a story with you how I used ansible-bender to release the 0.2.0 version.

  • VMware Buys Kubernetes-based Heptio to Boost Its Multi-Cloud Strategy

Arduino Gets a Command Line Interface

Filed under
Hardware
OSS

When using an Arduino, at least once you’ve made it past blinking LEDs, you might start making use of the serial connection to send and receive information from the microcontroller. Communicating with the board while it’s interacting with its environment is a crucial way to get information in real-time. Usually, that’s as far as it goes, but [Pieter] wanted to take it a step farther than that with his command line interpreter (CLI) for the Arduino.

The CLI allows the user to run Unix-like commands directly on the Arduino. This means control of GPIO and the rest of the features of the microcontroller via command line. The CLI communicates between the microcontroller and the ANSI/VT100 terminal emulator of your choosing on your computer, enabling a wealth of new methods of interacting with an Arduino.

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More in Tux Machines

Qt/KDE: Qt for Python, Inkscape Dark Theme on KDE Plasma, Atelier at Maker Faire and QtCon 2018!

  • Python and Qt: 3,000 hours of developer insight
    With Qt for Python released, it’s time to look at the powerful capabilities of these two technologies. This article details one solopreneur’s experiences. [...] The big problem with Electron is performance. In particular, the startup time was too high for a file manager: On an admittedly old machine from 2010, simply launching Electron took five seconds. I admit that my personal distaste for JavaScript also made it easier to discount Electron. Before I go off on a rant, let me give you just one detail that I find symptomatic: Do you know how JavaScript sorts numbers? Alphabetically. ’nuff said. After considering a few technologies, I settled on Qt. It’s cross-platform, has great performance and supports custom styles. What’s more, you can use it from Python. This makes at least me orders of magnitude more productive than the default C++.
  • Inkscape Dark Theme on KDE Plasma
    On KDE Plasma, it's very easy to setup Inkscape Dark Theme. To do so, go to System Settings > Application Style > GNOME/GTK+ Style > under GTK+ Style: switch all themes to Dark ones and give check mark to Prefer Dark Theme > Apply. Now your Inkscape should turned into dark mode. To revert back, just revert the theme selections. This trick works on Kubuntu or any other GNU/Linux system as long as it uses Plasma as its desktop environment.
  • Atelier at Maker Faire and QtCon 2018!
    On the weekend of November 3 and 4, it happened on Rio de Janeiro the first Maker Faire of Latin America. And I was able to do a talk about Atelier and the current status of our project. The event hold more than 1.500 people on the first day, that saw a lot of talks and the exposition of makers of all over the country that came to Rio to participate in this edition of the Maker Faire.

Security: Updates, Systematic Evaluation of Transient Execution Attacks and Defenses, New IoT Security Regulations and GPU Side-Channel Attacks

  • Security updates for Thursday
  • A Systematic Evaluation of Transient Execution Attacks and Defenses

    [...] we present a sound and extensible systematization of transient execution attacks. Our systematization uncovers 7 (new) transient execution attacks that have been overlooked and not been investigated so far. This includes 2 new Meltdown variants: Meltdown-PK on Intel, and Meltdown-BR on Intel and AMD. It also includes 5 new Spectre mistraining strategies. We evaluate all 7 attacks in proof-of-concept implementations on 3 major processor vendors (Intel, AMD, ARM). Our systematization does not only yield a complete picture of the attack surface, but also allows a systematic evaluation of defenses. Through this systematic evaluation, we discover that we can still mount transient execution attacks that are supposed to be mitigated by rolled out patches.

  • New IoT Security Regulations
    Due to ever-evolving technological advances, manufacturers are connecting consumer goods­ -- from toys to light bulbs to major appliances­ -- to the Internet at breakneck speeds. This is the Internet of Things, and it's a security nightmare. The Internet of Things fuses products with communications technology to make daily life more effortless. Think Amazon's Alexa, which not only answers questions and plays music but allows you to control your home's lights and thermostat. Or the current generation of implanted pacemakers, which can both receive commands and send information to doctors over the Internet. But like nearly all innovation, there are risks involved. And for products born out of the Internet of Things, this means the risk of having personal information stolen or devices being overtaken and controlled remotely. For devices that affect the world in a direct physical manner -- ­cars, pacemakers, thermostats­ -- the risks include loss of life and property.
  • University Researchers Publish Paper On GPU Side-Channel Attacks
    University researchers out of University of California Riverside have published a paper this week detailing vulnerabilities in current GPU architectures making them vulnerable to side-channel attacks akin to Spectre and Meltdown. With their focus on NVIDIA GPUs, UCLA Riverside researchers demonstrated attacks both for graphics and compute by exploiting the GPU's performance counters. Demonstrated attacks included a browser-based attack, extracting passwords / keystroke logging, and even the possibility of exposing a CUDA neural network algorithm.

VirtualBox 6.0 Beta 2

  • Announcement: VirtualBox 6.0 Beta 2 released
    Please do NOT use this VirtualBox Beta release on production machines! A VirtualBox Beta release should be considered a bleeding-edge release meant for early evaluation and testing purposes. You can download the binaries here: http://download.virtualbox.org/virtualbox/6.0.0_BETA2 Please do NOT open bug reports at our public bugtracker but use our VirtualBox Beta Feedback forum at https://forums.virtualbox.org/viewforum.php?f=15 to report any problems with the Beta. Please concentrate on reporting regressions since VirtualBox 5.2! Version 6.0 will be a new major release. Please see the forum at https://forums.virtualbox.org/viewtopic.php?f=15&t=90315 for an incomplete list of changes. Thanks for your help! Michael
  • VirtualBox 6.0 Beta 2 Adds File Manager For Host/Guest File Copies, OS/2 Shared Folder
    Last month Oracle rolled out the public beta of VirtualBox 6.0 though didn't include many user-facing changes. They have now rolled out a second beta that does add in a few more features. VirtualBox 6.0 Beta 2 was released today and to its user-interface is a new file manager that allows the user to control the guest file-system with copying file objects between the host and guest. Also improved with VirtualBox 6.0 Beta 2 is better shared folder auto-mounting with the VBox Guest Additions. This beta even brings initial shared folder support to the guest additions for OS/2.

Thunderbird version 60.3.1 now Available, Includes Fixes for Cookie Removal and Encoding Issues

Thunderbird happens to be one of the most famous Email client. It is free and an open source one which was developed by the Mozilla Foundation back in 2003, fifteen years ago. From a very basic interface, it has come a long way to be what it is today in 2018. With these updates, a recent one into the 60.x series from the 52.x series was a significant one. While the 60.x (60.3.0) update started rolling out, Mozilla was keen to push out 60.3.1. This new version of Thunderbird had a few bugs and kinks here and there which needed to be addressed which Mozilla did, most of them at least. Read more