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Friday, 20 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Authorsort icon Replies Last Post
Story 5 Ways Xoopit Extends Gmail adriantry 27/04/2009 - 10:27am
Story Audacity: The Versatile Audio Tool for Everyone adriantry 12/05/2009 - 10:03am
Forum topic Dialup dilemma afs 05/06/2008 - 5:40pm
Blog entry Distribution Release: EnGarde Secure Linux 3.0.21 akramshaikh 08/10/2008 - 7:55am
Blog entry 25 Cool & Beautiful Linux Wallpapers akramshaikh 31/08/2009 - 6:50pm
Blog entry Ubuntu 10.04 LTS Finally Released! akramshaikh 29/04/2010 - 7:18pm
Story Top 10 Addictive games on Linux alieneyes 06/03/2010 - 5:07pm
Blog entry “Can’t locate module” Error in Linux and Data Loss allen 06/10/2008 - 4:52am
Blog entry “No such file or directory” Error in Linux allen 15/10/2008 - 4:47am
Blog entry ‘attempt to access beyond end of device’ Linux Error allen 27/03/2009 - 6:45am

Linux Foundation LFCS: James Medeiros

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

I spent my formative years glued to the CRT screen of my 486. In 1997 I was 12 years old and had discovered the local, text-only FreeNet -- my portal to the world's collective knowledge via 2400 baud modem. I quickly became familiar with the Lynx browser and eventually found the Schoolnet MOO (an object-oriented MUD which is still running today) where I made fast friends and began to explore basic coding in the environment. In high school, I was fortunate enough to have a fabulous teacher who gave us free time to experiment with installing our choice of operating systems on machines with swappable hard drives. My first Linux distribution was Mandriva (Mandrake at the time), but I've only recently made the switch to Linux as my primary OS.

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5 Raspberry Pi Operating Systems That Aren’t Linux

Filed under
OS

Looking for a way to get the most out of your Raspberry Pi? Running a project that just needs something more? Odd as it may seem, Linux might be the problem, so why not consider a non-Linux operating system? Several have been released, or adapted, for use on the Raspberry Pi.

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Linux and the beauty of browser-based games

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

Judged across all platforms and architectures, Linux is the most popular operating system on the planet, surpassing even Microsoft Windows. But one aspect of computing that the open source operating has trailed the Windows operating system is desktop gaming, where Linux only occupies a small percentage of the (desktop) market. As a result many of the most popular Windows desktop games are not available on Linux. So Windows users contemplating switching to Linux must first answer this question: Is my favorite Windows desktop game available on Linux?

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Tiny, rugged IoT gateways offer 10-year Linux support

Filed under
Linux

Moxa announced a line of rugged, compact “UC 2100” IoT gateways that run 10-year available Moxa Industrial Linux and optional ThingsPro Gateway middleware on a Cortex-A8 SoC.

Moxa announced the UC-2100 Series industrial IoT gateways along with its new UC 3100 and UC 5100 Series, but it offered details only on the UC-2100. All three series will offer ruggedization features, compact footprints, and on some models, 4G LTE support. They all run Moxa Industrial Linux and optional ThingsPro Gateway data acquisition software on Arm-based SoCs.

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today's leftovers

  • Civil Infrastructure Platform Takes Open Source to an Industrial Scale

    One of the less discussed uses for open source software is actually in the role that it plays for industrial-scale hardware. Whereas power plants, factories, and other large infrastructure projects were once ruled over nearly entirely by operational technology (OT) control systems, in recent years, information technology — built on open source software — has been making its way onto the scene in an increasingly significant way.

    Additionally, another surprising fact is that the this push to use open source in complex hardware operations has been embraced by industry leaders. One company helping to lead the charge is Siemens, one of the world’s largest producers of hardware devices, Siemens. Siemens plays an active role in advancing open source in the industrial space, with a focus on making open source security a priority for development, in part through their involvement in the Civil Infrastructure Platform (CIP) initiative.

  • Final Directive is a surprisingly good shooter, we have a copy to give away

    Final Directive is a pretty good shooter that released for Linux back in February and we have a copy to give away.

  • The Vrms Program Helps You To Find Non-free Software In Debian
  • ‘Dead Cells’ Was Supposed to Be in a Different Genre

    And we’re going to release the Mac and Linux versions as soon as we can.

  • [Krita] Interview with Runend

    I have tried some of the features, especially the brush engine, UI/UX, layering, animation tools, I love all of them! And of course it’s free and open source.

  • Kdenlive in Paris

    The next weeks will be exciting for Kdenlive! First, there is a Kdenlive sprint, that will take place in Paris from the 25th to the 29th of april. We are very proud to be hosted at the Carrefour Numérique in the Cité des Sciences, Paris.

  • Free software log (March 2018)

    I did get a few software releases out this month, although not as much as I'd planned and I still have a lot of new releases pending that are waiting for me to have a bit more free time.

    control-archive got a 1.8.0 release, which catches up from accumulated changes over the past year plus and falls back to GnuPG v1 for signature processing. One of the projects that I'd like to find time for is redoing all of my scattered code for making and checking Usenet control messages.

  • Update desktop components for released version
  • Building my ideal router for $50

    After my Asus N66U kicked the bucket, I considered a few options: another all-in-one router, upgrade to something like an EdgeRouter, or brew something custom. When I read the Ars Technica article espousing the virtues of building your own router, that pretty much settled it: DIY it is.

    I’ve got somewhat of a psychological complex when it comes to rolling my own over-engineered solutions, but I did set some general goals: the end result should be cheap, low-power, well-supported by Linux, and extensible. Incidentally, ARM boards fit many of these requirements, and some like the Raspberry Pi have stirred up so much community activity that there’s great support for the ARM platform, even though it may feel foreign from x86.

    I’ve managed to cobble together a device that is not only dirt cheap for what it does, but is extremely capable in its own right. If you have any interest in building your own home router, I’ll demonstrate here that doing so is not only feasible, but relatively easy to do and offers a huge amount of utility - from traffic shaping, to netflow monitoring, to dynamic DNS.

    I built it using the espressobin, Arch Linux Arm, and Shorewall.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Bringing open source to the network edge with Akraino

    Innovation at the network edge will bring numerous benefits to telcos and their users. Intel is a major participant in edge computing, and Rajesh Gadiya explains what are the key technologies for edge deployments and how open source is now being used at the edge? Intel announced at ONS that it is working with AT&T on the Akraino Edge Stack project to create an open source software stack supporting high-availability cloud services optimized for edge computing systems and applications.

  • Get ready for Ceph Day London 2018

    Next week the combined Ceph and Cloudstack Day will be hosted in London (2018-04-19). The agenda is online, get ready and your ticket to a great event!

  • TenFourFox FPR7b2 available

    Despite being currently in the grip of my annual case of bronchitis, in which I sweat and secrete more foul cloudy phlegm than Jabba the Hutt, TenFourFox Feature Parity Release 7 beta 2 is now available for testing (downloads, hashes, release notes).

  • The Internet Is Facing a Health Scare, Suggests Mozilla Report

    Mozilla earlier this week launched the first full edition of its Internet Health Report.

    The report is "an open source effort to explore the state of human life on the Internet," wrote Mozilla Executive Director Mark Surman in an online post.

    It consists of research and analysis about the Internet compiled by researchers, engineers, data scientists, policy analysts and artists in Mozilla's extended community.

    The digital rights, open source, and Internet freedom movements stand for the idea that it is possible to build a digital world that is open, accessible and welcoming to all, according to Mozilla.

  • Xiaomi promises to adhere better to the rules of Android for new devices

    Xiaomi might be one of the largest Android device manufacturers in the world, but it has a knack for skirting the law when it comes to open source rules and regulations. In a statement sent to XDA Developers, Xiaomi said that will change with future device launches.

  • How open source is democratizing technology, upcoming events in North America, and more news

Security: Open Source Security Podcast, Old JavaScript Crypto Flaw and New FUD-based Marketing

Filed under
Security

Apple Threats

Filed under
Mac
  • Apple threatens leakers with criminal action in leaked memo – report

     

    The memo about leaking, which was leaked to Bloomberg and published on Friday, threatened employees with criminal consequences and shines a harsh light on the Silicon Valley company’s aggressive surveillance of its own employees and intensive investigative efforts to catch and punish leakers.  

  • In a Leaked Memo, Apple Warns Employees to Stop Leaking Information

     

    The Cupertino, California-based company said in a lengthy memo posted to its internal blog that it "caught 29 leakers," last year and noted that 12 of those were arrested. "These people not only lose their jobs, they can face extreme difficulty finding employment elsewhere," Apple added. The company declined to comment on Friday.

  • Apple's memo warning employees about leaking information is predictably leaked

    An internal memo warning Apple employees that leaking information could result in legal action and criminal charges has, rather predictably, been leaked.

  • Apple Sued an Independent iPhone Repair Shop Owner and Lost

    Last year, Apple’s lawyers sent Henrik Huseby, the owner of a small electronics repair shop in Norway, a letter demanding that he immediately stop using aftermarket iPhone screens at his repair business and that he pay the company a settlement.

    Norway’s customs officials had seized a shipment of 63 iPhone 6 and 6S replacement screens on their way to Henrik’s shop from Asia and alerted Apple; the company said they were counterfeit.

    In order to avoid being sued, Apple asked Huseby for “copies of invoices, product lists, order forms, payment information, prints from the internet and other relevant material regarding the purchase [of screens], including copies of any correspondence with the supplier … we reserve the right to request further documentation at a later date.”

4 cool new projects to try in COPR for April

Filed under
Red Hat
Software

COPR is a collection of personal repositories for software that isn’t carried in Fedora. Some software doesn’t conform to standards that allow easy packaging. Or it may not meet other Fedora standards, despite being free and open source. COPR can offer these projects outside the Fedora set of packages. Software in COPR isn’t supported by Fedora infrastructure or signed by the project. However, it can be a neat way to try new or experimental software.

Here’s a set of new and interesting projects in COPR.

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The Best Free Office Suites for Linux in 2018

Filed under
LibO
OSS
OOo

FossMint is particular about FOSS and related projects or partnerships. Sadly, though, not all the applications that are vital to certain needs fall under that category. Maybe someday they will but until then, potential users deserve the right to know about all their alternatives.

All the listed software are free to use with similar features to the ones in Microsoft’s Office Suite and even documents that are compatible with the same.

Some are desktop software while others are browser-based so you have the option to choose which one better suits your setup.

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10 Best Media Server Software for Linux in 2018

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Movies

A media server is simply a specialized file server or computer system for storing media (digital videos/movies, audio/music, and images) which can be accessed over a network.

In order to setup a media server, you need computer hardware (or perhaps a cloud server) as well as a software that enables you to organize your media files, and makes it easier to stream and/or share them with friends and family.

In this article, we will share with you a list of 10 best media server software for Linux systems. By the time you complete this article, you will be able to choose the most appropriate software to setup your home/office/cloud media server powered by a Linux system.

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Also: 5 Reasons Kodi Users Should Just Switch To Plex Already

Add ‘New Document’ Option in Right Click Context Menu in Ubuntu 18.04

Filed under
HowTos

New versions of Ubuntu like 17.10, 18.04 etc don’t include the option to create a new text document in right-click context menu anymore. Here is how to bring that useful option back.
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For project safety backup your people, not just your data

Filed under
OSS

The FSF was founded in 1985, Perl in 1987 (happy 30th birthday, Perl!), and Linux in 1991. The term open source and the Open Source Initiative both came into being in 1998 (and turn 20 years old in 2018). Since then, free and open source software has grown to become the default choice for software development, enabling incredible innovation.

We, the greater open source community, have come of age. Millions of open source projects exist today, and each year the GitHub Octoverse reports millions of new public repositories. We rely on these projects every day, and many of us could not operate our services or our businesses without them.

So what happens when the leaders of these projects move on? How can we help ease those transitions while ensuring that the projects thrive? By teaching and encouraging succession planning.

Read more

Also:

  • Dear software manager, working in the open for the very first time? Challenges (Sleepy

    When moving from managing software projects/teams in classic corporate environments into Open Source (FOSS) projects, there are several new challenges any front line manager will need to face.

  • Dear software manager, working in the open for the very first time? Face the challenges (II)

    Working in the open involve new challenges that requires a different mindset to be successfully faced by front line managers moving from corporate to Open Source projects. They will need to develop new habits and the most effective way to do so, in my view, is understanding since day one that your focus will need to move towards alignment instead of insisting in autonomy, according to my mental model. With that in mind, my advice is to pay special attention to those habits that will lead you to become a servant for your managees, promoting transparency by example…

  • Android: postmarketOS Update, Android P Names, and Fuchsia Friday

    Filed under
    Android
    Google
    • Introducing #postmarketOS-lowlevel

      As a community project, and one that encourages contributors to work on what they like, we have attracted people with a broad range of interests and skill levels. Recently a small hacking group #postmarketOS-lowlevel has emerged, and its masterminds @McBitter and @unrznbl are eager to introduce you to the madness that awaits when digging deeper and deeper in the embedded hardware and software stack.

      But before we get started, please keep in mind that these are moon shots. So while there is some little progress, it's mostly about letting fellow hackers know what we've tried and what we're up to, in the hopes of attracting more interested talent to our cause. After all, our philosophy is to keep the community informed and engaged during the development phase!

      For those new to postmarketOS, we are a group of developers, hackers, and hobbyists who have come together with a common goal of giving a ten year life cycle to mobile phones. This is accomplished by using a simple and sustainable architecture borrowed from typical Linux distributions, instead of using Android's build system. The project is at an early stage and isn't useful for most people at this point. Check out the newly-updated front page for more information, the previous blog post for recent achievements, and the closed pull requests to be informed about what's going on up to the current minute.

    • What Are Some Android P Name Predictions? We Found 17 Desserts
    • Fuchsia Friday: The dream team behind Google’s new OS

      On the Fuchsia team there are approximately 160 Google employees who have contributed to one of the four layers of Fuchsia. This is not counting managers and team leads who haven’t directly contributed code. Comparing it to other OS teams, this is not a significant number, and is a sign of the stage of development Google likely considers Fuchsia to be in.

    Review: Neptune 5.0

    Filed under
    Reviews

    What I tended to find with Neptune was if I stuck with the default settings and used applications in the normal or most straight forward fashion, then things went smoothly. But when I stepped off the straight and narrow path, things tended to unravel. Trying Enlightenment or Wayland sessions, for example, did not work well, but things went smoothly while using Plasma's X session. Checking for updates as soon as I logged in resulted in no packages being found, but if I waited for things to settle in the background and gave the operating system a few minutes, I'd eventually be told updates were available and could install them with a few clicks.

    There are a few rough edges here and there, but on the whole Neptune worked well. The stable Debian base combined with the latest version of Plasma, Chromium and LibreOffice were a good mixture. It gives us a solid base with lots of new features and I think that's a good combination, especially for me. There are some edge cases where I ran into minor problems and I didn't like that the settings panel didn't warn me before discarding changes, but otherwise I had a good week with Neptune. I think it's a good fit for relative newcomers to Linux and people looking for a balance between reliability and fresh desktop software.

    Read more

    Linux 4.17 RC 1

    Filed under
    Linux
    • Kernel prepatch 4.17-rc1

      Linus has released 4.17-rc1 and closed the merge window for this release.

    • Linux 4.17-rc1
    • Linux 4.17-rc1

      So two weeks have passed, and the merge window was pretty normal and
      is now closed.

      This does not seem to be shaping up to be a particularly big release,
      and there seems to be nothing particularly special about it. The most
      special thing that happened is purely numerology: we've passed the six
      million git objects mark, and that is reason enough to call the next
      kernel 5.0. Except I probably won't, because I don't want to be too
      predictable. The version numbers are meaningless, which should mean
      that they don't even follow silly numerological rules - even if v3.0
      and v4.0 happened to be at the 2M and 4M mark respectively.

      But v5.0 will happen some day. And it should be meaningless. You have
      been warned.

      Anyway, we do have a *few* other things that happened, like Arnd
      getting rid of a number of architectures that seem to simply not
      matter any more. If it turns out that somebody wants to resurrect any
      of them, the code is all there in the git history, but you'll have to
      do the work and show that you'll maintain it and have a few users.

      And just to not make it *all* about removing old architectures,
      there's a new one in there too.

      The architectures that are gone are blackfin, cris, frv, m32r, metag,
      mn10300, score, and tile. And the new architecture is the nds32
      (Andes Technology 32-0bit RISC architecture).

      We actually have a fair amount of other removal and cleanups too. I
      was somewhat pleasantly surprised by the number of pull requests that
      actually ended up removing a lot of lines. Some of it was staging
      drivers that finally gave up the ghost (like irda), but we also got
      rid of some copyright language boiler-plate in favor of just the spdx
      lines. And some pre-shipped lexer/parser files are no more, we're
      better off just generating them.

      End result: we actually removed more lines than we added:

      13538 files changed, 627723 insertions(+), 818855 deletions(-)

      which is probably a first. Ever. In the history of the universe. Or at
      least kernel releases.

      I'd call it momentous, but I think the arch removal was most of it,
      and I'm sure people will quickly rectify that momentary glitch of
      actually shrinking the kernel source code.

      Go out and test,

      Linus

    • Linux 4.17-rc1 Kernel Released: A Ton Of New Functionality While Shedding Old Code

      Just like clockwork the Linux 4.17-rc1 kernel was released tonight following the two week long merge window.

      See the Linux 4.17 features article published this morning to learn all about what's new in this kernel release. There is a ton of work from prominent AMD and Intel graphics driver updates to new hardware support and much more. As covered just a short time ago, Linux 4.17 power measurements are looking surprisingly good for lowering the power use while idling and also the power efficiency under load.

      More Linux 4.17 kernel benchmarks are on the way.

    • Linux 4.17 Offers Some Promising Power-Savings Improvements

      Of the many improvements to be found in the in-development Linux 4.17 kernel -- nicely summarized in our Linux 4.17 feature overview -- one of the features I've been anxious the most to begin benchmarking has been the reported power management improvements. Here are my initial power/performance tests of Linux 4.17 that for some systems is seeing a measurable drop in power usage, even in some cases under load while without sacrificing the performance.

    • The Many Great Features & Changes Coming For The Linux 4.17 Kernel

      Linus Torvalds is expected by the end of the day to release Linux 4.17-rc1, thereby marking the end of the two-week merge window that saw a lot of changes and new features land for Linux 4.17. Here is our original feature overview of the changes to be found in this next major release of the Linux kernel, which should premiere as stable by the middle of June.

      While many of you have likely not even upgraded yet to the feature-packed Linux 4.16, there is a lot more coming to look forward to with the Linux 4.17 kernel this summer. There are many Intel/AMD graphics driver improvements, support for obsolete CPU architectures being dropped, some new CPU support added including initial bits for the NVIDIA Xavier SoC, a potentially very big improvement for dropping Linux idle power usage, various file-system improvements, new hardware support, and even improvements for the Macintosh PowerBook 100 series from more than 20 years ago.

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    More in Tux Machines

    Linux Kernel 4.15 Reached End of Life, Users Urged to Move to Linux 4.16 Now

    After a very busy cycle due to the Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerabilities, which were publicly disclosed earlier this year and later discovered to put billions of devices using modern processors at risk of attacks, the Linux 4.15 kernel series was released at the of January heavily redesign against two critical hardware bugs. Now, nearly three months and only eighteen maintenance updates later, the Linux 4.15 kernel series reached end of life and it will no longer receive support. As such, all those using a kernel from the Linux 4.15 branch on their GNU/Linux distributions are urged to upgrade to the latest Linux 4.16 kernel series as soon as possible. Read more

    LibreOffice 6.1 Lands Mid August 2018, First Bug Hunting Session Starts April 27

    Work on the next big release of the widely-used open-source and cross-platform office suite for GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows operating systems, LibreOffice 6.1, has already begun this week with a focus on revamping the online experience and improving the Writer and Calc components. A first bug hunting session was scheduled for the end of next week, on April 27, 2018, when developers will hack on the first alpha milestone of LibreOffice 6.1, which should be available to download for all supported platforms a few days before the event. During the bug hunting session, devs will try to fix as many bugs as possible. Read more

    This Chart Shows How The Radeon RX 580 vs. GeForce GTX 1060 Now Compete Under Linux

    It was just last year that open-source RadeonSI/RADV developers were trying to get the Radeon RX 580 "Polaris" GPU to be competitive with the GeForce GTX 1060 as it is under Windows given each GPU's capabilities. We've seen the RX 580 and GTX 1060 dancing under Linux the past few months and yesterday's 20-way GPU comparison with Rise of the Tomb Raider was quite significant -- perhaps most surprising being how well the RX 580 performed. Heck, just one or two years ago it was an accomplishment seeing any official Radeon driver support at-launch for new Linux game releases. So here are some extensive tests looking closer at the GTX 1060 vs. RX 580 battle in this latest Vulkan-powered Linux game port. Read more

    Linux 4.9.95

    I'm announcing the release of the 4.9.95 kernel. All users of the 4.9 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 4.9.y git tree can be found at: git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.9.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st... Read more