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Friday, 24 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Authorsort icon Replies Last Post
Story 5 Ways Xoopit Extends Gmail adriantry 27/04/2009 - 10:27am
Story Audacity: The Versatile Audio Tool for Everyone adriantry 12/05/2009 - 10:03am
Forum topic Dialup dilemma afs 05/06/2008 - 5:40pm
Blog entry Distribution Release: EnGarde Secure Linux 3.0.21 akramshaikh 08/10/2008 - 7:55am
Blog entry 25 Cool & Beautiful Linux Wallpapers akramshaikh 31/08/2009 - 6:50pm
Blog entry Ubuntu 10.04 LTS Finally Released! akramshaikh 29/04/2010 - 7:18pm
Story Top 10 Addictive games on Linux alieneyes 06/03/2010 - 5:07pm
Blog entry “Can’t locate module” Error in Linux and Data Loss allen 06/10/2008 - 4:52am
Blog entry “No such file or directory” Error in Linux allen 15/10/2008 - 4:47am
Blog entry ‘attempt to access beyond end of device’ Linux Error allen 27/03/2009 - 6:45am

Arch Linux-Based ArchEX Distro Is Powered by LXQt Desktop, Linux Kernel 4.10.3

Filed under
GNU
Linux

GNU/Linux developer Arne Exton is known for all sort of distributions most of which are derivatives of some of the most popular Linux-based operating systems, and he informs us this weekend about the availability of a new build of his ArchEX distro.

ArchEX is an Arch Linux-based distribution built around the lightweight LXQt desktop environment. The new things implemented in ArchEX Build 170318 is the recently released Linux 4.10.3 kernel, as well as all the latest package versions that have been released on the official Arch Linux repositories.

Read more

Releases already covered here: 4MLinux 22.0 Launches July 2017 Based on GCC 6.2.0 and the Linux 4.9 LTS Kernel

Zorin OS 12.1 Education Promises to Make Learning Better and More Impactful

Linux Kernel News

Filed under
Linux
  • Standards for ARM computers and Linaro

    It looks like someone else figured it out, ergo Linaro. Unfortunately, they do not seem to be eager to create a real platform, but rather slap a veneer of something OpenFirmware-like on top of exising systems. Also, they are buddying with Ubuntu. So, a half-hearted effort and a top-down deal. But it's a step in the right direction.

  • Linux Kernel 4.10.4 Released with MIPS Improvements, Updated USB Drivers

    The fourth maintenance update to the Linux 4.10 kernel series arrived this weekend with various improvements to some of the supported filesystems and architectures, as well as updated drivers.

  • Linux Kernel 4.9.16 LTS Has Various MIPS and PowerPC Changes, Updated Drivers

    Immediately after announcing the release of the Linux 4.10.4 kernel, Greg Kroah-Hartman informed the community about the availability of the sixteenth maintenance update to the long-term supported Linux 4.9 kernel series.

Vulkan, Mir, and Wayland

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Audacity 2.1.3

Filed under
Software
  • Audacity 2.1.3 Released

    Audacity 2.1.3 has been released as the latest version of this popular open-source audio software.

  • Audacity 2.1.3 Open-Source Audio Editor Adds New Scrubbing Features, Effects

    The open-source and cross-platform Audacity audio editor has been updated recently to version 2.1.3, a maintenance update that adds various new features, effects, generators, but also some options and settings.

    The biggest new feature of the Audacity 2.1.3 update appears to be support for the Windows 10 operating system, but it also looks like it improves Magic Mouse horizontal scroll and trackpad pinch support for macOS users.

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

4MLinux 22.0 Launches July 2017 Based on GCC 6.2.0 and the Linux 4.9 LTS Kernel

Filed under
Linux

Softpedia was informed by Zbigniew Konojacki‏, developer of various GNU/Linux distributions based on the 4MLinux project, about the immediate availability of a Beta version of his upcoming 4MLinux 22.0 operating system.

Read more

Audacity 2.1.3 Released

Filed under
OSS

Audacity 2.1.3 has been released as the latest version of this popular open-source audio software.

With Audacity 2.1.3 there is a new distortion effect, rhythm track, a new scrub ruller and pinned option, new features in timer record, and 64 bug/annoyance fixes. For Mac users there is also now partial support for Sierra along with other macOS work.

Read more

Also: Audacity 2.1.3 Open-Source Audio Editor Adds New Scrubbing Features, Effects

Arch Linux-Based ArchEX Distro Is Powered by LXQt Desktop, Linux Kernel 4.10.3

Filed under
Linux

GNU/Linux developer Arne Exton is known for all sort of distributions most of which are derivatives of some of the most popular Linux-based operating systems, and he informs us this weekend about the availability of a new build of his ArchEX distro.

Read more

Zorin OS 12.1 Education Promises to Make Learning Better and More Impactful

Filed under
OS

The developers of the Ubuntu-based Zorin OS operating system announced the release of the Zorin OS 12.1 Education Edition, a specially crafted and officially supported flavor of the OS designed for educational institutions.

Read more

10 Best Linux Backup Solutions

Filed under
Linux

Backing up your computer takes time and effort but that is nothing compared to the stress you undergo if things happen to go wrong. A dependable backup tool is something everyone needs to have. Let’s look at some great Linux backup solutions.

Read<br />
more

Benchmarks Of Many ARM Boards From The Raspberry Pi To NVIDIA Jetson TX2

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

For some weekend benchmarking fun, I compared the Jetson TX2 that NVIDIA released this weekend with their ARM 64-bit "Denver 2" CPU cores paired with four Cortex-A57 cores to various other ARM single board computers I have access to. This is looking at the CPU performance in different benchmarks ranging from cheap ~$10 ARM SBCs to the Raspberry Pi to the Jetson TX1 and Jetson TX2.

Read more

Linux 4.10.4

Filed under
Linux

I'm announcing the release of the 4.10.4 kernel.

All users of the 4.10 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 4.10.y git tree can be found at:
git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.10.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st...

Read more

Also: Linux 4.9.16

Linux 4.4.55

Best VPN for Android: Top 5

Filed under
Android

VPN, which stands for Virtual Private Network, allows users to create a secure connection to another network using the internet. In this list we are focusing on Android options.

These options range in prices from free to yearly plans requiring a single or monthly payment. Importantly this list compiled by CBR also includes options for the advanced user of VPNs, in which some manual configuration is required, to an option so simple that it requires one click.

These solutions also vary in speed, the robustness of their encryption, and in terms of their global presence, with some having tens of international servers, down to merely a few.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • Gitter + GitLab = win

    Before getting into the details, we’d like to thank the 800,000+ people who make up the Gitter community for your enthusiasm and support for everything we’ve done. You’ve inspired our tiny team to keep shipping and making the open source and developer community a better place to connect to one another.

  • Google Unveils Guetzli, Open Source JPEG Encoder, to Speed Browsing

    Google on Thursday announced Guetzli, a new contribution to its evolving set of tools for the open source community. Guetzli is an encoder that allows JPEG files to be compressed as much as 35 percent, resulting in much faster Web page loading.

    "Guetzli," which means "cookie" in Swiss German, allows users to create smaller JPEG images while maintaining compatibility with existing Web browsers, image processing applications and the existing JPEG standard, noted Robert Obryk and Jyrki Alakuijala, software engineers at Google Research Europe, in an online post.

  • Google Summer of Code starts in four days, many open source project ideas still available

    The application period for this year’s Google Summer of Code (GSoC) opens in just four days (March 20, 16:00 UTC) and runs until April 3th. If you couldn’t find anything interesting in the 54 Google Summer of Code ideas by the KDE project, here’s some more ideas on participating projects and their ideas.

  • Speakerfight: A new way to do call4talks

    Since January I’m participating on events on Rio de Janeiro area. The one that every month is scheduled in my calendar is PythonRio. A Python(obviously =P ) event, but you can talk about everything that you want that fit the goal of the event: Share knowledge.

  • University Connect – PCCOE, Pune

    Another bright morning and another college visit was planned under the wings of University Connect. Thanks to the Pune site team again for the arrangements. On 15th February 2017, we visited the PCCOE college in Pune. Again the early morning alarm clock bell managed to break my sleep. Though, I was not feeling very well (thanks to my on going illness due to allergies), but Open Source, college students and Fedora makes me feel enough energy to beat a dull me.

  • March 2017 GNU Toolchain Update
  • Fund Open Source Software Research to Enhance ICT for Development (ICT4D) and ICT for Dollars (ICT4$)

    I owe part of my IT education to the Open Source community. I enhanced my programming skills using Open Source programming languages; I garnered a better understanding of operating systems through my study and research of the Linux kernel; I understood the inner workings of software by having access to their code; and in college, I used learning materials from computer science classes made available by MIT Open Courseware. But this article is not about how I benefited from open source software. I only mentioned my experience with Open Source Software (OSS) to stress the plethora of opportunities that it provides and the impact it can have on our ICT sector, and the country as a whole. Hence, the subsequent paragraphs provide insights into the positive impact that Open Source Software can have on a developing country like Liberia. The article is also a call to both the public and private sectors to invest in Open Source Software or OSS in order to enhance Information and Communications Technology for Development (ICT4D) and Information and Communications Technology for Dollars (ICT4$).

  • Linux XIA Joins Conservancy as a Member Project

    Software Freedom Conservancy proudly welcomes Linux XIA as a member project. Linux XIA is a new protocol stack for Linux built using eXpress Internet Architecture (XIA), an interoperable meta network architecture. Linux XIA is designed to meet unfulfilled demands of real-world networking. The project's roadmap includes the development of a DDoS protection system, and the addition of state-of-the-art algorithms and data structures to increase Linux XIA's speed and flexibility.

    Conservancy, a non-profit public charity focused on ethical technology, acts as a home to over forty member projects dedicated to developing free and open source software. Conservancy acts as a corporate umbrella, allowing member projects to operate as charitable initiatives without having to independently manage their own corporate structure and administrative services.

  • Practical Color Theory for People Who Code

    pick any color on the color wheel and the functions will make sure that the scheme will still work!

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • RetroShare Release notes for v0.6.2

    This release brings a few good things, including a new differential file lists sytem and end-to-end encryption for file transfer (thanks Mr.Alice for that!), and a greatly improved GUI.

  • Free software archive system Nikita now able to store documents
  • Sponge – A Linux tool which makes you feel you missed it for years

    How often do you come across a situation where you need to parse a file, change some value and write the content back to the file? This mostly occurs when you are dealing with configuration files, which requires some script automated editing. More often than not you will involve a temperory file to do the intermediate changes and then later overwrite the original file. The reason you use temporary file is because if you use pipes and redirections then the output content stream starts flowing before the input stream gets completed. To understand lets look at this example

  • Todo Indicator Fork Adds Context Filtering [Quick Update]

    The original Todo Indicator was last updated back in May, 2014, so WebUpd8 reader William decided to fork it and add a new feature: filtering based on a specific context or project. Furthermore, indicator was updated to work with either Python 2 or Python 3.

  • Shell Scripts Matter

    The shell is an odd beast. Although it goes against every current trend in software engineering (strong typing, compile checks over runtime checks, ...), shell scripts are here to stay, and still constitute an important part of every developer's life.

    The weird thing about shell scripts is that even strong advocates of good practices gladly forget all they know when it comes to shell scripting.

  • Beginners Guide To The Bash Terminal

    BASH also offers the ability to write scripts. A script can be anything from just a few commands to a very complex program. Basically, anything you can type at a command line can be put into a script and run as a program. This is very useful when you find yourself typing in a series of commands to get something done over and over again. Just throw it into script and then it happens with just one command. Now, are you begging to see just how powerful the terminal can be?

  • 6 Alternative Linux Shells for Power Users

    Bash, or the Bourne Again Shell, is what comes pre-installed on most Linux distros. However, it’s not the only shell out there. There are several others to try. Here are six alternative shells that can replace bash. Each of them has its pros and cons, so you have to try them out and see which is the best for you.

  • What's a point to switch from bash to another shell?

Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE
  • KDE ideas – A better browser

    The first thing I have to do when I log into KDE is move Firefox windows to the activities they ought to be in. One to Programming, another to Writing, Administration, Internet, etcetera. KDE deserves a browser that takes advantage of activities and other features of the Plasma Desktop.

  • [Video] KDE SlimBook Unveiling
  • Climbing grades: a Kirigami example app

    You can grab it on Android from the Play Store, or build it from source for yourself either for your desktop or cross-compile it over Android.

    From the screenshots you can see there is some amount of automatic adjustment between the mobile and desktop versions, both in terms of style and layout/functionality.

  • SOK 2017 wrap-up !!

    So, this month sok 2017 came to an end, with a hell lot of learning & community bonding.
    I must say that the four months during the season were awesome & i gained a lot from it.
    Thanks to KDE for giving me the wonderful opportunity of working on an awesome open source project named GCompris.
    GCompris is a high quality educational software suite comprising of numerous activities for children aged 2 to 10.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Some HTTPS inspection tools might weaken security [iophk: "the death of web-mail UI"]

    In a typical enterprise environment, an HTTPS connection can even be intercepted and re-encrypted multiple times: at the network perimeter by gateway security products or data leak prevention systems and on endpoint systems by antivirus programs that need to inspect such traffic for malware.

    The problem is that users' browsers no longer get to validate the real server certificates because that task falls to the interception proxy. And as it turns out, security products are pretty bad at validating server certificates.

  • Defence against the Dark Arts involves controlling your hardware

    In light of the Vault 7 documents leak (and the rise to power of Lord Voldemort this year), it might make sense to rethink just how paranoid we need to be.

  • This laptop-bricking USB stick just got even more dangerous

    Remember that USB stick that would destroy almost anything in its path, from laptops, photo booths, kiosks, to even cars?

    Now there's a new version, and it's even more dangerous than before.

    In case you missed it the first time around, a Hong Kong-based company built a weaponized pocket-sized USB stick, which when plugged into a device, will rapidly charge its capacitors from the USB power supply and then discharge, frying the affected device's circuits.

  • Docker Image Vulnerability Research

    Managing known vulnerabilities is the first step towards a strong security posture. If we’re not updating our systems, and keeping an eye on emerging vulnerabilities that are yet to be patched upstream, we’re basically leaving the front door wide open.

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat
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More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu MATE 17.04 Final Beta Is Out with MATE 1.18, Drops 32-bit PowerPC Support

Ubuntu MATE leader Martin Wimpress is informing Softpedia today about the immediate availability of the Final Beta release of the upcoming Ubuntu MATE 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) operating system, due for release on April 13, 2017. Read more Also: Ubuntu 17.04 Final Beta Released

Today in Techrights

Leftovers: OSS

  • Are Low-Code Platforms a Good Fit for Feds?
    Open-source code platforms — in part, because they’re often free — have long been a popular choice for digital service creation and maintenance. In recent years, however, some agencies have turned to low-code solutions for intuitive visual features such as drag-and-drop design functionality. As Forrester Research notes, low-code platforms are "application platforms that accelerate app delivery by dramatically reducing the amount of hand-coding required."
  • Crunchy Data Brings Enterprise Open Source POSTGRESQL To U.S. Government With New DISA Security Technical Implementation Guide
    Crunchy Data — a leading provider of trusted open source PostgreSQL and enterprise PostgreSQL technology, support and training — is pleased to announce the publication of a PostgreSQL Security Technical Implementation Guide (STIG) by the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), making PostgreSQL the first open source database with a STIG. Crunchy Data collaborated with the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) to evaluate open source PostgreSQL against the DoD's security requirements and developed the guide to define how open source PostgreSQL can be deployed and configured to meet security requirements for government systems.
  • Democratizing IoT design with open source development boards and communities
    The Internet of Things (IoT) is at the heart of what the World Economic Forum has identified as the Fourth Industrial Revolution, an economic, technical, and cultural transformation that combines the physical, digital, and biological worlds. It is driven by such technologies as ubiquitous connectivity, big data, analytics and the cloud.

Software and today's howtos