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Wednesday, 18 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Q4OS 1.8.2 Is the First Linux OS to Be Based on Debian GNU/Linux 8.7 "Jessie"

Filed under
OS
GNU
Linux
Debian

Softpedia was informed today, January 16, 2017, by the developers of the Debian-based Q4OS GNU/Linux distribution about the availability of a new stable build of the 1.8 series.

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OSS in the Back End

Filed under
Server
OSS
  • Target CIO explains how DevOps took root inside the retail giant [Ed: Don’t ever make/give Target any payments, certainly not digitally. They use a lot of Microsoft Mindows i.e. back doors]

    When I arrived at Target in mid-2015, I was excited to find an active grassroots DevOps and agile movement in pockets of the technology team. We’d already seen some great results with our digital teams and our enterprise architecture group moving to agile and DevOps. And we had a lot of engineers and team members who were hungry to start working this way.

  • OpenStack Vendor Mirantis Offers Managed OpenContrail SDN Services

    The open-source OpenContrail Software Defined Networking (SDN) technology is one of the most widely used and deployed networking approaches in the OpenStack cloud market. That's a fact that is not lost on OpenStack vendor Mirantis, which is why today Mirantis is announcing commercial support for OpenContrail.

  • Cloud Kindergarten preps students for OpenStack careers

    Cloud Kindergarten began this year to offer students a chance to learn about OpenStack and how to work with it. The students taking part in this program have access to Devstack so that they can learn about different commands and how to best utilize them in practice. Students are also able to create a tenant or network with routers and host an application like WordPress with databases and web servers.

  • OpenStack private cloud: benefits, challenges and what the future holds

    Many businesses in the UK have turned to private cloud to run mission-critical applications, with 80 percent of senior IT professionals having moved, or planning to move, to the OpenStack private cloud.

    The impact and adoption rates of this “cloud of choice” were explored in a recent study by SUSE, looking into the key benefits of private cloud and the effect its growth is having on UK businesses.

  • Navigating OpenStack: community, release cycles and events

    Hopefully last week we piqued your interest in a career path in OpenStack. Like any other open source project, if you’re going to use it—professionally or personally—it’s important to understand its community and design/release patterns.

  • Containers on the CERN cloud

    We have recently made the Container-Engine-as-a-Service (Magnum) available in production at CERN as part of the CERN IT department services for the LHC experiments and other CERN communities. This gives the OpenStack cloud users Kubernetes, Mesos and Docker Swarm on demand within the accounting, quota and project permissions structures already implemented for virtual machines.

  • Effective OpenStack contribution: Seven things to avoid at all cost

    There are numerous blogs and resources for the new and aspiring OpenStack contributor, providing tips, listing what to do. Here are seven things to avoid if you want to be an effective OpenStack contributor.

  • Tips for contributors, managing containers at CERN, and more OpenStack news

    Are you interested in keeping track of what is happening in the open source cloud? Opensource.com is your source for news in OpenStack, the open source cloud infrastructure project.

Puppy Linux Fork Quirky 8.1.6 "Xerus" Is Built From Ubuntu 16.04 Binary Packages

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Ubuntu

Puppy Linux's creator Barry Kauler is kicking off 2017 with a new stable release of the Quirky "Xerus" operating system, which is built from the binary packages of Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus).

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Android Leftovers

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Android

Terrible Ideas in Git

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Development
Movies
  • Terrible Ideas in Git

    "Git does let you do some extraordinarily powerful things. Powerful, of course, in this talk, is a polite euphemism for stupid," says Corey Quinn of FutureAdvisor at LinuxCon North America. Who hasn't experienced at least one moment of feeling like a complete dunce when using Git? Sure, Git is wonderful, everyone uses it, and you can do most of your work with a few basic commands. But it also has mighty powers to make us feel like we have no idea what we're doing.

  • Terrible Ideas in Git by Corey Quinn, FutureAdvisor

    In this presentation at LinuxCon, Corey Quinn takes you on a magical tour through the (mis)use of Git to do things its creators never intended.

RADV Improved

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • RADV Vulkan Driver Support For Multiple Devices

    Open-source driver developer Bas Nieuwenhuizen has posted a patch for allowing the open-source Radeon Mesa Vulkan driver (RADV) to support multiple devices.

  • The open source Vulkan driver for AMD 'radv' now supports using multiple GPUs

    A commit that just landed in Mesa-git allows for 'radv', the open source Vulkan driver for AMD GPUs to use multiple devices.

    This will likely be useful in future for people who have two (or maybe even more) GPUs to really push their games.

    Support for things like that on Linux should improve as Vulkan evolves and is adopted by more developers. Just how useful this will end up being is the real question.

From Windows to GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
  • Turn an old laptop into a Chromebook-Linux hybrid

    Common scenario: You buy a new laptop, thinking you'll sell, donate or hand down the old one... but it never happens. Maybe you don't want to deal with the hassles of Craigslist or Ebay, not to mention wiping all your data, reinstalling Windows and so on.

    Whatever the case, now it's just taking up space. But it doesn't have to: You can give that old laptop new life.

    With Linux, right? Wrong! I mean, yes, you could install Linux, which has always been the go-to option, but not everybody needs or wants the complexity of that operating system. For some, Chromium might be the better choice.

    Chromium is the OS that's at the heart of Chromebooks -- those fast-booting, cloud-powered devices that are so popular these days. Think about it: For whatever reason, no one buys Linux laptops. They buy Chromebooks.

    If you like the idea of giving your old system a Chromebook-like lease on life, good news: It's fast, free and easy. And it's not even permanent unless you want it to be.

  • When Peer Pressure Nukes Linux for Windows

    Several months ago, my 16-year-old grandson decided he wanted a powerful computer for gaming. I showed him Steam and some other stuff in Linux and he thought that looked good, so I started accumulating parts. If it was substantially more powerful than anything I have for myself, it was on the list. Sorry I don’t have the details list nearby, but it had a motherboard with a name I had heard, a fairly fast AMD processor with six cores, maxed out RAM, 1TB hard drive, video that took up two slots and had two fans, power supply you could use for welding, and a pair of 22″ monitors.

    I installed Mint 17.3 KDE in less than half an hour (the usual), including separate swap and home partitions (it’s a neurotic thing), setting wallpaper and the like, and doing whatever came to mind at the time. It ran flawlessly and I was happy, so I played with it a while. I really liked it. If I could think of a use, I’d build one for myself.

  • That Other Operating System Continues Its Decline

    The big winner is the Linux kernel. The vociferous opponents of GNU/Linux who haunt this blog can’t have it both ways. If GNU/Linux is not “GNU” and is Linux, then Android/Linux can’t be just Android. It’s Linux underneath.

Linux Mint 18.1 'Serena' KDE Edition Beta is available for download now

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Linux

A Beta release for Linux Mint 18.1 'Serena' KDE is here. There are already versions available featuring other desktop environments, such as Cinnamon, Mate, and Xfce. You'd think that would be enough, but no! Apparently a fourth edition is needed. Some people feel that a KDE version is a waste of resources, but either way, here we are.

So what is new? The KDE Plasma 5.8 desktop environment is the star of the show -- after all, if you do not want KDE, you wouldn't choose this version. The shipping Linux kernel is 4.4.0-53, which is surprisingly outdated. Ubuntu-based operating systems are never known for being bleeding-edge, however.

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64-bit Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 ships for $25 to $30

Filed under
Linux
OSS

The Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 has arrived with 1GB RAM and the same quad-core -A53 SoC as the RPi 3, available for $30, or $25 without 4GB eMMC.

Raspberry Pi Trading’s first 64-bit computer-on-module version of their flagship single board computer has finally arrived. Despite the name, the Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 (CM3) is only the second generation of the CM1. Its name syncs up with the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B SBC, which uses the same quad-core, 64-bit Broadcom SoC. The CM3 is now shipping in $30 Standard (4GB eMMC) or $25 Lite versions, while the CM1 drops in price to $25.

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Panasonic Toughpad Rugged Tablet Muscles into Android Space

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Android

Panasonic Jan. 12 unveiled a new tablet in its Toughpad series of devices designed for the corporate world. But unlike so many other rugged Panasonic machines, the FZ-A2 doesn’t run Windows. Instead, the device is running on Google’s Android Marshmallow, an operating system not typically associated with rugged PCs and mobile devices designed for rough-and-tumble field-service work. But the FZ-A2 is just the latest model in Panasonic's expanding line of Android tablets. This new Toughpad includes several corporate-friendly features such as robust security, a hot-swappable battery and plenty of ports that allow connection to a wide range of accessories. The Toughpad is launching at a time when market reports have consistently shown a steady decline in popularity of tablets. But Panasonic says its device is coming along at the right time. This slide show will take a look at the Toughpad to see whether its features will convince field-service workers and corporate hardware buyers that the tablet really is as appealing a buy as Panasonic claims it is. Read on to learn more about Panasonic’s FZ-A2 Toughpad.

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LXQt Spin Proposed For Fedora 26

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Red Hat

A new spin/flavor has been proposed for Fedora 26, one integrating the LXQt desktop environment.

For those late to the party, LXQt is the formation of the LXDE and Razor-qt projects and built around the Qt5 tool-kit. Fedora currently has an LXDE spin while this proposed Fedora LXQt would continue to co-exist alongside the existing LXDE version. Christian Dersch who proposed the LXQt spin explained, "LXDE spin will exist until its maintainer will stop it, LXQt is independent from LXDE spin. So nobody is forced to change Wink Also both projects are maintained upstream so there is no reason to drop anything here."

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Also: F26 Self Contained Change: LXQt Spin

Linux Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Raspberry Pi 1 and Zero: Hands on with Manjaro ARM and PiCore Linux

Filed under
Linux

In the previous two posts I wrote about SUSE Linux and Fedora/Manjaro ARM/Ubuntu MATE for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The results were mixed, at best.

This time I'm taking on even more of a challenge because I'm going to be looking at the original Raspberry Pi Model B and B+, and the Raspberry Pi Zero. These models all have much more limited CPU power and memory than the Pi 2 and 3, so it will be interesting to see what can be done with them.

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Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Raspberry Pi 3

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 Launched

    The Raspberry Pi Foundation this morning announced the Compute Module 3 (CM3) as the successor to their original Compute Module.

    The Raspberry Pi Compute Module remains targeted as a offering for those manufacturing customized products based upon the Raspberry Pi. The Compute Module uses a DDR2 SO-DIMM interface and makes it easy and low-cost to integrate within custom hardware designs.

  • Giveaway: Win a Linux-friendly Raspberry Pi 3 and Eleduino Aluminum Case with Heatsinks!

    If you have been wanting one, I have good news. We here at BetaNews are giving away the best version -- the Raspberry Pi 3. We aren't stopping there, however, as we are also including a very nice aluminum case -- including heatsinks for overclocking. It is the exact Raspberry Pi 3 and case as seen in the video above. In other words, the case has already been installed by yours truly. Want to enter to win? There are multiple ways to enter. Just click the link below!

Linux Kernel and Linux Event

Filed under
Linux

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat

Leftovers: Software and HowTos

Filed under
Software
HowTos
  • Top Software

    The number of open source applications and tools that are available on today’s popular operating systems is simply mind-blowing. They come in all forms. Small scripts and console tools that can be easily integrated into large projects, feature-rich applications that offer everything a complete solution, well designed tools, games that encourage real participation, and eye catching candy.

    Open source software holds many compelling advantages over proprietary software. Open source improves the quality of the code, keeps costs down, encourages innovation and collaboration, combined with superior security, freedom, flexibility, interoperability, business agility, and much more.

  • Kodi 17.0 "Krypton" Release Candidate 3 Updates Estuary Skin, Fixes More Bugs

    The wait is almost over, and you'll finally be able to enjoy a much modern, improved, and full of new technologies Kodi media center on your PC or HTPC device, be it an Apple TV or Raspberry Pi.

    Martijn Kaijser announced the third Release Candidate (RC) development version for the Kodi 17.0 "Krypton" media center, and it looks to us like these pre-releases are getting smaller by the day, the RC3 build including only seven changes listed on the release notes attached to the official announcement.

  • Accessing Bingo Sites through Linux
  • Fedora - linux and shell.
  • Getting started with shell scripting
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More in Tux Machines

Security News

  • Wednesday's security updates
  • Secure your Elasticsearch cluster and avoid ransomware
    Last week, news came out that unprotected MongoDB databases are being actively compromised: content copied and replaced by a message asking for a ransom to get it back. As The Register reports: Elasticsearch is next. Protecting access to Elasticsearch by a firewall is not always possible. But even in environments where it is possible, many admins are not protecting their databases. Even if you cannot use a firewall, you can secure connection to Elasticsearch by using encryption. Elasticsearch by itself does not provide any authentication or encryption possibilities. Still, there are many third-party solutions available, each with its own drawbacks and advantages.
  • Resolve to Follow These 8 Steps for Better Data Security in 2017
    Getting physically fit is a typical New Year's resolution. Given that most of us spend more time online than in a gym, the start of the new year also might be a great time to improve your security “fitness.” As with physical fitness challenges, the biggest issue with digital security is always stagnation. That is, if you don't move and don't change, atrophy sets in. In physical fitness, atrophy is a function of muscles not being exercised. In digital fitness, security risks increase when you fail to change passwords, update network systems and adopt improved security technology. Before long, your IT systems literally become a “sitting duck.” Given the volume of data breaches that occurred in 2016, it is highly likely that everyone reading this has had at least one breach of their accounts compromised in some way, such as their Yahoo data account. Hackers somewhere may have one of the passwords you’ve used at one point to access a particular site or service. If you're still using that same password somewhere, in a way that can connect that account to you, that's a non-trivial risk. Changing passwords is the first of eight security resolutions that can help to improve your online security fitness in 2017. Click through this eWEEK slide show to discover the rest.
  • Pwn2Own 2017 Takes Aim at Linux, Servers and Web Browsers
    10th anniversary edition of Pwn2Own hacking contest offers over $1M in prize money to security researchers across a long list of targets including Virtual Machines, servers, enterprise applications and web browsers. Over the last decade, the Zero Day Initiative's (ZDI) annual Pwn2Own competition has emerged to become one of the premiere events on the information security calendar and the 2017 edition does not look to be any different. For the tenth anniversary of the Pwn2Own contest, ZDI, now owned and operated by Trend Micro, is going farther than ever before, with more targets and more prize money available for security researchers to claim by successfully executing zero-day exploits.
  • 'Factorio' is another game that was being hit by key scammers
    In another case of scammers trying to buy keys with often stolen credit cards to sell on websites like G2A, the developers of 'Factorio' have written about their experience with it (and other stuff too).

Red Hat News

Development News: LLVM, New Releases, and GCC

PulseAudio 10 and Virtual GPU in Linux

  • PulseAudio 10 Coming Soon, Using Memfd Shared Memory By Default
    It's been a half year since the debut of PulseAudio 9.0 while the release of PulseAudio 10 is coming soon. PulseAudio 9.99.1 development release was tagged earlier this month, then usually after x.99.2 marks the official release, so it won't be much longer now before seeing PulseAudio 10.0 begin to appear in Linux distributions.
  • Experimenting With Virtual GPU Support On Linux 4.10 + Libvirt
    With the Linux 4.10 kernel having initial but limited Intel Graphics Virtualization Tech support, you can begin playing with the experimental virtual GPU support using the upstream kernel and libvirt.