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Friday, 21 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Linux Foundation Certified Engineer: Karthikeyan Ramaswamy

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Linux was part of my academics. I was introduced to Linux at the Anna University Bioinformatics Lab by my Professor Gautam Pennathur. After that introduction, I became truly interested in Linux and open source when I was doing my final year project with Professor Nagasuma Chandra in the bioinformatics department, Indian Institute of Science. It was an incredible journey with the different flavors of Linux as well as the scripting and programming languages. After learning about the history of Linux and open source software movement, I become an Individual supporter of The Linux Foundation and an Annual Associate Member of the Free Software Foundation.

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A Doctor Learns How to Code Through Open Source

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Judy Gichoya is a medical doctor from Kenya who became a software developer after joining the open source medical records project, OpenMRS. The open source project creates medical informatics software that helps health professionals collect and present data to improve patient care in developing countries.

After seeing how effective the open medical records system was at increasing efficiency and lowering costs for clinics in impoverished areas of Africa, she began hacking on the software herself to help improve it. Then she set up her own implementation in the slums outside Nairobi, and has done the same for dozens of clinics since.

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Announcing the Release of Fedora 25 Beta

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Red Hat

The Fedora Project is pleased to announce the immediate availability of Fedora 25 Beta, the next big step on our journey to the exciting Fedora 25 release in November.

Download the prerelease from our Get Fedora site:

Get Fedora 25 Beta Workstation
Get Fedora 25 Beta Server

Looking for Cloud edition? Check out the section on Fedora Atomic below. Or, check out one of our popular variants:

Get Fedora 25 Beta Spins
Get Fedora 25 Beta Labs
Get Fedora 25 Beta ARM

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today's leftovers

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  • Linux-Based Photographic Workflow on Android with Termux

    The title is a bit of a mouthful, but the basic idea is pretty simple; Instead of schlepping around a Linux machine, you can transform an Android device into a lightweight Linux-based platform for organizing, processing, and backing up photos and RAW files when you are on the move. The key ingredient of this solution is the Termux, a small open source app that combines a terminal emulator and a lightweight Linux environment. The app comes with its own software repository that has all the tools you need to set up a simplified photographic workflow. The Linux Photography book explains exactly how to can go about it, but here are a few pointers to get started.

  • NVIDIA Announces The GeForce GTX 1050 Series

    NVIDIA this morning is expanding the Pascal family with the announcement of the GeForce GTX 1050 and GTX 1050 Ti lower-cost graphics cards.

  • GStreamer Conference 2016 Videos, Vulkan Support Was Among The Talks

    The annual GStreamer Conference took place last week in Berlin alongside the Linux Foundation's Embedded Linux Conference Europe. The videos from this multimedia open-source conference are now available.

    The folks from Ubicast have once again done a nice job recording all of the presentations from this GStreamer event. Conference talks ranged from the "stage of the union" to the state of VA-API with GStreamer, GStreamer Video Editing, dynamic pipelines, Vulkan, and more.

    When it comes to Vulkan support in GStreamer, there is work underway on vulkansink and vulkanupload elements, basic Vulkan support modeled on GStreamer's libgstgl API, and more, but much more work is needed before it will be at the level of OpenGL support.

  • Solus 1.2.1 Released With Budgie Desktop Updates, Ships RADV Driver

    Version 1.2.1 of the promising Solus Linux distribution is now available and also premieres a MATE edition ISO to complement its original Budgie desktop.

  • Bill Belichick rants against NFL tablets: 'I'm done'

    After the image of the New England Patriots coach slamming a Microsoft Surface tablet on the sideline in a Week 4 game against the Buffalo Bills went viral, Belichick explained Tuesday why he is fed up with the product.

News About Servers

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  • Demand compels container management vendor Rancher to create partner program
  • Rancher Labs Expands Container-Management Reach With New Partner Program
  • Rancher Labs Introduces Global Partner Network
  • Rancher Labs Launches Partner Program Around Open Source Container Management
  • WTF is a container?

    You can’t go to a developer conference today and not hear about software containers: Docker, Kubernetes, Mesos and a bunch of other names with a nautical ring to them. Microsoft, Google, Amazon and everybody else seems to have jumped on this bandwagon in the last year or so, but why is everybody so excited about this stuff?

    To understand why containers are such a big deal, let’s think about physical containers for a moment. The modern shipping industry only works as well as it does because we have standardized on a small set of shipping container sizes. Before the advent of this standard, shipping anything in bulk was a complicated, laborious process. Imagine what a hassle it would be to move some open pallet with smartphones off a ship and onto a truck, for example. Instead of ships that specialize in bringing smartphones from Asia, we can just put them all into containers and know that those will fit on every container ship.

  • Solving Enterprise Monitoring Issues with Prometheus

    Chicago-based ShuttleCloud helps developers import user contacts and email data into their applications through standard API requests. As the venture-backed startup began to acquire more customers, they needed a way to scale system monitoring to meet the terms of their service-level agreements (SLAs). They turned to Prometheus, the open source systems monitoring and alerting toolkit originally built at SoundCloud, which is now a project at the Cloud-Native Computing Foundation.

    In advance of Prometheus Day, to be held Nov. 8-9 in Seattle, we talked to Ignacio Carretero, a ShuttleCloud software engineer, about why they chose Prometheus as their monitoring tool and what advice they would give to other small businesses seeking a similar solution.

  • VMware Embraces Kubernetes in Container Push

    VMware is the latest IT vendor to support Kubernetes, the open-source container management system that Google developed.
    VMware announced on Oct. 18 at its VMworld 2016 Europe event that it is now supporting the Kubernetes container management system on the VMware Photon platform.

    Kubernetes is an open-source project that was developed by Google and today benefits from the contributions of a diverse community, including Red Hat and CoreOS. The Kubernetes project became part of the Linux Foundation's Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) in July 2015. The Kubernetes 1.4 release debuted on Sept. 26 with added security features.

    "We have now built a Kubernetes-as-a-service capability into Photon Platform," Jared Rosoff, chief technologist for cloud native apps at VMware, told eWEEK.

  • CoreOS Expands Kubernetes Control With Redspread Acquisition

    The purchase of container management vendor Redspread is the container startup's second acquisition.
    CoreOS on Oct. 17 announced the acquisition of privately held container management vendor Redspread. Financial terms of the deal are not being publicly disclosed.

    Redspread got its start in the Y Combinator cyber accelerator for technology startups and was officially launched in March. Coincidentally, CoreOS was also originally part of Y Combinator, graduating in 2013. To date, CoreOS has raised $48 million in funding to help fuel its container efforts. The acquisition of Redspread is the second acquisition by CoreOS and comes more than two years after CoreOS' acquisition of in 2014.

Software and Games

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  • Indicator Diskman Makes It Easy to Manage Drives & Partitions on Ubuntu

    Indicator Diskman Indicator Diskman is a small panel-based indicator applet that lets you view and manage mounted drives, volumes, partitions, and disc images.

  • Synapse or Alfred — What’s Your Favourite App Launcher for Linux?

    Sometimes there are apps that I want to write about but I’m uncertain of why I want to write about them. Case in point today is Synapse, a smart application launcher (and then some), a one-time mainstay on many a Linux desktop.

  • VirtualBox 5.1.8 Out Now, Oracle Adds Linux Kernel 4.8 Support in VirtualBox 5.0

    A few minutes ago, Oracle announced the availability of two new maintenance updates for its popular, open-source and cross-platform VirtualBox virtualization software, versions 5.1.8 and 5.0.28.

    The VirtualBox 5.1.8 point release is the most advanced Oracle VM VirtualBox version you can get right now, and it promises a month's worth of bug fixes and improvements to further stabilize the application for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, Mac OS X, and Microsoft Windows.

  • Wine Staging 1.9.21 Lets You Run Steam Web Browser in Windows 7 Mode on Linux

    Today, October 18, 2016, the Wine Staging development team announced the availability for download of a new version of their Wine Staging open-source alternative to the popular Wine software.

    Based on the recently released Wine 1.9.21 development build, Wine Staging 1.9.21 promises a bunch of goodies for those interested in running the latest Windows games and applications on their GNU/Linux operating system, among which we can mention improvements to the Vulkan wrapper.

  • The 'SMACH Z' gaming handheld is back on Kickstarter, no longer using SteamOS but their own Linux version

    The 'SMACH Z' [Kickstarter] is a promising device and I'm quite excited to see how this all turns out, the promise of taking my Steam library easily on the go sounds fun.

    They are no longer using SteamOS, but their own Linux-based "SMACH Z OS", although it will still be a mostly normal Linux distribution since it will run Linux games and Steam.

    What bugs me, is that they "recommend" their Linux OS, but all their benchmarks in the video and noted on the Kickstarter were done on Windows. That tells me a lot about their confidence in showing how it will run games if people don't use Windows. As sad as that is, we know most games run a bit slower on Linux right now, so it's not really surprising. The real issue here, is that Windows support is a stretch-goal, meaning all of the benchmark/performance information is useless unless they hit that goal.

Leftovers: KDE

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  • Global Menu Support Is Coming Back to KDE Plasma 5
  • KDE Plasma Looking At Global Menu, Wayland & Mobile For 2017

    KDE Plasma developers talked this week about their plans for the new development cycle and what they want the desktop to look like moving into 2017 and further ahead into 2018.

  • KDE Plasma 5 Desktop to Become a Solid and Reliable Workhorse That Stands Out

    On October 18, 2016, long time KDE software developer Sebastian Kügler published an in-depth story about what's coming to the KDE Plasma 5 desktop environment in the next couple of years.

    It appears that KDE’s Plasma team had their traditional kickoff meeting on Monday, October 17, to discuss the upcoming features of the next KDE Plasma 5 release, which will be versioned 5.9 and whose release schedule has been already published, as reported earlier right here on this space.

    However, the Plasma team also discussed new ways to improve the quality of the popular desktop environment, as well as make it faster, more stable and reliable than existing versions. Their aim is to bring KDE Plasma to an unprecedented level of quality that will blow the competition away.

    "Our general direction points towards professional use-cases. We want Plasma to be a solid tool, a reliable work-horse that gets out of the way, allowing to get the job done quickly and elegantly. We want it to be faster and of better quality than the competition," said Sebastian Kügler in the blog announcement.

  • Twenty and counting: KDE marks another milestone

    Twenty years ago, a German software developer named Matthias Ettrich kicked off a project to provide Linux users with all the desktop functionality that Windows users had at the time.

    The detailed email inviting participation was sent by Ettrich on 14 October 1996. He outlined his ideas and goals and attracted plenty of interest. The K Desktop Environment project was on its way.

Linux Devices and Tizen

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  • Industrial Internet of Things Set to Rocket Towards 100bn Devices
  • Build Your Own Raspberry Pi Camera

    During the past few years, my BirdCam setup has evolved significantly. As I mention in the UpFront section of this issue, I hope to get the stream transferred to a YouTube Live stream at some point, so I can watch the feathery show on my television. And although watching the birds is the end goal, I'm constantly on a mission to improve the quality and flexibility of my setup.

  • COM Express Type 6 and Type 7 modules feature security chip

    Kontron’s Linux-ready Intel 6th Gen Type 6 and 5th Gen Type 7 COM Express modules integrate its new Security Solution Approtect technology.

  • Huawei Honor S1 Smartwatch Launched, Not Android Wear, Not Likely Tizen either

    Today, Huawei unveiled their next smartwatch branded as the Honor S1. We previously reported on the possibility that this new wearable device would run Tizen. According to a report in the JoongAng Ilbo newspaper Huawei are currently working with Samsung to deploy the Tizen operating system in its next smartwatches. Well today the unveil happened and strangely enough there is no mention of Android Wear in any of the supporting documentation, but also there is no mention of Tizen either ! Looking at the User Interface (UI) it definitely isn’t an Android Wear device, as Google will not let OEMs alter its appearance, but more of a bespoke Operating System (OS).

  • Game: War Thunder for Samsung Z1, Z2, Z3 [Ed: Mono...]

    More action games come rolling in as War Thunder is released on the Tizen Store for Tizen smartphones. This is a Unity game that has been released for the Tizen platform. The game is brought to you by Pham Dinh, the same person that brought you Action Strike, Zombie Reborn, Call of Duty , and Danger Run.

Leftovers: OSS

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  • New Blockchain Solution Dragonchain Has Been Made Open Source

    Blockchain enthusiasts were all too aware of how Disney is working on distributed ledger technology as well. The company has open sourced their dragon chain concept, which, in theory, makes it easier to integrate advanced blockchain features for third parties. Quite an exciting development, as integration existing systems with blockchain, has proven to be quite a challenge so far.

    Dragonchain is officially labeled as a blockchain platform that encompasses everything one would need to integrate distributed ledger features. This internal blockchain platform provides a foundation to develop these features as the enterprise or user sees fit.Additionally, the project also offers a network-wide interface, an efficient data distribution model, and cryptographic capabilities.

  • Node.js v6 Transitions to LTS

    Node.js v6 transitioned to LTS line today, so let’s talk about what this means, where other versions stand, and what to expect with Node.js v7.

  • Node.js 7 set for release next week

    The Node.js Foundation will release version 7 of the JavaScript platform next week. With the new release, version 6 will move to long-term support, and version 0.10 will reach "end of life" status.

    Node 7, offered in beta in late September, is a "checkpoint release for the Node.js project and will focus on stability, incremental improvement over Node.js v6, and updating to the latest versions of V8, libuv, and ICU (International Components for Unicode)," said Mikeal Rogers, Foundation community manager.

  • Open source software matches benefits to eligible recipients

    State agencies can now leverage an open source tool to help ensure that individuals eligible for income-based human service benefits actually receive them.

    The software is Benefit Assist, and it was first launched in 2015 by Intuit for that company’s TurboTax users. Benefit Assist sifts through tax information to help determine a person’s eligibility for benefits from programs such as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, Medicaid and Medicare.

  • New Business Intelligence Performance Benchmark Reveals Strong Innovation amongst Open-Source projects
  • Odoo Community Association Joins Open Source Initiative

    The Open Source Initiative® (OSI), a global non-profit formed to educate about and advocate for the benefits of open source software and communities, announced today the affiliate membership of the Odoo Community Association (OCA), a nonprofit organization whose mission is to promote the widespread use of Odoo and to support the collaborative development of Odoo features.

  • Google releases Chrome Canary for Android
  • Chrome Canary comes to Android, but beware: it’s unstable and only recommended for developers

    Google Chrome has multiple release channels to test new features and insure that bugs are ironed out before they reach end users. Joining Android’s current stable, beta, and dev channel is Chrome Canary. Long available on desktop, Canary “is primarily intended to be used by developers and early adopters to test recent Chromium changes.”

    Chrome Canary for Android is currently at version 56 and the only notable difference is its yellow Chrome icon. Otherwise, the UI and features are similar to current versions. While it might include new features, enhancements, and bug fixes in the future, there is a high likelihood that the app will be unstable.

  • Java JDK 9 Firmed Up For A Late July Release

    The JDK 9 release schedule is indeed being pushed back by four months and now will be released in late July.

  • 122 Speakers Wow Sold-Out Percona Live Europe Open Source Database Conference 2016
  • Fosdem 2017 BSD devroom Call for Participation

OpenStack News

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  • OpenStack & Private Cloud, at Scale, Are Cheaper Than Public Cloud

    Beyond a certain scale, commercial private clouds and OpenStack distributions are cheaper than public clouds, according to the latest Cloud Price Index from 451 Research.

    Commercial private cloud offerings from vendors such as VMware and Microsoft offer a lower total cost of ownership (TCO) when labor efficiency is lower than 400 virtual machines managed per engineer, according to the report, which was published today.

  • How OpenStack keeps its summits safe and welcoming

    The great promise of a global open source software project like OpenStack is that it can bring together the best and the brightest from all around the world to together create something far greater than any one person, company, or nation could do on its own.

    But with diversity can come challenges, as cultural norms and social expectations can vary greatly from place to place and group to group. If bringing in the best ideas requires diverse contributors, then bringing in diverse contributors requires building a safe space where each person can feel comfortable and welcome.

  • OpenStack Foundation Survey Finds the Platform Heading to Smaller Companies

    Back in April, the OpenStack Foundation released the results of its seventh official OpenStack survey, which found that sixty-five percent of OpenStack deployments were in production, 33 percent more than a year ago. Now, the foundation has released the results of the eighth official survey, which shows growing user interest in containers, and a growing focus on cost savings driven by OpenStack.

Security Leftovers

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Ubuntu Leftovers

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openSUSE Leap 42.2 Approaching with RC, Meet Maui 1

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The openSUSE project today announced the release of Leap 42.2 Release Candidate 1 with less than one month remaining before final. On the other side of town, Dustin Kirkland announced Ubuntu kernel hotfixes and the Hectic Geek reviewed recently released 16.10. Jack Germain said Maui 1 "is stable and easy to use" and Sebastian Kügler blogged on "Plasma's road ahead."

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Ubuntu 16.10 Review: Not Bad, But if You’re Happy with 16.04 LTS, Stick with it!

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After the previous 16.04 Long Term Release, Ubuntu has rolled out its latest ‘short term’ (my own naming convention for the non-LTS releases) version 16.10. Mainly, the ‘short term’ releases are only supported for 9 months and usually include software applications with their recent updates.

When you release a new version of your operating system within every 6 months, usually there isn’t a lot of room for adding major changes. And that is the case with many GNU/Linux distributions these days, and Ubuntu 16.10 release is no exception. Since Unity is based on the user application set provided by GNOME desktop environment, according to the release notes, the underlying GNOME user applications have been upgraded to the version 3.20 at least (which is the case with the file manager -- ‘files’, for instance) and some others have been upgraded to the version 3.22 which is the latest release of GNOME currently.

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Red Hat eye from the Ubuntu guy: Fedora – how you doin'?

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Red Hat

Comment Red Hat is the biggest – and one of the oldest – companies in the Linux world, but despite the difficulty of accurately measuring Linux usage figures, Ubuntu and its relatives seem to be the most popular Linux distributions. Red Hat isn’t sitting idle, though. Despite its focus on enterprise software, including virtualisation, storage and Java tools, it’s still aggressively developing its family of distros: RHEL, CentOS and Fedora.

Fedora is the freebie community-supported version, with a short six-month release cycle, but it’s still important. Although RHEL is the flagship, it’s built from components developed and tested in Fedora. According to Fedora Project Lead Matthew Miller told this year’s Flock to Fedora conference this summer its future looks bright.

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Ubuntu 16.10 Now Offers More than 500 Snaps, Including VLC 3.0.0 and Krita 3.0.1

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With the release of the Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) operating system, Canonical also had the pleasure of informing the community about the latest status of their Snaps universal binary packages.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Google’s Open Source Report Card Highlights Game-Changing Contributions
    Ask people about Google’s relationship to open source, and many of them will point to Android and Chrome OS — both very successful operating systems and both based on Linux. Android, in particular, remains one of the biggest home runs in open source history. But, as Josh Simmons from Google’s Open Source Programs Office will tell you, Google also contributes a slew of useful open source tools and programs to the community each year. Now, Google has issued its very first “Open Source Report Card,” as announced by Simmons on the Google Open Source Blog. "We're sharing our first Open Source Report Card, highlighting our most popular projects, sharing a few statistics and detailing some of the projects we've released in 2016. We've open sourced over 20 million lines of code to date and you can find a listing of some of our best known project releases on our website," said Simmons.
  • Nino Vranešič: Open Source Advocate and Mozilla Rep in Slovenia
    “My name is Nino Vranešič and I am connecting IT and Society,” is what Nino says about himself on LinkedIn. The video is a little hard to understand in places due to language differences and (we think) a slow or low-bandwidth connection between the U.S.-based Zoom servers and Eastern Europe, a problem that crops up now and then in video conversation and VOIP phone calls with people in that part of the world, no matter what service you choose. But Vranešič is worth a little extra effort to hear, because it’s great to learn that open source is being used in lots of government agencies, not only in Slovenia but all over Europe. And aside from this, Vranešič himself is a tres cool dude who is an ardent open source volunteer (“Mozilla Rep” is an unpaid volunteer position), and I hope I have a chance to meet him F2F next time he comes to a conference in Florida — and maybe you’ll have a chance to meet him if he comes to a conference near you.
  • MySQL and database programming for beginners
    Dave Stokes has been using MySQL for more than 15 years and has served as its community manager since 2010. At All Things Open this year, he'll give a talk about database programming for newbies with MySQL. In this interview, he previews his talk and shares a few helpful resources, required skills, and common problems MySQL beginners run into.
  • Nadella's trust talk is just so much hot air
    Microsoft chief executive Satya Nadella appears to have an incredibly short memory. Else he would be the last person who talks about trust being the most pressing issue in tech in our times. Over the last year, we have been treated to a variety of cheap tricks by Microsoft, attempting to hoodwink Windows users left, right and centre in order to get them to upgrade to Windows 10. After that, talking about trust sounds odd. Very odd. Microsoft does not have the best reputation among tech companies. It is known for predatory practices, for being convicted as a monopolist, and in recent times has been trying to cultivate a softer image as a company that is not as rapacious as it once was. That has, in large measure, come about as its influence and rank in the world of computing have both slipped, with other companies like Apple, Facebook and Google coming to dominate.
  • If you wish, you may rebuild all dports to use non-base SSL library of your choice
  • DragonFlyBSD Continues LibreSSL Push, OpenSSL To Be Dropped
    DragonFlyBSD is now defaulting to LibreSSL throughout its operating system stack and is planning to completely remove OpenSSL in the near future. Last month DragonFlyBSD began using LibreSSL by default while that effort has continued. OpenSSL is no longer being built by default and in about one month's time the OpenSSL support will be completely stripped from the DragonFly tree.
  • Ranking the Web With Radical Transparency
    Ranking every URL on the web in a transparent and reproducible way is a core concept of the Common Search project, says Sylvain Zimmer, who will be speaking at the upcoming Apache: Big Data Europe conference in Seville, Spain. The web has become a critical resource for humanity, and search engines are its arbiters, Zimmer says. However, the only search engines currently available are for-profit entities, so the Common Search project is creating a nonprofit engine that is open, transparent, and independent. We spoke with Zimmer, who founded Jamendo, dotConferences, and Common Search, to learn more about why nonprofit search engines are important, why Apache Spark is such a great match for the job, and some of the challenges the project faces.
  • A look inside the 'blinky flashy' world of wearables and open hardware
    While looking at the this year's All Things Open event schedule, a talk on wearables and open hardware caught my eye: The world of the blinky flashy. Naturally, I dug deeper to learn what it was all about.
  • Why Perl is not use for new development , most of time use for maintenance and support projects ?
    There has been a tendency amongst some companies to play a “wait and see” attitude towards Perl, but the Perl market appears to have stabilized in the past couple of years and more companies appear to be returning to Perl. As one of our clients explained to me when I asked why they chose Perl “We’re tired of being bitten by hype.”

And More Security Leftovers

  • The NyaDrop Trojan for Linux-running IoT Devices
  • Flaw resides in BTB helps bypass ASLR
  • Thoughts on the BTB Paper
    Though the attack might have some merits with regards to KASLR, the attack on ASLR is completely debunked. The authors of the paper didn't release any supporting code or steps for independent analysis and verification. The results, therefore, cannot be trusted until the authors fully open source their work and the work is validated by trusted and independent third parties.
  • Spreading the DDoS Disease and Selling the Cure
    Earlier this month a hacker released the source code for Mirai, a malware strain that was used to launch a historically large 620 Gbps denial-of-service attack against this site in September. That attack came in apparent retribution for a story here which directly preceded the arrest of two Israeli men for allegedly running an online attack for hire service called vDOS. Turns out, the site where the Mirai source code was leaked had some very interesting things in common with the place vDOS called home.

Blockchain and FOSS

Ubuntu Leftovers

  • Celebrating 12 years of Ubuntu
    Founder Mark Shuttleworth announced the first public release of Ubuntu – version 4.10, or “Warty Warthog” – on Oct. 20, 2004. The idea behind what would become the most recognizable and widely used Linux distributions ever was simple – create a Linux operating system that anybody could use. Here’s a look back at Ubuntu’s history.
  • Happy 12th Birthday, Ubuntu!
    Yup, it’s twelve years to the day since Mark Shuttleworth sat down to tap out the first Ubuntu release announcement and herald in an era of “Linux for human beings”.
  • A Slice of Ubuntu
    The de facto standard for Raspberry Pi operating systems is Raspbian–a Debian based distribution specifically for the diminutive computer. Of course, you have multiple choices and there might not be one best choice for every situation. It did catch our eye, however, that the RaspEX project released a workable Ubunutu 16.10 release for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. RaspEX is a full Linux Desktop system with LXDE (a lightweight desktop environment) and many other useful programs. Firefox, Samba, and VNC4Server are present. You can use the Ubuntu repositories to install anything else you want. The system uses kernel 4.4.21. You can see a review of a much older version of RaspEX in the video below.
  • Download Ubuntu Yakkety Yak 16.10 wallpaper
    The Yakkety Yak 16.10 is released and now you can download the new wallpaper by clicking here. It’s the latest part of the set for the Ubuntu 2016 releases following Xenial Xerus. You can read about our wallpaper visual design process here.
  • Live kernel patching from Canonical now available for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS
    We are delighted to announce the availability of a new service for Ubuntu which any user can enable on their current installations – the Canonical Livepatch Service. This new live kernel patching service can be used on any Ubuntu 16.04 LTS system (using the generic Linux 4.4 kernel) to minimise unplanned downtime and maintain the highest levels of security.
  • How to enable free 'Canonical Livepatch Service' for Linux kernel live-patching on Ubuntu
    Linux 4.0 introduced a wonderful feature for those that need insane up-time -- the ability to patch the kernel without rebooting the machine. While this is vital for servers, it can be beneficial to workstation users too. Believe it or not, some home users covet long up-time simply for fun -- bragging rights, and such. If you are an Ubuntu 16.04 LTS user (with generic Linux kernel 4.4) and you want to take advantage of this exciting feature, I have good news -- it is now conveniently available for free! Unfortunately, this all-new Canonical Livepatch Service does have a catch -- it is limited to three machines per user. Of course, home users can register as many email addresses as they want, so it is easy to get more if needed. Businesses can pay for additional machines through Ubuntu Advantage. Want to give it a go? Read on. "Since the release of the Linux 4.0 kernel about 18 months ago, users have been able to patch and update their kernel packages without rebooting. However, until now, no other Linux distribution has offered this feature for free to their users. That changes today with the release of the Canonical Livepatch Service", says Tom Callway, Director of Cloud Marketing, Canonical.
  • KernelCare Is Another Alternative To Canonical's Ubuntu Live Kernel Patching
    Earlier this week Canonical announced their Kernel Livepatching Service for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS users. Canonical's service is free for under three systems while another alternative for Ubuntu Linux users interested in a commercial service is CloudLinux's KernelCare. The folks from CloudLinux wrote in to remind us of their kernel patching solution, which they've been offering since 2014 and believe is a superior solution to Canonical's service. KernelCare isn't limited to just Ubuntu 16.04 but also works with Ubuntu 14.04 and other distributions such as CentOS/RHEL, Debian, and other enterprise Linux distributions.