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Tuesday, 12 Dec 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Authorsort icon Replies Last Post
Story Games for GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 01/11/2016 - 10:07am
Story GNOME News Roy Schestowitz 01/11/2016 - 10:11am
Story Manjaro Fringilla finally released Roy Schestowitz 01/11/2016 - 10:16am
Story What’s New in RancherOS v0.7.0 Roy Schestowitz 01/11/2016 - 10:19am
Story SnapRoute/OpenSwitch and the Linux Foundation Roy Schestowitz 01/11/2016 - 12:02pm
Story Hyperledger, Blockchain, and China's Huawei Roy Schestowitz 01/11/2016 - 12:30pm
Story Linux Graphics Roy Schestowitz 01/11/2016 - 12:35pm
Story elementary OS 0.4 "Loki" Roy Schestowitz 01/11/2016 - 12:46pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 01/11/2016 - 3:32pm
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 01/11/2016 - 4:29pm

Vienna hobbles open-source migration

Filed under
OSS

zdnet.co.uk: In a setback for the City of Vienna's three-year-old open-source migration programme, city authorities decided on Wednesday to scrap most of the systems that have so far adopted the city's custom-built Linux distribution, instead approving an €8m migration to Windows Vista.

Enhance OpenOffice.org with free extensions and templates

Filed under
OOo

cnet.com: You could create every document, spreadsheet, and presentation you work on from scratch, but if you're like me, you'll likely spend more time futzing with the file's layout and design than entering the data that comprises it. That's why I rely on the many free templates and extensions for my favorite productivity apps.

Just a word on Pardus 2008 (Beta 1)

Filed under
Linux

beranger.org: I once liked Pardus. Quite a lot. When I dropped it, it was because of what I considered to be a tremendously ill-educating behavior. But I wanted to get a glimpse of where are they going to.

Where’s the Ubuntu Server Push?

Filed under
Ubuntu

workswithu.com: It’s far too early to press the panic button. But anecdotal evidence is mounting that Canonical’s server push hasn’t gained much momentum.

Open source helps keep vulnerable people connected

Filed under
OSS

siliconrepublic.com: Four IBM workers in Dublin are to be awarded for their contribution to the development of a community project that uses open source software to ensure older people and vulnerable members of the public in 20 counties across Ireland receive a good neighbour service.

Review: Mandriva One Spring 2008 LiveCD

Filed under
MDV

muddygeek.wordpress: I’ve been sampling GNU/Linux distros for years now. I’ve played with Red Hat and the old SuSE. And I think Mandriva One Spring 2008 is a joke. Its realistically performs no better than those old distros.

KDE 4 sucks big time

Filed under
KDE

thelinuxrant.com: I’ve been a KDE user for many years. Maybe it’s just me, maybe the UI world is changing, but the newest incarnation of KDE sucks big time.

Running a GNU/Linux desktop on the web with Ulteo

Filed under
Linux

freesoftwaremagazine.com: Is it possible to develop full GNU/Linux desktops that run on the web and can therefore be accessed from anywhere? We already have a flavour of this with web-based services such as Google’s Gmail, Google Docs and online storage space but these are run from the user’s own desktop and are restricted to bespoke services. What about full desktops? Enter Ulteo, created by Gael Duval.

Phoronix Test Suite 1.0.0

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: It's been a lot of work -- over the past few months especially -- though we've reached our initial goal in formalizing and releasing our internal test tools and at the same time developing a feature-rich platform. In this article we'll highlight some of what is already possible with Phoronix Test Suite 1.0.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Can open source help liberate the bureaucracy?

  • Future of FLOSS password storages: combined solution soon?
  • The Mismanagement of One Laptop Per Child.
  • Cheap Mobil Computing
  • Mark Shuttleworth: People do research to win customers, not to file patents
  • KDE Everywhere
  • Sourceforge: Vote for your favorite open source projects
  • 'Duke Nukem Forever' Gameplay Video
  • Hands on with the Ubuntu Netbook Remix
  • Top video capture/editing software
  • What I think of the manifesto b...s...
  • Will Linux force Microsoft to give XP Pro more life?
  • Linux Outlaws 41 - Now with File Retention Technology
  • The 10 Best Linus Torvalds Quotes

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Put irssi in a chroot jail

  • An Introduction to Gnome Inform7, Part 1
  • Linux tar: /dev/st0: Cannot write: Invalid argument error and solution
  • Filter Out RIAA/MPAA with PeerGuardian on IPCop
  • Setting up ubuntu from scratch
  • Accessing upnp server from ubuntu
  • eBay sniping with JBidwatcher 2.0
  • Ubuntu Forums Menu Firefox Extension

Why does the retail box matter? (openSUSE 11.0 ready for pre-order)

Filed under
SUSE

zonker.opensuse: Retail box? What’s up with that, right? We’re all about the free downloads over here, right? Yes, but… there’s a method to the madness of offering a retail box as well.

Open source ‘not a threat’: group

Filed under
OSS

sunstar.com.ph: A GROUP of computer manufacturers, distributors and dealers in the country believe the emergence of the open source software technology is not a threat to the industry. Instead, the group considers open source technology as a source of “grassroots ideas.”

2.6.26-rc5, "Another Batch Of Mostly Pretty Small Fixes"

Filed under
Linux

kerneltrap.org: "Another week, another batch of mostly pretty small fixes. Hopefully the regression list is shrinking, and we've fixed at least a couple of the oopses on Arjan's list," said Linux creator Linus Torvalds, announcing the 2.6.26-rc5 kernel.

IceWM Guide

Filed under
HowTos

celettu.wordpress: IceWM is a delightful little window manager, which aims to be must faster than the standard desktop environments like Gnome or KDE, without being as sparse as, for example, Openbox. This step-by-step guide can help anyone who tries to install, configure and use IceWM.

It's Not About the Distro

Filed under
Linux

linuxjournal.com: This summer, I'm changing our entire 250+ workstation infrastructure from Fedora to Edubuntu. Under the hood, our computers will be very, very different. Not a single one of my users, however, will notice.

One Linux distro to rule them all?

Filed under
Ubuntu

newlinuxuser.com: In one way or another, Ubuntu has been getting popular over the past how many years. In the beginning I didn’t like Ubuntu much. For the last two years I’ve been wondering if Ubuntu will be the Linux distro to rule them all.

Big Buck Bunny, We Want More!

Filed under
Movies

junauza.com: Blender Institute, part of the Blender Foundation, made another animated open content film entitled Big Buck Bunny. I watched Big Buck Bunny yesterday together with my 3-yr old son. While Elephant's Dream has a darker storyline, Big Buck Bunny is the complete opposite.

Desktop Environments: The Past and The Future

Filed under
Software

polishlinux.org: While looking at modern operating systems, like: Ubuntu, Windows or Mac OS X, it’s difficult to believe that the GUI is a pretty old idea. The fact that we can see icons on the desktop, or that we can move the mouse pointer around doesn’t mean we’re using a desktop environment. This term stands for a whole of programs enabling to work in a graphical mode.

Opera Looking Sharp

Filed under
Software

my.opera.com: If one word should describe the new look, it would be Sharp. We wanted to create a skin with clean lines and clear icons, inspired by the intuitive symbols you can expect at an airport and in line with our Scandinavian heritage. This also better matches the look and feel we introduced on the Wii and refine in Opera 9.5 for Windows Mobile.

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More in Tux Machines

Games: Radeon Benchmarks, New Games, and CrossOver 17

  • AMDGPU-PRO 17.50 vs. RADV/RadeonSI Radeon Linux Gaming Performance
    With today's AMDGPU-PRO 17.50 Linux driver release alongside the Radeon Software Adrenalin Driver for Windows users, it's significant in a few ways. First and foremost, AMD has stuck to their word of the past two years and is now able to open-source their official Vulkan Linux driver. When it comes to AMDGPU-PRO 17.50 itself you are now able to mix-and-match driver components to choose what pieces you want of AMD's somewhat complicated driver make-up. Additionally, their OpenGL/Vulkan drivers in 17.50 have some new feature capabilities. So with that said here's a fresh look at how the AMDGPU-PRO 17.50 professional driver performance compares to the latest open-source RadeonSI OpenGL and RADV Vulkan drivers.
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Graphics: NVIDIA and AMD

  • NVIDIA Pushes Out CUDA 9.1 With Compiler Optimizations, Volta Enhancements & More
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    For modern AMD graphics cards there are two OpenGL drivers and two Vulkan drivers available to Linux users/gamers that support the same modern AMD GPUs, not counting the older AMD Linux drivers, etc. Here's a rundown now on how those drivers compare. With AMDGPU-PRO 17.50 now allowing you to mix and match driver components and AMD finally open-sourcing their official Vulkan driver, the scene may be even more confusing about which AMD Linux driver(s) to use depending upon your use-case.
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End of Fedora 27 Modular Server

  • Fedora 27 Server classic release after all — and Modularity goes back to the drawing board
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  • Fedora 27 Modular Server Gets Canned; Fedora 27 Server Classic Released
    - The Fedora Project's plans on delivering an initial "Fedora 27 Modular Server" build constructed under their new packaging principles has been thwarted. Due to less than stellar feedback on their Fedora 27 Modular Server build, the Fedora Modular working group is going back to the drawing board for determining a brighter future to its design. Previous to being canned, F27 Modular Server was delayed to January but is now being abandoned in its current form.

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