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Wednesday, 27 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Authorsort icon Replies Last Post
Story Linux lab to fund open-source developers srlinuxx 29/03/2006 - 5:20pm
Story Release Candidate of KOffice 1.5 srlinuxx 29/03/2006 - 10:10pm
Story Policy routing srlinuxx 29/03/2006 - 10:12pm
Story Waterfall 2006 -- the year's hottest software development show srlinuxx 29/03/2006 - 10:13pm
Story Damn Small Linux 2.3: 50mb of Penguin Power srlinuxx 2 23/05/2006 - 9:31am
Story 'A lawyer who is also idealist - how refreshing' srlinuxx 30/03/2006 - 2:31am
Story OpenOffice confab issues call for papers srlinuxx 30/03/2006 - 2:33am
Story Firefox Growth Due to Windows Users srlinuxx 30/03/2006 - 2:35am
Story Book Review: Self-Service Linux srlinuxx 30/03/2006 - 5:10am
Story Why I use...Gentoo? srlinuxx 1 30/03/2006 - 10:29am

UML maintainer Jeff Dike makes virtualization predictions

Filed under
Software

One of the great things about Linux.conf.au is the chance to mingle with some of the brightest lights in the open source community. For example, Jeff Dike, author and maintainer of User-Mode Linux is here this week to talk about UML and the Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM). During one of the breaks on Monday, I sat down with Dike to talk about UML's immediate future, and picked his brain about other virtualization technologies.

New Gnome Control Center for Ubuntu’s Feisty Fawn & Gnome 2.17

Filed under
Software

One of the more noteworthy changes that users you will likely see in the next release of Ubuntu’s Feisty Fawn and in Gnome 2.18, will be a new Gnome Control Center. This article will poke around the current Gnome Control Center, as it is in the Herd 2 build of Feisty Fawn (which includes Gnome 2.17.5) to give users an idea what to expect.

Fun and sun down under: Day one at Linux.conf.au

Filed under
Linux

It took more than 17 hours in planes and a trip through customs, but I've made the trek from Denver, Colorado, to Sydney, Australia, for Linux.conf.au (LCA) 2007. Already it looks like the trip was worthwhile.

Font smoothing on minimal setups

Filed under
HowTos

If you build extremely light setups, you might think something is lacking in the font department. Chances are, you’re right. Font smoothing isn’t activated by default under minimal setups.

So Many Distros, So Little Time

Filed under
Linux

Carla’s rant in response to my review of Vector Linux is well taken if misplaced. Vector Linux has been around since the late ’90s. Her point, though, is very valid. There are literally hundreds of distributions out there if not more. Ryan Lortie made the same point, albeit less clearly, in his article in response to the Free Software Foundation’s Bad Vista Campaign which Chromatic lampooned. Do we really need a separate distribution like GNewSense strictly for ideological purity?

Five reasons why Linux will eventually rule the world

Filed under
Linux

Let's face it, folks - Linux is an unstoppable force. It runs on everything, everywhere and impacts each one of our lives on a daily basis, whether or not you realize it. Here are five reasons why your operating system of the future will be a Linux distribution and why Microsoft is powerless to stop it.

Save time with text editing one-liners

Filed under
Linux

Text-editing operations are normally done interactively, inside a text editor application. Some tasks, however, can be accomplished quickly and easily, right from the UNIX command line. What's more, these one-liners can be used in scripts to automate various editing procedures.

A Beginner's Guide To LVM

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

This guide shows how to work with LVM (Logical Volume Management) on Linux. It also describes how to use LVM together with RAID1 in an extra chapter. As LVM is a rather abstract topic, this article comes with a Debian Etch VMware image that you can download and start, and on that Debian Etch system you can run all the commands I execute here and compare your results with mine. Through this practical approach you should get used to LVM very fast.

Start programs like a pro with XBindKeys

Filed under
HowTos

Desktop environments like KDE and GNOME make it possible for you to assign keyboard shortcuts to a number of global operations, but don't make it easy to create shortcuts to run any program you'd like. To set up shortcuts for programs, XBindKeys is the way to go.

Inkscape Vector Graphics Editor in Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

Inkscape is an Open Source vector graphics editor, with capabilities similar to Illustrator, Freehand, CorelDraw, or Xara X using the W3C standard Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) file format. Inkscape’s main goal is to create a powerful and convenient drawing tool fully compliant with XML, SVG, and CSS standards.

WoW: The Burning Crusade Launch

Filed under
Gaming

Midnight on January 16 marked the official release of The Burning Crusade, the first official major add-on for the blockbuster massively multiplayer online roleplaying game World of Warcraft. But does it run on Linux?

DRM, GPLv3 is 'hot air': Linus Torvalds

Filed under
Software

Digital rights management and the General Public License cause a lot of 'hot air' to be exchanged but they are not a 'big deal', according to the creator of Linux, Linus Torvalds.

M$ and Open Source Experts to Brief House of Lords

Filed under
Security

Representatives of Microsoft Corp and the open source community will this week brief members of the UK's House of Lords as part of its ongoing inquiry into personal internet security.

School Turns To Open Source To Cut Cost, Foster Student Thinking

Filed under
Linux

When existing computing facilities were not meeting the growing need of students and teachers at the Lorien Novalis school in Dural, NSW, students suggested that the school investigate open source software as a cost effective way of improving its computing power.

Fluendo makes proprietary codecs available to Linux

Filed under
Software

In response to the growing demand for proprietary multimedia codecs on the open-source Linux platform, multimedia software development company Fluendo has released GStreamer codec plugins that provide native support for a variety of proprietary media formats.

Linux: Users Follow the Developers

Filed under
Linux

I know I’m not the only person who doesn’t like to feel like a beginner whenever I use a computer. There are those of us who only like to use something that they can easily master within a few minutes. Fear of feeling like a beginner is a major reason why people have avoided Linux. I’m definitely part of the target audience for the Linux LiveCDs.

Mainstream cartoons mentioning Linux

Filed under
Humor

This link goes to a page making the social bookmark rounds, showing various cartoons that name-drop Linux. Amongst the better-known are Doonesbury, Dilbert, and Fox Trot.

Xfce 4.2.4 released

Filed under
Software

A new bug fix release of Xfce 4.2 is available. This release is supposed to be the last release for the 4.2 branch. It includes several fixes ported from the current development branch. This release should not be confused with the upcoming Xfce 4.4 release. Downloads.

DIY DNS service

I have a problem with my ISP, Bell South. Its DNS (Domain Name System) service is slow, and there have been times that it just doesn't work. Since I make my living off non-stop Internet connectivity, this is bad news. Without DNS, using the Web and email becomes almost impossible. What to do?

Online documentation: what's missing

Filed under
Misc

For several years I’ve been fascinated with technical information people get online, instead of from books or journals. Everybody looks online for help installing software, finding programming library calls, fixing bugs, and solving any other technical problem they have on their systems. A lot of information is still missing online.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Microsoft and Linux

GNOME News

  • gnome-boxes: Coder’s log
    So another two weeks have passed and it’s time to sum things up and reflect a little on the struggles and accomplishments that have marked this time period, which was quite a bumpy ride compared to the others, but definitely more exciting.
  • GNOME Keysign 0.6
    It’s been a while since I reported on GNOME Keysign. The last few releases have been exciting, because they introduced nice features which I have been waiting long for getting around to implement them.
  • Testing for Usability
    I recently came across a copy of Web Redesign 2.0: Workflow That Works (book, 2005) by Goto and Cotler. The book includes a chapter on "Testing for Usability" which is brief but informative. The authors comment that many websites are redesigned because customers want to add new feature or want to drive more traffic to the website. But they rarely ask the important questions: "How easy is it to use our website?" "How easily can visitors get to the information they want and need?" and "How easily does the website 'lead' visitors to do what you want them to do?" (That last question is interesting for certain markets, for example.)

SUSE Leftovers

  • Newest Tumbleweed snapshot updates KDE Applications
    The latest openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshot has updated KDE Applications in the repositories to version 16.04.3. Snapshot 20160724 had a considerably large amount of package updates for Tumbleweed KDE users, but other updates in the snapshot included updates to kiwi-config-openSUSE, Libzypp to version 16.1.3, yast2-installation to version 3.1.202 and Kernel-firmware to 2016071
  • Highlights of YaST development sprint 22
    openSUSE Conference’16, Hackweek 14 and the various SUSE internal workshops are over. So it’s time for the YaST team to go back to usual three-weeks-long development sprints… and with new sprints come new public reports! With Leap 42.2 in Alpha phase and SLE12-SP2 in Beta phase our focus is on bugs fixing, so we don’t have as much fancy stuff to show in this report. Still, here you are some bits you could find interesting.