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About Tux Machines

Monday, 26 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Authorsort icon Replies Last Post
Story NVIDIA debuts GeForce 6800 GS srlinuxx 07/11/2005 - 10:13pm
Story Brazil Starts Deployment of Low Cost KDE Computers srlinuxx 07/11/2005 - 9:21pm
Story Cool Tool: Nessus, for good or ill srlinuxx 08/11/2005 - 10:56am
Story A review of Rickford Grant's "Linux Made Easy" srlinuxx 08/11/2005 - 10:59am
Story Xen Pushes 'Paravirtualization' srlinuxx 08/11/2005 - 11:01am
Story Grokster quits file-sharing fight srlinuxx 08/11/2005 - 11:03am
Story Cedega 5.0 Reviewed srlinuxx 08/11/2005 - 11:07am
Story Installing OpenOffice.org 2.0 for Debian srlinuxx 1 09/11/2005 - 12:47am
Story Costs, culture or communism? Why governments choose open source srlinuxx 2 09/11/2005 - 9:55am
Story Co-Founder Sees Slashdot As The Original Blog srlinuxx 08/11/2005 - 10:00pm

The Busy Java Developer’s Guide to db4o

Filed under
HowTos

An object database like db4o simply has more to offer to object-oriented developers, in today's object-oriented world, than its relational cousins.

Download podcasts and sync music automatically with podget

Many so-called podcatchers have shown up to help users download podcasts on request. Most of them are great applications, but what do you do when you want all of your podcasts downloaded automatically and synced to your MP3 player?

Command line tips - checking a folder’s disk usage with du

Filed under
HowTos

Konqueror is one of my favourite file managers on any platform (add OS X’s Finder column view and it would be the best). Why? Well, amongs many other features, it has a view called File Size View, that allows you to see how much space folders and files are taking up visually, and makes it really easy to see what files need cleaning up and deleting.

Securing Apache Web Server from information leakage

Filed under
HowTos

By default, most pre-packaged apache installations come with full information leakage, so if you telnet to port 80 on your webserver you can check, just type in the GET / HTTP/1.1 line, then hit enter twice

KDE Commit Digest 51: Phonon, Decibel, and KsirK

Filed under
KDE
-s

Since our good friend liquidat is taking a vacation, on a business trip, or having a kidney removed, I thought I'd try to brief folks on the latest KDE commit digest.

Linux reloaded

Filed under
Linux

When Linux first made its way onto the radar in the mid-1990s, one of its most touted advantages was its ability to give ageing computers a new lease on life.

At the time many people found the newest versions of Microsoft Windows and Office demanded more power than their systems could deliver. Linux, on the other hand, could run on the smell of an oily rag.

Linux Gazette April 2007 (#137) Issue Online

Filed under
Linux

This month's Linux Gazette is up and ready to read.

Some of this months topics include:

* Cursor Appearance in the Linux Console, by Anonymous
* Getting Started with Linux Mint, by Shane Lazar
* Measuring Congestion Windows of TCP Senders, by René Pfeiffer

How to find files in a remote Windows network from Linux

Filed under
HowTos

Scanning a network remotely is not always an easy task. It is even more difficult when different operating systems are involved. Here's how you can scan an entire tcp/ip range of Windows computers from a Kubuntu Linux box. This is very basic and serves as an example but it is usefull for learning which computers have mp3's or pr0n when they shouldn't have.

Oracle Linux adopters labelled 'idiots'

Filed under
Linux

One of the first converts to Oracle's support for Linux has revealed the public backlash it has endured since their decision to drop Red Hat.

Melbourne company Opes Prime Stockbroking told ZDNet Australia that in the weeks following its announcement to adopt Oracle Linux, upset Linux enthusiasts phoned, e-mailed and wrote about the company online to complain at the decision.

The Sorry State of WiFi Support with Feisty Beta

Filed under
Ubuntu

I have been keeping up with most of the reviews for the new beta release of Ubuntu Feisty with great interest. As a full-time user of Ubuntu Dapper and Edgy, I’m, to say the least, "comfortable" in all aspects of getting the most from my Linux experience.

Easily Convert .WMA to .MP3 in Linux

Filed under
HowTos

If, like me, you find that the majority of applications outside of the fuzzy, feel good realm of Windows do not inherently recognize .wma file format, then this script help you out.

Open up a file named wma2mp3 in your favorite editor, copy and paste the following code, then save. Don't forget to 'chmod +x wma2mp3' when you're finished so you can execute the script.

American Dental Association Sues FSF, Linux Foundation over FLOSS Acronym

Filed under
Legal

The American Dental Association announced Friday that they are suing both the Free Software Foundation and the Linux Foundation over the use of the acronym FLOSS.

PCLinuxOS Magazine April 2007 Issue 8 Released!

Filed under
PCLOS

It is my privilege to announce on behalf of the team members of the PCLinuxOS Magazine Project sponsored by MyPCLinuxOS.com, the April 2007 issue (#8) is available for download!

Some highlights include:

1. KDE User's Guide
2. What is ROOT?
3. A Letter to My Windows Friends
4. Free as in Free Beer
5. Creating a Favorite Applications Menu
6. As always, much more

Review: Bayanihan Linux 4

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

This Filipino-based Linux distribution, initiated by the Open Source Group in the Philippines’ Advanced Science and Technology Institute in October 2001, hasn’t received a lot of press (in the US, at least). I just first heard of it via DistroWatch announcing their latest release. Curious, I checked out the distribution’s website, which looked very nice.

Oracle yet to tip Red Hat

Filed under
Linux

Oracle is yet to provide evidence Australian customers are switching to its Red Hat Linux support program despite announcing new business deals for the last quarter.

Get This About Open Source

Filed under
OSS

You like packaged apps because they're standard, but is standard performance what your company is gunning for?

Mandriva 2007.1: KDE vs. Gnome

Filed under
MDV

Mandriva 2007.1 RC3 is out since this weekend, so we are really near the final release now. After all the Gnome testing I did for Mandriva 2007.1, I thought it was time to do some ultimate testing with KDE. Actually, I'm very deceived: where Mandriva 2007.1 is very polished, the default KDE install is terrible. Really, not just bad, but plain terrible. Here's an overview.

Feisty Openbox on 1Ghz Pentium III, start to finish

Filed under
HowTos

This post is one part memo to self, one part demonstration of how I put together a very lightweight Feisty system using Openbox on a Dell Inspiron 1Ghz Pentium III laptop with 512Mb of PC133, two 60Gb 7200rpm hard drives and an Intel 2200BG wireless card.

ThinkGeek offers new selections in product line

Filed under
Misc

Does playing with your Wii make you tired? Do you long for the nostalgic 8-bit clothing days? Get a whole new meaning from snooze you lose. The Lonely Guy Dream Vacation Digital Photo Frame is the next best thing to actually going.

New products include:

* The ThinkGeek WiiHelm
* SnuzNLuz - Wifi Donation Alarm Clock
* Piranhaz - R/C Battle Fish

Non-Destructive Partitioning with GParted

Filed under
HowTos

What is partitioning and why would you want to repartition?

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Linux Graphics

  • The RADV Radeon Vulkan Linux Driver Continues Picking Up Features
  • OpenChrome Maintainer Making Some Progress On VIA DRM Driver
    Independent developer Kevin Brace took over maintaining the OpenChrome DDX driver earlier this year to improve the open-source VIA Linux graphics support while over the summer he's slowly been getting up to speed on development of the OpenChrome DRM driver. The OpenChrome DRM driver was making progress while James Simmons was developing it a few years back, but since he left the project, it's been left to bit rot. It will take a lot of work even to get this previously "good" code back to working on the latest Linux 4.x mainline kernels given how DRM core interfaces have evolved in recent times.
  • My talk about Mainline Explicit Fencing at XDC 2016!
    Last week I was at XDC in Helsinki where I presented about the Explicit Fencing work we’ve been doing on the Mainline Linux Kernel in the lastest few months. There was a livestream of all presentations during the conference and recorded sections are available. You can check the video of my presentation. Check out the slides too.

Linux Kernel News

  • Linux 4.8 gets rc8
    Chill, penguin-fanciers: Linux lord Linus Torvalds is sitting on the egg that is Linux 4.8 for another week. As Torvalds indicated last week, this version of the kernel still needs work and therefore earned itself an eighth release candidate.
  • Linux 4.8-rc8 Released: Linux 4.8 Next Weekend
  • Linux Kernel 4.7.5 Released with Numerous ARM and Networking Improvements
    The fifth maintenance update to the Linux 4.7 kernel series, which is currently the most advanced, secure and stable kernel branch you can get for your GNU/Linux operating system, has been announced by Greg Kroah-Hartman. Linux kernel 4.7.5 is here only ten days after the release of the previous maintenance version, namely Linux kernel 4.7.4, and it's a big update that changes a total of 213 files, with 1774 insertions and 971 deletions, which tells us that the kernel developers and hackers had a pretty busy week patching all sorts of bugs and security issues, as well as to add various, much-needed improvements.
  • Blockchain Summit Day Two: End-Of-Conference Highlights From Shanghai
    Financial services firms and startups looking to be the bridge to blockchain ledgers continued to dominate presentations on the second and final day of the Blockchain Summit, ending International Blockchain Week in Shanghai that also saw Devcon2 and a startup demo competition.
  • Testing Various HDDs & SSDs On Ubuntu With The Linux 4.8 Kernel
    Here are some fresh benchmarks of various solid-state drives (SATA 3.0 SSDs plus two NVMe M.2 SSDs) as well as two HDDs for getting a fresh look at how they are performing using the Linux 4.8 Git kernel. After publishing Friday's Intel 600P Series NVME SSD tests of this lower-cost NVM Express storage line-up, I continued testing a few other SSDs and HDDs. These additional reference points are available for your viewing pleasure today. The additional data is also going to be used for reference in a Linux 4.8-based BCache SSD+HDD comparison being published next week. Stay tuned for those fresh BCache numbers.

Behind the GNOME 3.22 Release Video

This is less than usual. The time saving mostly stems from spending less time recording for the release video. At first thought you might think recording would be a breeze but it can be one of the most frustrating aspects of making the videos. Each cycle the GNOME community lands improvement a wide set of GNOME’s applications. So before each release I have to find some way to run a dozen of applications from master. I do this either by: Read more