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Friday, 24 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Authorsort icon Replies Last Post
Story New Releases Roy Schestowitz 30/09/2016 - 1:45am
Story TDF Releases Fresh Update to LibreOffice 5.2 Roy Schestowitz 30/09/2016 - 8:05am
Story FreeBSD 11.0 Comes Up Short In Ubuntu 16.04 vs. macOS Sierra Benchmarks Roy Schestowitz 30/09/2016 - 8:10am
Story LXLE: A Linux distro to give new life to old hardware Roy Schestowitz 30/09/2016 - 9:20am
Story 10 reasons why CIOs should consider open source software Roy Schestowitz 30/09/2016 - 9:40am
Story Licensing resource series: Free GNU/Linux distributions & GNU Bucks Roy Schestowitz 30/09/2016 - 10:20am
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 30/09/2016 - 11:17am
Story Games for GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 30/09/2016 - 11:35am
Story Security News Roy Schestowitz 30/09/2016 - 11:36am
Story Linux Graphics Roy Schestowitz 30/09/2016 - 11:52am

Dell Beings Ubuntu Linux 8.04 Pre-installs

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

thevarguy.com: It’s finally official. Dell’s Ubuntu Linux PCs now come with the latest build of the operating system, version 8.04. That may not seem like news, but it’s actually a significant move by Dell. Here’s why.

Can Linux Replace Windows - Maybe!

Filed under
Linux

community.zdnet.co.uk/blog: I loaded Ubuntu Linux on my test laptop a couple of weeks ago more or less on a lark. After two weeks of loading a variety of different Linux distributions (but nowhere near all or even most of them!), and configuring, and experimenting, and learning, and talking with my partner and my brother, I would say the answer to that question is a qualified "Yes".

Breaking Down OpenSolaris on the Desktop

Filed under
OS

informit.com: A lot has been said about OpenSolaris, the community-supported version of Sun's Solaris operating system. Is it for you? Not if you're a SOHO user interested in business productivity applications, says A.Lizard.

Why does open source need a villain?

Filed under
OSS

blogs.zdnet.com: Bill Gates has been in “retirement” for less than a month (heading his Foundation may be harder than being Microsoft CEO) and already open source advocates have settled on a replacement.

Xubuntu + BEOS theme + Remastersys = PC/OS

Filed under
Linux

ruminationsonthedigitalrealm.org: This must have been the briefest test run a Linux distribution had on my box. I continued until the live desktop, only to confirm the massive suspicion I had. This is yet another remaster posing as something new. The culprit: PC/OS.

The New and Improved Ubuntu QA

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntu.com: For the last couple of weeks, Jordan Mantha been working behind the scenes on creating a community Ubuntu QA (quality assurance) team. For quite a while Canonical has largely driven QA efforts in Ubuntu. The community can and should step up in this area.

Acer Aspire one (Linux)

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

laptopmag.com: Mini-notebooks are getting bigger and more elaborate by the day, but Acer enters the crowded market with a simple yet solid miniature laptop for only $379. The Aspire one’s easy to use, customized Linux operating system and low price make it a compelling mini-notebook.

NASA Uses Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntulinuxtipstricks.blogspot: Two weekends ago was the Smithsonian Folklife Festival. Due to NASA's 50th anniversary they got one of the country spots this year. Dan walks over, looks at the photo of a woman in front of a projector, and goes "that's gnome-terminal!"

OpenBSD devs respond to Torvalds' monkey jibe

zdnet.com.au: OpenBSD developers have responded to comments made by Linus Torvalds that they are a "bunch of masturbating monkeys". In an email exchange with ZDNet.co.uk, developer Ken Westerback wrote that an interest in security should lead to fixing all bugs.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Sweet Home 3D: simple interior design

  • The Year of the Free Software Desktop
  • What version of linux seems to be the least buggiest
  • What Linux version for a newcomer to Linux?
  • Intux 1.0 A Clone of PCLinuxOS with New Graphics
  • To Break ABI or Not to Break ABI: That is the Question
  • Red Hat Offers a Model for Patent Licensing
  • The Top command
  • Is content you can edit open source?
  • Tough Love
  • Ubuntu Tweak Utility Review
  • Plasma Embedded
  • Open Source OS's Part 3: OpenSuse
  • Linux Not The Savior For Our Economy
  • NVIDIA Updates Its Legacy Linux Drivers
  • Nicaragua: Open Source Software in Public Institutions

PCLinuxOS to Mandriva Spring 2008.1

Filed under
MDV

datalude.com/blog: I posted an entry here a month or so ago about my switch from Linux Mint to PCLinuxOS. There was good, bad, and definitely very ugly. In the many comments on that article, someone suggested that I should try Mandriva. So I did.

Linus Torvalds: Short update and pause in 2.6.27 merge window

Filed under
Linux

lkml.org: This is just a quick note to let people know that I'll be off for an extended weekend starting later today, so the next few days will be very quiet from a merge standpoint.

Which platform: Cathedral or open source?

Filed under
OSS

computerworld.com.au: Have you ever experienced a software bug and thought to yourself, "I could fix that"? If you could, would you? How could that even be possible?

Don't Overcomplicate Linux!

Filed under
Linux

community.zdnet.co.uk/blog: This is the kind of thing I don't particularly enjoy writing, but as I have been blogging about learning Linux, and I've tried to approach as an "ordinary PC user" would, I think it's important to pass along lessons learned from mistakes.

10 Must-Have Linux Applications

Filed under
Software

Matt Hartley: What finally allowed me to go full-time with my chosen distro was not so much the progression of hardware detection and self-mounting partitions but the applications. Today, I would like to share some of my personal favorites with you.

BLAG 90000: The Che Guevara Of Linux

Filed under
Linux

reddevil62-techhead.blogspot: THERE'S an alluring whiff of rebellion about the Linux/Open Source community. Using Linux, writing about Linux, championing Linux - it is like sticking up two fingers (or one, if you are reading this in America) to a corporate world that insists on telling me what I can and cannot do with my own computers. Every time I use BLAG 90000, I cannot help thinking of Che Guevara.

Audio/Visual Synthesis: The New Arts, Part 2

Filed under
Software

linuxjournal.com: In this second part of my survey I focus on the tools that achieve this new synthesis of arts. Each of these programs takes a different approach to the practical concerns of blending images (moving or still) with sound (realtime or recorded).

Auto-NDISwrapper–a tool for enabling wireless network card to work with its Windows driver on Linux

Filed under
Software

linuxine.com: I often see Linux users complain their wireless network card doesn’t work on Linux at the forums,indeed , some wireless network cards can’t work/work well on Linux. Auto-NDISwrapper would be one of the solutions for those complaints.

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Tizen News

Mozilla Firefox Quantum

  • Can the new Firefox Quantum regain its web browser market share?
    When Firefox was introduced in 2004, it was designed to be a lean and optimized web browser, based on the bloated code from the Mozilla Suite. Between 2004 and 2009, many considered Firefox to be the best web browser, since it was faster, more secure, offered tabbed browsing and was more customizable through extensions than Microsoft’s Internet Explorer. When Chrome was introduced in 2008, it took many of Firefox’s best ideas and improved on them. Since 2010, Chrome has eaten away at Firefox’s market share, relegating Firefox to a tiny niche of free software enthusiasts and tinkerers who like the customization of its XUL extensions. According to StatCounter, Firefox’s market share of web browsers has fallen from 31.8% in December 2009 to just 6.1% today. Firefox can take comfort in the fact that it is now virtually tied with its former arch-nemesis, Internet Explorer and its variants. All of Microsoft’s browsers only account for 6.2% of current web browsing according to StatCounter. Microsoft has largely been replaced by Google, whose web browsers now controls 56.5% of the market. Even worse, is the fact that the WebKit engine used by Google now represents over 83% of web browsing, so web sites are increasingly focusing on compatibility with just one web engine. While Google and Apple are more supportive of W3C and open standards than Microsoft was in the late 90s, the web is increasingly being monopolized by one web engine and two companies, whose business models are not always based on the best interests of users or their rights.
  • Firefox Nightly Adds CSD Option
    I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: Firefox 57 is awesome — so awesome that I’m finally using it as my default browser again. But there is one thing it the Linux version of Firefox sorely needs: client-side decoration.

First Renesas based Raspberry Pi clone runs Linux

iWave’s “iW-RainboW-G23S” SBC runs Linux on a Renesas RZ/G1C, and offers -20 to 85°C support and expansion headers including a RPi-compatible 40-pin link. iWave’s iW-RainboW-G23S is the first board we’ve seen to tap the Renesas RZ/G1C SoC, which debuted earlier this year. It’s also the first Renesas based SBC we’ve seen that features the increasingly ubiquitous Raspberry Pi 85 x 56mm footprint, layout, and RPi-compatible 40-pin expansion connector. The board is also notable for providing -20 to 85°C temperature support. Read more Also: GameShell Is An Open Source And Linux-powered Retro Game Console That You’ll Love

Games: SuperTuxKart, Tannenberg, Observer