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Tuesday, 19 Mar 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Top 5 Reasons Why You Should Use Fedora Linux

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat

These are some of the major reasons why you should use Fedora. It might not be popular as Ubuntu or comes with advanced tools by default as Kali Linux or user-friendly as Linux Mint, but it has a solid base when it comes to latest features and security. Another fact is, anyone, can build a Linux distribution but you should not use one run by a single or few people. Fedora is backed by RedHat, one of the most reputable names in Linux industry and hence you will have peace of mind.

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OpenXR 0.90 Released For AR/VR Standard - Monado Is An Open-Source Implementation

Filed under
OSS

Last year we were expecting The Khronos Group to introduce OpenXR 1.0 for this standard to address fragmentation and provide interoperability in the VR space followed by AR. That debut last year didn't happen although they did show off the first demonstration at SIGGRAPH. This week though at GDC they are announcing the OpenXR 0.90 provisional specification release.

The OpenXR 0.90 provisional specification is now available today. Yes, v0.90 and not 1.0... This caught me by surprise too when being briefed last week. This provisional specification ended up incorporating not only VR support but also AR (augmented reality) into the design. They are hoping for more feedback from AR/VR developers before officially declaring 1.0 especially with the AR support squeezing in when originally they only anticipated to get that in post-1.0.

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Best 15 Fractal Software for Linux For Beginners and Professionals

Filed under
Software

Are you seriously seeking to know about some fantastic fractal software for Linux? It may seem to be a common and normal thing to find, but only a few resources will show you the right solution. Yes, you came one of the proper places to check! I am gonna show you the best 15 Linux fractal tools that are excellent in the drawing, shading, and creating a perfect and appealing artistic work.

Before going the main part, let’s have a look what actually the tool means. From the dictionary, fractal means a geometrical figure which holds the same statistical character as the whole. It may define as a complex pattern showing self-similarity in different scales. That means, whatever you do with any part (like zooming or the opposite), it shows the same amount of detail as before.

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FOSS: On the Road to Nowhere

Filed under
OSS

I started using free and open source software 20 years ago. In many ways, I’m delighted in how it has developed and spread. I can use KDE’s Plasma, the most advanced desktop on any platform, and it’s been 15 years since I needed to buy software for my professional work. From being an outlying oddity, FOSS has become the norm — so much so that invitations for bids often specify that the resulting software must be open source.

Yet I can’t help thinking that FOSS as a whole has lost its sense of shared values. Nor do groups that might provide those shared values, like the Free Software Foundation (FSF) and the Linux Foundation, seem capable of providing the leadership that could provide those shared values.

Oh, I’m aware that projects and foundations continue to provide leadership on a local scale. I am aware, too, of the Linux Foundation’s Open Source Leadership Summit, which helps to promote cooperative development. What is missing, though, is often the sense of everyone working towards the same goals for shared reasons.

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Games: Second Earth, Two Point Hospital, SDL2, Battle for Wesnoth, Linux Gaming News Punch, GameHub, Football Story, RPCS3

Filed under
Gaming
  • Second Earth, a base-building game from the developer of Broforce has a Linux build

    Broforce is the game from developer Free Lives that made me fall in love with platformers again, can they do the same for base-building tower defense games? Second Earth could be good when further developed.

    To be clear, Second Earth is in the very early stages to the point that they're calling it a prototype. Even so, I've played with it for a little while and the Linux version seems to run pretty well.

  • Two Point Hospital | Linux Gaming | Ubuntu 18.04 | Native

    Two Point Hospital has a free weekend on Steam right now!

  • SDL2 has pulled in support for the Wii U/Switch USB GameCube controller adapter

    SDL2, the cross-platform development library has now merged in support for the Wii U/Switch USB GameCube controller adapter.

    This work is the result of the successful IndieGoGo crowdfunding campaign from Ethan Lee, who previously ported a ton of games to Linux and Lee now also works with CodeWeavers to help with Steam Play/Proton development. This campaign was a personal project of Lee's, done across a few weekends.

  • Looks like Battle for Wesnoth is being ported to Godot Engine

    Battle for Wesnoth, the classic open source turn-based strategy game has been around for a long time and it seems they're going to switch over to the Godot Engine.

    In a Twitter post sent out yesterday, the team teased "Are we working on a thing?

  • List Of 30+ Best Linux Games That You Should Play in 2019

    There are thousands of Games available for Linux based operating systems. Those used to be the day when it was hard to find Linux games but these days there are several gaming marketplace, gaming platforms and games being developed for the Linux based operating systems.

  • Linux Gaming News Punch - Episode 4

    For those who have trouble keeping up with all the happenings, here's another bite-sized round-up of some interesting Linux gaming news recently.

    The Linux Gaming News Punch - Episode 4 is officially here. As usual, it comes in both video and audio-only flavours.

  • GameHub is another open source game launcher, giving Lutris some competition

    Not a fan of Lutris or just want to try something different? GameHub could be a pretty good option for you.

    I've been meaning to try this for a while, after many people emailed it in over the last few months. I finally sat down with it this weekend to give it a good run and honestly, I'm pretty impressed. While it claims it is "designed for elementary OS" it of course works across different distributions.

  • Football Story blends a narrative campaign with competitive multiplayer, coming to Linux

    For those who love their games that involve sports, Football Story sounds like it could be one to watch. It's being developed by fructus temporum, with publishing by Crytivo (The Universim).

  • The latest progress report for PlayStation 3 emulator RPCS3 is looking good

    The RPCS3 team have a huge mountain to climb to get more PlayStation 3 titles playable but it's all coming together now.

    The latest report shows that 1,119 titles are now class as playable, up from 1,081 reported the month before. Considering the amount of effort required in such an emulator, it's really impressive. Some of these newly playable titles include Skate 3, Dragon Ball Z: Battle of Z, Ni no Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch, No More Heroes: Heroes’ Paradise, Ragnarok Odyssey Ace and more!

Setting up Continuous Integration With GitLab, Jenkins and SonarQube

Filed under
HowTos

This tutorial is about continuous integration between GitLab, Jenkins and SonarQube. At the end of this tutorial, you will be able to view the quality reports of GitLab repository codes at SonarQube by using Jenkins as a Continuous Integrator and sonar-scanner as code analyzer.
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Review: Kubuntu versus KDE neon

Filed under
KDE
Reviews

Often times when I'm browsing open source forums I run into variations of the query "Why do we need KDE neon when we have Kubuntu?" Or, possibly the inverse: "What is the benefit to running Kubuntu when we have KDE neon?" Sometimes the question is more neutral: "What is the difference between running Kubuntu with backports and running KDE neon?"

These are fair questions. While Kubuntu tends to be seen as being more geared toward end users and KDE neon tends to be regarded as being a way for curious testers to try out the latest KDE technology, there is a lot of overlap between the two projects. Both are based on Ubuntu, both feature recent releases of the KDE Plasma desktop, and both stick pretty close to a vanilla KDE experience. This got me wondering if there is much of a difference between the two projects from the end-user's point of view. Are they basically the same experience with slightly different configurations, or are there practical differences in play that would make a users choose one over the other?

I decided to find out. I downloaded a snapshot of the User edition of KDE neon and a copy of Kubuntu. Since KDE neon is based on Ubuntu long-term support (LTS) releases, specifically Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, I opted to download Kubuntu 18.04.2 in order to make sure the base operating systems were as close to the same as I could get. Then I started comparing the two side-by-side.

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Solus 4 Fortitude Released

Filed under
OS

We are proud to announce the immediate availability of Solus 4 Fortitude, a new major release of the Solus operating system. This release delivers a brand new Budgie experience, updated sets of default applications and theming, and hardware enablement.

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Also: Solus 4 "Fortitude" Officially Released, It's Now Available for Download

Linux 5.1-rc1

Filed under
Linux

It's Sunday, and two weeks have passed, and everything is normal. You
all know the drill by now - the merge window is closed, and things are
supposed to calm down.

The merge window felt fairly normal to me. And looking at the stats,
nothing really odd stands out either. It's a regular sized release
(which obviously means "big" - , but it's not bigger than usual) and
the bulk of it (just over 60%) is drivers. All kinds of drivers, the
one that stands out for being different is the habanalabs AI
accelerator chip driver, but I suspect we'll be starting to see more
of that kind of stuff. But there are all the usual suspects too - gpu,
networking, block devices etc etc.

Read more

Also: Linux 5.1-rc1 Kernel Released After A "Fairly Normal" Merge Window

Linus Torvalds Kicks Off Development of Linux 5.1 Kernel, First RC Is Out Now

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Intel Comet Lake Processors To Feature Up To 10 Cores: Linux Support List

    With Intel set to release their next-gen Comet Lake processors, a leaked Linux support list has indicated that the forthcoming desktop processors might feature up to 10 cores.

    Intel will still rely on the 14nm manufacturing process, and the Comet Lake-S is speculated to be based on the Skylake micro-architecture. It will succeed the currently popular Intel Core i9-9900K processor which has 8 cores and 16 threads.

  • The KVM Changes Aren't Too Notable For Linux 5.1, But Many x86 Cleanups

    Paolo Bonzini submitted the Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM) changes for the Linux 5.1 kernel on Friday, much later in the cycle than normal. This isn't due to some big ticket features landing but rather "some ugly factors" in the form of tracking down some bugs and ended up dropping some premature optimizations. 

    So for Linux 5.1 the KVM virtualization work isn't the most exciting but there are some clean-ups for the ARM code, similar work on the S390 front, bug fixes and improvements to the POWER code, and "many, many cleanups" on the x86 front. Along with the many x86/x86_64 cleanups to the KVM code, a number of unnecessary MMU code optimizations were removed.

  • The First Test Release Of Phoronix Test Suite 8.8 Plus Exciting New Benchmarks

    The first development milestone release of Phoronix Test Suite 8.8-Hvaler is now available for your open-source, automated benchmarking needs on Linux, BSD, Windows, and macOS operating systems. 

    Phoronix Test Suite 8.8 Milestone 1 features a smattering of different improvements compared to Phoronix Test Suite 8.6 that shipped last month as the Q1'2019 feature update.

  • SMLR Episode 303 See Other Green
  • Full Circle Weekly News #124

Servers: IBM/Red Hat Delay, Submariner, Jenkins and More

Filed under
Server
  • Signs emerge IBM-Red Hat merger may face delay; IBM says it's still on

    Is IBM's $34 billion merger with Red Hat in trouble? Is it facing delays?

  • Rancher Labs Submariner Project Links Kubernetes Clusters

    Sheng Liang, CEO and co-founder of Rancher Labs, explained that Submariner creates the necessary tunnels and routes between Kubernetes clusters that allow for direct connections regardless of their location. It can be deployed into existing Kubernetes clusters with the addition of Layer-3 network connectivity between pods in different clusters.

    The project also secures those connection paths using IPSec tunnels, though Rancher Labs does plan to add different interconnectivity plugins. Liang said this includes additional remote connectivity plugins for WAN-optimized or SD-WAN technologies.

  • Jenkins tries to reinvent itself as cloud-native for Kubernetes

    The popular but troubled Jenkins CI/CD system is being reworked to support cloud-native applications on the Kubernetes container-orchestration platform. The Jenkins X project is a response to user concerns that Jenkins had lost its luster and had developed configuration and stability issues.

    Jenkins X is intended for Kubernetes users who want to adopt CI/CD or who want CI/CD and are moving to the cloud, without necessarily knowing anything about Kubernetes. Jenkins X builds on Jenkins with open source tools, promoting a Git branching and a repository model. A Jenkins distribution is used as the core CI/CD engine.

  • Chipmakers Watching Mellanox Deal With Interest

    Weekly Briefing March 15, 2019: Nvidia buys Mellanox, Facebook snatches up Sonics, Linus Foundation holds its first Open Source Leaders’ Summit, Geneva auto show

  • The Year of Open RAN

    Mobile operators are seeking to transform their networks to keep up with the demands of Industry 4.0 – as wireless connectivity requirements evolve from connected devices to connected everything – people, places, and things. Navigating the open source landscape can be a challenge as there are a number of open ecosystems that have emerged to help define how next-generation networks will be built to support 50+ billion connected devices and new 5G services and applications.

  • Cincinnati Bell division CBTS bows new open source reference architecture

    C

    CBTS is putting elements of the Open Networking Foundation's SEBA reference design into play with a new reference architecture called COI.

    [...]

    "One of the things is that R-CORD has been tough for the carriers to do themselves," said Lee Doyle, principal analyst of Doyle Research, in an interview with FierceTelecom. "They're (CBTS) trying to jump on a new market opportunity and we'll see if there's a substantial market for that or not.

    "The market is extremely nascent right now. There are a lot of people who are trialing R-CORD, but we've all seen that before with NFV. Just because you're trialing it doesn't mean you're using it."

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Proposing a 'Declaration of Digital Independence'

    THIS MESSAGE IS mainly for the leaders and enthusiasts of the broad-based movement toward decentralizing content, but especially social media. I’m not trying to start a new project or organization—after all, decentralization is what I am encouraging. I’m partly trying to start a conversation among individuals, to get them thinking and talking—but on a massive scale. But I’m also trying to inspire people to action, to come together and go the last mile to achieving robust and extremely widespread decentralization.

  • How To Get Started on Mastodon and Leave Twitter Behind

    Close your Twitter account, delete your old Tweets, pack your bags, and head over to Mastodon's wild world of federated microblogging.

  • [SUSE:] Why the future of IT transformation is open source

    For many organisations, undergoing IT transformation means re-investigating and overhauling existing information technology to support various new technological aspects of the organisation such as digital transformation and changes in IT infrastructure. Today, open source technologies are providing viable, cost efficient and leading-edge solutions, with more organisations and businesses adopting open source to support their IT transformation goals.

    [...]

    Research by SUSE found that 95 percent of IT leaders believe SDI is the future for the data centre. Businesses that are focused on the future of their organisations and transformation strategies
    will need to address a multifaceted IT world which encompasses traditional data centres, SDI and cloud environments.

  • The secret sauce behind smart city efforts

    Why should technology be open source? Why is open source important?

    DP: Open source technology is developed by a community of developers, and benefits from collaborations among highly-skilled talents and professionals to facilitate more, and better ideas. More importantly, open source isn't a company or a product. It's a methodology that ensures greater innovation and collaboration.

    Today, open source is the preferred choice for organizations that want to become more agile and flexible. It offers a wide range of benefits, from improved security to freedom from vendor lock-in. Industries across the spectrum in the region – even those traditionally regarded as being very private and guarded such as the public sector and financial services – are now embracing open source approaches to realize innovation and drive transformation. Beyond its positive impacts on business, open source innovation has also led to greater citizen participation and contribution in government initiatives around the world. Open source methodologies have the potential to fundamentally transform how countries are run, and at the same, enrich the lives of citizens in so many ways, technologically and culturally.

  • How PC/GEOS found a 5th life as an open source DOS shell

    For those who cut their teeth on computers like the Apple II and Commodore 64, GEOS brought a Mac-like GUI to comparatively lower-powered, 8-bit home computers. The team behind GEOS developed GeoWorks for PC in 1990. GeoWorks was also the basis of America Online for DOS. Substantial amounts of GeoWorks were written in fine-tuned x86 Assembly, making it decently more performant on Intel 386-based computers than Windows 3.0, which was released the same year. This high performance in constrained environments gave GeoWorks a protracted lifespan.

  • MyEtherWallet launches an open-source blockchain explorer to promote innovation
  • MyEtherWallet (MEW) Launches Open Source ETH Blockchain Explorer on Testnet

    Popular Ethereum wallet service MyEtherWallet (MEW) has launched an open-source blockchain explorer named EthVM (virtual machine) on the Ropsten testnet. EthVM will compete directly with leading Ethereum block explorer Etherscan.io.

    According to a press release published on Monday, March 11th, MEW seeks to offer a comprehensive solution to Ethereum developers while at the same time designed to provide a seamless and simple interface for blockchain users (especially beginners).

  • Launches Open Source Blockchain Explorer for Ethereum
  • MyEtherWallet Launches New Open Source Ethereum Blockchain Explorer
  • Neha Narkhede: Open Source Isn't A Business Model, It's A Distribution Strategy [Ed: It's neither. It's about the software licence.]
  • A software market prediction: it’s all about open source

    Over the course of 2019, the big battleground in the software market is going to be around open source and specifically around how it’s used.

    “You’re starting to see the battle lines drawn up between the Mongos, the AWSs and Redis,” confirms Jim Rose, CEO at CircleCI.

    At the moment, you have these open source communities/companies that have built very valuable software that is “being taken off the shelf “and implemented for money by all of the cloud vendors.

  • OpenStack Foundation Announces First Open Infrastructure Summit in…

    The 20th Open Infrastructure Summit—formerly known as the OpenStack Summit—is headed to the Shanghai Expo Center the week of November 4, 2019. China is the one of the largest markets for OpenStack based on the number and scale of users—including China Mobile, China UnionPay, China Railway, the State Grid Corporation of China—and developers who contribute to the open source software project. Contributors and users from 30 open infrastructure projects will attend and speak at the event.

  • Couchbase Named a Leader in the Big Data NoSQL Database Evaluation by Independent Research Firm
  • A WordPress safety plan for SEOs and developers

    WordPress powers an astonishing one-third of all websites these days.

  • Samsung Galaxy S10, S10e, and S10+ kernel sources are available for the Exynos models
  • Stop Child Abuse Before it Happens with New Open Source Geospatial Machine Learning Tools
  • Orchestra | An Open-Source Robotic Process Automation System

    Orchestra is an open source workflow management system that uses the Robotics Process Automation to support teams and improve how people do analytical and creative work. By having the machines do repetitive parts of a project, developers can spend much more time working on some of the more engaging tasks.

  • Open data needed to address agriculture's problems
  • Exclusive: Meet the UK’s ‘Data Diplomat’

    “It’s not about what data can do for diplomacy. It is how diplomacy can possibly remain relevant unless we embrace data.”

    So says Graham Nelson, the founder of the UK Foreign Office’s Open Source Unit (OSU). He is fresh from delivering a seminar on data-driven policymaking at Singapore’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

    It’s been a long day, but he becomes visibly more animated when talking about his work: helping governments around the world use data to solve their most defining challenges. “I am really excited by the potential for data to do so much good,” says the mathematician-turned-diplomat. He shares how data is an indispensable tool for governments today, and how it can help agencies examine the impact they are really making.

    [...]

    It certainly helps that governments today “have got much better access to commercial satellite data and meteorological data than we would have had before”. “There are some really easy ways that countries thinking about setting up on this journey of using data can start,” Nelson points out.

  • Healthcare Design Studio Releases Repo of Free, Open Source Visualizations

    GoInvo, a digital health design consultancy headquartered in Arlington, Massachusetts, today announced the release of a repo featuring over 20 open source health visualizations and graphics (https://www.goinvo.com/vision/health-visualizations) available to all for use or modification, under a Creative Commons Attribution v3 license or MIT license.

As a longtime Windows user, I made the switch to Chrome OS: How does it fair?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

I’m a Google fan, but there has always been one product that I’ve been hesitant to try: Chrome OS, Google’s desktop operating system that powers all Chromebooks on the market. If you’ve ever heard anything about Chromebooks, chances are that you’ve heard the stereotype that it’s just a “glorified web browser.” I’ve been following Chrome OS for years and I know that there is so much more to it now—Android apps, Linux support, etc. But I never actually ditched Windows and exclusively used a Chromebook as my only laptop—until now.

Read more

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

deepin, the prettiest Linux distribution, switches to Debian stable in 15.9.2 beta

Filed under
Debian

There are many Linux distributions in the wild nowadays, but none are more beautiful than deepin. Even though I don't use the operating system regularly (I prefer Fedora and GNOME), I recognize deepin's beauty as second to none. Some people refuse to use the distro because its developers are in China, but in reality, it should be fine to use. Just like concerns about Huawei hardware, it is largely due to xenophobia.

While deepin has always seemed rock solid to me, its base of Debian unstable apparently made it less reliable than the developers liked. As a result, beginning with the new 15.9.2 beta, deepin is switching to Debian stable. In other words, the developers are not only focused on the superficial.

Read more

BSD: Coming Back to OpenBSD and EuroBSDcon 2019 Call for Talks

Filed under
BSD
  • Well, it’s been a while – falling in love with OpenBSD again

    When the Mac laptop came out without an ESC key (it was on this gimmicky little one row display at the top of the keyboard that could be reconfigured based on your application), as a long-time VI user (the commands are programmed into my spinal cord, I really have no choice now) I was disgusted. That forced me to recognize that I wasn’t Apple’s target market. They wanted average computer users who didn’t care if they were on the latest and greatest chipset and they were getting more and more closed and “un-upgradeable” every day.

  • EuroBSDcon 2019: Lillehammer, Norway

    The Call for Talk and presentation proposals for EuroBSDCon 2019 is now
    open.

    EuroBSDcon is the European technical conference for users and developers
    of BSD-based systems. The conference will take place September 19-22
    2019 in Lillehammer, Norway. The tutorials will be held on Thursday and
    Friday to registered participants and the talks are presented to
    conference attendees on Saturday and Sunday.

    The Call for Talk and Presentation proposals period will close on May
    26th, 2019. Prospective speakers will be notified of accepteance or
    otherwise by June 3rd, 2019.

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More in Tux Machines

Security: Updates, "US Huawei Blackballing Efforts" and Microsoft's Back Doors Keep Crackers Busy

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • US Huawei Blackballing Efforts Stall Due To Lack Of 'Actual Facts'
    During the Trump era, the US government has dramatically ramped up claims that Chinese hardware vendor Huawei is a nefarious spy for the Chinese government, blackballing it from the U.S. telecom market. From pressuring U.S. carriers to drop plans to sell Huawei phones to the FCC's decision to ban companies from using Huawei gear if they want to receive federal subsidies, this effort hasn't been subtle. While Huawei should never be confused with a saint (what telecom company would be?) there's several problems with the effort. The biggest being that despite a decade of hand-wringing and one eighteen month investigation by the US government, there's still no public evidence Huawei uses its network gear to spy on Americans. That's not sitting well with countries we've asked to join along in the fun.
  • Sorry, Linux. We know you want to be popular, but cyber-crooks are all about Microsoft for now
    Eight out of the ten most exploited vulnerabilities tracked by threat intelligence biz Recorded Future in 2018 targeted Microsoft products – though number two on its list was, surprise surprise, a Flash flaw. The most exploited vuln in the firm's hall of shame was a remote code execution flaw in Windows' VBScript engine that could pwn users who opened a booby-trapped web page with Internet Explorer. "Exploit kits associated with this vulnerability were noted to spread the malware Trickbot through phishing attacks," said Recorded Future in a report published today. The Flash vuln was none other than one exploited by North Korean state-backed hackers – first detected by South Korea's CERT, which discovered a flood of booby-trapped MS Office documents, web pages, spam messages and more.

Graphics and Games: NVIDIA, Orbital/Vulkan, Cataclysm and System Shock 3

  • NVIDIA Shows Off Quake II Path-Traced Using Vulkan RTX/Ray-Tracing
    ne of the demos NVIDIA is showing off this week at their GPU Technology Conference is Quake II being path-traced using a Vulkan port of the game and adapted to handle VK_NV_ray_tracing functionality paired with the latest GeForce RTX GPUs. Q2VKPT is a path-traced version of Quake II started by a former NVIDIA intern and is rendered using Vulkan and does support Linux.
  • Orbital: A PlayStation 4 Emulator That Is Emulating The PS4's AMD GPU Using Vulkan
    Orbital is an open-source project providing a virtualization-based PlayStation 4 emulator that is still in its early stages but what interests us is its technical details including the use of Vulkan/SPIR-V. Orbital leverages QEMU and other open-source components. At this stage it's not running any PS4 games but is able to boot into safe mode on PS4 5.xx kernels.
  • Cataclysm - Dark Days Ahead, a free and open source turn-based survival game had a huge update
    It occurred to me today, that no one here at GOL seems to have ever written about the free and open source turn-based survival game Cataclysm - Dark Days Ahead. Okay, so what is it? A classic roguelike with a survival theme, set in a post-apocalyptic procedurally generated world.
  • System Shock 3 may see Linux support, OtherSide still working on Underworld Ascendant for Linux
    OtherSide Entertainment have teased out a new short video of System Shock 3 and it may see Linux support. Not to be confused with the crowdfunded System Shock reboot that Nightdive Studios are currently working on. System Shock 3 is being made with some of the original team behind the first two games as well like Warren Spector, so it should remain faithful to the series while being a rather nice upgrade in visuals.

Stable kernels 5.0.3, 4.20.17, 4.19.30, 4.14.107 and 4.9.164

  • Linux 5.0.3
    I'm announcing the release of the 5.0.3 kernel. All users of the 5.0 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 5.0.y git tree can be found at: git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.0.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st...
  • Linux 4.20.17
  • Linux 4.19.30
  • Linux 4.14.107
  • Linux 4.9.164

Firefox 66 Released

Firefox now prevents websites from automatically playing sound. You can add individual sites to an exceptions list or turn blocking off. Read more Also: Firefox 66 Arrives - Blocks Auto-Playing Sounds, Hides Title Bar By Default For Linux