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Saturday, 16 Feb 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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First Look: Tuxedo InfinityCube Linux Desktop PC With Intel Core-i7 8700

Filed under
Linux

I've played with Linux on several of my own machines, but I recently unboxed my first custom-built Linux PC courtesy of Tuxedo Computers. It's called the InfinityCube v9, and it's left me very impressed. In fact I've been leaning on it more than the beefy AMD Ryzen 1950X rig I built because it's silent and super stable. Tuxedo Computers just launched the InfinityCube on their web shop, so let's take a quick look at this new desktop along with some initial benchmarks.

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Redcore Linux Gives Gentoo a Nice Facelift

Filed under
Linux
Gentoo
Reviews

I like the overall look and feel of Redcore Linux. I generally do not use Gentoo-based Linux distros.

However, this distro does a good job of leveling the field of differences among competing Linux families. I especially like the way the LXQt and the KDE Plasma desktops have a noticeable common design that makes the Redcore distro stand out.

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GNU/Linux Distributions Deconstructed, GNU/Linux Distros on Old Chromebooks

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Linux Distributions Deconstructed

    Wanna know what’s in a Linux Distribution? Watch this video...

  • What To Do When Your Chromebook Reaches the End of Its Life

    Chrome OS is built on top of the Linux kernel, which is why newer models can install Linux applications. It also means that users can install Ubuntu and other Linux distributions. There are a few problems you may run into with installing other versions of Linux, but overall, it’s a great way to give your Chromebook a new life.

Stable kernels 4.20.10, 4.19.23, 4.14.101 and 4.9.158

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 4.20.10

    I'm announcing the release of the 4.20.10 kernel.

    All users of the 4.20 kernel series must upgrade.

    The updated 4.20.y git tree can be found at:
    git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.20.y
    and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
    http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st...

  • Linux 4.19.23
  • Linux 4.14.101
  • Linux 4.9.158

Stable kernels 4.20.9, 4.19.22, 4.14.100 and 4.9.157

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 4.20.9

    I'm announcing the release of the 4.20.9 kernel.

    Stay away from this, use 4.20.10 instead.

    The updated 4.20.y git tree can be found at:
    git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.20.y
    and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
    http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st...

  • Linux 4.19.22
  • Linux 4.14.100
  • Linux 4.9.157

Games: Forgiveness, Littlewood, Steam Play and More

Filed under
Gaming
  • Forgiveness, a new escape room style puzzle game is coming to Linux this month

    With themes based around the seven deadly sins with psychological-horror vibes, Forgiveness, a new escape room puzzle game is coming to Linux.

  • Littlewood, the peaceful building RPG has been fully funded and it's on the way to Linux

    Unlike a lot of RPGs, Littlewood actually takes place after all the action has been done. It's your job to rebuild and the Kickstarter campaign was a huge success.

    For those who didn't see this before, it's developed by Sean Young (Roguelands, Magicite, Kindergarten) with their own take on the building and crafting type of game taking inspiration from titles like Animal Crossing, Dark Cloud and earlier versions of Runescape.

    Against a funding goal of only $1,500 it managed to pull in $82,061 from 3,952 backers. This means it has smashed through every single stretch-goal that was set.

  • The 2D beat 'em up 'Tunche' is another game funded on Kickstarter and heading to Linux

    Another bit of positive crowdfunding news for you today, as Tunche, the 2D beat 'em up with procedurally generated worlds has been funded and so it's coming to Linux.

    Their Kickstarter campaign managed to get $55,395 from 1,080 backers against their original goal of $35,000. With that funding secured, they managed to break through two stretch goals, which will add in "challenge events" and a "dark heroes expansion pack".

  • The Linux version of Eastshade, the peaceful open-world exploration game is still coming to Linux

    While the Linux version of Eastshade sadly didn't arrive at release, the developer has confirmed it's still coming.

  • Dungeons 3 has a new unexpected DLC out today, adding in another campaign

    I have to hand it to Realmforge Studios and Kalypso Media Digital, they've supported Dungeons 3 exceptionally well since release.

    Not only have they released multiple new (and fully voiced) campaign packs, they also put out a free update earlier this month adding in a new multiplayer map and a powerful new spell can be earned by completing the Clash of Gods expansion.

  • Apparently Valve are working with Easy Anti-Cheat to get support in Steam Play (updated: yup)

    Turns out, this is true. As a Valve developer did reply to a user on the VKx Discord to say "they're probably referring to the ongoing conversation, which is currently stalled by the NDA, yes" which I've now seen myself—thanks for the tip, MartinPL.

  • A look at what games and bundles are on sale ahead of the weekend

    Ah yes, another weekend is about to crash into our lives and so you're looking for a new game to sink some hours into. Let's have a look at what's available.

    First up, itch.io has a Midwinter Selects Bundle available with four games that support Linux and two that don't. The Linux games included are Minit, Wheels of Aurelia, Heaven Will Be Mine and Milkmaid of the Milky Way. The entire bundle is $10 and that's a pretty good price for all of them together.

    GOG have a midweek sale going on for another day or so which has some gems like Owlboy, Pinstripe, Timespinner and more with their prices cut down to size. GOG also have an 11 bit studios sale, with lots of their games going cheap too like Moonlighter and This War of Mine.

  • Fancy working on Wine to help push Steam Play? CodeWeavers are hiring

    What will you need to work with them? They require strong C language skills, you obviously need to be very familiar with Linux, a good understanding of build systems, know your way around debugging problems and so on.

    This is great, if they're after more developers it shows just how serious they are about pushing Steam Play forwards to really improve Linux gaming for those titles that will never come to Linux.

postmarketOS – A Linux Distribution for Mobile Devices

Filed under
OS
Android

Not too long ago, I published an article on TecMint about 13 Most Promising New Linux Distributions to Look Forward in 2019 in which I listed a distro for mobile phones, Bliss OS.

Today, I introduce to you a free, open source, and futuristic project that aims to bring mobile devices together in one swoop.

postmarketOS is a touch-optimized, security-focused, and pre-configured Alpine-based Linux distribution created to be compatible with several old and new devices.

Below is an introduction from the developers themselves,

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Mozilla: Root Certificate Store, Rust and WebAssembly

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Why Does Mozilla Maintain Our Own Root Certificate Store?

    Mozilla maintains a database containing a set of “root” certificates that we use as “trust anchors”. This database, commonly referred to as a “root store”, allows us to determine which Certificate Authorities (CAs) can issue SSL/TLS certificates that are trusted by Firefox, and email certificates that are trusted by Thunderbird. Properly maintaining a root store is a significant undertaking – it requires constant effort to evaluate new trust anchors, monitor existing ones, and react to incidents that threaten our users. Despite the effort involved, Mozilla is committed to maintaining our own root store because doing so is vital to the security of our products and the web in general. It gives us the ability to set policies, determine which CAs meet them, and to take action when a CA fails to do so.

    A major advantage to controlling our own root store is that we can do so in a way that reflects our values. We manage our CA Certificate Program in the open, and by encouraging public participation we give individuals a voice in these trust decisions. Our root inclusion process is one example. We process lots of data and perform significant due diligence, then publish our findings and hold a public discussion before accepting each new root. Managing our own root store also allows us to have a public incident reporting process that emphasizes disclosure and learning from experts in the field. Our mailing list includes participants from many CAs, CA auditors, and other root store operators and is the most widely recognized forum for open, public discussion of policy issues.

  • Extract Method Refactoring in Rust
  • Why should you use Rust in WebAssembly?

    WebAssembly (Wasm) is a technology that has the chance to reshape how we build apps for the browser. Not only will it allow us to build whole new classes of web applications, but it will also allow us to make existing apps written in JavaScript even more performant.

    In this article about the state of the Rust and Wasm ecosystem, I'll try to explain why Rust is the language that can unlock the true potential of WebAssembly.

Programming: Conda-Forge, Meson Quest, PyLadies Auction at PyCon 2019 and More

Filed under
Development

Graphics: Intel's OpenGL Mesa Driver, DRM and More

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Intel's OpenGL Mesa Driver To Better Handle Recovery In Case Of GPU Hangs

    It's sure been a busy week in the Intel open-source graphics driver space... The latest improvement is a patch series providing better context restoration in the case of GPU hangs.

    Chris Wilson who usually deals with the Intel DRM kernel driver, including on the reset/restore front recently, sent out a set of two patches for improving the Intel i965 Mesa driver's behavior following GPU hangs.

  • Intel's Linux DRM Driver To Enable PSR2 Power-Savings By Default

    The Intel DRM/KMS kernel driver will soon see PSR2 panel self refresh capabilities enabled by default for allowing more power-savings on Intel-powered ultrabooks/notebooks.

    For a while now Intel's Direct Rendering Manager driver has enabled Panel Self Refresh (PSR) by default as well as other power-savings features like frame-buffer compression (FBC). But the newer Panel Self Refresh standard, PSR2, for eDP displays has not been enabled by default.

  • Intel Linux Graphics Driver Adding Device Local Memory - Possible Start of dGPU Bring-Up

    A big patch series was sent out today amounting to 42 patches and over four thousand lines of code for introducing the concept of memory regions to the Intel Linux graphics driver. The memory regions support is preparing for device local memory with future Intel graphics products.

    The concept of memory regions is being added to the Intel "i915" Linux kernel DRM driver for "preparation for upcoming devices with device local memory." The concept is about having different "regions" of memory for system memory as for any device local memory (LMEM). Today's published code also introduces a simple allocator and allowing the existing GEM memory management code to be able to allocate memory to these different memory regions. Up to now with Intel integrated graphics, they haven't had to worry about this functionality not even with their eDRAM/L4 cache of select graphics processors.

Dating is a free software issue

Filed under
GNU

Many dating Web sites run proprietary JavaScript. JavaScript is code that Web sites run on your computer in order to make certain features on Web sites function. Proprietary JavaScript is a trap that impacts your ability to run a free system, and not only does it sneak proprietary software onto your machine, but it also poses a security risk. Any piece of software can be malicious, but proprietary JavaScript goes the extra mile. Much of the JavaScript you encounter runs automatically when you load a Web site, which enables it to attack you without you even noticing.

Proprietary JavaScript doesn't have to be the only way to use Web sites. LibreJS is an initiative which blocks "nonfree nontrivial" JavaScript while allowing JavaScript that is either free or trivial.

Many dating apps are also proprietary, available only at the Apple App and Google Play stores, both of which currently require the use of proprietary software.

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Latte – Excellent KDE Dock based on Plasma Frameworks

Filed under
KDE

Let’s tackle the obvious starting question for 10. What’s a dock? I doubt this will ever be a question on the TV programme University Challenge…

A dock is a graphical user interface element that allows the user to have one-click access to frequently used software. This type of utility also enables users to switch quickly between applications, as well as to monitor programs. This type of application is an excellent way of extending the functionality and usefulness of the desktop

Latte is a dock based on plasma frameworks that aims to offer an elegant and intuitive experience for your tasks and KDE Plasma widgets. It animates its contents by using parabolic zoom effect and tries to be as unobtrusive is possible.

The software is mostly written in Qt/QML and C++, but this project also heavily relies on KDE Frameworks 5.

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Games: Ethan Lee, "We. The Revolution" and Sid Meier's Civilization VI: Gathering Storm

Filed under
Gaming
  • Game porter and Steam Play dev Ethan Lee is running a crowdfunding campaign

    Nintendo's USB GameCube adapter for the Wii U and Switch could soon work on Linux, Mac and Windows if this crowdfunding campaign from Ethan Lee is a success.

    Ethan Lee should be a well-known name to most of our readers, they're responsible for a ridiculous amount of indie games that were ported to Linux (see here). On top of that, they're also now working on Steam Play (Valve's fork of Wine that's integrated with the Steam client on Linux) with Codeweavers and Valve too.

  • We. The Revolution, a unique looking strategy game set during the French Revolution will be on Linux

    For those after a strategy game that certainly looks unique, We. The Revolution is bringing the blood-soaked history of the French Revolution to Linux.

    Developed by Polyslash with a publishing hand from Klabater, it's going to release with same-day Linux support on March 21st.

  • Sid Meier's Civilization VI: Gathering Storm is out with Linux support as expected

    Sid Meier's Civilization VI: Gathering Storm, the massive new expansion has arrived and as expected Aspyr Media managed to get in support for Linux right away. Note: Key provided by Aspyr Media.

    This is the second major expansion for the game, following on from Rise and Fall which launched on Linux back in March last year. You can see some thoughts on that one from BTRE here.

RadeonSI Primitive Culling Yields Mixed Benchmark Results

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Yesterday's patches introducing RadeonSI primitive culling via async compute yielded promising initial results, at least for the ParaView workstation application. I've been running some tests of this new functionality since yesterday and have some initial results to share on Polaris and Vega.

I've been running tests using a Radeon RX 590 and RX Vega 64 graphics cards. Tests were run with the latest Mesa Git branch of Marek's that provides this primitive culling implementation. That Mesa version was built against LLVM 9.0 SVN, which is a requirement otherwise the very latest LLVM 8.0 release state otherwise this functionality will not work. Additionally, it depends upon the AMDGPU DRM-Next material in the kernel as well so I was running a fresh kernel build off Alex Deucher's latest code branch.

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Ubuntu 18.04.2 LTS Released with Linux Kernel 4.18 from Ubuntu 18.10, More

Filed under
Ubuntu

Initially planned for release on February 7th, 2019, the Ubuntu 18.04.2 LTS operating system has been delayed by Canonical until Valentine's Day, February 14th, due to a bug in the Linux 4.18 kernel inherited from Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) causing boot failures with certain graphics chipsets.

The kernel regression was quickly addressed in the Linux 4.18 kernel package of both Ubuntu 18.10 and Ubuntu 18.04 LTS systems, so Canonical now released Ubuntu 18.04.2 LTS (Bionic Beaver) with updated graphics and kernel stacks from Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish), as well as all the latest security and software updates.

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Also: Ubuntu 18.04.2 LTS Now Available With The New HWE Stack

The SheevaPlug NAS mini-PC is back with dual -A53 Sheeva64

Filed under
Ubuntu

Globalscale announced a $89 “Sheeva64” version of the old SheevaPlug NAS mini-PC that runs Ubuntu on Marvell’s dual-core -A53 Armada 3720 with 2x GbE, 3x USB, optional wireless, and a wall-power plug.

Globascale Technologies has resurrected Marvell’s old open-spec SheevaPlug mini-PC NAS design built around the same dual-core, Cortex-A53 Marvell Armada 3720 SoC it used in its circa-2016, Pico-ITX form-factor EspressoBin network switching SBC. The long-time Marvell partner has opened $89 pre-orders for the Ubuntu-powered Sheeva64, with shipments due in April.

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SUSE and Red Hat Server Software

Filed under
Red Hat
Server
SUSE
  • SUSE OpenStack Cloud 9 Release Candidate 1 is here!
  • The New News on OpenShift 3.11

    Greetings fellow OpenShift enthusiasts! Not too long ago, Red Hat announced that OKD v3.11, the last release in the 3.x stream, is now generally available. The latest release of OpenShift enhances a number of current features that we know and love, as well as a number of interesting updates and technology previews for features that may or may not be included in OpenShift 4.0. Let’s take a look at one of the more exciting releases that may be part of The Great Updates coming in OpenShift 4.0.

  • Red Hat Satellite 6.4.2 has just been released

    Red Hat Satellite 6.4.2 is now generally available. The main drivers for the 6.4.2 release are upgrade and stability fixes. Eighteen bugs have been addressed in this release - the complete list is at the end of the post. The most notable issue is support of cloning for Satellite 6.4.

    Cloning allows you to copy your Satellite installation to another host to facilitate testing or upgrading the underlying operating system. For example, when moving a Satellite installation from Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 to Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7. An overview of this feature is available on Red Hat’s Customer Portal.

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More in Tux Machines

Opening Files with Qt on Android

After addressing Android support in KF5Notifications another fairly generic task that so far required Android specific code is next: opening files. Due to the security isolation of apps and the way the native “file dialog” works on Android this is quite different from other platforms, which makes application code a bit ugly. This can be fixed in Qt though. Read more

Android Leftovers

Ubuntu-Centric Full Circle Magazine and Debian on the Raspberryscape

  • Full Circle Magazine: Full Circle Weekly News #121
  • Debian on the Raspberryscape: Great news!
    I already mentioned here having adopted and updated the Raspberry Pi 3 Debian Buster Unofficial Preview image generation project. As you might know, the hardware differences between the three families are quite deep ? The original Raspberry Pi (models A and B), as well as the Zero and Zero W, are ARMv6 (which, in Debian-speak, belong to the armel architecture, a.k.a. EABI / Embedded ABI). Raspberry Pi 2 is an ARMv7 (so, we call it armhf or ARM hard-float, as it does support floating point instructions). Finally, the Raspberry Pi 3 is an ARMv8-A (in Debian it corresponds to the ARM64 architecture). [...] As for the little guy, the Zero that sits atop them, I only have to upload a new version of raspberry3-firmware built also for armel. I will add to it the needed devicetree files. I have to check with the release-team members if it would be possible to rename the package to simply raspberry-firmware (as it's no longer v3-specific). Why is this relevant? Well, the Raspberry Pi is by far the most popular ARM machine ever. It is a board people love playing with. It is the base for many, many, many projects. And now, finally, it can run with straight Debian! And, of course, if you don't trust me providing clean images, you can prepare them by yourself, trusting the same distribution you have come to trust and love over the years.

OSS: SVT-AV1, LibreOffice, FSF and Software Freedom Conservancy

  • SVT-AV1 Already Seeing Nice Performance Improvements Since Open-Sourcing
    It was just a few weeks ago that Intel open-sourced the SVT-AV1 project as a CPU-based AV1 video encoder. In the short time since publishing it, there's already been some significant performance improvements.  Since the start of the month, SVT-AV1 has added multi-threaded CDEF search, more AVX optimizations, and other improvements to this fast evolving AV1 encoder. With having updated the test profile against the latest state as of today, here's a quick look at the performance of this Intel open-source AV1 video encoder.
  • Find a LibreOffice community member near you!
    Hundreds of people around the world contribute to each new version of LibreOffice, and we’ve interviewed many of them on this blog. Now we’ve collected them together on a map (thanks to OpenStreetMap), so you can see who’s near you, and find out more!
  • What I learned during my internship with the FSF tech team
    Hello everyone, I am Hrishikesh, and this is my follow-up blog post concluding my experiences and the work I did during my 3.5 month remote internship with the FSF. During my internship, I worked with the tech team to research and propose replacements for their network monitoring infrastructure. A few things did not go quite as planned, but a lot of good things that I did not plan happened along the way. For example, I planned to work on GNU LibreJS, but never could find enough time for it. On the other hand, I gained a lot of system administration experience by reading IRC conversations, and by working on my project. I even got to have a brief conversation with RMS! My mentors, Ian, Andrew, and Ruben, were extremely helpful and understanding throughout my internship. As someone who previously had not worked with a team, I learned a lot about teamwork. Aside from IRC, we interacted weekly in a conference call via phone, and used the FSF's Etherpad instance for live collaborative editing, to take notes. The first two months were mostly spent studying the FSF's existing Nagios- and Munin-based monitoring and alert system, to understand how it works. The tech team provided two VMs for experimenting with Prometheus and Nagios, which I used throughout the internship. During this time, I also spent a lot of time reading about licenses, and other posts about free software published by the FSF.
  • We're Hiring: Techie Bookkeeper
    Software Freedom Conservancy is looking for a new employee to help us with important work that supports our basic operations. Conservancy is a nonprofit charity that promotes and improves free and open source software projects. We are home to almost 50 projects, including Git, Inkscape, Etherpad, phpMyAdmin, and Selenium (to name a few). Conservancy is the home of Outreachy, an award winning diversity intiative, and we also work hard to improve software freedom generally. We are a small but dedicated staff, handling a very large number of financial transactions per year for us and our member projects.