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Tuesday, 24 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
  • Monumental Failure is absolutely hilarious, a game you just need to try

    The developers of Monumental Failure [Steam, Official Site] sent over a key for me to test out their hilarious and totally historically accurate game about building monuments.

    I might have been lying about it being historically accurate, since I’m pretty sure they didn’t have jetpacks when this stuff was built.

    You’re controlling two groups of people at the same time, to build a monument. While that doesn’t sound too difficult, you are given the most ridiculous way of building them. From sliding a big statue down a massive slide, to using jetpacks with an item attached by bungee ropes.

  • Some thoughts on the Shadowrun series
  • Unreal Engine 4.15 Preview 1 Brings AArch64 Linux Support

    It's been a while since the last update to Unreal Engine 4, but available today is the first public preview release for UE4.15.

Red Hat News

  • 'Indian IT decision makers adopting open source to go digital'
  • 86% CIOs in India Bank on Open Source for Digital Innovation

    Red Hat, Inc. has announced the results of a commissioned study by Forrester Consulting, on behalf of Red Hat, about the use of open source in digital innovation initiatives in the Asia Pacific region. The results, highlighted in the study Open Source Drives Digital Innovation, revealed that IT decision makers in India are turning to open source to drive digital innovation to support business with new capabilities.

    The research surveyed 455 CIOs and senior IT decision makers from nine countries in Asia Pacific. The insights gathered reflect that 73 percent of respondents from India regard open source as a cost-saving initiative. The survey respondents from India believe that technology innovation is either “very important” or “critical” to their organization’s success.

  • Indian IT decision makers turn to open source: Study

    86 percent of survey respondents highlighted reducing cost as one of their key business initiatives within the next 12 months.
    Red Hat, a provider of open source solutions, has announced the results of a commissioned study by Forrester Consulting, on behalf of Red Hat, about the use of open source in digital innovation initiatives in the Asia Pacific region. The results, highlighted in the study Open Source Drives Digital Innovation, revealed that IT decision makers in India are turning to open source to drive digital innovation to support business with new capabilities.

  • Red Hat's OpenShift Gives Storage Flexibility to Developers

    Software-defined networking (SDN) has emerged as a mighty tech trend, and many of the leadin players on the open source scene are waking up to it. While it is known widely for its enterprise Linux efforts, Red Hat has updated its OpenShift Container Platform to provide support for dynamic storage provisioning in local and remote applications. It's all done with the cloud in mind.

    "Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform 3.4 provides a platform for innovation while retaining a focus on existing mission-critical workloads, offering dynamic storage provisioning for both traditional and cloud-native applications and multi-tenant capabilities that can support multiple applications, teams and deployment processes in a hybrid cloud environment," the company notes.

  • Earnings in Full Force, Analysts Take Aim at Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • The Jacobs Levy Equity Management Inc. Boosts Stake in Red Hat Inc. (RHT)
  • Earnings Outlook Revision Scan: Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Capital Investment Counsel Inc Has $1,706,000 Stake in Red Hat Inc. (RHT)

Code for Pakistan and Linux Foundation Event

Filed under
Linux
OSS
  • Code for Pakistan to host Open Source Day for Women

    Open source refers to software with its source code publicly available for people to modify and share. However, it does not simply mean to write a source code and make it publicly available, it is also about collaborative participation, transparency, rapid growth and community-oriented development.

    The Open Source Day is an opportunity for women with a background in Computer Science to get started on Open Source Projects and network with mentors in the tech industry. It provides them an opportunity to come together and hone their tech skills.

  • Open Source Software Strategies for Enterprise IT

    Enterprises using open source code in infrastructure must understand both the risks and benefits of community-developed software. Professional open source management is a discipline that focuses on minimizing risk and delivering the benefits of open source software as efficiently as possible.

    For successful open source management, enterprises must adopt clear strategies, well-defined policies, and efficient processes. Nobody gets all this right the first time, so it’s also important to review and audit your policies for continuous improvement. Additionally, successful open source initiatives for enterprise IT must provide real ROI in acquisition, integration, and management.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

Leftovers: BSD

Filed under
BSD
  • BSD Mag: Understanding Unikernels by Russell Pavlicek

    The number of tasks which lend themselves to being unikernels is larger than you might think. In 2015, Martin Lucina announced the successful creation of a “RAMP” stack. A variant of the common “LAMP” stack (Linux. Apache, MySQL, PHP/Python), the “RAMP” stack employs NGINX, MySQL, and PHP each built on Rumprun. Rumprun is an instance of a Rump kernel, which is a unikernel system based on the modular operating system functions found in the NetBSD project. So even this very common solution stack can be successfully converted into unikernels.

  • Summary of the preliminary LLDB support project

    Operating systems can be called monitors as they handle system calls from userland processes. A similar task is performed by debuggers as they implement monitors for traced applications and interpret various events that occurred in tracees and are messaged usually with signals to their tracers. During this month I have started a new Process Plugin within LLDB to incept NativeProcessNetBSD - copied from NativeProcessLinux - implementing basic functionality and handling all the needed events in the MonitorCallback() function. To achieve these tasks, I had to add a bunch of new ptrace(2) interfaces in the kernel to cover all that is required by LLDB monitors. The current Process Plugin for NetBSD is capable to start a process, catch all the needed events correctly and if applicable resume or step the process.

  • NetBSD Making Progress On LLDB Debugger Support

    NetBSD developers have been implementing the relevant interfaces needed for the LLVM debugger to effectively monitor and work on the operating system. As part of that they have also improved some of their own documentation, provided new ptrace interfaces, and more.

    Those interested in LLDB and/or NetBSD can learn more about this debugging work via this NetBSD.org blog post.

Firefox 51 Released With FLAC Audio Support, WebGL 2.0 By Default

Filed under
Moz/FF

Firefox 51.0 just hit Mozilla's FTP servers for those wanting the latest version of this open-source web-browser.

Firefox 51 isn't a big feature release for end-users but notably does have support for FLAC audio, at long last! Great to see the web browsers finally shipping support out-of-the-box for this open-source audio codec.

Read more

Intel Core i3 7100 Kabylake Linux Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Last week I began delivering Linux Kabylake benchmarks with the Core i5 7600K while this week I finally am set to receive the Core i7 7700K. But for those curious how Kabylake is looking on the low-end, I picked up a Core i3 7100 as currently the cheapest Kabylake desktop processor. Here are some initial Linux benchmarks of this Core i3 processor on Ubuntu Linux.

Read more

Why it's time to stop blaming open source for ransomware attacks

Filed under
OSS
Security

Developers may be the new kingmakers, to quote Redmonk, but they're not very careful about locking the gates. That's the primary take-away from a slew of ransomware attacks against MongoDB, CouchDB, Elasticsearch, and Hadoop, as I've argued.

Some people, however, have learned the exact wrong lesson from this debacle. Exhibit A is David Ramel's article wherein he suggests that open source is ultimately to blame for the attacks. This is wrong on so many levels, but let's address just a few.

Read more

Google seeks dev feedback for putting AI on Raspberry Pi

Filed under
Linux

Google will bring its AI and machine learning technology to the Raspberry Pi this year, and has posted a survey seeking input.

Google is planning to deliver tools for the Raspberry Pi later this year built around its artificial intelligence and machine learning technology, according to a Raspberry Pi Foundation blog entry. The announcement links to a Google survey that seeks to determine what kind of tools RPi developers would find most useful.

Read more

Hands-On: Installing openSUSE Tumbleweed, Manjaro, and Debian GNU/Linux on my new notebook

Filed under
HowTos

In my previous post about installing Linux on my new, very low-priced laptop (the Asus X540S), I went through the initial setup of Windows 10 Home.

My first impressions of the laptop were very mixed. The size and weight are nice, but the overall construction doesn't feel very good. The case feels like very thin plastic, the keyboard doesn't feel good at all, it has a particularly cheesy version of the dreaded "clickpad" (a touchpad with integrated buttons), and the power connection didn't feel very stable.

Read more

Rugged, compact IoT gateway runs Linux on Apollo Lake

Filed under
Linux

Axiomtek’s DIN-rail ready “ICO100-839” IoT controller offers an Atom x5-E3930, 8-bit DIO, mini-PCIe, mSATA, extended temp support, and a compact footprint.

The ICO100-839 is one of the first embedded computers to use Intel’s recent “Apollo Lake” generation of 14nm-fabricated Atom SoCs. Like the Advantech UTX-3117, the fanless ICO100-839 is referred to as an IoT gateway, and runs on a dual-core Atom X5-E3930 clocked from 1.3GHz to 1.8GHz. The ICO100-839, which is also called an industrial IoT controller, is a stripped down, but updated version of the Bay Trail Atom based ICO300 DIN-rail controller. Last year, the ICO300 was followed by an almost identical ICO300-MI gateway, which added Intel IoT Gateway Technology and Wind River Intelligent Device Platform software.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • GoboLinux 016

    GoboLinux is available for 64-bit x86 computers exclusively. The ISO I downloaded for GoboLinux 016 was 958MB in size. Booting from the installation media brings up a text-based menu system where we are asked to select our preferred language from a list of six European languages. We are then asked to select our keyboard's layout from another list. At this point, the system drops us to a command prompt where we are logged in as the root user. The default shell is zsh. A welcome message lets us know we can run the startx command to launch a desktop environment or run the Installer command to begin installing the distribution.

  • Solus Linux Working On A Flatpak-Based, Optimized Steam Runtime

    The Solus Linux developers have been working on their "Linux Steam Integration" for Steam and improvements around the Steam runtime, with this being one of the distributions interested in good Linux performance and making use of some Clear Linux optimizations, while their next step is looking at Flatpak-packaging up of libraries needed by the Steam runtime to fork a Flatpak-happy Linux gaming setup.

  • It’s ‘Best Linux Distro’ Time Again

    It’s time to start the process of choosing the FOSS Force Reader’s Choice Award winner for Best Desktop Linux Distro for 2016. This is the third outing for our annual poll, which began in a March, 2015 contest that was won by Ubuntu, which bested runner-up Linux Mint by only 11 votes. Last year we moved the voting up to January, in a contest which saw Arch Linux as the overall winner, with elementary OS in second place.

    Just like last year, this year’s polling will be a two round process. The first round, which began early Friday afternoon when the poll quietly went up on our front page, is a qualifying round. In this round, we’re offering a field of 19 of the top 20 distros on Distrowatch’s famous “Page Hit Ranking” list. Those whose favorite distro isn’t on the list shouldn’t worry — your distro’s not out of the game yet. Below the poll there’s a place to write-in any distro that’s not in the poll to be tallied for possible inclusion in the second and final round of polling to follow.

  • Tracktion NAMM 2017 Preview [Ed: Raspberry Pi with Ubuntu]
  • Snapdragon 410E SBC offers long lifecycle support at $85

    The Linux/Android-ready Inforce 6309L is a cheaper version of the DragonBoard 410c-like Inforce 6309. It sacrifices GbE and LVDS, but has 10-year support.

    Inforce Computing has released a more affordable and slightly less feature rich version of its commercial-oriented, circa-2015 Inforce 6309 SBC. Like the Inforce 6309, the new Inforce 6309L has the same 85 x 54mm footprint and much the same feature set as Arrow’s Qualcomm-backed, community-backed DragonBoard 410c SBC. It also offers the same Linux and Android BSPs used by the DragonBoard 410c, one of the first SBCs to adopt Linaro’s 96Boards form-factor.

  • It’s time to spring-clean your IT contracts

    The start of a new year is a time for review and planning, in business, as well as in our personal lives. It’s likely that you will be focused on finalising your company’s objectives and strategy for the year ahead. But it’s also important to consider whether the tools and processes that you have in place remain fit for purpose – and that includes your contract templates and contractual risk and compliance processes.

    When it comes to the law, “the only thing that is constant is change”. Without fail, each year brings the introduction of new legislation, case law and regulatory guidance that may have an impact on your contracts – whether it’s the terms of use or privacy policy for your website or app, or the contract terms that you use when supplying or purchasing technology services. Therefore, it’s important to carry out a regular review of your contract terms (and any existing contracts) to make sure that they remain compliant with law and are future-proofed as much as possible in terms of new legal and regulatory developments that you know are around the corner.

  • Chinese investors buy owner of PCWorld, IDC

    International Data Group, the owner of PCWorld magazine, several other tech journals and the IDC market research organisation, has been bought by two Chinese investors.

    China Oceanwide Holdings Group and IDG Capital (no affiliate of IDG) have paid between US$500 million and US$1 billion for IDG sans its high-performance computing research businesses.

    The two Chinese entities had made separate bids but were told by investment banker Goldman Sachs to join hands. The sale of IDG has been cleared by the US Committee on Foreign Investment and should be completed by end of the first quarter this year.

    China Oceanwide Holdings Group, founded by chairman Zhiqiang Lu, is active in financial services, real estate, technology, and media among others.

OpenStack News

Filed under
Server
OSS
  • So you want to create a new official OpenStack project...

    OpenStack development is organized around a mission, a governance model and a set of principles. Project teams apply for inclusion, and the Technical Committee (TC), elected by all OpenStack contributors, judges whether that team work helps with the OpenStack mission and follows the OpenStack development principles. If it does, the team is considered part of the OpenStack development community, and its work is considered an official OpenStack project.

    The main effect of being official is that it places the team work under the oversight of the Technical Committee. In exchange, recent contributors to that team are considered Active Technical Contributors (ATCs), which means they can participate in the vote to elect the Technical Committee.

  • Why you should hire upstream
  • The OpenStack Interoperability Challenge Update: Phase Two Progress

    In 2016 the OpenStack Interoperability Challenge was originally announced by IBM GM Don Rippert at the OpenStack Austin Summit. This effort was the first initiative to use the deployment and execution of enterprise workloads using automated deployment tools as the means of proving interoperability across OpenStack cloud environments. The first phase of the OpenStack Interoperability Challenge culminated with a Barcelona Summit Keynote demo comprised of 16 vendors all running the same enterprise workload and automation tools to illustrate that OpenStack enables workload portability across public and private OpenStack clouds. Here is a short trip down memory lane:

  • OpenStack’s Stewardship Working Group and what it can do for you

    Stewardship is defined as the careful and responsible management of something entrusted to one’s care. OpenStack Foundation community members formed a Stewardship Working Group to ensure that “people at the bottom and the boundaries of the organization choice over how to serve a customer, a citizen, a community.”

  • Tips for instance configuration, creating a new project, and more OpenStack news

Phoronix on Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Phoronix Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Are you Struggling With Finding Text In Files Or Locating Files? Try 'Recoll' Program In Linux

    Recoll is a full text search QT based free, open source program especially made for Unix-like and Linux but it is also available for Windows and Mac systems, licensed under GPL. It provides efficient desktop full text search from single-word to arbitrarily complex boolean searches, basically it indexes the documents data (along with their compressed versions) and huge number of files then let you find quickly whatever you search for. Recoll updates its index at designed intervals (for example through Cron tasks) but if desired, the indexing task can run as a file-system monitoring daemon for real-time index updates.

  • New Inkscape 0.92 breaks your previous works done with Inkscape

    I hope this type of blog-post will shake the mindset a bit, and make developers more serious about compatibility. The users shouldn't be prompted with a dialog with jargon. The artwork or rendering shouldn't be broken. Inkscape should do the auto-conversion to keep the artwork as it was (especially because the software can). Isn't it the task of Inkscape to be able to read SVG? to properly read itself? I hope a version 0.92.x will happens and solve this serious bug [1] .

    For those who have been following my work for the last ten years, I like to promote the release of new Free/Libre and Open-Sources Software versions. It costs me a lot emotionally and in production-time to have to make this type of blog-post against a project I love. But what else can I do?

  • Ardour + Cinelerra + 4 Cams + Heavy Blues
  • Albert Quick Launcher 0.9.0 Released With External Extensions Support

    Albert is a quick launcher for Linux inspired by Alfred (Mac). It can be used to run applications, open files, search the web, open bookmarks in your web browser, calculate math expressions, and more.

  • MKVToolNix 9.8.0 Open-Source MKV Manipulation App Adds Support for DVB Subtitles

    Moritz Bunkus released today, January 22, 2017, a new stable release of his popular, multiplatform, and open-source MKV (Matroska) manipulation utility for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows.

    There are bunch of exciting new features added in the new MKVToolNix 9.8.0 release, which comes three weeks after the previous version, namely MKVToolNix 9.7.1, but first we'd like to inform package maintainers about an important change in the build system as parallel builds are now enabled by default.

  • Libvirt 3.0 Released With Various Improvements

    The libvirt virtualization API saw a major 3.0 release this week to succeed its earlier v2.5 milestone.

  • 5 Highly Promising Terminal Emulators

    The terminal emulator is a venerable but essential tool for computer users. The reason why Linux offers so much power is due to the command line. The Linux shell can do so much, and this power can be accessed on the desktop by using a terminal emulator. There are so many available for Linux that the choice is bewildering.

  • What Spotify Takes Away, the Open-Source Community Brings Back…

    One of my favourite bands has just released a new album, which means I now have 11 new songs to learn the words to before I go see them play next!

  • Skype for Linux Alpha Video Call Support Begins ‘Rollout’

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Wine Staging 2.0 RC6

Filed under
Software

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
  • Appreciating how far Linux gaming has actually come in the past few years

    During the livestream I did last night I had one of those moments where you fully appreciate how far Linux gaming has come.

  • A developer of the awesome itch games client has a blog post on compressing files for updates

    The guys over at itch.io are doing some truly interesting work. The itch store is open to all developers, they have an open source client and they talk openly about their work. A developer of their games client has written up about how they compress data for downloads.

  • IORTCW Continues Letting Return to Castle Wolfenstein Live On As Open-Source

    For those looking to relive some old gaming moments this weekend, the iortcw project continues to be developed as the open-source code-base around Return to Castle Wolfenstein.

    It's been 16 years since "RTCW" was first released or even 15 years since it first had a native Linux port while iortcw continues to see routine code commits for this open-source game derived from ioquake3. Over the original classic game, iortcw offers SDL 2 support, OpenAL sound, full x86_64 support, VoIP support, Ogg Vorbis audio support, PNG support, and many other more modern features.

  • 'Detention 返校' is an immersive psychological horror adventure with 'overwhelmingly positive' reviews, demo available

    Honestly, I never heard about 'Detention 返校' or the developers behind it, the Taiwanese indie studio Red Candle Games, until Steam recommended me the title a few days ago. Since I love games which have received a lot of care in their ambience and artistic style, naturally this one caught my attention immediately, and once I learned that it has a demo available, then it became a priority in a matter of seconds.

    In order to get the demo, you'll need to visit the official site, then go to 'Subscribe' and enter a valid email address twice. Also, there is one more detail: at least in my case, I had to create an account at Mega.nz to be able to download the Linux build (approximately 1 GB of content), because when I was at 94% of completion a message suddenly appeared about reaching a daily limit, or something like that.

  • The interesting survival game 'Raft' has dropped Linux support

    Sad news, the survival game 'Raft' that really caught my interest for doing something very different has decided to drop Linux support.

    It's a real shame as it was the first survival game to come along for quite some time that properly interested me.

  • Our Fifth Podcast with Feral Interactive

    Well this is already 2017 yet we have something left from 2016 to release. Our podcast conducted with our friends from Feral, that is! While it was recorded back in December, the different edits and the holidays in-between have somewhat caused some delays, but do not worry one bit: its content is still as fresh as ever.

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More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • Berkeley launches RISELab, enabling computers to make intelligent real-time decisions
  • Amazon, Google, Huawei, and Microsoft sponsor UC Berkeley RISELab, AMPLab's successor
  • Brotli: A new compression algorithm for faster Internet
    Brotli is a new open source compression algorithm designed to enable an Internet that's faster for users. Modern web pages can often be made up of dozens of megabytes of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, and that's before accounting for images, videos, or other large file content, which all makes for hefty downloads. Such loads are why pages are transferred in compressed formats; they significantly reduce the time required between a website visitor requesting a web page and that page appearing fully loaded on the screen and ready for use. While the Brotli algorithm was announced by Google in September 2015, only recently have the majority of web browsers have adopted it. The HTTP servers Apache and nginx now offer Brotli compression as an option. Besides Google, other commercial vendors (such as Cloudflare and DreamHost) have begun to deploy support for Brotli as well.
  • New Year’s resolution: Donate to 1 free software project every month
    Free and open source software is an absolutely critical part of our world—and the future of technology and computing. One problem that consistently plagues many free software projects, though, is the challenge of funding ongoing development (and support and documentation). With that in mind, I have finally settled on a New Year’s resolution for 2017: to donate to one free software project (or group) every month—or the whole year. After all, these projects are saving me a boatload of money because I don’t need to buy expensive, proprietary packages to accomplish the same things.
  • Toyota and Ford Promote Open Source Smartphone Interfaces
    Ford and Toyota have formed a four-automaker consortium to speed up the deployment of open source software for connected in-car systems, according to a report by Bloomberg. The SmartDeviceLink Consortium, which includes Mazda, PSA Group, Fuji, and Suzuki, aims to prevent Apple and Google from controlling how drivers connect smartphones to their vehicles. Suppliers Elektrobit, Harma, Luxoft, QNX, and Xevo have also joined the organization, which is named after an open source version of Ford’s AppLink connectivity interface, a system used in over 5 million vehicles globally.
  • What your code repository says about you
    "You only get one chance to make a first impression," the old saying goes. It's cliche, but nevertheless sound, practical advice. In the realm of open source, it can make the difference between a project that succeeds and a project that fails. That's why making a positive first impression when you release a repo to the world is essential—at least if your motivations involve gaining users, building a community of contributors, and attracting valuable feedback.
  • The Open Source Way of Reaching Across Languages
    I don’t speak Spanish, but that doesn’t mean I can’t learn some important things from this video. The visuals alone are quite instructive. At my public library job, I mentor a number of wonderful Latino youth. One of them might ask me about open source CAD software — and I’ll direct them right to this FOSS Force article. Of course, I subscribed to the YouTube channel of the creator of this video, and also clicked on its like button. If the screencast creator comes back to look at this video in February, they’ll find that they have a number of new subscribers, a number of likes for the video and the video view count might be more than 100. All those indicators will be encouragement for them to make their next open source screencast. And so it goes. That’s how we support each other in the open source world.
  • School systems desperate for standards-aligned curricula find hope
    Open Up Resources is a nonprofit collaborative formed by 13 U.S. states that creates high-quality, standards-aligned open educational resources (OERs) that are openly licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0. Unlike other providers, Open Up Resources provides curriculum-scale OER options; they believe that while many people seem to know where to find supplemental materials, most curriculum directors would not know where to look if they were planning a textbook adoption next year.
  • Visual Studio Test joins Microsoft's open source push [Ed: More openwashing of proprietary software from Microsoft, which interjects surveillance into compiled code]
  • Microsoft Open-Sources DirectX Shader Compiler [Ed: Windows lock-in.]

Red Hat's Survey in India

From Raspberry Pi to Supercomputers to the Cloud: The Linux Operating System

Linux is widely used in corporations now as the basis for everything from file servers to web servers to network security servers. The no-cost as well as commercial availability of distributions makes it an obvious choice in many scenarios. Distributions of Linux now power machines as small as the tiny Raspberry Pi to the largest supercomputers in the world. There is a wide variety of minimal and security hardened distributions, some of them designed for GPU workloads. Read more

IBM’s Systems With GNU/Linux

  • IBM Gives Power Systems Rebates For Linux Workloads
    Big Blue has made no secret whatsoever that it wants to ride the Linux wave up with the Power Systems platform, and its marketeers are doing what they can to sweeten the hardware deals as best they can without adversely affecting the top and bottom line at IBM in general and the Power Systems division in particular to help that Linux cause along.
  • Drilling Down Into IBM’s System Group
    The most obvious thing is that IBM’s revenues and profits continue to shrink, but the downside is getting smaller and smaller, and we think that IBM’s core systems business will start to level out this year and maybe even grow by the third or fourth quarter, depending on when Power9-based Power Systems and z14-based System z mainframes hit the market. In the final period of 2016, IBM’s overall revenues were $21.77 billion, down 1.1 percent from a year ago, and net income rose by nearly a point to $4.5 billion. This is sure a lot better than a year ago, when IBM’s revenues fell by 8.4 percent to $22 billion and its net income fell by 18.6 percent to $4.46 billion. For the full 2016 year, IBM’s revenues were off 2.1 percent to $79.85 billion, but its “real” systems business, which includes servers, storage, switching, systems software, databases, transaction monitors, and tech support and financing for its own iron, fell by 8.3 percent to $26.1 billion. (That’s our estimate; IBM does not break out sales this way, but we have some pretty good guesses on how it all breaks down.)