Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Friday, 25 Sep 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Intel DG1 Sound Support Coming For Linux 5.10

    Intel continues bringing up the DG1 discrete graphics card under Linux with continued refinements set to hit for Linux 5.10.

    Besides all of the Intel (i915) DRM kernel graphics driver improvements coming for Linux 5.10 some of which explicitly benefit Gen12/Xe and the DG1 discrete graphics card, the sound subsystem updates for this next kernel cycle are bringing up the audio support.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2020/39

    During this week we have released ‘only’ three Snapshot (0919, 0922 and 0923). But some of you might have noticed that we are finally sending the ‘build fail notification mails’ again, helping you be more laid back, not having to look at your packages all the time, as the bot does that for you. Unfortunately, due to some OBS issue, this feature was broken for a little while.

  • Renovating payment services with microservices, cloud-native integration, and artificial intelligence

    Red Hat sees three fundamental areas of modernization that financial institutions should focus on in order to modernize their payment service and benefit from the same technologies that upstart new entrants to the payments industry already have: microservices, cloud-native integration, and intelligent process automation.

  • Modernize telco business support systems for 5G with Red Hat
  • What are containers and why do you need them?

    The best analogy for understanding containers is a shipping container. That’s why the majority of all container articles and blog posts show a photo of a shipping container. We’re sure you’ve seen the transport of those big steel shipping containers. (We’ve also seen some people use them to build houses and swimming pools.) The shipping industry standardized on a consistent size container. Now, the same container can move from a ship to a train to a truck without unloading the cargo. The container contents do not matter.

    Just like a shipping container, a software container is a standardized package of software. Everything needed for the software to run is inside the container. The software code, runtime, system tools, system libraries, and settings are all inside a single container.

  • LHS Episode #369: The Weekender LVII

    It's time once again for The Weekender. This is our bi-weekly departure into the world of amateur radio contests, open source conventions, special events, listener challenges, hedonism and just plain fun. Thanks for listening and, if you happen to get a chance, feel free to call us or e-mail and send us some feedback. Tell us how we're doing. We'd love to hear from you.

  • Directing Traefik | Self-Hosted 28

    We get fancy with Traefik labels, and gush over some new Home Assistant features while saving our data from inevitable future failure.

  • TikTok and App Censorship

    Doc Searls and Katherine Druckman talk to Kyle Rankin and Petros Koutoupis about TikTok and who controls your phone.

Devices: Precursor Motherboard, Android and Raspberry Pi

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • Guided Tour of the Precursor Motherboard

    We talk a lot about “verifiable hardware”, but it’s hard to verify something when you don’t know what you’re looking at. This post takes a stab at explaining the major features of the Precursor motherboard by first indicating the location of physical components, then by briefly discussing the rationale behind their curation.

  • Amazon Fire TV Stick 3rd Gen is Powered by MediaTek MT8695D SoC

    Amazon Fire TV Stick 4K powered by a MediaTek MT8695 quad-core SoC for launched for $50 about two years ago. The company has now introduced two cheaper variants with Amazon Fire TV Stick Lite and Fire TV Stick powered by a similar MediaTek MT8695D quad-core processor designed for 1080p (Full HD) HDR video playback.

  • DeskPi Pro Raspberry Pi 4 Case Comes with 2.5-inch HDD/SSD Bay, Full-sized HDMI Ports, PWM Fansink

    If you’d like to connect a 2.5-inch SSD or hard drive disk to your Raspberry Pi 4, and are not a fan of the micro HDMI ports, DeskPi Pro enclosure might be what you are looking for.

    The “Set-top Box” enclosure offers an alternative to the popular Argon One case, as it also re-arrange the ports in a more user-friendly way with most Raspberry Pi ports found on the rear panels, and the front panel adds an additional MicroSD card socket, plus two USB ports for a total of 5 USB ports, as well as a safe-shutdown & reset button.

  • 17000ft | The MagPi 98

OSS: OSI, Cyphon and Swedish e-Krona

Filed under
OSS

     
  • OSI’s Joshua Simmons on the State of Open Source

    OSI’s Joshua Simmons examines the current state of open source in this presentation from the recent State of the Source Summit.
    Paragraphs
    In his keynote presentation at the recent State of the Source Summit, Joshua Simmons, President at Open Source Initiative, provided a thoughtful look at the state of open source today, acknowledging strengths and shared history and examining challenges with an eye toward conscious, collaborative improvement.

    Open source has gone “from fringe to mainstream,” Simmons said, and the ecosystem has understandably undergone many changes. In this moment, he said, open source is being tested, with questions being raised about the sustainability of projects, the health and safety communities, fair treatment of maintainers, and open source’s overall ability to weather attempts at redefinition. 

    In the talk, Simmons explored various open source narratives, discussed OSI’s role, and described the organization’s 

  • Cyphon: An Open-source Incident Tracking Management System for the Enterprise

    Enterprise and often government are required to handle dozens of incident reporting sources at once, which is not resources or cost-effective at all.

    Some companies are still using emails, ticket systems, CRMs, or messaging systems for incident reports.

    To resolve this issue, they need a centralized incident tracking management system and here comes Cyphon.

    Cyphon is an open-source incident management and response platform. It helps the enterprise to track incident from different sources, prioritize them and automate the response system for them.  

  • Sweden considers open source software for its digital currency proof of concept

    The BIS working paper compares digital currency initiatives by the central banks of China, Sweden, and Canada. Describing the Swedish e-Krona project, “preference will be given to solutions built on open source code,” the paper says. BIS refers to a study by senior advisers working for the Riksbank, published in June.

    The bankers outline their ideas for the e-Krona, which is intended as a complement to cash. They bank prefers an 'open architecture' (see 2018 report on the Riksbank’s e-krona project) but the researchers in June seem to be still undecided on the choice between proprietary or open source technology, listing weaknesses for both. (In the case of proprietary software: IT vendor lock-in, and for open source: the risk of the community being abandoned or the build-up of dependence on open source consultants.)

Mozilla/Firefox/Tor Browser

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • New Release: Tor Browser 10.5a1

    Tor Browser 10.1a1 is now available from the Tor Browser Alpha download page and also from our distribution directory.

    Note: This is an alpha release, an experimental version for users who want to help us test new features. For everyone else, we recommend downloading the latest stable release instead.

  • Karl Dubost: Week notes - 2020 w39 - worklog - A new era

    So the Mozilla Webcompat team is entering a new era. Mike Taylor (by the time this will be published) was the manager of the webcompat team at Mozilla since August 2015. He decided to leave. Monday, September 21 was his last day. We had to file an issue about this.

    The new interim manager is… well… myself.

    So last week and this week will be a lot about: * have a better understanding of the tasks and meetings that Mike was attending. * trying to readjust schedules and understanding how to get a bit of sleep with a distributed organization which has most of its meeting toward friendly European and American time zones. Basically, all meetings are outside the reasonable working timeframe (8:00 to 17:00 Japan Time). * trying to figure out how to switch from peer to manager with the other persons in the webcompat team. I want to remove any sources of stress.

  • Mozilla Localization (L10N): L10n Report: September 2020 Edition

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • Code your first algorithm in Scratch

    With more kids learning from home this year, it's important to engage them with unique learning opportunities. The classroom looks very different than it did before, and it's going to continue to evolve. So should the lessons we teach.

    In the first article in this series, I shared how my students taught me to code. Over the next few weeks, I will be exploring how educators and parents can harness the power of coding to teach kids a wide variety of skills.

    "But I don't know anything about coding!" you may be shouting at your computer. That's one of the beauties of open source code: everyone is a learner, and everyone is a teacher. Whether you're new to coding or you've been doing it all your life, part of the process is making mistakes. It's all about problem-solving and learning how to find information. The greatest tool an educator has in a coding classroom is the phrase, "I don't know; let's find out together!"

  • 5 questions to ask yourself when writing project documentation

    Before getting down to the actual writing part of documenting another one of your open source projects, and even before interviewing the experts, it's a good idea to answer some high-level questions about your new document.

    [...]

    Or, what company is behind the document? What brand identity does it want to convey to its audience? The answer to this question will significantly influence your writing style. The company may also have its own style guide or at least a formal mission statement, in which case, you should start there.

    If the company is just starting out, you may ask the questions above to the document's owner. As the writer, it's important to integrate the voice and persona you create for the company with your own worldview and beliefs. This will make your writing sound more natural and less like company jargon.

  • 33 Excellent Free Books to Learn all about R

    The R language is the de facto standard among statisticians for the development of statistical software, and is widely used for statistical software development and data analysis. R is a modern dialect of S, one of several statistical programming languages designed at Bell Laboratories.

    R is much more than a programming language. It’s an interactive suite of software facilities for data manipulation, calculation, and graphical display. R offers a wide variety of statistical (linear and nonlinear modelling, classical statistical tests, time-series analysis, classification, clustering, …) and graphical techniques, and is highly extensible. The ability to download and install R packages is a key factor which makes R an excellent language to learn. What else makes R awesome? Here’s a taster.

  • [Perl] while loops that have an index

    Perl got this syntax that allow to use a while loop without having to explicitly increment an index by doing an i++. It is made possible by the each function.

  • OO linked lists in Perl

    After many days, trying to implement linked lists by nested hash (link to Rosetta Code) (link to my code) or Struct::Dumb, I get how to write the (singly) linked list in object-oriented style by Perl. One with bless, another one with Moose. Keep the learning record here.

  • Find all the prime numbers less than 'n' in O(n) Time complexity

    Our task is to find all the prime numbers that are less than n in Linear Time.

    We use Sieve of Eratosthenes to find the prime numbers till n.
    But the time complexity is O(N log (log N)).
    Here our desired time complexity is O(N). Hence a modified version of the Sieve of Eratosthenes is to be used.

  • PyPy 7.3.2 triple release: python 2.7, 3.6, and 3.7

    The interpreters are based on much the same codebase, thus the multiple release. This is a micro release, all APIs are compatible with the 7.3.0 (Dec 2019) and 7.3.1 (April 2020) releases, but read on to find out what is new.

    Conda Forge now supports PyPy as a python interpreter. The support is quite complete for linux and macOS. This is the result of a lot of hard work and good will on the part of the Conda Forge team. A big shout out to them for taking this on.

    Development of PyPy has transitioning to https://foss.heptapod.net/pypy/pypy. This move was covered more extensively in this blog post. We have seen an increase in the number of drive-by contributors who are able to use gitlab + mercurial to create merge requests.

    The CFFI backend has been updated to version 1.14.2. We recommend using CFFI rather than c-extensions to interact with C, and using cppyy for performant wrapping of C++ code for Python.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Friday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (rails), openSUSE (chromium, jasper, ovmf, roundcubemail, samba, and singularity), Oracle (firefox), SUSE (bcm43xx-firmware, firefox, libqt5-qtbase, qemu, and tiff), and Ubuntu (aptdaemon, atftp, awl, packagekit, and spip).

  • Foreign Hackers Cripple Texas County’s Email System, Raising Election Security Concerns

    Last week, voters and election administrators who emailed Leanne Jackson, the clerk of rural Hamilton County in central Texas, received bureaucratic-looking replies. “Re: official precinct results,” one subject line read. The text supplied passwords for an attached file.

    But Jackson didn’t send the messages. Instead, they came from Sri Lankan and Congolese email addresses, and they cleverly hid malicious software inside a Microsoft Word attachment. By the time Jackson learned about the forgery, it was too late. Hackers continued to fire off look-alike replies. Jackson’s three-person office, already grappling with the coronavirus pandemic, ground to a near standstill.

  • Windows XP Source Code Reportedly Leaked, Posted to 4chan
  • Windows XP source code leaked online, on 4chan, out of all places
  • [Attacker] Accessed Network of U.S. Agency and Downloaded Data

    An unnamed U.S. federal agency was hit with a cyber-attack after a [attacker] used valid access credentials, authorities said on Thursday.

    While many details of the hack weren’t revealed, federal authorities did divulge that the [attacker] was able to browse directories, copy at least one file and exfiltrate data, according to the Cybersecurity & Infrastructure Security Agency, known as CISA.

    The [attacker] implanted malware that evaded the agency’s protection system and was able to gain access to the network by using valid access credentials for multiple users’ Microsoft 365 accounts and domain administrator accounts, according to authorities.

New in calibre 5.0

Filed under
Software

Welcome back, calibre users. It has been a year since calibre 4.0. The two headline features are Highlighting support in the calibre E-book viewer and that calibre has now moved to Python 3.

There has been a lot of work on the calibre E-book viewer. It now supports Highlighting. The highlights can be colors, underlines, strikethrough, etc. and have added notes. All highlights can be both stored in EPUB files for easy sharing and centrally in the calibre library for easy browsing. Additionally, the E-book viewer now supports both vertical and right-to-left text.

calibre has moved to using Python 3. This is because Python 2 was end-of-lifed this year. This should be completely transparent to calibre users, the only caveat being that some third party calibre plugins have not yet been ported to Python 3 and therefore will not work in calibre 5. For status on the various plugin ports, see here. This effort involved porting half-a-million lines of Python code and tens-of-thousands of lines of extension code to Python 3. This would not have been possible without the help of Eli Schwartz and Flaviu Tamas.

Read more

Also: 5 Best free software for disk imaging or cloning hard drives

Musiko – cross-platform music player

Filed under
Software

I spend most of the past few months listening to music. My favorite pastime is to see an eclectic range of bands, solo artists, and orchestras live. It’s such a life-changing and exhilarating experience. It’s one thing to be sitting at home listening to a CD or watching music videos on TV or on YouTube, but being in the audience, packed out in a stadium or music hall, takes it to another level. But it’s an expensive pastime, and still on hold given the current coronavirus pandemic. These days, I’m listening to music from my CD collection which I’ve encoded to FLAC, a lossless audio format.

Linux is endowed with a plethora of open source music players. And I’ve reviewed the vast majority. But I seem to keep finding interesting music players. Musiko is the latest I’ve stumbled across.

Musiko is a free to use, open source and cross platform music player. It supports a good range of audio formats including both lossy and lossless formats. Musiko uses JavaScript, Electron, VueJS, the music-metadata module and a few others.

[...]

Musiko definitely doesn’t get our recommendation. It’s really slow at loading in a fairly small music folder, it’s poorly designed, and offers only a fairly limited set of features.

If it was the only music player available for Linux, it would be bearable to use. But there’s so many vastly better open source music players available. Our recommended GUI music player is Tauon Music Box. And if you prefer console based software, musikcube gets our seal of approval.

But it’s really huge memory footprint consigns Musiko to the bin. With a subset of my music folder loaded, the program uses 1.8GB of RAM (as reported by ps_mem). That’s truly ridiculous. Just look how this memory footprint compares with Byte and other music players.

Read more

Alan Pope (Canonical/Snap): Stepping Down Gracefully

Filed under
Ubuntu

The Snap Store has been designed to enable upstream developers and enthusiastic community contributors to publish snaps. As with most Linux packaging solutions, the wider community are often responsible for starting and maintaining software packages. This is a double-edged sword, especially for humans with limited life spans and other shiny things to steal their attention.

If a community contributor decides to move on from maintaining software packaging, has too many other things on their plate, or life just gets in the way, it’s not necessarily a problem. Users are appreciative that someone packaged up their favourite application, but can get upset quickly if that software is no longer updated. Snap publishers who are overwhelmed or busy doing other things have some options here.

[...]

When the maintainer of a snap has decided to focus on other things, we can handle that too. Where possible, we recommend snap publishers transition their applications to another individual or organisation rather than let them become outdated. Ideally snaps should be published in the Snap Store by the upstream project. So the first port of call would be to offer to transition the snap upstream. Sometimes this isn’t possible if the developers are unable to take on the additional workload themselves, however small that might be.

Alternatively we recommend seeking out another enthusiastic, trustworthy community member to take on the mantle of maintaining the snap package. Often just starting a conversation on the upstream issue tracker, or in their real-time chat of choice will yield good results. Someone keen may even be found within the wider community of the upstream project.

If that fails, a further option would be to find someone within the snapcraft community. There are a group of dedicated snapcraft enthusiasts who love the challenge of maintaining new snaps, and taking on existing ones if necessary. They can be found in the snapcraft forums. Start a new thread, looking for a new maintainer, and typically one can be found.

Once a new maintainer is found, the transition from one publisher to another can be actioned via the forums. Start a thread in the store-requests category indicating who the snap(s) are moving from, and who to. The store admins team can do the necessary validation checks behind the scenes, and move the snap(s) to their new home. It’s then up to the new maintainer to hook up whatever build or CI system is needed to seamlessly continue publishing of the snap.

Note that when a snap is transferred, by default the previous maintainer is kept as a collaborator on the snap. They can continue to be involved but without being named as the publisher, or they can be removed as a collaborator, and no longer maintain the snap.

So the take away from this is, if you’re feeling overwhelmed and need to offload maintainership of snaps to others, don’t panic. We can help, and our community can too.

Read more

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

What To Do After Installing Linux Mint 20 LTS Ulyana

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Ulyana brings friendliness to computer users continuing Mint's tradition. This traditional article is for you who purchased a new preloaded Mint computer or simply install it by yourself. This contains tips and tricks including some apps recommendation for new comers plus a nostalgic remembrance for long timers. Okay, now let's enjoy this elegant operating system!

Read more

Games: King of the Board, SkateBIRD, SteamTinkerLaunch and More

Filed under
Gaming
  • After a new auto-battler? King of the Board is one to keep an eye on

    After Dota 2 Auto Chess made the auto-battle chess-like system popular, a few more have popped up and the latest is King of the Board from developer StandArts.

    It seems they're going with a similar competitive theme like Valve did with Dota Underlords, having multiple players battling together online to be the last one standing. It's not entirely clear on how exactly they plan to be unique, although the trailer did show some sort of skill tree you can pump a lot of points into as you play through the battles.

    [...]

    We spoke with StandArts over email, who confirmed King of the Board will be supporting Linux.

  • SkateBIRD gets a demo for Tokyo Game Show 2020 try it now

    Megan Fox of Glass Bottom Games announced that SkateBIRD has a demo up again, to celebrate being included in the Tokyo Game Show 2020 and you can play until September 28.

    SkateBIRD is a game that doesn't need much of an introduction. It's skateboarding, with birds. Funded on Kickstarter in July 2019 with thanks to 2,526 backers giving the team $67,220 it's not actually due to release until later in 2021, so this small slice gives a quick look at what to expect from it.

    What's different to the original demo? According to Fox, quite a lot behind the scenes. It's the same map but they've given it all new skating physics, "We iterated on momentum, top speed, pushing behavior, and grind friction. It's also a new iteration of the camera. Goal was to address prior feedback and see how folks felt about it now." and they also improved the balancing behaviour and lots of other little things.

  • SteamTinkerLaunch is a huge all in one Linux wrapper tool for gaming

    You all love to tinker right? SteamTinkerLaunch is an open source project to bundle together tons of available extra options for running your Steam games.

    It's a wrapper which allows you to customize game launching so it can get your games to hook in with other tools like MangoHud, GameMode, vkBasalt, ReplaySorcery, automatically run a growing list of tweaks needed for specific games, it has support for Steam Play (including Proton and other Steam Play tools) and the list goes on for a while.

  • Don't Starve Together gets a new animated short, plus a Wigfrid character refresh

    Klei continue going through all the characters in Don't Starve Together to bring them up to date with all the new content and game mechanics with a fresh upgrade out now.

  • Check out the open source 2D level editor 'LEd' from the former lead on Dead Cells

    Additionally, they have an open ticket tagged as "help wanted" to sort a proper Linux build out so if you know Haxe it might be a fun project for you to help with.

Games: Paradox, Stoneshard, Civilization VI

Filed under
Gaming
  • Stellaris: Necroids Species Pack announced, huge Paradox sale going on

    Paradox are set to return to my favourite grand strategy game, with the announcement of a brand new DLC coming to Stellaris with the Stellaris: Necroids Species Pack.

    Right now Paradox are keeping all the details close and more will be revealed later. From what they said Stellaris players "will learn that death is not the end, but rather the beginning of their intergalactic journey as new changes reincarnate playthroughs of Stellaris for long time players, as well as bringing new undeath to established playtypes. To live amongst the Necroids, embracing death is not only encouraged, it’s required!".

    [...]

    Paradox also mentioned how they wanted their ships to look a little sinister, along with their portraits too, since the big theme here is death. While not undead or decaying, they wanted to give a pretty dark theme and they say that they've managed to make "something really great" with more details in future developer diaries.

  • Challenging turn-based RPG 'Stoneshard' has a huge overhaul update out, price rising

    Ink Stains Games have released a major upgrade to the challenging turn-based RPG Stoneshard, one they've been working on for some time now and it's quite the overhaul.

  • The next addition to the Civilization VI New Frontier Pass is out with Byzantine and Gaul

    Sid Meier's Civilization VI has another expansion out now for the New Frontier Pass with the Byzantium & Gaul Pack available now.

    This is part of their ongoing process hopping between new DLC and afree upgrades, with this available now to anyone who owns the New Frontier Pass or you can buy it directly. If you do own the New Frontier Pass instead of picking up each newer DLC, they're throwing in the exclusive Teddy Roosevelt and Catherine De Medici Persona Packs.

  • Zink OpenGL-Over-Vulkan With Unigine Heaven Seeing Improved Performance

    Following word last week that the Zink OpenGL-on-Vulkan layer was seeing 50~100% performance gains, more details are now available.

    This Mesa OpenGL software implementation over Vulkan has been seeing more performance optimizations by developer Mike Blumenkrantz following his remarkable work on getting OpenGL 4.6 up and running. He's been making a number of optimizations recently while last week's note of a "50~100%" improvement was certainly enticing albeit left wondering if it was just up to some OpenGL micro-benchmarks.

10 Open Source Static Site Generators to Create Fast and Resource-Friendly Websites

Filed under
OSS
Web

Technically, a static website means the webpages are not generated on the server dynamically. The HTML, CSS, JavaScript lie on the server in the version the end user receives it. The raw source code files are already prebuilt, the source code doesn’t change with the next server request.

It’s FOSS is a dynamic website which depends on several databases and the web pages are generated and served when there’s a request from your browser. Majority of the web is powered by dynamic sites where you interact with the websites and there are plenty of content that often change.

Read more

Richard Stallman: You can get arrested without a reason

Filed under
GNU
Interviews

The last few months have put data protection back in the spotlight. During a crisis of this kind, do we have to choose between safety and privacy? We talked about this with Richard Stallman, digital privacy activist and the founder of the Free Software Movement.

Read more

7 Amazing Linux Distributions For Kids

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Linux is a very powerful operating system and that is one of the reasons why it powers a lot of servers on the Internet. Though there have been concerns about its user-friendliness which has brought about the debate of how it will overtake Mac OSX and Windows on desktop computers, I think users need to accept Linux as it is to realize its real power.

Today, Linux powers a lot of machines out there, from mobile phones to tablets, laptops, workstations, servers, supercomputers, cars, air traffic control systems, refrigerators, and many more. With all this and more yet to come in the near future, as I had already stated at the beginning, Linux is the operating system for future computing.

Because the future belongs to the kids of today, then introducing them to technologies that will change the future is the way to go. Therefore they have to be introduced at an early stage to start learning computer technologies and Linux as a special case.

One thing common to children is curiosity and early learning can help instill a character of exploration in them when the learning environment is designed to suit them.

Having looked at some quick reasons why kids should learn Linux, let us now go through a list of exciting Linux distributions that you can introduce your kids to so that they can start using and learning Linux.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Mozilla/Firefox/Tor Browser

  • New Release: Tor Browser 10.5a1

    Tor Browser 10.1a1 is now available from the Tor Browser Alpha download page and also from our distribution directory.

    Note: This is an alpha release, an experimental version for users who want to help us test new features. For everyone else, we recommend downloading the latest stable release instead.

  • Karl Dubost: Week notes - 2020 w39 - worklog - A new era

    So the Mozilla Webcompat team is entering a new era. Mike Taylor (by the time this will be published) was the manager of the webcompat team at Mozilla since August 2015. He decided to leave. Monday, September 21 was his last day. We had to file an issue about this. The new interim manager is… well… myself. So last week and this week will be a lot about: * have a better understanding of the tasks and meetings that Mike was attending. * trying to readjust schedules and understanding how to get a bit of sleep with a distributed organization which has most of its meeting toward friendly European and American time zones. Basically, all meetings are outside the reasonable working timeframe (8:00 to 17:00 Japan Time). * trying to figure out how to switch from peer to manager with the other persons in the webcompat team. I want to remove any sources of stress.

  • Mozilla Localization (L10N): L10n Report: September 2020 Edition

Programming Leftovers

  • Code your first algorithm in Scratch

    With more kids learning from home this year, it's important to engage them with unique learning opportunities. The classroom looks very different than it did before, and it's going to continue to evolve. So should the lessons we teach. In the first article in this series, I shared how my students taught me to code. Over the next few weeks, I will be exploring how educators and parents can harness the power of coding to teach kids a wide variety of skills. "But I don't know anything about coding!" you may be shouting at your computer. That's one of the beauties of open source code: everyone is a learner, and everyone is a teacher. Whether you're new to coding or you've been doing it all your life, part of the process is making mistakes. It's all about problem-solving and learning how to find information. The greatest tool an educator has in a coding classroom is the phrase, "I don't know; let's find out together!"

  • 5 questions to ask yourself when writing project documentation

    Before getting down to the actual writing part of documenting another one of your open source projects, and even before interviewing the experts, it's a good idea to answer some high-level questions about your new document. [...] Or, what company is behind the document? What brand identity does it want to convey to its audience? The answer to this question will significantly influence your writing style. The company may also have its own style guide or at least a formal mission statement, in which case, you should start there. If the company is just starting out, you may ask the questions above to the document's owner. As the writer, it's important to integrate the voice and persona you create for the company with your own worldview and beliefs. This will make your writing sound more natural and less like company jargon.

  • 33 Excellent Free Books to Learn all about R

    The R language is the de facto standard among statisticians for the development of statistical software, and is widely used for statistical software development and data analysis. R is a modern dialect of S, one of several statistical programming languages designed at Bell Laboratories. R is much more than a programming language. It’s an interactive suite of software facilities for data manipulation, calculation, and graphical display. R offers a wide variety of statistical (linear and nonlinear modelling, classical statistical tests, time-series analysis, classification, clustering, …) and graphical techniques, and is highly extensible. The ability to download and install R packages is a key factor which makes R an excellent language to learn. What else makes R awesome? Here’s a taster.

  • [Perl] while loops that have an index

    Perl got this syntax that allow to use a while loop without having to explicitly increment an index by doing an i++. It is made possible by the each function.

  • OO linked lists in Perl

    After many days, trying to implement linked lists by nested hash (link to Rosetta Code) (link to my code) or Struct::Dumb, I get how to write the (singly) linked list in object-oriented style by Perl. One with bless, another one with Moose. Keep the learning record here.

  • Find all the prime numbers less than 'n' in O(n) Time complexity

    Our task is to find all the prime numbers that are less than n in Linear Time. We use Sieve of Eratosthenes to find the prime numbers till n. But the time complexity is O(N log (log N)). Here our desired time complexity is O(N). Hence a modified version of the Sieve of Eratosthenes is to be used.

  • PyPy 7.3.2 triple release: python 2.7, 3.6, and 3.7

    The interpreters are based on much the same codebase, thus the multiple release. This is a micro release, all APIs are compatible with the 7.3.0 (Dec 2019) and 7.3.1 (April 2020) releases, but read on to find out what is new. Conda Forge now supports PyPy as a python interpreter. The support is quite complete for linux and macOS. This is the result of a lot of hard work and good will on the part of the Conda Forge team. A big shout out to them for taking this on. Development of PyPy has transitioning to https://foss.heptapod.net/pypy/pypy. This move was covered more extensively in this blog post. We have seen an increase in the number of drive-by contributors who are able to use gitlab + mercurial to create merge requests. The CFFI backend has been updated to version 1.14.2. We recommend using CFFI rather than c-extensions to interact with C, and using cppyy for performant wrapping of C++ code for Python.

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Friday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (rails), openSUSE (chromium, jasper, ovmf, roundcubemail, samba, and singularity), Oracle (firefox), SUSE (bcm43xx-firmware, firefox, libqt5-qtbase, qemu, and tiff), and Ubuntu (aptdaemon, atftp, awl, packagekit, and spip).

  • Foreign Hackers Cripple Texas County’s Email System, Raising Election Security Concerns

    Last week, voters and election administrators who emailed Leanne Jackson, the clerk of rural Hamilton County in central Texas, received bureaucratic-looking replies. “Re: official precinct results,” one subject line read. The text supplied passwords for an attached file.

    But Jackson didn’t send the messages. Instead, they came from Sri Lankan and Congolese email addresses, and they cleverly hid malicious software inside a Microsoft Word attachment. By the time Jackson learned about the forgery, it was too late. Hackers continued to fire off look-alike replies. Jackson’s three-person office, already grappling with the coronavirus pandemic, ground to a near standstill.

  • Windows XP Source Code Reportedly Leaked, Posted to 4chan
  • Windows XP source code leaked online, on 4chan, out of all places
  • [Attacker] Accessed Network of U.S. Agency and Downloaded Data

    An unnamed U.S. federal agency was hit with a cyber-attack after a [attacker] used valid access credentials, authorities said on Thursday.

    While many details of the hack weren’t revealed, federal authorities did divulge that the [attacker] was able to browse directories, copy at least one file and exfiltrate data, according to the Cybersecurity & Infrastructure Security Agency, known as CISA.

    The [attacker] implanted malware that evaded the agency’s protection system and was able to gain access to the network by using valid access credentials for multiple users’ Microsoft 365 accounts and domain administrator accounts, according to authorities.

New in calibre 5.0

Welcome back, calibre users. It has been a year since calibre 4.0. The two headline features are Highlighting support in the calibre E-book viewer and that calibre has now moved to Python 3. There has been a lot of work on the calibre E-book viewer. It now supports Highlighting. The highlights can be colors, underlines, strikethrough, etc. and have added notes. All highlights can be both stored in EPUB files for easy sharing and centrally in the calibre library for easy browsing. Additionally, the E-book viewer now supports both vertical and right-to-left text. calibre has moved to using Python 3. This is because Python 2 was end-of-lifed this year. This should be completely transparent to calibre users, the only caveat being that some third party calibre plugins have not yet been ported to Python 3 and therefore will not work in calibre 5. For status on the various plugin ports, see here. This effort involved porting half-a-million lines of Python code and tens-of-thousands of lines of extension code to Python 3. This would not have been possible without the help of Eli Schwartz and Flaviu Tamas. Read more Also: 5 Best free software for disk imaging or cloning hard drives