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Friday, 18 Sep 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Debian Etch: Solid, Crufty, Some Assembly Required srlinuxx
Story This months Cosmo srlinuxx 06/02/2005 - 4:03am
Story 50 gmail invites? srlinuxx 1 06/02/2005 - 4:10am
Story Moooore Spam! srlinuxx 1 06/02/2005 - 4:12am
Story Vin Diesel going soft on us? srlinuxx 2 06/02/2005 - 4:25pm
Poll How's the new site? srlinuxx 2 06/02/2005 - 9:01pm
Story Hackers homing in on Cellular Phones srlinuxx 5 07/02/2005 - 2:20pm
Story M$ Claims Safer than Linux srlinuxx 1 11/02/2005 - 5:34am
Story This Week At the Movies: Boogeyman & Alone in the Dark & Hide and Seek srlinuxx 1 11/02/2005 - 5:41am
Story Forbes Wants to Know srlinuxx 2 11/02/2005 - 6:13am

Audiocasts/Shows and Videos About Python and UNIX

Filed under
Development
BSD

Games: Helheim Hassle, Python Games, Life is Strange 2 and C-Dogs SDL

Filed under
Gaming
  • Helheim Hassle is a seriously funny adventure puzzle-platforming mix

    What could take the crown for the funniest Linux game this year, Helheim Hassle released earlier in August and it's a genuine delight to play through. Note: key provided by the developer after the release.

    Created by Perfectly Paranormal, the same developers who made Manual Samuel, with Helheim Hassle taking place in some weird shared universe they created. You are Bjørn, a pacifist viking who runs away from battle surrounded by those who thirst for a good fight but you end up dying and go to Valhalla.

  • Add throwing mechanics to your Python game

    My previous article was meant to be the final article in this series, and it encouraged you to go program your own additions to this game. Many of you did! I got emails asking for help with a common mechanic that I hadn't yet covered: combat. After all, jumping to avoid baddies is one thing, but sometimes it's awfully satisfying to just make them go away. It's common in video games to throw something at your enemies, whether it's a ball of fire, an arrow, a bolt of lightning, or whatever else fits the game.

    Unlike anything you have programmed for your platformer game in this series so far, throwable items have a time to live. Once you throw an object, it's expected to travel some distance and then disappear. If it's an arrow or something like that, it may disappear when it passes the edge of the screen. If it's a fireball or a bolt of lightning, it might fizzle out after some amount of time.

    That means each time a throwable item is spawned, a unique measure of its lifespan must also be spawned. To introduce this concept, this article demonstrates how to throw only one item at a time. (In other words, only one throwable item may exist at a time.) On the one hand, this is a game limitation, but on the other hand, it is a game mechanic in itself. Your player won't be able to throw 50 fireballs at once, since you only allow one at a time, so it becomes a challenge for your player to time when they release a fireball to try to hit an enemy. And behind the scenes, this also keeps your code simple.

    If you want to enable more throwable items at once, challenge yourself after you finish this tutorial by building on the knowledge you gain.

  • The first Life is Strange 2 episode is now permanently free

    Have you been on the fence about picking up Life is Strange 2? Well, now you have a much better chance to take a look at it. DONTNOD Entertainment have now made the entire first episode permanently free to grab.

    "After a tragic incident, brothers Sean and Daniel Diaz run away from home. Fearing the police, and dealing with Daniel's newly manifested telekinetic power – the power to move objects with your mind – the boys decide to travel to their father's hometown of Puerto Lobos in Mexico for safety."

    youtube video thumbnail

  • C-Dogs SDL, the classic run and gun game has a new release

    C-Dogs SDL is something of a classic. A free and open source overhead run-and-gun game that continues being updated and a fresh release is out now.

    What is it? C-Dogs is the followup to Cyberdogs, a classic from back in 1994 that ended up being really popular. Originally created by Ronny Wester as a freeware DOS game back in 1997, it was later open sourced and now it continues on with it using SDL for more modern platform support.

    The new C-Dogs SDL 0.9.0 release is a major upgrade, which brings with it a complete Doom campaign filled with secret levels, ammo/health pickups and persistent guns.

Java 15 Reaches General Availability

Filed under
Development

Oracle has announced that Java 15 is now generally available. The announcement was made in the opening keynote of Oracle Developer Live, an online version of the usual CodeOne and OpenWorld conferences.

This is the first release of 'official' Oracle Java following the language’s 25th anniversary in May.

Read more

Also: Oracle open-sources Java machine learning library

Arm Officially Supports Panfrost Open-Source Mali GPU Driver Development

Filed under
OSS

Most GPU drivers found in Arm processors are known to be closed-source making it difficult and time-consuming to fix some of the bugs since everybody needs to rely on the silicon vendor to fix those for them, and they may even decide a particular bug is not important to them, so you’d be out of luck.

So the developer community has long tried to reverse-engineer GPU drivers with projects like Freedreno (Qualcomm Adreno), Etnaviv (Vivante), as well as Lima and Panfrost for Arm Mali GPUs. Several years ago, Arm management was not interested at all collaborating with open-source GPU driver development for Mali GPUs, but as noted by Phoronix, Alyssa Rosenzweig, a graphics software engineer employed by Collabora, explained Panfrost development was now done in partnership with Arm during a talk at the annual X.Org Developers’ Conference (XDC 2020).

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Open Up: Open Source Hardware — A Chat with Carl

Filed under
Hardware
Interviews
OSS

From a broader lens, to produce “open source hardware” means that we have developed and shared the recipe to create a high-end commercial product that can be learned from, adapted, and used by anyone else. In the same way we’ve stood on the shoulders of the Linux and open source software giants who came before us, we now get to be pioneers in developing open source hardware for those who come next. If you want to learn more how a computer is designed or how something is made, our schematics are the instructions for how to do it. It describes every step of the process, from each piece of the machine and its dimensions, to the type of aluminum used and how to bend it.
It’s similar to open source software in that you can learn from the product, adapt it to your needs, and distribute it. The difference is that it requires outside equipment to produce your own version. Open hardware has become more accessible with 3-D printing, but as we found when we were making acrylic prototypes of Thelio, you reach a point where it’s time to work with metal, which presents its own challenges. You have to cut it, bend it, and paint it, all of which requires specific equipment.

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Deepin 20 Review: The Gorgeous Linux Distro Becomes Even More Beautiful (and Featureful)

Filed under
Reviews

Deepin is already a beautiful Linux distribution. Deepin version 20 puts in a different league altogether with all those visual and feature improvements.
Read more

PinePhone Manjaro Edition Pre-Orders Go Live

Filed under
Hardware

The moment you’ve all been waiting for is here, you can now pre-order the PinePhone Manjaro Edition Linux phone from PINE64’s online store for as low as $149 USD for the 2GB RAM model or $199 USD for the so-called Convergence Package variant, which comes with 3GB RAM and a USB-C dock to turn the phone into a PC when connected to a monitor, keyboard and mouse.

The PinePhone Manjaro Community Edition was announced last month. It comes pre-installed with Manjaro Linux ARM, which is based on the Arch Linux ARM operating system. Three variants of Manjaro Linux ARM for PinePhone are available for you to try with UBports’ Lomiri, Purism’s Phosh or KDE’s Plasma Mobile.

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''4 Best Lightweight Linux Distros to install on USB Drive for Portable OS

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Well, it doesn’t mean the only scenario one requires one of the best Live USB bootable Linux distros when he or she needs to use the computer that is not trustable. There are other situations as well, such as your current system is running Windows and you don’t want to have dual boot on your system, and still want to try out Linux? Then use the USB running Linux system.

One of the main reasons that make Linux Distro an extremely portable operating system is the low consumption of RAM, depending upon the OS version or GUI, and support to run in a Live environment. This also beneficial for testing, preparing, backing up, or handling drive of the system that are crashed somehow… Furthermore, the machine without a hard disk can also be used with USB drive Linux OS

Although we can install any Linux distro on a USB drive, however, here we will show the best open-source Linux distributions that are light in weight, consume less RAM, and other hardware resources to become a perfect portable OS option for Pen drives.

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SUSE/OpenSUSE: OpenSUSE + LibreOffice Conference, ZeroLogon, YaST and More

Filed under
SUSE
  • Conference organizers announce schedule and platform registration

    Organizers of the online openSUSE + LibreOffice Conference are pleased to announce that the schedule for the conference is published.

    All times on the schedule are published in Coordinated Universal Time. The conference will take place from live Oct. 15 to Oct. 17 using the oslo.gonogo.live platform.

    There are more than 100 talks scheduled, covering the openSUSE and LibreOffice projects. There are talks about open-source projects, cloud and container technologies, embedded devices, community development, translations, marketing, documentation, Future Technologies, Quality Assurance and more.

  • SUSE Addresses “ZeroLogon” Vulnerability

    On September 11, Secura research published a new software vulnerability called “ZeroLogon”, which exploits a protocol weakness in the SMB Netlogon protocol. This vulnerability may affect users of SUSE Linux Enterprise Server running Samba servers in older or non-standard configurations. Attackers could use it to bypass access control to the domain controller.

  • Digest of YaST Development Sprint 108

    In our previous post we reported we were working in some mid-term goals in the areas of AutoYaST and storage management. This time we have more news to share about both, together with some other small YaST improvements.

  • Johann Els on running SUSE Linux Enterprise Server on SAP

Devices With GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • Raspberry Pi enables world’s smallest iMac
  • Banana Pi BPI-M5

    The Banana Pi BPI-M5 SBC, based on the 2.0GHz quad-core Amlogic S905X3 SoC, features 4GB RAM, 16G eMMC, microSD, HDMI, 3.5mm audio, GbE LAN, 4x USB3.0, and 40-pin Raspberry Pi style expansion.

  • Modules and dev kits run Linux on 2.3-TOPS equipped i.MX8M Plus

    Variscite’s “VAR-SOM-MX8M-PLUS” and smaller “DART-MX8M-PLUS” modules run Linux or Android on NXP’s AI-enabled i.MX8M Plus with up to 4GB LPDDR4, 64GB eMMC, WiFi/BT, and optional dev kits.

    Variscite has launched some of the first embedded boards to support NXP’s i.MX8M Plus, an up to quad-core, Cortex-A53 SoC running at 1.8GHz and equipped with a 2.3-TOPs Neural Processing Unit (NPU). Variscite’s VAR-SOM-MX8M-PLUS and DART-MX8M-PLUS modules join TechNexion’s Wandboard IMX8M-Plus SBC and the Wandboard IMX8M-Plus EDM SOM module that powers it. Toradex, meanwhile, has teased an upcoming Verdin iMX8M Plus module.

  • DR6018 V2 Embedded WiFi 6 Router Board Adds Support for WiFi 6E and 5G IoT M.2 Cards

    A few months ago we covered DR6018 (aka CP01) WiFi 6 Embedded SBC powered by Qualcomm IPQ6018 processor and offering six Ethernet ports including five Gigabit interfaces and one 2.5 Gbps Ethernet port.

    Wallys Communications has now informed CNX Software they had a new version of the board called DR6018 V2 with a more compact form factor, support for PoE, as well as optional WiFi 6E and 5G IoT M.2 modules.

  • Epiq Solutions Introduces Matchstiq™ Z3u, a New Radically Small, Field-Ready, Low Profile Software-Defined Radio (SDR) RF Platform Ideal for On-the-Go Signal Processing

    A complete Platform Development Kit (PDK) with Linux board support package (BSP), open API and FPGA reference design source code is available to allow customers to develop their own signal processing applications for Matchstiq Z3u. This PDK leverages the same API and FPGA reference design used with Epiq’s Sidekiq portfolio of SDR modules, providing a familiar interface for existing customers.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Pros and cons of using open source software in your business

    Open source software (OSS) refers to computer software which is released and distributed with its source code open for modification by other users. The source code is released under a license where the copyright holder has granted the rights to use, study, change or distribute the software for any purpose.

    Often developed in a collaborative, public manner, many developers are able to add, change and manipulate the source code to suit their needs.

    Software licensed as open source allows commercial companies to run, modify and share the underlying software code. Open source licenses are legal contracts between the creator and user.

    Although often available to access free of charge, open source licenses sometimes have restrictions applied. Restrictions may mean a user must preserve the name of the original author within the code, or there may be limitations on the way they are allowed to redistribute the software.

    [...]

    Free software has nothing to do with price, rather it is about freedom of use. Free software respects the freedom and community of users, giving the right to run, copy, distribute, change or improve the software. Campaigners for software freedom, Gnu.org, use the analogy “think of “free” as in “free speech”, not as in “free beer”.

    Free software allows users to control the program and what it can do for them. If users don’t have control of a program, this is referred to as “nonfree” or “proprietary”.

  • Oracle Linux State of the Penguin Webcast
  • Oracle Linux sessions at Open Source Summit Europe 2020
  • How the Internet Archive is Ensuring Permanent Access to Open Access Journal Articles

                         

                           

    Researchers found that 176 open access journals have already vanished from their publishers’ website over the past two decades, according to a recent preprint article by Mikael Laakso, Lisa Matthias, and Najko Jahn. These periodicals were from all regions of the world and represented all major disciplines — sciences, humanities and social sciences. There are over 14,000 open access journals indexed by the Directory of Open Access Journals and the paper suggests another 900 of those are inactive and at risk of disappearing. The pre-print has struck a nerve, receiving news coverage in Nature and Science.

  • OpenBSD::Unveil(3p) added to -current

                     

                       

    Andrew Fresh (afresh1@) has committed OpenBSD::Unveil(3p), a Perl interface to unveil(2): [...]

  • Upcoming Entry Level IT Certification from The Linux Foundation to Provide an Onramp to an IT Career

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Thursday

    Security updates have been issued by Fedora (dotnet3.1, kernel, mbedtls, and python35), Mageia (libraw), openSUSE (mumble), SUSE (libsolv, libzypp, and perl-DBI), and Ubuntu (libdbi-perl, libphp-phpmailer, mcabber, ncmpc, openssl, openssl1.0, qemu, samba, storebackup, and util-linux).

  • Russell Coker: Dell BIOS Updates

    I have just updated the BIOS on a Dell PowerEdge T110 II. The process isn’t too difficult, Google for the machine name and BIOS, download a shell script encoded firmware image and GPG signature, then run the script on the system in question.

    One problem is that the Dell GPG key isn’t signed by anyone. How hard would it be to get a few well connected people in the Linux community to sign the key used for signing Linux scripts for updating the BIOS? I would be surprised if Dell doesn’t employ a few people who are well connected in the Linux community, they should just ask all employees to sign such GPG keys! Failing that there are plenty of other options. I’d be happy to sign the Dell key if contacted by someone who can prove that they are a responsible person in Dell. If I could phone Dell corporate and ask for the engineering department and then have someone tell me the GPG fingerprint I’ll sign the key and that problem will be partially solved (my key is well connected but you need more than one signature).

  • An inside look at CVE-2020-10713, a.k.a. the GRUB2 "BootHole"

    As GRUB2 upstream maintainers, Oracle developers took the lead on both the disclosure coordination and the technical solutions. In their role as community maintainers for GRUB2, Daniel and Alexsandr were notified of the security vulnerability and immediately began analyzing the impact of these vulnerabilities, coordinating the cross-vendor industry response, and ensuring that this vulnerability would be fixed swiftly. In the end, this coordination effort would entail around 100 individuals from 18 companies.

    CVE-2020-10713, the "BootHole" vulnerability, affects systems using UEFI Secure Boot signed operating systems and has a CVSS Base Score of 8.2.

Python Programming

Filed under
Development
  • The mmap() copy-on-write trick: reducing memory usage of array copies

    Let’s say you have an array, and you need to make some copies and modify those copies. Usually, memory usage scales with the number of copies: if your original array was 1GB of RAM, each copy will take 1GB of RAM. And that can add up.

    But often, you’re just changing a small part of the array. Ideally, the memory cost would only be the parts of the copies that you changed.

  • Pip Install Specific Version of a Python Package: 2 Steps

    In this Python tutorial, you will learn how to use pip install a specific version of a package. The outline of the post (as also can be seen in the ToC) is as follows. First, you will get a brief introduction with examples on when you might need to install an older version of a package. Second, you will get the general syntax for how to carry out this task. After that, you will get two steps to installing specific versions of Python packages with pip. In this section, you will also learn how to work with a virtual environment. In the next section, we will look at how to specify the version of multiple Python packages by creating a .txt file.

  • Angular 10 and Django 3 Image Files Upload with FormData

    Throughout this tutorial, we'll see how we can implement file and image upload in Django 3, Django REST Framework and Angular 10 with a step by step example.

    Our application will expose an /upload REST API endpoint that accepts POST requests which contain the image file posted with a multipart/form-data content type via FormData.

    For the frontend, we'll be using Angular 10 to create a simple interface that allows the user to select a file or image and upload it to the server via a POST request using HttpClient and FormData.

  • Multiple Image Files Upload with Django 3, Angular 10 and FormData

    In the previous tutorial we have seen how to implement image file uploading in Django 3 and Angular 10. In this tutorial, we'll see how to implement multiple file uploading with FormData and HttpClient.

  • Python: Check if File or Directory is Empty

    Python has a set of built-in library objects and functions to help us with this task. In this tutorial, we'll learn how to check if a file or directory is empty in Python.

  • For Loop vs. List Comprehension

    Many simple “for loops” in Python can be replaced with list comprehensions. You can often hear that list comprehension is “more Pythonic” (almost as if there was a scale for comparing how Pythonic something is, compared to something else

Graphics: Mesa 20.1.8 Released and More

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • mesa 20.1.8
    Hi all,
    
    I'd like to announce Mesa 20.1.8, the eighth bugfix release for the 20.1 branch.
    
    The next bugfix release is planned for 2 weeks from now, on 2020-09-30.
    
    Cheers,
    Eric
    
  • Mesa 20.1.8 Released While Waiting For Mesa 20.2

    Mesa 20.2 (or 20.2-RC5) didn't debut last week as intended, but for the interim the Mesa 20.1.x release cycle brought 20.1.8 on Wednesday and now it's been extended to having at least a ninth point release to allow more time until not only Mesa 20.2.0 to ship but Mesa 20.2.1 alignment.

  • Ray-Tracing Support For AMDGPU LLVM Back-End Lands For RDNA 2

    AMD previously confirmed it would be supporting real-time ray-tracing with their next-generation GPUs while now one month out from the Radeon RX 6000 series debut are the first signs of the open-source driver work around GPU ray-tracing.

    One day after spotting the patches for AV1 video decode with VCN 3.0, the latest open-source Radeon driver work to point out is the fundamentals around their ray-tracing introduction.

  • NVIDIA 455.23.04 Linux Beta Released With GeForce RTX 3080/3090 Support

    NVIDIA has once again managed to provide launch-day Linux driver support for their next-generation graphics processors. Today the NVIDIA 455.23.04 beta driver is shipping for Linux support with the GeForce RTX 3080 and RTX 3090 "Ampere" graphics cards.

  • RADV's "ACO" Shader Backend Still Pursuing RadeonSI, Early Work On RDNA 2

    Valve developer Timur Kristóf who has been spending the past year working on the AMD Compiler "ACO" back-end for the Mesa Radeon Vulkan driver "RADV" as well as beginning to port this shader compiler back-end to RadeonSI Gallium3D. This alternative to the AMDGPU LLVM back-end has made incredible progress over the past year -- enough so that it's been the default for Mesa's RADV driver. During XDC2020 Day 2, Timur provided an update on ACO.

  • Cache Creator Tool Proposed For AMDVLK Vulkan Driver

    Google engineer Steven Perron has laid out their proposal for an XGL cache creator tool for AMD's official Vulkan Linux driver, AMDVLK.

    As part of their work on relocatable shaders and supporting the offline compilation of Vulkan/SPIR-V shaders, they are working on "xgl_cache_creator" as a tool to take precompiled shaders and construct a file that can be redistributed and passed as the initial data into the Vulkan pipeline cache.

  • Arm Is Now Backing Panfrost Gallium3D As Open-Source Mali Graphics Driver

    Most information presented during the annual X.Org Developers' Conference doesn't tend to be very surprising or ushering in breaking news, but during today's XDC2020 it was subtly dropped that Arm Holdings appears to now be backing the open-source Panfrost Gallium3D driver.

  • Microsoft Has A Large Presence At This Year's X.Org Conference [Ed: Microsoft is now interjecting Windows and DirectX into conferences about Linux]

    Years ago if saying Microsoft would have multiple developers presenting at the annual X.Org Developers' Conference (XDC) as well as being a sponsor, you'd probably raise some laughs. But this year for XDC2020 Gdansk (albeit virtual due to COVID-19), Microsoft engineers gave not just one talk but three on the opening day.

    [...]

    Jesse Natalie and Steve Pronovost both of Microsoft kicked off XDC2020 by talking about the WSL graphics architecture in a pre-recorded, well-edited video presentation. That was followed by Pronovost talking about X11/Wayland application support under WSL and then the third and final Microsoft talk of the day was Jesse talking about their Mesa Direct3D 12 mapping layers for getting OpenCL/OpenGL over D3D12.

Games: Blasphemous, Command & Conquer Remastered Collection, Godot 3.2.3

Filed under
Gaming
  • Blasphemous confirmed to release for Linux on September 21

    The Game Kitchen and Team17 today confirmed that Blasphemous will finally launch official Linux support on Monday, September 21 after the original 2019 release.

    "Play as The Penitent One - a sole survivor of the massacre of the ‘Silent Sorrow’. Trapped in an endless cycle of death and rebirth, it’s down to you to free the world from this terrible fate and reach the origin of your anguish."

  • Command & Conquered Remastered adds a beacon system, local replays, and more

    The Command & Conquer Remastered Collection has just seen its third major update go live. With this patch, the modernised version of the classic strategy game series is getting a few welcome modern features and expanded tools for modders and map-makers.

    One of the banner updates added in the latest patch is a much-requested pre-match info screen. Now, when you’re loading into a multiplayer or skirmish game, you’ll see the minimap, your starting position, and the other players who will be playing. The idea is to give players a better sense of orientation when they begin a match, and start planning their opening strategy as they’re loading games.

  • Maintenance release: Godot 3.2.3

    Godot contributors are proud to release Godot 3.2.3 as a maintenance update to the stable 3.2 branch. The main development focus for this version was to fix regressions reported against the fairly big 3.2.2 release from June, but in the process many other bugfixes for older issues have been merged.

Audiocasts/Shows: Clipmenu, Linux News, Ubuntu Podcast and BSD Now

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Clipmenu: Look No Further For A Simple Clipboard Manager

    I've noticed that a lot of X applications like to clear the clipboard when they close which can be quite annoying when I'm trying to get work done so why not skip all of that and just keep a list of everything you've copied, that's what you get with Clipmenu and instead of building a new interface it hooks into existing programs like Dmenu and Rofi so you can easily integrate it into your system.

  • HP and Lenovo support Linux, elementary OS on the Pinebook Pro, and a new Oxygen theme - Linux News

    Here are your Linux, Open Source and Privacy news for the first half of september 2020! This time, we've got tons of new hardware supporting Linux, elementary OS on the pinebook pro, and the revival of the Oxygen KDE theme.

  • Ubuntu Podcast S13E26 – The evil eye

    This week we’ve been playing with arcade boards and finishing DIY in the kitchen. We discuss if old technology is more fun than new technology, bring you a command line love and go over all your wonderful feedback.

  • BSD Now #368: Changing OS roles

    Modernizing the OpenBSD Console, OS roles have changed, FreeBSD Cluster with Pacemaker and Corosync, Wine in a 32-bit sandbox on 64-bit NetBSD, Find package which provides a file in OpenBSD, and more.

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