Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 17 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Blog entry Slackware 10.1 srlinuxx 8 27/03/2005 - 4:37am
Story sex bots srlinuxx 2 28/03/2005 - 7:02am
Story 'Game theft' led to fatal attack srlinuxx 1 31/03/2005 - 11:21pm
Story Cannabis: Too much, too young? srlinuxx 2 31/03/2005 - 11:33pm
Blog entry gentoo's april fools srlinuxx 1 01/04/2005 - 4:35pm
Page Real April 1st Screenshot srlinuxx 01/04/2005 - 5:38pm
Spring Forward srlinuxx 03/04/2005 - 6:14am
Story Pope John Paul II dies in Vatican srlinuxx 1 03/04/2005 - 7:27am
Blog entry New Logo srlinuxx 07/04/2005 - 7:07am
Story NoGravity Linux Game Port srlinuxx 07/04/2005 - 2:08pm

Explore climate data with open source tools

Filed under
OSS

You can't look anywhere these days without seeing evidence of the changing weather patterns on the earth. Monthly, we are confronted with facts and figures that point to a warming planet.

Climate scientists warn us that inaction could be fatal to our futures here. Military strategists at the Pentagon have recently cautioned President-Elect Trump that inaction on climate change could spell disaster for our national security as shrinking water supplies and meager rainfall cause crop failures will force large numbers of people to migrate to other parts of the world that can sustain them.

Read more

Linux Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • It's Getting Close Whether The OpenGL On-Disk Shader Cache Will Happen For Mesa 17.0

    While a lot of OpenGL improvements, Vulkan driver advancements, and performance optimizations can be found in Mesa Git for the forthcoming release as Mesa 17.0, one big feature that's still missing as of today is the OpenGL on-disk shader cache.

  • Intel vs. Modesetting X.Org DDX Performance Impact

    With word of Fedora switching away from using the Intel X.Org driver in favor of the generic xf86-video-modesetting driver, following in the steps laid by Debian/Ubuntu, there is fresh discussions over features and any performance impact of xf86-video-modesetting vs. xf86-video-intel DDX drivers. As such, here are some fresh 2D and 3D benchmarks.

SUSE Formalizes Container Strategy with a New Linux Distro, MicroOS

Filed under
Linux
SUSE

Arguably, CoreOS Linux could be called the first Linux-based operating system designed for cluster computing, containers/microservices. Even if CoreOS Linux (since renamed “Container Linux“) had its roots in the traditional Linux OS, it offered a new approach towards operating systems: One of the most significant features of Container Linux is transitional upgrades that keep the system up-to-date without user intervention.

Read more

Huawei Mate 9 Pro Review: Probably The Best Android Phone Of 2016

Filed under
Reviews

It is a testament (or perhaps indictment?) to the Wild Wild West nature of the mobile industry that, on December 14, thinking it was close enough to the end of the year, I wrote a piece ranking my favorite smartphones of 2016 -- only for the list to be thrown out of wack a week later when I got my hands on the Huawei Mate 9 Pro.

The Mate 9 Pro is now my favorite go-to phone to use, and since it was technically released in 2016, that means it is indeed my new favorite phone of 2016.

Read more

C Compiler News

Filed under
Development
GNU
  • Fedora 26 Likely To Receive GCC 7, Other Changes Still Being Devised

    Fedora 26 will likely be using GCC 7 as its default compiler.

    This shouldn't come as a big surprise since Fedora usually always ships with the latest stable GNU Compiler Collection release. GCC 7.1, the first stable GCC 7 version, should be out in late March or early April while it's just about in the final state of development and could allow GCC 7 being added to F26/Rawhide very soon.

  • A Look At The New Features Coming To GNU C Library 2.25

    Three weeks from today should mark a new release of the GNU C Library, glibc 2.25, and it's coming with many feature additions.

FOSS in Networking

Filed under
OSS
  • Kubernetes Helps Comcast Re-Engineer Cable TV

    Comcast cable is undergoing a major technical shift. The company is moving away from an always-on transmission of every single channel to every single customer, with the signal converted on either end by a piece of proprietary hardware, which is how cable has worked for decades. The new system is IP-based, on-demand streaming model where channel signal is sent only when requested by the user, explained Erik St. Martin, a systems architect at Comcast, at CloudNativeCon in November.

  • Keynote: Kubernetes: As Seen On TV by Erik St. Martin, Systems Architect, Comcast
  • IHS Markit: 70% of Carriers Will Deploy CORD in the Central Office

    The Central Office Re-Architected as a Data Center (CORD) combines network functions virtualization (NFV) and software-defined networking (SDN) to bring data center economics and cloud agility to the telco central office. CORD garnered so much attention in 2016 that its originator — On.Lab‘s Open Network Operating System (ONOS) — established CORD as a separate open source entity. And non-telcos have joined the open source group, including Google and Comcast.

Containers Rising

Filed under
Server
SUSE
  • SUSE Formalizes Container Strategy with a New Linux Distro, MicroOS

    Arguably, CoreOS Linux could be called the first Linux-based operating system designed for cluster computing, containers/microservices. Even if CoreOS Linux (since renamed “Container Linux“) had its roots in the traditional Linux OS, it offered a new approach towards operating systems: One of the most significant features of Container Linux is transitional upgrades that keep the system up-to-date without user intervention.

  • Container Revenue Growing to $2.7B by 2020

    The market for application containers, largely led by the open-source Docker container engine, has been a hot area in recent years, at least in terms of mindshare - but how much money is there in the container market? A new forecast from 451 Research aims to answer that question.

    According to 451 Research, the market for application container technologies in 2016 generated $762 million in revenue. Looking forward to 2020, 451 Research is forecasting that 2020 revenue will reach $2.7 billion for a 40 percent compound annual growth rate.

    The upward revenue growth trajectory for application containers is not a surprise given some of the current adoption trends. 451 Research conducted a study in April and May 2016 that found 14 percent of surveyed organizations were using Docker containers in production. Additionally nearly 31 percent of surveyed organizations indicated they were piloting or evaluating Docker containers.

Free/Libre Games

Filed under
Gaming

Mesa, Kernel, Wireshark update in Tumbleweed Snapshots

Filed under
SUSE

There were plenty of Tumbleweed snapshots leading up to the holiday season and openSUSE’s rolling release is gliding into 2017 with several new packages on the horizon.

The last snapshot of 2016, 20161226, updated the Linux Kernel to 4.9, which was a good way to end the year. Several packages were updated in the snapshot including Python3-setuptools to version 31.0.0, gnome-online-accounts 3.22.3, NetworkManager 1.4.4 and yast2-network 3.2.17.

Read more

The Newest Linux Operating Systems and Who Should Try Them

Filed under
OS
GNU
Linux

Linux operating systems (known as “distributions” or “distros”) have constant releases and updates, with some more substantial than others. Updates usually bring minor fixes and tweaks, but occasionally new distro releases or iterations can yield major changes.

Picking the right distro depends on several factors. Whether it’s a fresh release or major update, check out these new Linux operating systems and who should try them.

Read more

SUSE Pi, Newest Linuxes, openSUSE on GPD Win

Filed under
-s

There were several articles on portable Linux and devices today. Jamie Watson test drove the openSUSE, SUSE, and Tumbleweed for the Raspberry Pi. Unfortunately, he didn't have as much fun as anticipated with those tests. Speaking of openSUSE, Adrien Plazas is working on getting openSUSE installed and operative on the GPD Win gaming handheld that looks like a tiny laptop. Joey Sneddon reported today on the availability and price of the newest Dell Ubuntu mobile workstation and Scott Gilbertson reviewed the XPS 13. Finally, Brian Fagioli reported on System76's latest Superfan contest where users can win a trip to company headquarters in Denver.

Read more

Security News

Filed under
Security

BSD Leftovers

Filed under
BSD

From OSX to Ubuntu

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Mac
Ubuntu

I didn't debate this for days, I installed the latest available Ubuntu right away as it was the distribution I was using before moving to OSX (I even contributed to a book on it!). I was used to Debian-based systems and knew Ubuntu was still acclaimed for its ease of use and great hardware support. I wasn't disappointed as on the X1 everything was recognized and operational right after the installation, including wifi, bluetooth and external display.

I was greeted with the Unity desktop, which was disturbing as I was a Gnome user back in the days. Up to a point I installed the latter, though in its version 3 flavor, which was also new to me.

I like Gnome3. It's simple, configurable and made me feel productive fast. Though out of bad luck or skills and time to spend investigating, a few things were not working properly: fonts were huge in some apps and normal in others, external display couldn't be configured to a different resolution and dpi ratio than my laptop's, things like that. After a few weeks, I switched back to Unity, and I'm still happily using it today as it has nicely solved all the issues I had with Gnome (which I still like a lot though).

Read more

KDE and GNOME

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • GNOME Gaming Handheld

    Recently I got myself a GPD Win, to make it simple it's a PC in a Nintendo 3DS XL form factor, with a keyboard and a game controller. It comes with Windows 10 and many not too demanding games work perfectly on it: it's perfect to run indie games from Steam and for retro consoles emulation.

  • Dark title bars for apps with dark UI

    I really like the polished look of GNOME and its default theme Adwaita, but there is one thing that has been bugging me for some time. By default server side window decorations are light and if an app has a dark UI and uses a server side window decorations, you get a dark window with a light title bar. It doesn’t look every nice and when you maximize the window, it’ll get even worse because you get a nice black-and-white hamburger (black top bar, light title bar, and dark window content).

  • KDE Neon Invites Users to Test Drive the Latest Wayland ISO with KDE Plasma 5.9

    Jonathan Riddell is continuing to improve the KDE Neon Linux distribution with the latest Open Source software and GNU/Linux technologies, and he had the pleasure to announce the availability of a new development version of KDE Neon Developer Edition.

    Tomorrow, we should be able to get our hands on the Beta release of the upcoming KDE Plasma 5.9 desktop environment, but KDE Neon users can already test drive it if they download the new KDE Neon Developer Unstable Edition operating system, which also switches to the next-generation Wayland display server.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software

Fedora News

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Help FreeOrion come to Fedora

    Last month, Fedora Magazine published an article on how to compile and install FreeOrion. That article sparked some interest in open-source gaming on Fedora, and now FreeOrion is coming to Fedora.

  • Affinity Mapping and brainstorming

    We need a ‘fedora-specific’ data-field for events, because some events are Linux-wide, or open source-wide, and some are fedora-specific. We expect that ambassadors are the ones most likely to put non-fedora events into Hubs, since they may be attending/sponsoring, and don’t expect there to be non-fedora events listed without ambassador presence.

  • Xorg in Fedora-26 will use xorg-x11-drv-modesetting instead of -intel for all recent Intel GPUs

    A while back Debian has switched to using the modesetting Xorg driver rather then the intel Xorg driver for Intel GPUs.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

This Script Updates Hosts Files Using a Multi-Source Unified Block List With Whitelisting

If you ever tinker with your hosts file, you should try running this script to automatically keep the file updated with the latest known ad servers, phishing sites and other web scum.

Read more

via DMT/Linux Blog

today's leftovers

  • FLOSS Weekly 417: OpenHMD
    Fredrik Hultin is the Co-founder of the OpenHMD project (together with Jakob Bornecrantz). OpenHMD aims to provide a Free and Open Source API and drivers for immersive technology, such as head-mounted displays with built-in head tracking. The project's aim is to implement support for as many devices as possible in a portable, cross-platform package.
  • My next EP will be released as a corrupted GPT image
    Endless OS is distributed as a compressed disk image, so you just write it to disk to install it. On first boot, it resizes itself to fill the whole disk. So, to “install” it to a file we decompress the image file, then extend it to the desired length. When booting, in principle we want to loopback-mount the image file and treat that as the root device. But there’s a problem: NTFS-3G, the most mature NTFS implementation for Linux, runs in userspace using FUSE. There are some practical problems arranging for the userspace processes to survive the transition out of the initramfs, but the bigger problem is that accessing a loopback-mounted image on an NTFS partition is slow, presumably because every disk access has an extra round-trip to userspace and back. Is there some way we can avoid this performance penalty?
  • This week in GTK+ – 31
    In this last week, the master branch of GTK+ has seen 52 commits, with 10254 lines added and 9466 lines removed.
  • Digest of Fedora 25 Reviews
    Fedora 25 has been out for 2 months and it seems like a very solid release, maybe the best in the history of the distro. And feedback from the press and users has also been very positive.
  • Monday's security updates
  • What does security and USB-C have in common?
    I've decided to create yet another security analogy! You can’t tell, but I’m very excited to do this. One of my long standing complaints about security is there are basically no good analogies that make sense. We always try to talk about auto safety, or food safety, or maybe building security, how about pollution. There’s always some sort of existing real world scenario we try warp and twist in a way so we can tell a security story that makes sense. So far they’ve all failed. The analogy always starts out strong, then something happens that makes everything fall apart. I imagine a big part of this is because security is really new, but it’s also really hard to understand. It’s just not something humans are good at understanding. [...] The TL;DR is essentially the world of USB-C cables is sort of a modern day wild west. There’s no way to really tell which ones are good and which ones are bad, so there are some people who test the cables. It’s nothing official, they’re basically volunteers doing this in their free time. Their feedback is literally the only real way to decide which cables are good and which are bad. That’s sort of crazy if you think about it.
  • NuTyX 8.2.93 released
  • Linux Top 3: Parted Magic, Quirky and Ultimate Edition
    Parted Magic is a very niche Linux distribution that many users first discover when they're trying to either re-partition a drive or recover data from an older system. The new Parted Magic 2017_01_08 release is an incremental update that follows the very large 2016_10_18 update that provided 800 updates.
  • How To Use Google Translate From Commandline In Linux
  • How to debug C programs in Linux using gdb
  • Use Docker remotely on Atomic Host
  • Ubuntu isn’t the only version of Linux that can run on Windows 10
  • OpenSUSE Linux lands on Windows 10
  • How to run openSUSE Leap 42.2 or SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 on Windows 10

Leftovers: Software and Games

Hardware With Linux

  • Raspberry Pi's new computer for industrial applications goes on sale
    The new Raspberry Pi single-board computer is smaller and cheaper than the last, but its makers aren’t expecting the same rush of buyers that previous models have seen. The Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 will be more of a “slow burn,” than last year’s Raspberry Pi 3, its creator Eben Upton predicted. That’s because it’s designed not for school and home use but for industrial applications. To make use of it, buyers will first need to design a product with a slot on the circuit board to accommodate it and that, he said, will take time.
  • ZeroPhone — An Open Source, Dirt Cheap, Linux-powered Smartphone Is Here
    ZeroPhone is an open source smartphone that’s powered by Raspberry Pi Zero. It runs on Linux and you can make one for yourself using parts worth $50. One can use it to make calls and SMS, run apps, and pentesting. Soon, phone’s crowdfunding is also expected to go live.
  • MSI X99A RAIDER Plays Fine With Linux
    This shouldn't be a big surprise though given the Intel X99 chipset is now rather mature and in the past I've successfully tested the MSI X99A WORKSTATION and X99S SLI PLUS motherboards on Linux. The X99A RAIDER is lower cost than these other MSI X99 motherboards I've tested, which led me in its direction, and then sticking with MSI due to the success with these other boards and MSI being a supporter of Phoronix and encouraging our Linux hardware testing compared to some other vendors.
  • First 3.5-inch Kaby Lake SBC reaches market
    Axiomtek’s 3.5-inch CAPA500 SBC taps LGA1151-ready CPUs from Intel’s 7th and 6th Generations, and offers PCIe, dual GbE, and optional “ZIO” expansion. Axiomtek’s CAPA500 is the first 3.5-inch form-factor SBC that we’ve seen that supports Intel’s latest 7th Generation “Kaby Lake” processors. Kaby Lake is similar enough to the 6th Gen “Skylake” family, sharing 14nm fabrication, Intel Gen 9 Graphics, and other features, to enable the CAPA500 to support both 7th and 6th Gen Core i7/i5/i3 CPUs as long as they use an LGA1151 socket. Advantech’s Kaby Lake based AIMB-205 Mini-ITX board supports the same socket. The CAPA500 ships with an Intel H110 chipset, and a Q170 is optional.