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Wednesday, 25 Nov 15 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story NoGravity Linux Game Port srlinuxx 07/04/2005 - 2:08pm
Story Mandrake Thinking Name Change? srlinuxx 13 07/04/2005 - 5:48pm
Story Mandrakesoft Announces Name Change! srlinuxx 1 07/04/2005 - 8:04pm
Story Female networks create opportunities srlinuxx 09/04/2005 - 3:33pm
Story Advanced Micro to launch dual chips early srlinuxx 1 09/04/2005 - 4:17pm
Story An Offer He Could Refuse srlinuxx 09/04/2005 - 9:06pm
Story Earth's oldest object on display srlinuxx 09/04/2005 - 9:13pm
Story DOOM 3: Resurrection of Evil srlinuxx 3 10/04/2005 - 12:59am
Story More BS from the Evil One. srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:27pm
Story Linux leaders at open-source summit srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:35pm

Red Hat News

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Red Hat

Android Leftovers

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Ubuntu Touch Finally Gets the Latest BlueZ 5.x Stack for Better Bluetooth Support

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The Ubuntu Touch OS has finally upgraded to a much newer version of the BlueZ 5.x stack, bringing improved support for Bluetooth connectivity.

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ODF - the state of play - The future of ODF under OASIS, now that the standards war is won.

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ODF - open document format - is an open, XML-based rich document format that has been adopted as the standard for exchanging information in documents (spreadsheets, charts, presentations and word processing documents), by many governments and other organisations (see, for example, here), including the UK Government. This is despite strong opposition by Microsoft; but I have seen Microsoft's proposed "open XML" standard and, frankly, it is huge and horrid (in the word of standards, these go together). If I remember correctly, the early draft I saw even incorporated recognition of early Excel leap-year bugs into the standard.

ODF is now a pukka ISO standard, maintained by OASIS, under the proud banner: "The future is interoperability".

My personal thoughts, below, are prompted by an ODF session at ApacheCon Core titled "Beyond OpenOffice: The State of the ODF Ecosystem" held by Louis Suárez-Potts (community strategist for Age of Peers, his own consultancy, and the Community Manager for, from 2000 to 2011), and attended by very few delegates - perhaps a sign of current level of interest in ODF within the Apache community. Nevertheless, and I am talking about the ODF standard here, not Apache Open Office (which is currently my office software of choice) or its Libre Office fork (which seems to be where the excitement, such as it is, is, for now), the standards battle, or one battle, has been won; we have a useful Open Document Format, standardised by a recognised and mature standards organisation, and even Microsoft Office supports it. That's good.

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Linux Australia suffers another data leak

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Linux Australia has suffered a second leak of data from its servers, according to a message sent to its main mailing list by president Joshua Hesketh.

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CrossOver, Wine RC, and a Final Release in 2015

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Knoppix 7.6 Now Available

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Available this weekend is the latest version of Knoppix, version 7.6.

It's been a while since last hearing anything about Knoppix, the Debian-based Linux distribution viewed as the original Live CD/DVD OS, but an update has been pushed out this weekend.

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Leftovers: OSS

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  • Moodle Launches New Open Source Learning Platform To Enhance Student Quiz, Modules, Forums

    Moodle, an open source software and learning tool, launched a newer version of its digital learning platform that came with functionality improvements, enhancing administrators and learners' quizzes, forums, assignment modules, among others and creating a more personalized learning environment.

  • GCC 5.3 To Be Released Within A Few Weeks

    While GCC 6 is the next major feature release of the GNU Compiler Collection that will come out in 2016, GCC 5.3 will be here in likely about two weeks.

    GCC 5.3 is just the latest point release to GCC 5, per the group's version handling change that began with the GCC 5 release earlier this year. GCC 5.3 is mainly about bug-fixes and documentation updates.

  • HarfBuzz 1.1 Released

    This text shaping library used by Firefox, Chromium, LibreOffice, Qt, Pango, and others is up to version 1.1 as its latest stable release. HarfBuzz 1.1 implements a 'stch' stretch feature for supporting the Sryiac Abbreviation Mark, implements shaping of various Unicode space characters, fixes resulting from continous fuzzing, and other bug fixes and optimizations.

  • ​Secure Network Time Protocol goes beta

    Network Time Protocol is a vital part of the Internet that's recently been used in major DDoS attacks. To keep it from misused in the future, the first secure version of NTP beta has just been released.




  • Open Source Enthusiasts to Converge on Asterisk World at ITEXPO East 2016
  • Desktops DevRoom @ FOSDEM 2016: Have you submitted your talk yet?

    FOSDEM 2016 is going to be great (again!) and you still have the chance to be one of the stars.

    Have you submitted your talk to the Desktops DevRoom yet?

  • OSCON Deadline Nears, Linux in High Places & More…

    While the folks at the Southern California Linux Expo are putting the final touches on the speaker schedule for SCALE 14X, which takes place in January in Pasadena, a little further north in Sebastopol in the San Francisco Bay Area, our friends at O’Reilly are watching the clock wind down to the deadline for their speaker submissions for OSCON. OSCON’s proposal deadline is midnight on Nov. 24 for a conference which takes place in mid-May 2016 in Austin, Texas. This, of course, means that while you’re racing to get that proposal in — and we know you are (and that’s okay) — you’re going to want to keep in mind that it’s still going to have to be relevant in a half-year. Your mantra, then, from here on in is “long shelf life.” And good luck with that proposal.


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LinuxG on Ubuntu, Mint

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Mostly based on Softpedia's articles (close to plagiarism)...

Leftovers: KDE

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  • My personal difficulties finding students (or: Why my colleagues have no open culture)

    Hello guys. I have never written on the planet what I was thinking but today I finally found the courage. Not because I didn't feel like, but because I have always considered this place as a kind of showcase of everything we do. Lately I was a bit busy, I have so many things on my mind and I can concentrate on my passions (free) a little less than I would like. KDE project and the OCS-server unfortunately are among these.

  • Your input, please: naming of action icons (tables, vectorpaths, animation, text, …)

    Developing an application where you use or need icons for actions around tables, vectorpaths, animations, text formatting? Looking forward to use Breeze-styled icons, shared with other applications? Then please read on, this is especially for you:

  • KDE Applications 15.12 Now In Beta
  • KDE Applications 15.12 Is Now in Beta, Final Release Lands on December 16

    Today, November 20, KDE has had the pleasure of informing users about the immediate availability for download and testing of the Beta release of the upcoming KDE Applications 15.12 software suite for the KDE Plasma 5.5 desktop environment.

  • Efficiency Matters!

    We don’t want to reinvent all Qt’s display machinery, so unless we can convince Qt to compress textures, any possible savings would be academically nice, but practically impossible. Fortunately, through the QOpenGLTexture class (a KDAB contribution, btw), QQ2, provides all the necessary APIs to let us change the underlying behavior to use compressed textures without mucking around in the internals.

Nouveau Kepler Re-Clocking Is Working A Lot Better On Linux 4.4

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With the in-development Linux 4.4 kernel, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 600/700 series (Kepler) graphics cards are manually re-clocking a lot better to allow better performance on this unofficial NVIDIA Linux driver.

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DockerCon EU Highlights

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  • ClusterHQ Bringing Storage Smarts to Docker Containers

    VIDEO: ClusterHQ CEO Mark Davis discusses the Docker storage opportunity and how his company's open-source Flocker technology fits in.

    Mark Davis is no stranger to the world of virtualization storage. From 2007 until 2013, Davis was CEO of storage virtualization vendor Virsto, which he sold to VMware. Now Davis is once again in the storage virtualization space, this time as CEO of Docker storage startup ClusterHQ.

  • Container Security, Management Advances Grab DockerCon EU Spotlight

    Few technologies are as hyped today as is the open-source Docker container ecosystem. At the the DockerCon EU conference in Barcelona, Spain, held Nov. 16-17, developers, users and vendors from around the world gathered to not only learn more about Docker, but to also demonstrate new technologies and talk about what's next. For Docker Inc., the lead commercial sponsor of Docker, the event was an opportunity to highlight its next big commercial service, the Universal Control Plane, which provides enterprise-grade deployment and management capabilities. Meanwhile, one primary topic of discussion in multiple sessions was security, with new capabilities announced including hardware-based key signing for application images as well as enhanced control of applications through user namespace policies. Docker isn't just about Docker Inc.—it's a broad ecosystem of vendors, with IBM and Hewlett Packard Enterprise among the big-name supporters. Users of Docker also were front and center at the event, with gaming vendor Electronic Arts talking about how it uses containers to deliver mobile gaming infrastructure and airline software vendor Amadeus discussing how containers can work in a highly regulated, compliance-driven environment. In this slide show, eWEEK takes a look at some of the highlights of the DockerCon EU event.

  • Mirantis Led FUEL Project Gets Installed Under OpenStack Big Tent

    Mirantis first publicly released the FUEL library as an open-source effort in March of 2013. Now the FUEL effort has been formally approved by the OpenStack Foundation to be included under what is known as the 'Big Tent' model.

Security Leftovers

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  • Chrome Extensions – AKA Total Absence of Privacy

    Google, claiming that Chrome is the safest web browser out there, is actually making it very simple for extensions to hide how aggressively they are tracking their users. We have also discovered exactly how intrusive this sort of tracking actually is and how these tracking companies actually do a lot of things trying to hide it. Due to the fact that the gathering of data is made inside an extension, all other extensions created to prevent tracking (such as Ghostery) are completely bypassed.

  • 10 dumb security mistakes sys admins make

    When you log in as root, you have full control over the box. This can be extremely dangerous because if your credentials get stolen, an attacker can do whatever he or she wants.

  • Friday's security updates

today's leftovers

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  • DevOps explained in issue #159

    Docker, Puppet, Vagrant, CoreOS, Otto and more inside the new issue. Plus, code a Breakout game in Pygame Zero

  • 3D Printing Under Arch Linux

    3D technology and 3D printing are under quick development at this time. They have big future and can involve all parts of our live. But they are still quite expensive for normal user. BUT …. everything is changing. The 3D printing based on FDM technology is suitable and accessible for everybody.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2015/47
  • Red Hat Cut to “Hold” at Vetr Inc. (RHT)
  • Red Hat Focuses on Containers with Enterprise Linux 7.2

    It's been a week full of container news. Docker, which has driven the trend toward running application code in containers instead of widely used virtual machines, announced new tools that can help companies work with containers without getting rid of existing infrastructure. The Docker Universal Control Plane tool can run in data centers, and can also be useful in public cloud environments.

  • Debian/TeX Live 2015.20151116-1

    One month has passed since the big multiarch update, and not one bug report concerning it did come in, that are good news. So here is a completely boring update with nothing more than the usual checkout from the TeX Live tlnet distribution as of yesterday.

  • Openly Thankful
  • Community Appreciation Day

    Today is Ubuntu Community Appreciation Day, but this year I am going to expand my appreciation beyond the boundaries of the Ubuntu Community to include anyone in open source that has impacted my journey in open source.

  • Raspberry Pi: Simple forms of input

    It’s time to play with some affordable methods of getting input into your tiny Linux machine.

  • Future for Windows in smartphones is grim, Gartner says

    Gartner is predicting a grim future for Microsoft's Windows mobile OS, saying it won't make its mark in consumer smartphones, remaining relegated to enterprise users.

    Microsoft's Windows 10 mobile OS is just now reaching devices, but prior versions didn't fare so well. Windows Mobile was in just 5.87 million handsets shipped during the third quarter this year, declining from 9.03 million in the same quarter a year ago.

Leftovers: Software

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  • The Elementary OS Developers Have Decided To Fork Geary Under A New Name: Pantheon Mail

    As you may know, Yorba is a foundation that develops open-source software, famous for Geary, an awesome email client, Shotwell, a screenshot tool similar to Windows’ Snipping tool and California Calendar.

  • Cockpit 0.83 and 0.84 Released

    Cockpit releases every week. This week it was 0.84. I’ll also include notes from 0.83 here.

  • Pitivi 0.95 — Enfant Suisse

    Hey everyone! It’s time for a new Pitivi release, 0.95. This one packs a lot of bugfixes and architectural work to further stabilize the GES backend. In this blog post, I’ll give you an overview of the new and interesting stuff this release brings, coming out from a year of hard work. It’s pretty epic and you’re in for a few surprises, so I suggest listening to this song while you’re reading this blog post.

  • Cat discovers GNOME desktop bug

    It's a tip of the open source hat today to a cat belonging to one Christoph Reiter, which recently discovered a bug in Linux desktop GNOME.

  • gspell news

    If everything goes fine, the 1.0 version will be released at the same time as GNOME 3.20, with a stable API.

  • smartmontools

    I've also uploaded a new version of smartmontools which updates the package to the new upstream version. I'm not the regular maintainer for this package, but it is in the set of packages covered by the collab-maint team. To be polite I uploaded it to DELAYED-7, so it will take a week to hit unstable. I've temporarily put a copy of the package here in the meantime.

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