Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Monday, 04 May 15 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Mandrake Thinking Name Change? srlinuxx 13 07/04/2005 - 5:48pm
Story Mandrakesoft Announces Name Change! srlinuxx 1 07/04/2005 - 8:04pm
Story Advanced Micro to launch dual chips early srlinuxx 1 09/04/2005 - 4:17pm
Story DOOM 3: Resurrection of Evil srlinuxx 3 10/04/2005 - 12:59am
Story More BS from the Evil One. srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:27pm
Story Linux leaders at open-source summit srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:35pm
Story ATI has released 64-Bit drivers srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:38pm
Story Linux Kernel Security is Lacking? srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:42pm
Story Did SCO end up helping Linux? srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:42pm
Story More Summit Notes srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:43pm

Fedora 23 Release Schedule Published, the Distro Could Arrive on October 27

Filed under
Red Hat

Now that the Beta version of the Fedora 22 Linux operating system is available for download and testing, the Fedora developers are discussing plans for the next release of the distribution, Fedora 23.

Read more

Debian 8 and Mageia 5 RC Released Over the Weekend

Filed under
-s

What an exciting weekend that just passed. First up, the long-awaited Debian GNU/Linux 8.0 "Jessie" was released in live and traditional installation media. Elsewhere, Mageia 5 Release Candidate was released with UEFI support and other installation improvements. In addition, LibreOffice 4.3.7 was released Saturday as well.

Read more

2016 might just be the year of Linux on the (virtual) desktop

Filed under
Linux

Come November, some “pundit” will declare that next year is the year of Linux on the desktop. This November, expect a twist on that prediction, as 2016 could just perhaps conceivably be the year of virtual Linux desktops now that Citrix has taken kit capable of delivering it into Beta.

That kit is called the “Linux Virtual Desktop Tech Preview” and can be had here if you're a XenApp or XenDesktop customer with an active Subscription Advantage account. Citrix Partners can get it too.

Read more

Microsoft & Education: The Song Remains the Same

Filed under
Microsoft

One of our hardware donors emailed me and asked if I would come to Austin and pick up a dozen Optiplex 745s with 17 inch monitors and accompanying keyboards. These Dells already had scrubbed drives and had either 4 or 8 GB of RAM, depending on what they were originally assigned to do. I said I most certainly would and arranged a time to be there. This donor has been especially generous to us, and not with just decent hardware. They also present us an annual Christmas cash donation of $1000. On the years they do employee matching, it is more than that — a lot more.

Read more

Open-Source Maps Help Guide Nepalese Earthquake Relief

Filed under
OSS

Nearly 4,000 people have been counted dead and nearly 7,000 injured since a 7.8 magnitude earthquake shook Nepal on Saturday. A crucial need in any rescue effort — perhaps just as important to saving lives as medical supplies, food, and tents — is an up-to-date map that humanitarian workers can use to more efficiently navigate the rubble.

It seems miraculous that tiny, impoverished Nepal has that. The credit goes to the international community of citizen cartographers behind Open Street Map (OSM), a free, open-data map of the world that anyone can edit or download. For the past few years, people involved with the Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team (HOT) and its leading Nepalese partner, Kathamandu Living Labs (KLL), have been digitally mapping the capital city to prepare for an earthquake should one hit (it seemed inevitable, considering that Nepal sits on a major fault line). Now, thanks to their efforts, aid workers with organizations like the Red Cross aren’t getting lost and losing precious time.

Read more

Routers and Linux

Filed under
Linux
Web

Debian-Based Distribution Updated With KDE 3.5 Forked Desktop

Filed under
KDE
Debian

Q4OS 1.2 "Orion" is the new release that is re-based on Debian Jessie, focused on shipping its own desktop utilities and customizations, and designed to run on both old and new hardware.

Read more

Atom Shell is now Electron

Filed under
Development
OSS

Atom Shell is now called Electron. You can learn more about Electron and what people are building with it at its new home electron.atom.io.

Read more

Also: C++ Daddy Bjarne Stroustrup outlines directions for v17

A Fedora 22 beta walk-through

Filed under
Red Hat
Reviews

Unix and Personal Computers: Reinterpreting the Origins of Linux

Filed under
OS
GNU
Linux

So, to sum up: What Linus Torvalds, along with plenty of other hackers in the 1980s and early 1990s, wanted was a Unix-like operating system that was free to use on the affordable personal computers they owned. Access to source code was not the issue, because that was already available—through platforms such as Minix or, if they really had cash to shell out, by obtaining a source license for AT&T Unix. Therefore, the notion that early Linux programmers were motivated primarily by the ideology that software source code should be open because that is a better way to write it, or because it is simply the right thing to do, is false.

Read more

Also: Anti-Systemd People

Kubuntu 15.04 With Plasma 5.3 - A Totally Different Kubuntu

Filed under
KDE
Reviews

The latest version of Kubuntu, 15.04, aka Vivid Vervet was released last week and it's available for free download. With this release it has become the first major distro to ship Plasma 5 as the default desktop environment.

There are chances that some users may still have bad memories of Kubuntu. It's true. Back in 2011 when Ubuntu made a switch to Unity, I started looking for alternatives as their desktop environment was not suited for me. I started trying KDE-based distros and Kubuntu was among the top choices. However my experience with the distro was mixed. It was buggy, bloated and GTK apps would look ugly in it. That's when I found openSUSE and settled down with it.

Read more

More on KDE:

  • KActivities powered recent media in Plasma Media Center

    As you may have already read the blog post from Eike Hein about Building on new pillars: Activities and KPeople in Plasma 5.3, activities can provide the useful information about the recent applications and resources used by them.

  • kreenshot-editor is incubating

    Now, kreenshot-editor is a new Qt-based project that was inspired by Greenshot’s image editor. It is hosted on KDE playground. It focuses on the image editing task, can be invoked from command line and should also provide a resuable editor component which could be integrated into other screencapture tools. The current code is already separated into an image editor widget and the main application.

  • Spring break for the KDE system monitor

64-bit STB SoC supports 4K video and Android TV

Filed under
Android

Marvell announced an “Ultra” version of its Android-focused Armada 1500 STB SoC that advances to a 64-bit, quad-core Cortex-A53 foundation for 4K delivery.

The Armada 1500 Ultra (88DE3218) is designed to “enable PayTV operators and set-top box (STB) manufacturers to cost-effectively deliver small form factor devices with feature-rich 4K entertainment and gaming services,” says Armada. As with earlier Armada 1500 system-on-chips, it’s primarily focused on Android, with specific support for Android TV

Read more

Android is finally beating Apple in this one key metric

Filed under
Android

The iPhone is widely considered the "rich man's phone," but Android is finally beating Apple in one key metric — revenue.

According to new data from Digi-Capital, for the first time, Android is making more money from apps than iOS is.

Android has long beaten Apple in terms of absolute downloads, because it has a far larger install base. Last year, more than 1 billion Android handsets shipped, compared to a (relatively) paltry 192.7 million for the iPhone. But this is largely a vanity metric if it doesn't translate into actual money, and the largest audience in the world won't persuade developers to use your platform if there's no way to monetise it.

Read more

EU study recommends OpenBSD

Filed under
BSD

Nice to see recognition from the trenches of bureaucracy.

Read more

Linux Freedom vs. Convenience

Filed under
Linux

One of my favorite websites that illustrate this point is WhyLinuxIsBetter.net. As the page loads, you're immediately presented with clear, easy to understand reasons why Linux is better than proprietary operating systems. Now granted, the website is a bit dated. But the overall message is timeless and positive. What this site does well is show its readers exactly why Linux on the desktop is awesome. From its features to its built-in safety, everything is clearly illustrated and easy to understand.

Read more

LibreOffice Vulnerabilities Closed in Ubuntu 14.10, Ubuntu 14.04, and Ubuntu 12.04

Filed under
LibO
Security
Ubuntu

Canonical revealed details about a number of LibreOffice vulnerabilities that have been found and fixed in Ubuntu 14.10, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, and Ubuntu 12.04 LTS, which also upgrades the office suite.

Read more

Micromax Canvas Play With Android 5.0 Lollipop Listed on Company Site

Filed under
Android

Soon after introducing the Canvas Spark (Q380) affordable Android 5.0 Lollipop-based smartphone, Micromax now appears set to launch another Canvas-series handset - the Canvas Play (Q355) - which is now listed on the company's site. Unfortunately, there is no word on availability and pricing details of the Micromax Canvas Play.

Read more

World's largest open source health information technology project tackles Ebola

Filed under
OSS

An accurate, up to the minute, accessible medical record system is fundamental to effective treatment and tracking of the Ebola virus. But how to create this type of system in the rudimentary, overwhelmed Ebola care centers of West Africa where paper records or computers—even if they were available—couldn't be carried in and out of treatment areas?
As Ebola surged in resource-constrained Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea in the fall of 2014, the ingenious concept of a tablet computer usable by individuals in bulky protective gear and encased in polycarbonate enabling simple and repeated disinfection was developed and implemented by Google and Doctors Without Borders teams, solving the hardware part of the problem.
But what software to use on the specialized tablets and on the server where critical information is stored? Enter the OpenMRS community, who drives the world's largest open source project to develop health information technology for resource-constrained environments.

Read more

Bazel, Google’s Open Source Build System

Filed under
OSS

One of the most important, yet unsung, applications in a software developer’s life is the Make utility, or its equivalent. Make first appeared in 1977 and has been with us ever since. There are a very large number of build utilities, some based on Make, others completely different. The principle remains the same. The build system has a set of rules that tell it how to build an application from source files, usually fetched from a version control system. The Make utility reads the rules, then runs the compilers and linkers to do the build. The really good ones will run tests, as well.

Google has been using their own system, called Blaze, and open-sourced part of it as the anagrammatically named Bazel — recently released at alpha status. In this article I’ll give a general overview of Bazel.

Read more

Syndicate content