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Wednesday, 29 Jun 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Blog entry Slackware 10.1 srlinuxx 8 27/03/2005 - 4:37am
Story sex bots srlinuxx 2 28/03/2005 - 7:02am
Story 'Game theft' led to fatal attack srlinuxx 1 31/03/2005 - 11:21pm
Story Cannabis: Too much, too young? srlinuxx 2 31/03/2005 - 11:33pm
Blog entry gentoo's april fools srlinuxx 1 01/04/2005 - 4:35pm
Page Real April 1st Screenshot srlinuxx 01/04/2005 - 5:38pm
Spring Forward srlinuxx 03/04/2005 - 6:14am
Story Pope John Paul II dies in Vatican srlinuxx 1 03/04/2005 - 7:27am
Blog entry New Logo srlinuxx 07/04/2005 - 7:07am
Story NoGravity Linux Game Port srlinuxx 07/04/2005 - 2:08pm

Atomic Developer Bundle 2.2.1 Released for CentOS Linux with New Features

Filed under
Red Hat

Today, June 23, 2016, CentOS developer Lalatendu Mohanty was happy to announce the release of the Atomic Developer Bundle (ADB) 2.2.1 through CentOS Atomic SIG.

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Linux Kernel 4.1.27 LTS Is a Small Update with Nouveau and PowerPC Improvements

Filed under
Linux

Linux kernel developer Sasha Levin today, June 23, 2016, announced the release of the twenty-seventh maintenance release of the long-term supported Linux 4.1 kernel series, along with Linux kernel 3.18.36 LTS.

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Samsung's Reference Design Will Be Used with Red Hat Ceph Storage (RHT)

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Red Hat

Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd., the world leader in advanced memory technology, announced that its NVMe (SSD) Reference Design will be used with Red Hat Ceph Storage, a software-defined storage platform, in a new high performance Ceph Reference Architecture by Samsung.

Samsung’s NVMe Reference Design platform, together with Red Hat Ceph Storage, can deliver a highly scalable, more efficient TCO reference architecture that supports unified storage for enterprise IT or cloud environments in handling transactional databases, machine-generated data and unstructured data.

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Astronomy for KDE

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KDE

Although I have covered a large number of science applications in the past, I haven't really looked at too many options available within the KDE desktop environment. This has been due to my own biases in using a GTK-based desktop environment, but now I'd like to look at some of the packages available for people who really like to use KDE on their own machines. So, let's start with the KStars astronomy program.

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Raspberry Pi 3 tops SBC poll for self-brew hackers and Linux folk

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

The 64-bit Raspberry Pi 3 has topped a poll of 81 single-board Linux and Android systems among Linux folk.

The 2016 Single Board Computer (SBC) Survey saw the Raspberry Pi 3 slide into the number one slot ahead of the Odroid-C2 and BeagleBone.

A Raspberry Pi 2 topped the SBC poll in 2015, only this time organisers reckoned this year's Pi blew away the number two player by an even greater margin.

The Raspberry Pi 3 got a score of 387, versus 227 for the Ordroid-C2 and 191 for the BeagleBone Black in a poll of 473 people, carried out according to a proportional representation system. Boards had to run Linux-based distributions, including Android, and be priced at less than $200.

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Canonical Announces Snapd 2.0.9 with Full Snap Confinement on elementary OS 0.4

Filed under
Ubuntu

Today, June 23, 2016, Canonical's David Callé proudly announced the release and general availability of Snapd 2.0.9 for the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system.

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An Everyday Linux User Rant About Steam

Filed under
Gaming

When Valve's Steam was first introduced to Linux it was seen as a great victory. Finally prime time gaming will be available to the Linux masses.

That was some time ago now and there have been many new announcements relishing the fact that there were 400 games available and then 500 games available and then 1000 games available etc.

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An Everyday Linux User Review Of PCLinuxOS 2016 MATE

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

PCLinuxOS was the first Linux distribution that really made Linux useable for the masses and then Ubuntu came along and kind of stole the show.

It has to be said though that this is a really nice distribution for the Everyday Linux User and I can happily recommend using it as I did the last time I reviewed PCLinuxOS.

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How I Use Android: Franco.Kernel and Focus creator Francisco Franco

Filed under
Android
Interviews

Now we're talking! This isn't for everyone, and it may sound obvious, but I wouldn't be able to live without ADB and Fastboot.

For folks who don't know what it is, ADB is the Android Debug Bridge. It's a very powerful binary that lets you access your phone from your computer's terminal to do all sorts of magical commands.

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Cinnamon 3.0.6 Desktop Environment Brings Fixes for the Network Applet, Recorder

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Linux

Today, June 23, 2016, the leader of the Linux Mint project, Clement Lefebvre, has had the great pleasure of announcing the release and general availability of the Cinnamon 3.0.6 desktop environment.

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Flatpak Officially Released for Next-Generation, Standalone GNU/Linux Apps

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Development
GNU
Linux

Softpedia has been informed by GNOME Project's Allan Day about the official unveiling and general availability of the Flatpak project for various GNU/Linux operating systems.

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Snyk aims to help developers secure use of open source code

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OSS

Developers relying on open source code (or packages) is pretty much the norm these days. As software eats the world, the world is dining out on open source software.

But, regardless of how much time utilising someone else’s code can save you as a developer, it can also mean outsourcing the security of the code you ship, or spending a serious amount of time staying on top of known or newly discovered open source package vulnerabilities.

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Redefining how we share our security data.

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Red Hat

Red Hat Product Security has long provided various bits of machine-consumable information to customers and users via our Security Data page. Today we are pleased to announce that we have made it even easier to access and parse this data through our new Security Data API service.

While we have provided this information since January 2005, it required end users to download the content from the site, which meant you either downloaded many files and kept a local copy, or you were downloading large files on a regular basis. It also meant that, as part of writing the parser, if you were looking for certain criteria, you had to account for that criteria in your parser, which could make it more complex and difficult to write.

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Xen 4.7 Open Source Linux Hypervisor Arrives with Non-Disruptive, Live Patching

Filed under
Linux
Server
OSS

Today, June 23, 2016, the Xen Project has had the great pleasure of announcing the immediate availability for download of the Xen 4.7 open-source Linux hypervisor software for GNU/Linux operating systems.

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LibreOffice 5.1.4 Office Suite Now Available for Download with over 130 Bugfixes

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LibO

Today, June 23, 2016, The Document Foundation's Italo Vignoli has been happy to inform Softpedia about the immediate availability for download of the LibreOffice 5.1.4 "Fresh" open-source office suite.

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Also: LibreOffice Online Is Now Ready for ownCloud Enterprise, Thanks to Collabora

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • XCOM 2 - Alien Hunters thoughts, prepare to get frustrated

    So I've been playing through XCOM 2 again, but now with the Alien Hunters DLC enabled and my god it's frustrating.

    To get this out of the way: I freaking love XCOM 2, I think it's an incredibly challenging game, that keeps me coming back for more. I like that it's challenging, I enjoy thinking up different strategies when I've failed numerous times.

  • The nostalgia of Windows is everyday Linux.

    A few days ago, I read a mailing list discussion about the advantages of running a computer in the 1980s. A few, like the lack of Digital Rights Management (DRM), were points well-taken. Others may have been tongue-in-cheek, but might also express personal preferences. However, most of the rest were advantages that I still enjoy (or could enjoy) as a Linux user thirty years later, partly because that is how Linux is designed, and partly because of my personal choices.

  • Kernel hacking workshop

    As part of our "community" program at Collabora, I've had the chance to attend to a workshop on kernel hacking at UrLab (the ULB hackerspace). I never touched any part of the kernel and always saw it as a scary thing for hardcore hackers wearing huge beards, so this was a great opportunity to demystify the beast.

  • More Banks Are Trying Out Ripple’s Blockchain For Fund Transfers

    The San Francisco-based financial technology company Ripple has signed up seven more banks to potentially use its blockchain for cross-border payments.

  • Puppy Linux 6.3.2 "Slacko" Gets New 64-Bit UEFI Boot Capability, F2FS Support

    Today, June 23, 2016, Barry Kauler, the creator of the Puppy Linux distribution, has proudly announced the release and immediate availability for download of Puppy Linux 6.3.2 "Slacko."

    Puppy Linux 6.3.2 "Slacko" appears to be a point release to the Puppy Slacko 6.3 series, and as usual, it has been built from the binary TXZ packages of the Slackware 64-bit 14.1 GNU/Linux operating system. However, it looks like the distro is now powered by a kernel from the Linux 3.14 LTS series, version 3.14.55.

  • openSUSE Conference – First Impressions of Day One

    Wednesday, June 22nd, 2016. Long awaited openSUSE Conference (oSC) finally started. I arrived half an hour before the keynote to join an impressive crowd at the reception desk. Upon registration, like all attendees, I received the beautiful oSC 2016 T-shirt.f

  • Preparing my Chikiticluster in Frankfurt to my presentation

    I am excited that I will give a poster presentation about my experiences with HPC at #ISC16 I was selected to do it as part of the Women HPC:)

  • I've bought some more awful IoT stuff

    Today we're going to be talking about the KanKun SP3, a plug that's been around for a while. The idea here is pretty simple - there's lots of devices that you'd like to be able to turn on and off in a programmatic way, and rather than rewiring them the simplest thing to do is just to insert a control device in between the wall and the device andn ow you can turn your foot bath on and off from your phone. Most vendors go further and also allow you to program timers and even provide some sort of remote tunneling protocol so you can turn off your lights from the comfort of somebody else's home.

  • IBM to deliver 200-petaflop supercomputer by early 2018; Cray moves to Intel Xeon Phi

    More supercomputer news this week: The US is responding to China’s new Sunway TiahuLight system that was announced Monday, and fast. First, the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory is expected to take delivery of a new IBM system, named Summit, in early 2018 that will now be capable of 200 peak petaflops, Computerworld reports. That would make it almost twice as fast as TaihuLight if the claim proves true. (We had originally reported in 2014 that both Summit and Sierra would achieve roughly 150 petaflops.)

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • NGINX Amplifies Web Server Technology

    Gus Robertson, CEO of NGINX, discusses his firm's latest technology and what's coming next.

  • Elixir v1.3 released

    Elixir v1.3 brings many improvements to the language, the compiler and its tooling, specially Mix (Elixir’s build tool) and ExUnit (Elixir’s test framework). The most notable additions are the new Calendar types, the new cross-reference checker in Mix, and the assertion diffing in ExUnit. We will explore all of them and a couple more enhancements below.

  • qBittorrent 3.3.5 Released With New Torrent Management Mode, Other Improvements

    qBittorrent 3.3.5 was released today and it includes new features, such as a torrent management mode, a new cookie management dialog, as well as other improvements and bug fixes.

  • 5 Best Linux Package Managers for Linux Newbies

    One thing a new Linux user will get to know as he/she progresses in using it is the existence of several Linux distributions and the different ways they manage packages.

    Package management is very important in Linux, and knowing how to use multiple package managers can proof life saving for a power user, since downloading or installing software from repositories, plus updating, handling dependencies and uninstalling software is very vital and a critical section in Linux system Administration.

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat
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Red Hat Summit Videos

Linux Devices

  • COMs run Android on quad- or octa-core Samsung SoCs
    Boardcon announced a pair of 70 x 58mm COMs that run Android on Samsung’s quad-core, Cortex-A9 S5P4418 and octa-core, Cortex-A53 S5P6818 SoCs. The MINI4418 and MINI6818 computer-on-modules are “compatible” with each other, as well as with Boardcon’s earlier MINI3288, which is based on the quad-core, Cortex-A17 Rockchip RK3288. The new COMs instead tap two Samsung SoCs: the quad-core, Cortex-A9 S5P4418 for the MINI4418, and the octa-core, Cortex-A53 S5P6818 for the MINI6818. The MINI6818 supports applications such as “sensitive home automation, security, and industrial applications,” whereas the MINI4418 supports “MID, multimedia advertising, intelligent control terminals, and smart instrumentation,” says Boardcon.
  • Expansive Mini-ITX board runs Linux on Skylake
    Axiomtek’s “MANO0500” Mini-ITX board supports 6th Gen Intel Core, Pentium, and Celeron CPUs, and offers three SATA, two GbE, and mini-PCIe with SIM. Mini-ITX boards are typically among the first form-factors to support new Intel Core chips along with COM Express modules. We’re not sure why Axiomtek, one of the more prolific of embedded vendors, waited so long to launch its first 6th Generation Intel Core (“Skylake”) based Mini-ITX board, but it’s a welcome edition. Back in April, the company announced a Skylake-based PICO500 SBC using the smaller Pico-ITX form factor.

IBM Bluemix NYC Garage and Blockchain