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Thursday, 17 Jan 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Nvidia releases Version: 1.0-7167 srlinuxx 2 13/03/2005 - 6:58pm
Blog entry pclo news feed srlinuxx 1 14/03/2005 - 7:37am
Blog entry KDE 3.4 Out? srlinuxx 2 14/03/2005 - 10:25pm
Story Beer is fattening, say fat beer-swilling readers srlinuxx 1 15/03/2005 - 3:23am
Story CompUSA fingered by feds over rebates srlinuxx 2 15/03/2005 - 4:26pm
Story Gas prices on verge of setting a record srlinuxx 3 16/03/2005 - 7:03am
Story KDE DCop DoS Vulnerability prior to 3.4 srlinuxx 1 16/03/2005 - 6:12pm
Story It's hitting the mirrors folks. srlinuxx 1 16/03/2005 - 7:13pm
Story Windows Media Player Digital Rights Management Spy srlinuxx 2 17/03/2005 - 6:45am
Blog entry Problems Problems Problems Texstar 1 18/03/2005 - 3:21am

C Programming Language in 2019 and Python Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • State of C Programming Language in 2019

    In four years’ time, C will reach its 50th birthday, an anniversary also shared with PL/M and Prolog. Unlike those two, C remains immensely popular, it’s in the top ten of virtually every programming language popularity survey.

    Linux is mostly written in C. Python‘s CPython implementation, Perl, Matz’s Ruby, about half of R, the MyISAM code for MySQL and even the first Java compiler were all written in C. The kernels of most operating systems (including Windows, Mac, Linux, iOS and Android) all feature C.

    Now we have a new C standard, C18, that was ratified a few months ago. A mere 198 Swiss Francs will buy the ISO/IEC 9899:2018 standard, all 520 pages of it; you can view the final draft of it for free, though, on openStd.org (PDF) to get a sense of the document. It’s only really of use if you are a compiler writer who wants to be 100 percent conformant, or just curious.

  • Remove audio from video with Python and FFmpeg
  • Dockerizing Python Applications

    Docker is a widely accepted and used tool by leading IT companies to build, manage and secure their applications.

  • Improve Your Code With Atomic Functions

    In your studies, you may have encountered the terms "atomic function" and "Don't Repeat Yourself (DRY)". Today, I'm going to demonstrate how these concepts work together to provide easily maintainable, easily testable, and beautiful code.

    In your studies, you may have encountered the terms "atomic function" and "Don't Repeat Yourself (DRY)". Today, I'm going to demonstrate how these concepts work together to provide easily maintainable, easily testable, and beautiful code.

  • So... let's talk Pyramid

    Last year, I started working on a project that I truly believe(d) might change the world (cliche, right?). Like most developers, my first instinct at the outset was to make certain crucial decisions about the overall architecture of the project in view. First question that came to mind was the language to use for the backend of the web app, at least at the outset.

    To be clear, I am quite a Pythonista as I love everything about the language. Although I'm pretty much familiar with Java, Javascript and a little bit of Elixir, I knew there was no way I could go wrong with Python since I was going to be the only developer working on the project for months and I needed to churn out code quickly.

  • Speed Up Your Python Program With Concurrency

    If you’ve heard lots of talk about asyncio being added to Python but are curious how it compares to other concurrency methods or are wondering what concurrency is and how it might speed up your program, you’ve come to the right place.

Linux vs BSD: Is BSD better than Linux?

Filed under
Linux
BSD

Well, the world of operating systems isn’t that tiny. There is yet another class of operating system, which most users don’t know about, or haven’t used it ever in their life. It is BSD. BSDs are yet another class of operating system which is also popular among some individual users, or some organizations with some unified goal. If we keep the scene of Windows out of the picture, for now, most users might consider BSD and Linux to be quite similar, with some small differences, or do not have any conception about BSD altogether. And if you are on the verge of installing a new operating system on your computer, which is going to be better for you!

Read more

Faucet: An open source SDN controller for high-speed production networks

Filed under
OSS

Thanks to open source software, we can now take control over and modify the behavior of almost every component in an IT system. We can modify everything from the networking stack in the kernel all the way down to web server code in user space to make improvements or implement new features.

The final hurdle to having complete control over our hardware and software stack is the physical network hardware. These devices are usually built from the open source tools we love, but they are presented as black boxes that can't easily be modified by network operators.

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Comparing 3 open source databases: PostgreSQL, MariaDB, and SQLite

Filed under
OSS

In the world of modern enterprise technologies, open source software has firmly established itself as one of the biggest forces to reckon with. After all, some of the biggest technology developments have emerged because of the open source movement.

It's not difficult to see why: even though Linux-based open source network standards may not be as popular as proprietary options, they are the reason smart devices from different manufacturers can communicate with each other. In addition, many argue that open source development produces applications that are superior to their proprietary counterparts. This is one reason why the chances are good that your favorite tools (whether open source or proprietary) were developed using open source databases.

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Ubuntu’s Icon Theme Now Extends to Branded & Third-Party Apps

Filed under
Ubuntu

The single biggest issue I have with the Suru icon theme Ubuntu 18.10 debuted with was the lack of consistency.

Shipping an icon set with a uniform shape and glyph style is a bold move, but it’s one that only works when it extends to and covers every app icon on the system.

Alas, Suru did not. Third-party and branded apps were (understandably) left ‘untamed’.

The result? A punctured aesthetic:

Read more

Deepin Desktop Option Approved For Fedora 30

Filed under
Red Hat

Last month we mentioned that Fedora 30 was possibly picking up a Deepin Desktop Environment option for this Qt5-based desktop developed by the Deepin Linux distribution.

Assuming the packaging work remains in good shape, the Deepin desktop option will be found in the May release of Fedora 30. The Fedora Engineering and Steering Committee (FESCo) has formally approved of Deepin being offered by Fedora 30.

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Debian-Based Netrunner 19.01 "Blackbird" Officially Released with New Dark Look

Filed under
Debian

Dubbed Blackbird, Netrunner 19.01 comes ten months after the Netrunner 18.03 "Idolon" release with a fresh, dark new look and feel with a more 3D-looking design, which was created using the Kvantum theme engine and the Alpha-Black Plasma theme. The new theme comes with some bling too as there's now a light glow for the "Minimize all Windows to show Desktop" function.

"Around this time of the year, we thought we could try something more vivid and colorful to lighten up the shortened days. So instead of going with the previously used “material look”, we thought of something different. Blackbird ships with a new Look and Feel Theme called “Netrunner Black” that is based on a dark, yet not too harsh contrasting visual," reads today's announcement.

Read more

Also: Netrunner 19.01 – Blackbird released

Fedora: Releases, PHP and Fedora Test Day

Filed under
Red Hat

Top 5 Best Ubuntu Alternatives

Filed under
GNU
Linux

If you asked younger Linux users to tell you what their first Linux distribution was, we bet that Ubuntu would be the most common answer. First released in 2004, Ubuntu has helped establish Linux as a viable alternative to Windows and macOS and convinced millions that not all good things in life cost money.

Read more

Also: MultiBootUSB

AMD Raven 2 & Picasso AMDGPU Firmware Binaries Added To Linux-Firmware

Filed under
Linux

Now available via the official linux-firmware tree are the AMDGPU firmware binaries needed for initializing the forthcoming Raven 2 and Picasso AMD APUs.

Since a few months back AMD posted the initial open-source driver support for Picasso APUs as well as Raven 2 APUs. That kernel driver support was merged for the Linux 4.20 kernel and the necessary IDs are also present now in the Mesa drivers for rounding out the driver support. But for making this open-source driver support are also the necessary firmware bits needing to be in place.

Read more

30+ Awesome Linux Games to Look Forward to in 2019

Filed under
Gaming

2018 was filled with a lot of good news for game lovers – a trend which became significant in 2017 and now that 2019 is here we are certain that the best is yet to come.

There are several game titles which were not available to Linux gamers last year but because 2019 looks promising, check out the games you might be enjoying this new season.

Read more

In Steam:

Red Hat and SUSE Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
SUSE
  • DevOps for the hybrid cloud: Red Hat Ansible Tower 3.4

    With the growth of the cloud and containers, DevOps has become increasingly important. Old-school sysadmin methods and means simply aren't up to managing server instances that can spin up at a moment's notice when needed. Red Hat knows that better than many companies, so its latest release, Red Hat Ansible Tower 3.4, goes even further in automating today's IT stack.

  • Looking for a reason to attend SUSECON? I’ve got 5!
  • SUSE Linux for Arm is now available for all customers

    Subscriptions for SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for Arm and SUSE Manager Lifecycle for Arm are now available directly to customers through the Corporate price list or through the SUSE Shop https://www.suse.com/shop/
    Previously, SUSE subscriptions for the Arm hardware platforms were only available to SUSE Partners due to the relative immaturity of the Arm server platform. Now that we have delivered four releases of SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for Arm and have customers running SUSE Linux on Arm servers as diverse as the tiny Raspberry Pi and the high performance HPE Apollo 70 servers, we are now ready to sell subscriptions directly to customers.

Mozilla: Firefox 67 Plans, Servo, TenFourFox FPR12b1

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Moving to a Profile per Install Architecture

    With Firefox 67 you’ll be able to run different Firefox installs side by side by default.

    Supporting profiles per installation is a feature that has been requested by pre-release users for a long time now and we’re pleased to announce that starting with Firefox 67 users will be able to run different installs of Firefox side by side without needing to manage profiles.

  • This Week In Servo 123

    In the past three weeks, we merged 72 PRs in the Servo organization’s repositories.

  • TenFourFox FPR12b1 available

    TenFourFox Feature Parity 12 beta 1 is now available (downloads, hashes, release notes). As before, this is a smaller-scope release with no new features, just fixes and improvements. The big changes are a fix for CVE-2018-12404, a holdover security fix from FPR11 that also helps improve JavaScript optimization, and Raphael's hand-coded assembly language AltiVec-accelerated string matching routines with special enhancements for G5 systems. These replace the C routines I wrote using AltiVec intrinsics, which will be removed from our hacked NSPR libc source code once his versions stick.

    Unfortunately, we continue to accumulate difficult-to-solve JavaScript bugs. The newest one is issue 541, which affects Github most severely and is hampering my ability to use the G5 to work in the interface. This one could be temporarily repaired with some ugly hacks and I'm planning to look into that for FPR13, but I don't have this proposed fix in FPR12 since it could cause parser regressions and more testing is definitely required. However, the definitive fix is the same one needed for the frustrating issue 533, i.e., the new frontend bindings introduced with Firefox 51. I don't know if I can do that backport (both with respect to the technical issues and the sheer amount of time required) but it's increasingly looking like it's necessary for full functionality and it may be more than I can personally manage.

Security: Updates, Docker, Systemd and Government Shutdown

Filed under
Security

Audiocasts: Linux Thursday and This Week in Linux

Filed under
Interviews
  • Linux Thursday - Jan 13, 2019 - Lingering Cough Edition
  • Episode 50 | This Week in Linux

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, Linus Torvalds announced that the Linux 5.0 Kernel is coming soon. We got some Linux Mobile news from UBports Ubuntu Touch and Purism Librem 5. Then in App News, Bash 5.0 is out and we’ll check out some new interesting apps like a new Password Manager and subtitles syncing tool. In distro news, we’ll look at some news from Clonezilla Live, Funtoo, and Fedora. Later in the show we’ll check out some Security News for Metasploit and a new 2FA phishing tool. Then we’ll finish out the show with some Linux Gaming news for Super Tux Kart and A Story About My Uncle. All that and much more!

Theme changes in GTK 3

Filed under
GNOME

Adwaita has been the default GTK+ theme for quite a while now (on all platforms). It has served us well, but Adwaita hasn’t seen major updates in some time, and there is a desire to give it a refresh.

Updating Adwaita is a challenge, since most GTK applications are using the stable 3.x series, and some of them include Adwaita-compatible theming for their own custom widgets. Given the stable nature of this release series, we don’t want to cause theme compatibility issues for applications. At the same time, 3.x is the main GTK version in use today, and we want to ensure that GTK applications don’t feel stale or old fashioned.

Read more

Also: GNOME Developers Are Testing A Revised GTK3 Theme

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Ditching Out-of-Date Documentation Infrastructure

Long ago, the Linux kernel started using 00-Index files to list the contents of each documentation directory. This was intended to explain what each of those files documented. Henrik Austad recently pointed out that those files have been out of date for a very long time and were probably not used by anyone anymore. This is nothing new. Henrik said in his post that this had been discussed already for years, "and they have since then grown further out of date, so perhaps it is time to just throw them out." He counted hundreds of instances where the 00-index file was out of date or not present when it should have been. He posted a patch to rip them all unceremoniously out of the kernel. Joe Perches was very pleased with this. He pointed out that .rst files (the kernel's native documentation format) had largely taken over the original purpose of those 00-index files. He said the oo-index files were even misleading by now. Read more

Mozilla: Rust 1.32.0, Privacy, UX and Firefox Nightly

  • Announcing Rust 1.32.0
    The Rust team is happy to announce a new version of Rust, 1.32.0. Rust is a programming language that is empowering everyone to build reliable and efficient software.
  • Rust 1.32 Released With New Debugger Macro, Jemalloc Disabled By Default
    For fans of Rustlang, it's time to fire up rustup: Rust 1.32 is out today as the latest feature update for this increasingly popular programming language. The Rust 1.32 release brings dbg!() as a new debug macro to print the value of a variable as well as its file/line-number and it works with more than just variables but also commands.
  • Julien Vehent: Maybe don't throw away your VPN just yet...
    At Mozilla, we've long adopted single sign on, first using SAML, nowadays using OpenID Connect (OIDC). Most of our applications, both public facing and internal, require SSO to protect access to privileged resources. We never trust the network and always require strong authentication. And yet, we continue to maintain VPNs to protect our most sensitive admin panels. "How uncool", I hear you object, "and here we thought you were all about DevOps and shit". And you would be correct, but I'm also pragmatic, and I can't count the number of times we've had authentication bugs that let our red team or security auditors bypass authentication. The truth is, even highly experienced programmers and operators make mistakes and will let a bug disable or fail to protect part of that one super sensitive page you never want to leave open to the internet. And I never blame them because SSO/OAuth/OIDC are massively complex protocols that require huge libraries that fail in weird and unexpected ways. I've never reached the point where I fully trust our SSO, because we find one of those auth bypass every other month. Here's the catch: they never lead to major security incidents because we put all our admin panels behind a good old VPN.
  • Reflections on a co-design workshop
    Co-design workshops help designers learn first-hand the language of the people who use their products, in addition to their pain points, workflows, and motivations. With co-design methods [1] participants are no longer passive recipients of products. Rather, they are involved in the envisioning and re-imagination of them. Participants show us what they need and want through sketching and design exercises. The purpose of a co-design workshop is not to have a pixel-perfect design to implement, rather it’s to learn more about the people who use or will use the product, and to involve them in generating ideas about what to design. We ran a co-design workshop at Mozilla to inform our product design, and we’d like to share our experience with you. [...] Our UX team was tasked with improving the Firefox browser extension experience. When people create browser extensions, they use a form to submit their creations. They submit their code and all the metadata about the extension (name, description, icon, etc.). The metadata provided in the submission form is used to populate the extension’s product page on addons.mozilla.org.
  • Firefox Nightly: These Weeks in Firefox: Issue 51

Mesa 18.3.2

Mesa 18.3.2 is now available. In this release candidate we have added more PCI IDs for AMD Vega devices and a number of fixes for the RADV Vulkan drivers. On the Intel side we have a selection ranging from quad swizzles support for ICL to compiler fixes. The nine state tracker has also seen some love as do the Broadcom drivers. To top it all up, we have a healthy mount of build system fixes. Alex Deucher (3): pci_ids: add new vega10 pci ids pci_ids: add new vega20 pci id pci_ids: add new VegaM pci id Alexander von Gluck IV (1): egl/haiku: Fix reference to disp vs dpy Andres Gomez (2): glsl: correct typo in GLSL compilation error message glsl/linker: specify proper direction in location aliasing error Axel Davy (3): st/nine: Fix volumetexture dtor on ctor failure st/nine: Bind src not dst in nine_context_box_upload st/nine: Add src reference to nine_context_range_upload Bas Nieuwenhuizen (5): radv: Do a cache flush if needed before reading predicates. radv: Implement buffer stores with less than 4 components. anv/android: Do not reject storage images. radv: Fix rasterization precision bits. spirv: Fix matrix parameters in function calls. Caio Marcelo de Oliveira Filho (3): nir: properly clear the entry sources in copy_prop_vars nir: properly find the entry to keep in copy_prop_vars nir: remove dead code from copy_prop_vars Dave Airlie (2): radv/xfb: fix counter buffer bounds checks. virgl/vtest: fix front buffer flush with protocol version 0. Dylan Baker (6): meson: Fix ppc64 little endian detection meson: Add support for gnu hurd meson: Add toggle for glx-direct meson: Override C++ standard to gnu++11 when building with altivec on ppc64 meson: Error out if building nouveau and using LLVM without rtti autotools: Remove tegra vdpau driver Emil Velikov (13): docs: add sha256 checksums for 18.3.1 bin/get-pick-list.sh: rework handing of sha nominations bin/get-pick-list.sh: warn when commit lists invalid sha cherry-ignore: meson: libfreedreno depends upon libdrm (for fence support) glx: mandate xf86vidmode only for "drm" dri platforms meson: don't require glx/egl/gbm with gallium drivers pipe-loader: meson: reference correct library TODO: glx: meson: build dri based glx tests, only with -Dglx=dri glx: meson: drop includes from a link-only library glx: meson: wire up the dispatch-index-check test glx/test: meson: assorted include fixes Update version to 18.3.2 docs: add release notes for 18.3.2 Eric Anholt (6): v3d: Fix a leak of the transfer helper on screen destroy. vc4: Fix a leak of the transfer helper on screen destroy. v3d: Fix a leak of the disassembled instruction string during debug dumps. v3d: Make sure that a thrsw doesn't split a multop from its umul24. v3d: Add missing flagging of SYNCB as a TSY op. gallium/ttn: Fix setup of outputs_written. Erik Faye-Lund (2): virgl: wrap vertex element state in a struct virgl: work around bad assumptions in virglrenderer Francisco Jerez (5): intel/fs: Handle source modifiers in lower_integer_multiplication(). intel/fs: Implement quad swizzles on ICL+. intel/fs: Fix bug in lower_simd_width while splitting an instruction which was already split. intel/eu/gen7: Fix brw_MOV() with DF destination and strided source. intel/fs: Respect CHV/BXT regioning restrictions in copy propagation pass. Ian Romanick (2): i965/vec4/dce: Don't narrow the write mask if the flags are used Revert "nir/lower_indirect: Bail early if modes == 0" Jan Vesely (1): clover: Fix build after clang r348827 Jason Ekstrand (6): nir/constant_folding: Fix source bit size logic intel/blorp: Be more conservative about copying clear colors spirv: Handle any bit size in vector_insert/extract anv/apply_pipeline_layout: Set the cursor in lower_res_reindex_intrinsic spirv: Sign-extend array indices intel/peephole_ffma: Fix swizzle propagation Karol Herbst (1): nv50/ir: fix use-after-free in ConstantFolding::visit Kirill Burtsev (1): loader: free error state, when checking the drawable type Lionel Landwerlin (5): anv: don't do partial resolve on layer > 0 i965: include draw_params/derived_draw_params for VF cache workaround i965: add CS stall on VF invalidation workaround anv: explictly specify format for blorp ccs/mcs op anv: flush fast clear colors into compressed surfaces Marek Olšák (1): st/mesa: don't leak pipe_surface if pipe_context is not current Mario Kleiner (1): radeonsi: Fix use of 1- or 2- component GL_DOUBLE vbo's. Nicolai Hähnle (1): meson: link LLVM 'native' component when LLVM is available Rhys Perry (3): radv: don't set surf_index for stencil-only images ac/nir,radv,radeonsi/nir: use correct indices for interpolation intrinsics ac: split 16-bit ssbo loads that may not be dword aligned Rob Clark (2): freedreno/drm: fix memory leak mesa/st/nir: fix missing nir_compact_varyings Samuel Pitoiset (1): radv: switch on EOP when primitive restart is enabled with triangle strips Timothy Arceri (2): tgsi/scan: fix loop exit point in tgsi_scan_tess_ctrl() tgsi/scan: correctly walk instructions in tgsi_scan_tess_ctrl() Vinson Lee (2): meson: Fix typo. meson: Fix libsensors detection. Read more Also: Mesa 18.3.2 Released With Many Fixes As Users Encouraged To Upgrade