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Saturday, 23 Mar 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Nvidia releases Version: 1.0-7167 srlinuxx 2 13/03/2005 - 6:58pm
Blog entry pclo news feed srlinuxx 1 14/03/2005 - 7:37am
Blog entry KDE 3.4 Out? srlinuxx 2 14/03/2005 - 10:25pm
Story Beer is fattening, say fat beer-swilling readers srlinuxx 1 15/03/2005 - 3:23am
Story CompUSA fingered by feds over rebates srlinuxx 2 15/03/2005 - 4:26pm
Story Gas prices on verge of setting a record srlinuxx 3 16/03/2005 - 7:03am
Story KDE DCop DoS Vulnerability prior to 3.4 srlinuxx 1 16/03/2005 - 6:12pm
Story It's hitting the mirrors folks. srlinuxx 1 16/03/2005 - 7:13pm
Story Windows Media Player Digital Rights Management Spy srlinuxx 2 17/03/2005 - 6:45am
Blog entry Problems Problems Problems Texstar 1 18/03/2005 - 3:21am

Sway – A Tiling Wayland i3-Compatible Compositor

Filed under
GNU
Linux

I have covered window tiling editors/managers previously with apps like herbstluftwm and Tilix so check them out if you haven’t already.

Sway is a free and open source tiling Wayland compositor that is compatible with the i3 window manager, uses the same configuration syntax, and works with most of the software designed for i3.

Sway makes use of all the available space on your screen and automatically adjusts window sizes as you open more apps and you can navigate between apps with your keyboard.

App windows can be arranged horizontally, vertically, stacked, or tabbed and you can change their size as well as split windows into containers of several windows all without touching your mouse. You could, however, use your mouse to rearrange windows and even take windows out of the tiling grid and manipulate them.44

Read more

Graphics: RADV/Radeon and Nvidia Ray-Tracing Demos

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • RADV Vulkan Driver Gets Patches For VK_KHR_8bit_storage

    The Mesa Radeon "RADV" Vulkan driver has a series of patches pending for introducing VK_KHR_8bit_storage support.

    Rhys Perry of the Nouveau crowd worked on the VK_KHR_8bit_storage support for RADV back in February while it's now being carried forward by Valve Linux developer Samuel Pitoiset. The VK_KHR_8bit_storage extension as implied by the name allows for using 8-bit types in uniform and storage buffers as well as push constant blocks.

  • xf86-video-ati / xf86-video-amdgpu 19.0.1 Released To Better Deal With DP MST Displays

    Radeon DDX wrangler Michel Dänzer of AMD has announced the releases today of xf86-video-amdgpu 19.0.1 and the xf86-video-ati 19.0.1 release for older Radeon hardware.

    The lone change with the xf86-video-amdgpu X.Org driver update is support for the RandR output tile properties in better dealing with DisplayPort Multi-Stream Transport (DP MST) displays. This was the change that landed last week in these X.Org drivers and ushering out these new point releases to ship this support finally -- years after the support was added to the X.Org Server and xf86-video-modesetting.

  • Nvidia ray traces the heck out of Quake II… launching for free in April

    Nvidia has been working behind the scenes on Q2VKPT with creator Christoph Schied to build Quake II RTX: a cutting-edge reimagining of the old school classic. While Schied has been working on a ray-traced version of Quake II for some time, and doing a grand job of it too, Nvidia has lent its expertise to bring the classic shooter into 2019 and utilise all that ray tracing has to offer.

Games: GNU/Linux-powered Stadia, Humble Curve Digital Bundle and More on GNU/Linux-powered Atari VCS

Filed under
Gaming
  • Google announce ‘Stadia’, their new cloud gaming service built on Linux and Vulkan

    Google have now finally unveiled their new cloud gaming service named Stadia, offering instant access to play games in Google Chrome.

    What they joked was the worst-kept secret in the industry (no kidding), sounds like quite an interesting service. Certainly one that could eventually end up redefining what gaming is. A little hyperbolic maybe? I'm not so sure considering how easy this should be to jump into a game. On top of that, they very clearly talked about how it's built on Linux (Debian specifically) and Vulkan with custom GPUs from AMD.

  • Google’s Stadia Is “Netflix For Games” — Play Any Game Without Installation

    everaging the network of its highly efficient and scalable server infrastructure, Google has finally launched its much-anticipated game streaming service called Stadia. The announcement took place at the company’s keynote at the Game Developers Conference in San Francisco.

  • Stadia is Google’s New Gaming Service Powered by Linux & Open-Source Tech

    Stadia, a brand new game streaming service from Google, has been revealed — and it’s powered by open source technology.

    Long rumoured, but only formally announced at Games Developer Conference (GDC) 2019, the cloud gaming service promises to let gamers game from pretty much anywhere they want.

    There’s no Stadia console; no box you buy and hook up to your TV. Instead, games run from a datacenter and are streamed to you via the internet. Games can be streamed at up to 4k at 60fps, depending on your connection, of course.

    So folks, the dream of playing AAA games on Stadia on your crummy downstairs TV; your mid-range Android; or a potato laptop running Linux and Google Chrome, is now real.

  • Stadia Is Google's Cloud Gaming Service Using Linux, Vulkan & A Custom AMD GPU

    Google used the annual Game Developers Conference (GDC 2019) to officially unveil "Stadia" as their cloud-based game streaming service formerly known as Project Stream.

    To little surprise these days, the Google Stadia streaming service is built on Linux servers. Also to not a lot of surprise, Vulkan is their graphics API of choice for streaming right now up to 4K at 60FPS while they plan to expand to 8K at 120FPS in the future.

  • The Humble Curve Digital Bundle is out with four nice Linux games

    Now that the dust has settled on the Google Stadia news, here's something entirely different: the Humble Curve Digital Bundle.

  • Atari VCS Release Delayed – But There’s a Good Reason Why

    Remember the Atari VCS, aka the crowd-funded Linux-based games console that is totally not vapourware and will absolutely be released?

    Well, its release just got delayed.

    Those who backed the (very successful) IndieGoGo campaign won’t receive their units until late 2019 at the earliest. The console had originally planned to ship to backers in the summer of 2019, and go on general sale soon after.

    But although this delay is disappointing development for fans of this particular vintage gaming icon, there is an upside.

    Yup, it turns there is a very good reason for the delay…

Google Removed the KDE Connect App from the Play Store (Update: It’s Back)

Filed under
KDE
Google

The official KDE Connect Android app was briefly removed from the Google Play Store for “violating” app permission policies.

Google yanked the phone-side companion app, which works with desktop tools like GSconnect, from its Android app store on March 19. It said the app did not adhere to its new rules on apps that can access to SMS messages.

Read more

Debian members afraid to make or propose change, says leadership contender

Filed under
Debian

Michlmayr made the comments as part of his platform for the leadership elections; he and four others are contesting for leader of the project, with the campaigning period running until 6 April. Nominees also take part in online debates as part of pushing their claims to the post of leader.

He said that he had not been active in Debian of late but believed that the role of DPL should have three sides to it: administrator, facilitator and leader.

Having been the DPL in 2003 and 2004, Michlmayr said he was familiar with the role. "If I didn't believe in Debian, I wouldn't run in this DPL election. I acted as DPL before and know how difficult being the DPL can be sometimes. Yes, I see severe problems in Debian, but I firmly believe that together we can solve them!" he added.

Read more

Security: Updates, Trust, IPFire 2.21 and Superuserss

Filed under
Security
  • 40 Linux Server Hardening Security Tips [2019 edition]
  • Why Trust Is Key for Cyber-Security Risk Management

    "Trust" is an often-overused term, but according to Rohit Ghai, president of RSA Security, trust is the key to understanding and managing digital risk.

    In a video interview with eWEEK, Ghai discusses his views on trust, where the concept of an artificial intelligence "digital twin" fits in and why there could well be a need to redefine industry cyber-security categories to better reflect how risk management technologies should work. He also provides insight into how RSA Security's products, including Archer, Netwitness and SecurID, fit together to help organizations provide trust and manage risk.

    "As long as we pay attention to the idea of risk and trust co-existing and taking a risk orientation to security, I think we'll be fine," Ghai said. "Trust is important. We are living in an era where people are losing faith or trust in technology, and we have to act now to restore it."

  • IPFire 2.21 - Core Update 129 is ready for testing

    The next release is available for testing - presumably going to be last release in the 2.21 series before we bring some bigger changes. This update has a huge number and significant changes for IPsec as well as many updates to the core system and various smaller bug fixes.

  • Superuser accounts: What they are and how to secure them

    Most security technologies are helpless in protecting against superusers because they were developed to protect the perimeter – but superusers are already on the inside. Superusers may be able to change firewall configurations, create backdoors and override security settings, all while erasing traces of their activity.

    Insufficient policies and controls around superuser provisioning, segregation and monitoring further heighten risks. For instance, database administrators, network engineers and application developers are frequently given full superuser-level access. Sharing of superuser accounts among multiple individuals is also a rampant practice, which muddles the audit trail. And in the case of Windows PCs, users often log in with administrative account privileges –far broader than what is needed.

Python Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development

New From RMS: Install Fests: What to Do about the Deal with the Devil

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Install fests invite users to bring their computers so that experts can install GNU/Linux on them. This is meant to promote the idea of free software as well as the use of free software. In practice, these two goals conflict: users that want to reject nonfree software entirely need to choose their computers carefully to achieve that goal.

The problem is that most computers can't run with a completely free GNU/Linux distro. They contain peripherals, or coprocessors, that won't operate unless the installed system contains some nonfree drivers or firmware. This happens because hardware manufacturers refuse to tell us how to use their products, so that the only way to figure out how is by reverse engineering, which in most cases has not yet been done.

This presents the install fest with a dilemma. If it upholds the ideals of freedom, by installing only free software from 100%-free distros, partly-secret machines won't become entirely functional and the users that bring them will go away disappointed. However, if the install fest installs nonfree distros and nonfree software which make machines entirely function, it will fail to teach users to say no for freedom's sake. They may learn to like GNU/Linux, but they won't learn what the free software movement stands for. In effect, the install fest makes a tacit deal with the devil that suppresses the free software movement's message about freedom and justice.

The nonfree software means the user sacrifices freedom for functionality. If users had to wrestle with this choice, they could draw a moral lesson from it, and maybe get a better computer later. But when the install fest makes the compromise on the user's behalf, it shelters the user from the moral dimension; the user never sees that something other than convenience is at stake. In effect, the install fest makes the deal with the devil, on the user's behalf, behind a curtain so the user doesn't recognize that it is one.

I propose that the install fest show users exactly what deal they are making. Let them talk with the devil individually, learn the deal's bad implications, then make a deal—or refuse!

As always, I call on the install fest itself to install only free software, taking a strict stance. In this way it can set a clear moral example of rejecting nonfree software.

My new idea is that the install fest could allow the devil to hang around, off in a corner of the hall, or the next room. (Actually, a human being wearing sign saying “The Devil,” and maybe a toy mask or horns.) The devil would offer to install nonfree drivers in the user's machine to make more parts of the computer function, explaining to the user that the cost of this is using a nonfree (unjust) program.

Read more

Also: RMS article: "Install fests: What to do about the deal with the devil"

LinHES R8.6 Released

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The LinHES Dev team is pleased to announce the release of LinHES R8.6!

LinHES R8.6 updates MythTV to 30-fixes as well as updates to the kernel, system libraries, graphics drivers and many other parts of LinHES.

Release notes and upgrade instructions can be found here.

Read more

Also: Tails 3.13 is out

Debian and Ubuntu, Lies and Marketing

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
Misc
  • Jonathan Carter: Running for DPL

    I am running for Debian Project Leader, my official platform is published on the Debian website (currently looks a bit weird, but a fix is pending publication), with a more readable version available on my website as well as a plain-text version.

    Shortly after I finished writing the first version of my platform page, I discovered an old talk from Ian Murdock at Microsoft Research where he said something that resonated well with me, and I think also my platform.

  • Stephen Michael Kellat: Middle of March Meandering

    Eventually I intend to try Ubuntu Server installations to the three idle Raspberry Pi 3B+ boards. The ultimate goal there is for being able to offload video transcoding.

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 570
  • Two-thirds of Android antivirus apps are worthless or worse

    Yes, you may as well change your wallpaper to say "no viruses allowed:" it'd be just as effective as the 170 antivirus products that detected fewer than 30 per cent of the 2000 malicious apps installed for testing purposes.

  • Why foldable smartphones are more fad than forever devices

    I've been a part of many industries and, without fail, each industry eventually resorts to gimmicks to sell a product. In some instances, the gimmick convinces consumers that the new product and is the must-have of the industry.

    [...]

    The smartphone industry is no stranger to such snake-oil salesmanship. We've seen pop-up selfie cameras, Samsung Air View, built-in projectors, the HTC kickstand, the Amazon Fire Phone, the Ubuntu Phone, LG Modules, smart scroll, Alcatel disco lights, Blackberry Storm, Samsung edge display, KnockOn Password, HTC U11, and Pixel squeezable sides.

    The point being, the smartphone industry is keen on bringing to light a plethora of gimmicks to try and woo users away from their current devices.

OSS Leftovers: foss-north 2019, LibrePlanet 2019, Public Health, Public Interest and Simon Phipps on 'FRAND'

Filed under
OSS
  • foss-north 2019: Training Day

    The 2019 incarnation of foss-north is less than a month away. This year we’re extending the conference in two directions: a training day and a community day. This time, I wanted to write about the training day.

    The training day, April 10, is an additional day for those who want to extend
    the conference with a day of dedicated training. I’m very happy to have two experienced and well known trainers on side: Michael Kerrisk and Chris Simmonds. Both has years of training experience.

    Michael will teach about the details in dynamic linking. The topic may seem trivial, but when you start scratching the surface, there are a lot of details to discover such as how to handle version compatibility, how symbol resolution really works, and so on. You can read more about the Building and Using Shared Libraries on Linux training here.

  • Your guide to LibrePlanet 2019, March 23-24!

    Are you planning on joining us for LibrePlanet 2019, coming up this weekend, March 23-24, at the Stata Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)? If you haven't registered yet, there's still time -- registration is open through Tuesday, March 19 at 10:00 EDT, and we also welcome walk-ins (space permitting)! Remember, students and Free Software Foundation (FSF) associate members get in gratis.

    We also hope you'll join us for the Friday night open house at the FSF office, here in Boston -- you can pick up your badge early to skip the line Saturday morning (more details below).

  • Will this new openness to open source heed past lessons?

     

    We set out to demonstrate how open source could work in the NHS for both vendors and users, and to dispel many of the myths that existed about open source. We created the NHS Open Source Foundation (now The Apperta Foundation), a not-for-profit designed to act as a custodian for quality assured NHS open source software, adapting the model developed by OSERA in the US for VistA.
     

    We identified a number of issues which we worked hard to address.

  • France’s economic council wants a greater European role for free software

     

    The European Union should encourage the use of free software, for example by setting quotas in public procurement and financing its development, says France’s Economic, Social and Environmental Council (Conseil économique, social et environnemental, or CESE). The constitutional consultative assembly sees free software, sharing and reuse as strategic parts of the European digital culture.

  • Release of Opinion Paper on Open Source and FRAND by OFA Fellow Simon Phipps

    The question if Open Source Software can be combined with a FRAND (fair, reasonable, and non-discriminatory) regime is often at the centre of the debate. Possibly, this question though is not the deciding one, as such a legal compatibility would require that Open Source developers would collaborate under such a regime.

    OpenForum Europe is very excited to publish the Opinion Paper by OFA Fellow and President of the Open Source Initiative, Simon Phipps. In this paper Simon posits that the core issue of Open Source Software and FRAND is not a legal one, but that Open Source developers will not collaborate under a FRAND regime.

Security: Updates, "US Huawei Blackballing Efforts" and Microsoft's Back Doors Keep Crackers Busy

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • US Huawei Blackballing Efforts Stall Due To Lack Of 'Actual Facts'

    During the Trump era, the US government has dramatically ramped up claims that Chinese hardware vendor Huawei is a nefarious spy for the Chinese government, blackballing it from the U.S. telecom market. From pressuring U.S. carriers to drop plans to sell Huawei phones to the FCC's decision to ban companies from using Huawei gear if they want to receive federal subsidies, this effort hasn't been subtle.

    While Huawei should never be confused with a saint (what telecom company would be?) there's several problems with the effort. The biggest being that despite a decade of hand-wringing and one eighteen month investigation by the US government, there's still no public evidence Huawei uses its network gear to spy on Americans. That's not sitting well with countries we've asked to join along in the fun.

  • Sorry, Linux. We know you want to be popular, but cyber-crooks are all about Microsoft for now

    Eight out of the ten most exploited vulnerabilities tracked by threat intelligence biz Recorded Future in 2018 targeted Microsoft products – though number two on its list was, surprise surprise, a Flash flaw.

    The most exploited vuln in the firm's hall of shame was a remote code execution flaw in Windows' VBScript engine that could pwn users who opened a booby-trapped web page with Internet Explorer.

    "Exploit kits associated with this vulnerability were noted to spread the malware Trickbot through phishing attacks," said Recorded Future in a report published today.

    The Flash vuln was none other than one exploited by North Korean state-backed hackers – first detected by South Korea's CERT, which discovered a flood of booby-trapped MS Office documents, web pages, spam messages and more.

Graphics and Games: NVIDIA, Orbital/Vulkan, Cataclysm and System Shock 3

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming
  • NVIDIA Shows Off Quake II Path-Traced Using Vulkan RTX/Ray-Tracing

    ne of the demos NVIDIA is showing off this week at their GPU Technology Conference is Quake II being path-traced using a Vulkan port of the game and adapted to handle VK_NV_ray_tracing functionality paired with the latest GeForce RTX GPUs.

    Q2VKPT is a path-traced version of Quake II started by a former NVIDIA intern and is rendered using Vulkan and does support Linux.

  • Orbital: A PlayStation 4 Emulator That Is Emulating The PS4's AMD GPU Using Vulkan

    Orbital is an open-source project providing a virtualization-based PlayStation 4 emulator that is still in its early stages but what interests us is its technical details including the use of Vulkan/SPIR-V.

    Orbital leverages QEMU and other open-source components. At this stage it's not running any PS4 games but is able to boot into safe mode on PS4 5.xx kernels.

  • Cataclysm - Dark Days Ahead, a free and open source turn-based survival game had a huge update

    It occurred to me today, that no one here at GOL seems to have ever written about the free and open source turn-based survival game Cataclysm - Dark Days Ahead.

    Okay, so what is it? A classic roguelike with a survival theme, set in a post-apocalyptic procedurally generated world.

  • System Shock 3 may see Linux support, OtherSide still working on Underworld Ascendant for Linux

    OtherSide Entertainment have teased out a new short video of System Shock 3 and it may see Linux support.

    Not to be confused with the crowdfunded System Shock reboot that Nightdive Studios are currently working on. System Shock 3 is being made with some of the original team behind the first two games as well like Warren Spector, so it should remain faithful to the series while being a rather nice upgrade in visuals.

Stable kernels 5.0.3, 4.20.17, 4.19.30, 4.14.107 and 4.9.164

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 5.0.3

    I'm announcing the release of the 5.0.3 kernel.

    All users of the 5.0 kernel series must upgrade.

    The updated 5.0.y git tree can be found at:
    git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.0.y
    and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
    http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st...

  • Linux 4.20.17
  • Linux 4.19.30
  • Linux 4.14.107
  • Linux 4.9.164

Firefox 66 Released

Filed under
Moz/FF

Firefox now prevents websites from automatically playing sound. You can add individual sites to an exceptions list or turn blocking off.

Read more

Also: Firefox 66 Arrives - Blocks Auto-Playing Sounds, Hides Title Bar By Default For Linux

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More in Tux Machines

From Trusty to Bionic - my Ultrabook story

I am happy with how the upgrade went, given that I've actually bumped the system two major releases. Apart from small issues, there was nothing cardinal in the move. No data loss, no complications, no crashes. All my stuff remains intact, and so does Windows 8, living happily together and sharing the disk with Ubuntu. Mission accomplished. But we ain't done. I need to make the system as usable as possible. Which means Unity testing - and Plasma testing, of course, duh! Indeed, this remains a productivity box, and as such, it must fulfill some very stringent requirements. It must be stable, fast and elegant. It must work with me every step of the way, and it must allow me to transparently and seamlessly use various programs that I need. On this particular machine, that would be video editing with Kdenlive, that would be image processing with GIMP, the use of encryption and VPN tools, tons of writing on the superbly ergonomic Asus keyboard. But all that and more - coming soon. For now, thank you Trusty for five sweet, loyal years. May you ReST in ethernet peace. Read more

Software: Avidemux, Cockpit and NVMe VFIO in Linux

  • Avidemux 2.7.3 Released with Various Decoder Fixes (Ubuntu PPA)
    Avidemux video editor released a new bug-fix version just 11 days after the last, with decoder fixes and misc small improvements
  • Cockpit Project: Cockpit 190
    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 190.
  • NVMe VFIO Mediated Device Support Being Hacked On For Lower Latency Storage In VMs
    Maxim Levitsky of Red Hat sent out a "request for comments" patch series this week introducing NVMe VFIO media storage device support for the Linux kernel. Levitsky is pursuing faster virtualization of storage while striving for low latency and that led to the creation of a VFIO-based mediated device driver to pass an NVMe partition or namespace to a guest. This NVMe VFIO mediated device support would allow virtualized guests to run their unmodified/standard NVMe device drivers, including the Windows drivers, while still allowing the NVMe device to be shared between the host and guest.

Fedora: Parental Controls, FPgM, Ambassadors/Translation Sprint, Modularity Test Day and Delays

  • Allan Day: Parental Controls and Metered Data Hackfest
    This week I participated in the Parental Controls and Metered Data Hackfest, which was held at Red Hat’s London office. Parental controls and metered data already exist in Endless and/or elementary OS in some shape or form. The goal of the hackfest was to plan how to upstream the features to GNOME. It’s great to see this kind of activity from downstreams so I was very happy to contribute in my capacity as an upstream UX designer. There have been a fair few blog posts about the event already, so I’m going to try and avoid repeating what’s already been written…
  • FPgM report: 2019-12
    Fedora 30 Beta is No-Go. Another Go/No-Go meeting will be held on Thursday. I’ve set up weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else. The Fedora 30 Beta Go/No-Go and Release Readiness meetings are next week.
  • Not posting here means not there is nothing done
    I looking with fears to this strange ideas Mindshare has for the future of the Ambassadors. You can not write reports if you not have an event, so I telling here now how hard it is in this country to organize an event. Since October 2018 I search for a place which would host the next Translation Sprint. We have tons of co-working spaces or NGO’s which have space available. But is always the same I asked e.g. Open Institute, answer we can host you just on Saturday. And I had actually to write there several times and even make calls because I got no answer for the first contact. The same on The Desk, we can host you only on Saturday. This makes no sense in Cambodia, it is a regular working day, because they have 28 holidays. So most people have to work until 2pm. What sucked on this one, I was working on it since end of January. So first meeting was setup for 11th March, I went there but nobbody there to meet me. This is normal cambodian working style I dont tell I am busy and cant meet you and give you an alternative time. Well the promised mail with an alternative time never arrived, so I had to ask for it again. Second meeting was then this Monday, I spent an hour with them with the useless result of “just Saturday”. But there is light on the horizon OpenDevelopment might host us but here just on Sunday, which is for us better then just Saturday. So six months, hundreds of mails and several meetings and achieved nothing. How easy is it to setup a Fedora Womans Day in the Pune office, compared to this and then just travel around the world to visit other events and this is then called “active”
  • Fedora 30 Modularity Test Day 2019-03-26
  • Fedora 30 Beta Won't Be Released Next Week Due To Their Arm Images Lacking A Browser

Games: Lutris, Flux Caves, Cities: Skylines

  • Lutris 0.5.1 Brings Improved GOG Integration, Various Fixes
    Released at the start of February was the big Lutris 0.5 release with an enhanced GTK interface, GOG.com support, and much more for this open-source gaming platform. Lutris 0.5.1 is now available with some much needed fixes.
  • In the puzzle game Flux Caves you will be pushing around blocks to play with large marbles
    If you like puzzle games and marbles today is your lucky day as I came across Flux Caves, which merges them into one game. It's early-on in development but it has a pretty great idea. It's like piecing together an oversized marble-run, with each level having various tubes and other special blocks missing that you need to slot into place.
  • Cities: Skylines is another game having a free weekend on Steam right now
    As a reminder, it recently turned four years old and it's showing no signs of slowing down with multiple thousands on it every day. If you do decide to give it a go, I highly recommend the Clouds & Fog Toggler mod from the Steam Workshop to give you a really clear view. That's another thing that I love about Cities: Skylines, there's a huge amount of extra content available for it like maps, mods, scenarios and more. The mod selection is incredibly varied too from simple tools to automatically bulldoze abandoned or burned down buildings to adding in entirely new ways to play.