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Saturday, 29 Jul 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Nvidia releases Version: 1.0-7167 srlinuxx 2 13/03/2005 - 6:58pm
Blog entry pclo news feed srlinuxx 1 14/03/2005 - 7:37am
Blog entry KDE 3.4 Out? srlinuxx 2 14/03/2005 - 10:25pm
Story Beer is fattening, say fat beer-swilling readers srlinuxx 1 15/03/2005 - 3:23am
Story CompUSA fingered by feds over rebates srlinuxx 2 15/03/2005 - 4:26pm
Story Gas prices on verge of setting a record srlinuxx 3 16/03/2005 - 7:03am
Story KDE DCop DoS Vulnerability prior to 3.4 srlinuxx 1 16/03/2005 - 6:12pm
Story It's hitting the mirrors folks. srlinuxx 1 16/03/2005 - 7:13pm
Story Windows Media Player Digital Rights Management Spy srlinuxx 2 17/03/2005 - 6:45am
Blog entry Problems Problems Problems Texstar 1 18/03/2005 - 3:21am

Servers: Boltron, OpenStack, and GoDaddy

Filed under
Server
  • Announcing Boltron: The Modular Server Preview

    The Modularity and Server Working Groups are very excited to announce the availability of the Boltron Preview Release. Boltron is a bit of an anomaly in the Fedora world — somewhere between a Spin and a preview for the future of Fedora Server Edition. You can find it, warts (known issues) and all, by following the directions below to grab a copy and try it out.

    Fedora’s Modularity Working Group (and others) have been working for a while on a Fedora Objective. The Objective is generically called “Modularity,” and its crux is to allow users to safely access the right versions of what they want. However, there are two major aspects of “accessing the right versions.”

  • What you need to know about hybrid cloud

    At the center of hybrid cloud solutions sits open source software, such as OpenStack, that deploys and manages large networks of virtual machines. Since its initial release in October 2010, OpenStack has been thriving globally. Some of its integrated projects and tools handle core cloud computing services, such as compute, networking, storage, and identity, while dozens of other projects can be bundled together with OpenStack to create unique and deployable hybrid cloud solutions.

  • GoDaddy Drops Curtain on Its Cloud Business… Again

    Launched only a year ago, Cloud Servers was never intended to go after the big guys — AWS, Azure, GCP, and the like — and had no dreams of competing for well-heeled, big-business customers. Instead, it was hoping to position itself as a gateway to the cloud for small and medium sized businesses wanting to test the waters. In other words, it was hoping to take on DigitalOcean and Linode. It was also undoubtedly hoping to leverage the substantial base of its hosting business and convince some of those customers that their lives would only improve if they made a move to the cloud.

Kernel: "Secure Encrypted Virtualization" and New Blob From Nvidia

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • AMD Secure Encrypted Virtualization Updated For Linux

    While AMD's new Epyc processors have a new "Secure Encrypted Virtualization" feature, the support isn't yet mainlined in the Linux kernel but is getting closer.

  • Nvidia 384.59 Linux Graphics Driver Adds Support for GeForce GT 1030 GPUs, More

    Nvidia on Monday announced the release of a new long-lived graphics driver for Linux, FreeBSD, and Solaris-based operating systems, versioned 384.59, adding support for new GPUs, along with a bunch of bug fixes and improvements.

    Nvidia 384.59 is now considered the most advanced version of the proprietary graphics driver for GNU/Linux, FreeBSD, and Solaris platforms, which users should install on their personal computers running a supported Nvidia GPU immediately after reading this article.

Security: BKK, Password Managers, Kaspersky, Fruitfly, WHISTL, IoT and More

Filed under
Security
  • 18 year old guy arrested for reporting a shamefully stupid bug in the new Budapest e-Ticket system

     

    This last one was the one found by the 18 year old gentleman I started my story with. According to him, he doesn't even know how to program yet (he'll start the university this autumn). He just used the developer tools in the browser, that everybody has access to, saw that the price was being sent back to the server when he was about to make a purchase, and tried if he could change it. A monthly pass costs 9500HUF (about 30EUR) and he modified the price to 50HUF. When he got the confirmation that it worked and was able to see his pass in the app, he immediately emailed the BKK (the Transport Authority) that there was a serious problem. He got an email that his pass was invalidated, but otherwise they didn't get back to him. Instead, when it got leaked out to the press, and in a few hours everyone were talking about the above issues (not just this one), BKK together with T-Sytems Hungary started to what I would call massively covering their arses.  

  • How to use a password manager (and why you really should)

     

    Password managers remove both of these problems by generating and storing complex passwords for you. The password manager lives in your browser and acts a digital gatekeeper, filling in your login info when you need to get on a certain site. You just have to remember one (very secure!) master password for the manager itself, and everything else is taken care of for you. (For a quick introduction on creating a secure but memorable master password, check out this article.)  

  • US local govts still using Kaspersky software despite federal ban

     

    US local government agencies across the country are continuing to use software from Kaspersky Lab even though the federal government removed the company from a list of approved software suppliers for two government-wide purchasing contracts that are used to buy technology services.  

  • “Perverse” malware infecting hundreds of Macs remained undetected for years

    Besides the means of infection being unknown, the exact purpose of the malware is also unclear. Wardle said he found no evidence the malware can be used to install ransomware or collect banking credentials. That largely removes the possibility that Fruitfly developers were motivated by financial profit. At the same time, the concentration of home users largely rules out chances the malware was designed by state-sponsored hackers to spy on targets.

  • Exclusive: WHISTL Labs will be Cyber Range for Medical Devices

     

    The facilities, dubbed WHISTL, will adopt a model akin to the Underwriters Laboratory, which tests electrical devices, but will focus on issues related to cyber security and privacy, helping medical device makers “address the public health challenges” created by connected health devices and complex, connected healthcare environments, according to a statement by The Medical Device Innovation, Safety and Security Consortium (MDISS).

  • Smart fridges and TVs should carry security rating, police chief says

     

    Barton, the national policing lead for crime operations, proposed the idea as part of efforts to protect households from fraudsters and hackers in the era of the Internet of Things, where otherwise “dumb” devices can be put online and be interconnected for automation and smart appliance activities.

  • 'Devil's Ivy' Is Another Wake-Up Call for IoT Security

Fedora and Red Hat: Fedora Elections, Rawhide Notes, Financial Analysis

Filed under
Red Hat

Ubuntu: Kernel Security Update, End Of Life, Desktop Weekly Update, and Oranchelo

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • New Linux Kernel Security Update for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Patches 6 Vulnerabilities

    Canonical on Monday announced the availability of a new Linux kernel security update for all users of the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating systems series.

    The new kernel update comes hot on the heels of the kernel security updates that Canonical released last week for the Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) and Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) users, patching a total of six vulnerabilities affecting the Linux 4.4 LTS kernel on all supported architectures, including 64-bit, 32-bit, PowerPC, PPC64el, Raspberry Pi 2 and Snapdragon processors.

  • What To Do After Ubuntu 16.10 "Yakkety Yak" Got EOL

    Ubuntu 16.10 "Yakkety Yak" has reached End Of Life (EOL) stage at Friday 20 July 2017. This means the users won't receive official security updates from Canonical anymore. This leaves Yakkety users at least two choices, to stay at Yakkety (with using old-release repo) or to upgrade to 17.04 Zesty Zapus (by upgrading). This article explains shortly those two choices.

  • Ubuntu Desktop Weekly Update: July 24, 2017

    We’re working on adding captive portal detection to Artful. We think it would be good if there were an option in the privacy settings to enable or disable this. We’ve done some initial work as preparation – some patches have been submitted to Network Manager’s upstream to enable an option to be created. They are currently awaiting review.

  • Oranchelo: A New Flat Icon Theme for Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    You may have tried lots of icon themes and you may have a favorite but it is always a good idea to give try a new theme, who knows you may like. Here we are presenting you a new icon theme 'Oranchelo' which made way to Linux last year and continuously adding new icons. It is created with the design techniques "flat" and "Flat Long Shadow". Basically it is inspired by two icon themes "super-flat-remix" and "Cornie icons", some icons are also extracted from the pack Plateau icon theme. There is an official PPA from creator of this pack but only offers package for Ubuntu/Linux Mint/other Ubuntu derivatives. Since this icon theme is in active development, if you encounter any missing icon then directly report it creator via Github page. Arc theme suite used in the following screenshots and you can use Unity Tweak Tool, Gnome-tweak-tool to change themes/icons.

Software: Ring, Krunner, and MPV

Filed under
Software
  • Ring Stable Version Released: Ring 1.0 Liberté, Égalité, Fraternité

    Savoir-faire Linux releases the stable version of Ring:  Ring 1.0 – Liberté, Égalité, Fraternité. Ring is a free/libre and universal communication platform that preserves the users’ privacy and freedoms. It is a GNU package. It runs on multiple platforms; and, it can be used for texting, calls, and video chats more privately, more securely, and more reliably.

  • Krunner: When Minimalism Goes Wrong

    In most ways, KDE’s Plasma 5 is an improvement over earlier releases. It is more minimal, and many functions are easier to use than in Plasma 4. Certainly, it is more stylish and often better designed for the current generations of computer users. However, in at least one case, Plasma 5 has left a mess. To judge from my Debian Stretch installation, Krunner, the multi-function command line menu favored by experts has not only dropped several features, but made other features more difficult to use, creating unnecessary complications.

    As you may know, Krunner is one of the half-hidden secrets of KDE. Many users find it only by accident after months or even years of using Plasma. However, those who discover Krunner soon learn to value it as a convenient shortcut that, although it requires typing, is more efficient than clicking through the levels of the menu to launch an application and use a particular feature.

  • MPV: An Open-Source Mplayer Based Video Player for Ubuntu/Linux Mint (PPA)

    MPV video player is forked from mplayer2 and MPlayer, MPV supports wide variety of audio and video file formats. It offers some of the features with the former project while introducing many more. It is an command-line video player as well as offers GUI, it is lightweight and cross-platform available for Linux, Mac and Windows. From command line MPlayer's options parser was improved to behave more like other CLI programs, and many option names and semantics were reworked to make them more intuitive and memorable.

Migration to Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

For an introduction to my reasons for migrating from Windows to Linux, see my previous blog post. Here I will try to stick to my experience as a Linux beginner, and hopefully inspire other developers to try it out.

Read more

Ura Design crowdfunds free design for open source projects

Filed under
OSS

Open source software is nothing new in 2017. Even now, big tech giants are exploring open source. More and more companies allow employees to contribute to open source software on company hours, if it isn’t altogether encouraged. However, design assets and work have not enjoyed the same popularity with open source licensing and use as software has. However, Albanian design agency Ura Design is helping change this.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux Weather Forecast

    This page is an attempt to track ongoing developments in the Linux development community that have a good chance of appearing in a mainline kernel and/or major distributions sometime in the near future. Your "chief meteorologist" is Jonathan Corbet, Executive Editor at LWN.net. If you have suggestions on improving the forecast (and particularly if you have a project or patchset that you think should be tracked), please add your comments below.

  • Linux guru Linus Torvalds is reviewing gadgets on Google+

    Now it appears the godfather of Linux has started to put all that bile to good use by reviewing products on Google+.

  • Learning to love Ansible

    I’ve been convinced about the merits of configuration management for machines for a while now; I remember conversations about producing an appropriate set of recipes to reproduce our haphazard development environment reliably over 4 years ago. That never really got dealt with before I left, and as managing systems hasn’t been part of my day job since then I never got around to doing more than working my way through the Puppet Learning VM. I do, however, continue to run a number of different Linux machines - a few VMs, a hosted dedicated server and a few physical machines at home and my parents’. In particular I have a VM which handles my parents’ email, and I thought that was a good candidate for trying to properly manage. It’s backed up, but it would be nice to be able to redeploy that setup easily if I wanted to move provider, or do hosting for other domains in their own VMs.

  • GSoC: Improvements in kiskadee architecture

    Today I have released kiskadee 0.2.2. This minor release brings some architecture improvements, fix some bugs in the plugins and improve the log messages format. Initially, lets take a look in the kiskadee architecture implemented on the 0.2 release.

  • How UndoDB works

    In the previous post I described what UndoDB is, now I will describe how the technology works.

    The naïve approach to record the execution of a program is to record everything that happens, that is the effects of every single machine instruction. This is what gdb does to offer reversible debugging.

  • Wild West RPG West of Loathing Launches for PC/Mac/Linux on August 10th

    Today, developer Asymmetric announced that its comedy, wild west RPG, West of Loathing, is poised to launch for PC, Mac, and Linux on August 10th.

  • Canonical asks users' help in deciding Ubuntu Linux desktop apps

    Canonical Ubuntu Linux has long been one of the most popular Linux desktop distributions. Now, its leadership is looking to its users for help to decide the default desktop applications in the next long-term support version of the operating system: Ubuntu 18.04.

    This release, scheduled for April 2018, follows October's Ubuntu 17.10, Artful Aardvark. Ubuntu 18.04 will already include several major changes. The biggest of these is Ubuntu is abandoning its Unity 8 interface to go back to the GNOME 3.x desktop.

  • Enhanced Open Source Framework Available for Parallel Programming on Embedded Multicore Devices
  • Studiolada used all wood materials to create this affordable open-source home anyone can build

    Using wood panels as the principal building material reduced the project’s overall cost and footprint because the wooden beams and wall panels were cut and varnished in a nearby workshop. Prefabricated concrete was used to embed the support beams, which were then clad in wooden panels. In fact, wood covers just about everything in the home, from the walls and flooring to the ceiling and partitions. Sustainable materials such as cellulose wadding and wood fibers were even used to insulate the home.

Red Hat News: Former Red Hat CFO Joins CloudBees and More

Filed under
Red Hat

Android O Preview 4 and Who Killed Windows Phone

Filed under
Android
Microsoft
  • Android O Preview 4 is out—next stop, final release

    Google has just announced the availability of the fourth and final Android O Developer Preview. As usual, the preview is available for the Pixel, Pixel XL, Pixel C, Nexus 5X, Nexus 6P, Nexus Player, and the Android Emulator.

    Like the third preview, we're not expecting much in the way of UI changes in this release. It will take some time to find out, but hopefully this preview is a little more stable and performant than the third release. Right now, our Pixel XL test device has a super-slow camera, frequent crashes, and lots of bluetooth issues running the third preview.

  • Fiction: Who Killed Windows Phone?

    How could Microsoft’s Windows Phone licensing business model stand a chance against Google’s Free and Open Android? None of the Redmond giant’s complicated countermeasures worked, its smartphone platform is dead. And yet, inexplicably, Microsoft failed to use a very simple move, one we’ll explore today.
    Just back from three weeks in the Country of Good Sin’s heartland, I see Microsoft’s fresh and well-received Fourth Quarter Fiscal Year 2017 Results. The numbers acknowledge what was already notorious: Windows Phone is dead.

Events: Siggraph, Akademy, MesosCon Europe, and Libre Software Meeting 2017

Filed under
OSS
  • Siggraph 2017: ILM to tout open source CG library

    Lucasfilm and Industrial Light & Magic (ILM) have announced the first release of an open source computer graphics exchange library and will discuss its potential this week during Siggraph.

  • Akademy Monday Wrapup Session Video

    Akademy has had its first full day of BoFs, group sessions discussing our plans for the next year. The wrapup session has just finished so watch the video to find out about what Plasma devs are working on, what tutorials happened and how we avoided a fist fight to the finish.

  • Share Your Mesos Expertise: Submit a Proposal for MesosCon Europe Today
  • CzP @ RMLL / Libre Software Meeting 2017

    This year I participated again in the security track of the largest French open source conference, Libre Software Meeting (RMLL). “Participated” as I did not only give a talk on syslog-ng there, but also sat in to most of the presentations and had very good discussions both with visitors and fellow speakers. The organizers brought together talks from diverse IT security related fields, a very good opportunity for cross-pollination of ideas.

FOSS and Security

Filed under
OSS
Security

Microsoft, GNU, and GIMP

Filed under
GNU
Microsoft
  • GCC Is Working On An Implementation Of Microsoft's Language Server Protocol

    David Malcom of Red Hat today published an interesting patch series that includes an implementation of Microsoft's Language Server Protocol (LSP).

  • 5 free replacements for Microsoft Paint

    The old-standby, old-favorite open-source image editor, GIMP hews much closer to Photoshop than it does to Paint, and as such the learning curve is much steeper. If you're willing to learn, this is definitely a major upgrade.

  • More GIMP effects

    Since I have to prepare new material and slides to upcoming conferences,        I couldn’t help doing some effects, I have seen on GIMP, with myself and the two Linux projects I belong.

Linux Laptop: Buying New vs. Used Laptop

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

There are few things in a Linux enthusiast's life more fun than buying a new Linux laptop. One could even argue that the mere act of "spec'ing out" a new unit is more exciting than the actual use of the laptop itself.

In this article, I'm going to walk you through the decision making progress of buying a new Linux laptop vs. procuring a good second hand one instead. I'll share the advantages and disadvantages to each option.

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Also: The PC business: Decline continues in Q2

Canonical Is Working on Adding Captive Portal Detection to Ubuntu 17.10

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical's Ubuntu Desktop Director Will Cooke reports today on the latest developments done by his team for the upcoming Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system.

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GTK2/GTK3 Themes and Extension for GNOME

Filed under
GNOME
  • Oomox – Generate Color Variants of Numix GTK2/GTK3 Themes

    Oomox is a GUI tool with which you can generate several color variations of Numix (GTK2 / GTK3) themes, as well as Gnome-Colors and Archdroid icon themes. It ships with support for GNOME, Unity, Xfce4 and Openbox desktop environments, and a plethora of built-in presets which can be customized further.

    It is virtually the easiest way to create your own GTK 3.20 theme and thanks to one of the app’s users, Spatry, you can check out Oomox in action in the video below:

  • Get a New Desktop Wallpaper Each Day with this Extension for GNOME

    While Ubuntu’s switch to GNOME doesn’t render all of those methods redundant it does unlock some additional opportunities (like unified lock screen and desktop background) — something that the GNOME extensions framework dramatically simplifies.

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More in Tux Machines

Fedora: Fedora Classroom, Fedora Media Writer

  • Fedora Classroom Sessions are here!
    The Fedora Join SIG is proud to announce Classroom sessions. The Fedora Classroom is a project to teach interested users how to better use, understand and manage their Fedora system, and to show how the community works. The idea is to reach interested people and, if they desire, bring them closer to the Fedora community. Almost all classes will be held on IRC in the #fedora-classroom channel on Freenode (irc.freenode.net). If you’re not familiar with IRC, check out the Beginner’s guide to IRC. Also we’ll use BlueJeans, a video conferencing platform that works from browsers, mobile devices and a desktop application. If you have trouble connecting to Blue Jeans, please refer to the support page.
  • Fedora Media Writer – A Necessary Tool for the Fedora User
    Suppose that you have decided that you want to give the new Fedora release a try. You download the ISO and then you have to pick a method of putting that ISO on a thumb drive. You could choose to use the dd command or you could pick from a series of applications. However, with Fedora, you have only one option: Fedora Media Writer.

OpenSUSE 42.3

  • openSUSE 42.3 Released, Here’s What’s New
    After 8 months of continues development. The openSUSE team has just announced openSUSE 42.3. Which is considered to be the latest release of the stable openSUSE branch (called Leap).
  • openSUSE Leap 42.3 Linux-based operating system is here -- download it now
    Variety is both a gift and curse for Linux on the desktop. On the one hand, it is nice that there are so many operating systems based on the kernel from which to choose. On the other, it can sometimes feel like the community is very fragmented. Not only is there tribalism between users of distributions, but desktop environments too. For instance, there is Ubuntu vs. Fedora and KDE vs. GNOME -- much like Coke vs. Pepsi and Chevy vs. Ford. This is just human nature, I suppose.

Software: mtPaint, Suricata, Gabedit, Mozilla, LibreOffice, and GNU Binutils

  • mtPaint – A Lightweight Paint Software for Digital Photos
    mtPaint is an open source paint application for both Linux and Windows developed for the purpose of creating and manipulating pixel images. It was developed from scratch by Mark Tyler and maintained by Dmitry Groshev. If you hadn’t heard about it prior to reading this article it is probably because before its latest update in June 2016, its last update was in 2011! Update frequency not withstanding, mtPaint has a focus on being memory friendly and its latest update came with a handful of both new and improved features.
  • Suricata 4.0 released!
    We are thrilled to announce Suricata 4.0. This is a major new release, improving detection capabilities, adding new output options and more protocols.
  • Suricata 4.0 released
  • Gabedit: the Portal to Chemistry
         Many chemistry software applications are available for doing scientific work on Linux. I've covered several here in previous issues of the magazine, and of them have their own peculiar specialties—areas where one may work better than another. So, depending on what your research entails, you may need to use multiple software packages to handle all of the work. This is where Gabedit will step in to help you out.
  • How Could You Use a Speech Interface?
    Last month in San Francisco, my colleagues at Mozilla took to the streets to collect samples of spoken English from passers-by. It was the kickoff of our Common Voice Project, an effort to build an open database of audio files that developers can use to train new speech-to-text (STT) applications. What’s the big deal about speech recognition? Speech is fast becoming a preferred way to interact with personal electronics like phones, computers, tablets and televisions. Anyone who’s ever had to type in a movie title using their TV’s remote control can attest to the convenience of a speech interface. According to one study, it’s three times faster to talk to your phone or computer than to type a search query into a screen interface. Plus, the number of speech-enabled devices is increasing daily, as Google Home, Amazon Echo and Apple HomePod gain traction in the market. Speech is also finding its way into multi-modal interfaces, in-car assistants, smart watches, lightbulbs, bicycles and thermostats. So speech interfaces are handy — and fast becoming ubiquitous.
  • LibreOffice 5.4 Released with ‘Significant New Features’
    LibreOffice 5.4 serves as the final major release in the LibreOffice 5.x series (meaning LibreOffice 6.x will be next). The update is said to add “significant new features in every module” and (as always) improved Microsoft Office file compatibility.
  • LibreOffice 5.4 released with new features for Writer, Calc and Impress
    The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 5.4, the last major release of the LibreOffice 5.x family, immediately available for Windows, macOS and Linux, and for the cloud. LibreOffice 5.4 adds significant new features in every module, including the usual large number of incremental improvements to Microsoft Office file compatibility.
  • GNU Binutils 2.29 Released
    Binutils 2.29 is now available as well as a Binutils 2.28.1 point release. Binutils 2.29 brings a lot for MIPS and SPARC users. MIPS improvements for Binutils 2.29 include support for microMIPS eXtended Physical Addressing (PXA), microMIPS Release 5 ISA for assembly/disassembly, support for the Imagination interAptiv MR2 CPU, and support for the MIPS16e2 ASE assembly/disassembly.
  • AMD Ryzen 3 Rolls Out, Linux Benchmarks Coming

GNOME/GTK: Nautilus, Evince, GNOME Calendar, GNOME Photos, Libratbag

  • Nautilus Not Adding Tags, Might Add File Favoriting Instead
    Tags are a super handy way to organize, sort and find files without needing to worry about where you actually put ’em. So, naturally, I was super excited when GNOME developer Alexandru Pandelea began to share word of work he’d done to bring native file tags to Nautilus.
  • After 12 Years, GNOME's Evince Document Viewer Supports Adobe Illustrator Files
    GNOME developer Bastien Nocera reports today on some the improvements coming to the Evince document viewer app as part of the upcoming GNOME 3.26 desktop environment. The biggest change that'll be implemented in Evince 3.26 is the use of the libarchive library for decompressing various archive types, including the CBZ, CB7, and CBT formats that are usually used for comic books, and it also supports RAR files through the use of the unarr command-line utility.
  • GNOME Calendar is now capable of creating/editing recurring events
    I’m glad to announce that GNOME Calendar now supports creation of recurring events. Now you can easily create recurring events with the help of the modified edit-dialog.
  • Enhancing photos with GNOME Photos
    Photos can do more than edit. It also integrates with GNOME Online Accounts, and can be set up to share photos to various online photo services. Photos also lets you organize your photos into albums. It even detects screenshots and automatically sorts them into a Screenshots album for you!
  • Libratbag-Powered Piper Is Looking Good For Configuring Gaming Mice On Linux
    It's not quite ready for primetime yet by Linux gamers, but Piper as the GTK-powered user-interface for controlling gaming mice on Linux is getting into shape. Piper is the GTK interface for configuring mice on Linux via libratbag/ratbagd, the library offering a generic way to access various mice features and abstract away hardware/kernel differences.