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About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 20 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

OOo Off the Wall: Master Documents

Filed under
HowTos

If you are an MS Word user, and we all have secret shames in our pasts, you may have fallen into the habit of avoiding master documents--and for good reason. But if you have this habit of avoiding master documents, you can change it when you use OpenOffice.org Writer. They can help to organize and write long documents more efficiently.

IBM Forms Global Alliance with Red Hat, Novell

Filed under
Linux

IBM has elevated Linux vendors Red Hat Inc. and Novell Inc. to highest-tier partner status by making them members of its Strategic Alliance program.

The move will make it simpler for clients to acquire open standards-based Linux hardware, software and services.

The Beauty of "The Debian System"

Filed under
Reviews

Charles Darwin would "get" the beauty Debian if he were alive today. Martin Krafft certainly "gets" the beauty of Debian, and he wants you to get it too, so he has written a very detailed exposition of the Debian code and community called The Debian System: Concepts and Techniques, co-published by Open Source Press and No Starch Press.

Just Say NO to Gnome?

Filed under
Software

GNOME still encourages productivity over KDE because it uses screen space more efficiently. So in light of Linus' recent rantings on the GNOME usability mailing list here are three good reasons why you should stick with GNOME.

Science Journal: Wikipedia Pretty Accurate

Filed under
Web

Wikipedia, the encyclopedia that relies on volunteers to pen nearly 4 million articles, is about as accurate in covering scientific topics as Encyclopedia Britannica, the journal Nature wrote in an online article published Wednesday.

Thunderbird 1.5 Gets Ready to Fly

Filed under
Software

First Look: Version 1.5 of the Mozilla Foundation's e-mail client brings with it a useful set of new features, without the annoying bugs of the earlier version.

Firefox swings to the rescue

Filed under
Moz/FF

Mitchell Baker, trapeze artist and leader of an open-source web browser, is on a mission to keep the internet free.

Lightweight windowing system supports embedded Linux

Filed under
Software

A free software project based in Instanbul has released a portable, embedded client-server windowing system. The Xynth Windowing System, released under the GPL, offers a lightweight GUI-capable windowing system usable in Linux-based embedded systems and devices, such as handhelds and set-top boxes.

C and C++ give way to managed code

Filed under
Software

One important trend highlighted by this year's research is the ongoing transition away from C and C++ -- the two languages that have been programmers' mainstays for many years -- in favor of Java, and, more recently, C#.

Massachusetts says it's open to multiple formats

Filed under
OSS

Massachusetts legislators assembled some of the IT industry's most powerful companies Wednesday to discuss the state's electronic document standards, a closely watched decision with significance that has stretched far beyond state boundaries.

n/a

Let’s see some ID, please

As the joke goes, on the Internet nobody knows you’re a dog. But although anonymity has been part of Internet culture since the first browser, it’s also a major obstacle to making the Web a safe place to conduct business:

No More Linux on the WRT54G?

Filed under
Linux

There has been a lot of confusion lately as to what's going on with the end of Linux support on the WRT54G and WRT54GS line of routers. Hopefully I'll be able to describe what's going on, what's changing, what's coming, and what you can do about it.

Linus on source code, developer craziness, and the makings of successful projects

Filed under
Linux

This is a more in-depth look at the fascinating interchange between Linus Torvalds and Chris Blizzard on the Desktop Linux (public) mailing list concerning user-interfaces.

Should Apple switch Mac OS X from Mach to Linux kernel?

Filed under
Mac

In many ways, OS X is what Linux would be with a great GUI. Likewise, Linux is in some ways what OS X could be. For all its strengths, OS X does allow tasks to so dominate the OS that everything else stops while the beach ball spins.

What Would You Do With A Supercomputer?

Filed under
Hardware

Searching for a massively powerful digital system to help researchers grapple with complex tasks like forecasting weather and simulating particle interactions? Look to an enormous, well-funded organization. Or on a desktop.

A year in the life of open source in South Africa

Filed under
OSS

It's been a long, bad year for politicians, petrol prices and proprietary software. But 2005 was an exceptional year for open source software. It really found its feet this year, and I think it also started to cement a new façade that will serve it well for years to come.

Rendering HTML In Your Head? Bad Idea!

Filed under
Humor

If you thought the security holes in Internet Explorer were large enough to push a G-class star through, then you haven't seen anything yet.

China's Red Flag Sees Desktop as Linux Battlefield

Filed under
Linux

The vice president of the dominant Linux supplier in China says government support is creating opportunities for desktop Linux to grow. Zheng shared some of his views on Linux, open source and China's IT future in a rare, candid interview with eWEEK senior editor Darryl K. Taft last week in Beijing.

Torvalds wades into desktop debate

Filed under
Linux

Linux creator Linus Torvalds has stepped into a desktop war, expressing a preference for the K Desktop Environment over GNOME, and accusing the developers of the latter project of being "interface nazis".

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More in Tux Machines

What Is the Intersection of OpenStack and Kubernetes?

Lew Tucker is a busy man. Aside from his day job as VP and CTO for Cloud Computing at Cisco, Tucker also sits on the board of directors at both the OpenStack Foundation and the Cloud Native Computing Foundation, giving him a unique perspective on both organizations. Some in the industry have positioned Kubernetes as a competitive replacement for OpenStack, but that's not what Tucker sees. In a video interview, Tucker explains where the intersection currently exists between OpenStack and Kubernetes and why he expects both to be successful. Read more

Graphics: Vulkan, AMDGPU, Wayland

  • Vulkan Display Extensions To Be Used By SteamVR Merged Into Mesa RADV/ANV
    Keith Packard's long in development work for improving the Linux display stack infrastructure for better dealing with VR head-mounted displays is about rounded out with the new Vulkan extension support being merged into Mesa. Just over a year ago famed X developer Keith Packard started contract work for Valve to improve the plumbing around the Linux/X.Org support for virtual reality HMDs for better performance and better integration. Within the Linux kernel and the X.Org Server he's worked and landed the DRM leasing support of outputs to let a VR compositor (Steam VR) have direct access to the output, "non-desktop" quirk handling so VR HMDs don't become mapped as part of a standard Linux desktop, and related work.
  • A Slew Of AMDGPU DC Updates Published, Further Improvements For Raven Ridge
    There hasn't been a new AMDGPU DC code drop in a while as AMD developers work to improve their internal processes, but hitting the wire today is a set of 51 new patches for this "display code" stack that work on a variety of improvements.
  • Sway 1.0 Wayland Compositor Nears With Floating Windows, Tablet Support & More
    The release of the Sway 1.0 Wayland compositor is inching closer with the recent third alpha release. Sway for the uninformed is a very promising i3-compatible Wayland compositor. Earlier this month Sway 1.0 Alpha 3 was released to succeed the second alpha release from the month prior. Sway 1.0 is succeeding the Sway 0.15 changes with a great deal of improvements. Most notably with the 1.0 series is now requiring the WLROOTS modular Wayland compositor library.

Security: OpenBSD, FUD and More

  • OpenBSD Disabling SMT / Hyper Threading Due To Security Concerns
    Security oriented BSD operating system OpenBSD is making the move to disable Hyper Threading (HT) on Intel CPUs and more broadly moving to disable SMT (Simultanious Multi Threading) on other CPUs too. Disabling of Intel HT and to follow with disabling SMT for other architectures is being done in the name of security. "SMT (Simultanious Multi Threading) implementations typically share TLBs and L1 caches between threads. This can make cache timing attacks a lot easier and we strongly suspect that this will make several spectre-class bugs exploitable. Especially on Intel's SMT implementation which is better known as Hypter-threading. We really should not run different security domains on different processor threads of the same core." OpenBSD could improve their kernel's scheduler to workaround this, but given that is a large feat, at least for now they have decided to disable Hyper Threading by default. Those wishing to toggle the OpenBSD SMT support can use the new hw.smt sysctl setting on OpenBSD/AMD64 and is being extended to cover CPUs from other vendors and architectures.
  • Linux malware threats - bots, backdoors, trojans and malicious apps [Ed: Ignoring back doors in Windows and other proprietary platforms to instead focus on malicious software one actually needs to install on one's machine or choose a trivial-to-guess password (when there are open ports)]
  • Does Open Source Boost Security? Hortonworks Says Yes
    Organizations are best served security-wise if they favor and adopt open source technology — especially enterprise open source — over proprietary alternatives, according to Hortonworks. However, not everybody agrees that open source software intrinsically is more secure. It’s tough to argue that open source hasn’t brought significant benefits to the IT industry and the tens of thousands of organizations that rely on IT products to automate their operations. Starting with the introduction of Linux in the late 1990s, major swaths of the tech industry have shifted to open source development methodologies. That includes the vast majority of the big data ecosystem, which has been largely bootstrapped by various Apache Software Foundation projects.
  • Don't Neglect Open Source Security [Ed: Well, if you have chosen proprietary software, then you have already given up on security altogether. With FOSS there's at least control and hope.]
  • How to build a strong DevSecOps culture: 5 tips [Ed: Red Hat is still promoting dumb buzzwords that help employers overwork their staff]
  • A Framework to Strengthen Open Source Security and Compliance [Ed: Firms that profit from perceived insecurity of FOSS push so-called 'white papers' into IDG]

Mozilla: Diversity & Inclusion in Open Source, VR, Phabricator, Rust and WebRender

  • Call for Feedback! Draft of Goal-Metrics for Diversity & Inclusion in Open Source (CHAOSS)
    In the last few months, Mozilla has invested in collaboration with other open source project leaders and academics who care about improving diversity & inclusion in Open Source through the CHAOSS D&I working group. Contributors so far include: Alexander Serebrenik (Eindhoven University of Technology) , Akshita Gupta (Outreachy), Amy Marrich (OpenStack), Anita Sarma (Oregon State University), Bhagashree Uday (Fedora), Daniel Izquierdo (Bitergia), Emma Irwin (Mozilla), Georg Link (University of Nebraska at Omaha), Gina Helfrich (NumFOCUS), Nicole Huesman (Intel) and Sean Goggins ((University of Missouri).
  • Introducing A-Terrain - a cartography component for A-Frame
    Have you ever wanted to make a small web app to share your favorite places with your friends? For example your favorite photographs attached to a hike, or just a view of your favorite peak, or your favorite places downtown, or a suggested itinerary for friends visiting?
  • Setting up Arcanist for Mozilla development on Windows
  • Taming Phabricator
    So Mozilla is going all-in on Phabricator and Differential as a code review tool. I have mixed feelings on this, not least because it’s support for patch series is more manual than I’d like. But since this is the choice Mozilla has made I might as well start to get used to it. One of the first things you see when you log into Phabricator is a default view full of information.
  • This Week in Rust 239
    This week's crate is SIMDNoise, a crate to use modern CPU vector instructions to generate various types of noise really fast. Thanks to gregwtmtno for the suggestion!
  • WebRender newsletter #20