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Thursday, 23 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story New OSI President Steps Down srlinuxx 2 05/03/2005 - 5:04am
Story Cronkite denounces the war on drugs. srlinuxx 3 05/03/2005 - 6:07am
Story Texas Gaming Festival: Quick Peek at the LAN Party srlinuxx 06/03/2005 - 3:16pm
Story The Rock solidifies Doom movie role srlinuxx 2 08/03/2005 - 2:29am
Story Bumbling Bully srlinuxx 2 08/03/2005 - 2:30am
Story A Week with KDE 3.4rc1 srlinuxx 5 08/03/2005 - 3:46pm
Story Student in High School zombie terror threat srlinuxx 1 08/03/2005 - 4:00pm
Story European democracy bogus, says Open Source Consortium srlinuxx 2 08/03/2005 - 4:27pm
Story Linux Making Inroads into Automotive Industry srlinuxx 1 08/03/2005 - 4:59pm
Blog entry Cooker (Mandrake 10.2b3) Woes srlinuxx 1 09/03/2005 - 7:08pm

Red Hat Gets NIST Certification for Open-Source Security Compliance Scanner

Filed under
Red Hat
OSS

The National Institute of Standards and Technology has approved Red Hat‘s open-source security content automation protocol scanner for deployment on the U.S. government’s Enterprise Linux 6 and 7-based systems.

Red Hat said Friday that NIST certified the OpenSCAP 1.2 platform’s capacity to analyze and evaluate security automation content as well as address functionality and documentation requirements in security-conscious

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WebKitGTK+ 2.16

Filed under
Development
GNOME

The Igalia WebKit team is happy to announce WebKitGTK+ 2.16. This new release drastically improves the memory consumption, adds new API as required by applications, includes new debugging tools, and of course fixes a lot of bugs.

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IBM + Red Hat = An open source hybrid cloud

Filed under
Red Hat
OSS

IBM Cloud and Red Hat OpenStack and storage teams are partnering to integrate their products and in doing so are creating a compelling hybrid offering for open source-minded customers.

The announcement came at IBM’s InterConnect conference in Las Vegas, where an estimated 20,000 developers, customers and IBM partners are gathering.

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Also: IBM (IBM) and Red Hat (RHT) To Collaborate on Hybrid Cloud

OpenSSH 7.5 released

Filed under
OSS
Security

OpenSSH 7.5 has just been released. It will be available from the
mirrors listed at http://www.openssh.com/ shortly.

OpenSSH is a 100% complete SSH protocol 2.0 implementation and
includes sftp client and server support. OpenSSH also includes
transitional support for the legacy SSH 1.3 and 1.5 protocols
that may be enabled at compile-time.

Read more

Also: OpenSSH 7.5 Released, Legacy Crypto Functions Still Heading For Retirement

The Intel Edison: Linux Maker Machine in a Matchbox

Filed under
Linux

The console is a great place to start to see if the Edison is up and running. Connect the micro USB labeled console on the Base Block breakout to your desktop Linux machine and check dmesg to see something like the below to discover where the console is. The Base Block has power, TX, and RX LEDs on board so you can get some feedback from the hardware if things are working. If things go as they should, you will be presented with a root console to the Edison. There is no default password, you should just get right onto the console.

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Jetson TX2 module gains third party carrier boards

Filed under
Linux

Connect Tech released three carriers for the Jetson TX2 and TX1: Cogswell with GigE Vision, Spacely for cam-intensive Pixhawk drones, and a $99 Sprocket.

Last April, Connect Tech announced an Astro carrier board for Nvidia’s Tegra X1-driven Jetson TX1 COM, and then followed up with the Orbitty and Elroy boards in May. Now, following Nvidia’s release of the Jetson TX2 earlier this month, Connect Tech has launched three new carriers that support both the TX2 and TX1 modules.

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Giessen Public Works using open source for energy supply

Filed under
OSS

The German City of Giessen is using open source software for IT Service Management (ITSM) functions in its municipal energy supply. The most visible part of the setup is openITCOCKPIT, a web-based front-end for the Nagios and Naemon packages for IT infrastructure monitoring.

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Pico-ITX board gives you Rockchip RK3288 and optional wireless

Aaeon’s RICO-3288 Pico-ITX SBC runs Android 6.0 on a quad Cortex-A17 RK3288, and offers up to 4Kx2K resolution and optional wireless, CAN, and -20 to 70°C.

The RICO-3288 is the first Aaeon product we can recall featuring a Rockchip SoC, and one of the relatively few Rockchip RK3288 based SBCs we’ve seen outside of Firefly’s open-spec Firefly boards, such as the sandwich-style Firefly-RK3288 Reload. The other main exception is the recent, maker oriented Tinker Board from Aaeon’s owner, Asus.

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The best cheap Android mobile phones for 2017 and where to buy them for less

Filed under
Android

We round up the best deals on phones including the Samsung Galaxy, Moto G4 and Sony Xperia XZ, plus five handy tips on how to pay less for your contract

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Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • IBM unveils Blockchain as a Service based on open source Hyperledger Fabric technology

    IBM unveiled its “Blockchain as a Service” today, which is based on the open source Hyperledger Fabric, version 1.0 from The Linux Foundation.

    IBM Blockchain is a public cloud service that customers can use to build secure blockchain networks. The company introduced the idea last year, but this is the first ready-for-primetime implementation built using that technology.

  • Software And Choice

    Some projects, whether intentionally (e.g., LLVM) or by accident (e.g., Linux) will grow beyond this scope (in those cases, vastly so). The question then becomes murkier. The two projects I've chosen for example here are both, I would say, "fork-proof" - LLVM has a very lenient code acceptance policy (see: all of the ghc-specific portions of the backend), while Linux has an extremely powerful module interface against which things can be built that do not merit inclusion into mainline. A user could fork LLVM, or Linux, but their version is extremely unlikely to become authoritative. Even if one does become authoritative, or close to it, that decision may also revert if the new fork does not live up to the quality standards of the old (I'm thinking about ffmpeg/libav here).

  • Hello FOSSASIA: Revisiting the event *and* the first program we write in C

    I was at FOSSAsia this weekend to deliver a workshop on the very basics of programming. It ended a pretty rough couple of weeks for me, with travel to Budapest (for Linaro Connect) followed immediately by the travel to Singapore. It seems like I don’t travel east in the timezone very well and the effects were visible with me napping at odd hours and generally looking groggy through the weekend at Singapore. It was however all worth it because despite a number of glitches, I had some real positives to take back from the conference.

  • Community leadership charts course for OpenStack

    Last week, about 40 people from the OpenStack Technical Committee, User Committee, Board of Directors and Foundation Staff convened in Boston to talk about the future of OpenStack. We candidly discussed the challenges we face as a community, but also why our mission to deliver open infrastructure is more important than ever.

    To kick things off, Mark Collier opened with a state of the union address, talking about the strength of our community, the number of users running OpenStack at scale across various industries and the progress we’ve made working across adjacent open source projects. OpenStack is one of the largest, global open source communities. In 2016 alone, we had 3,479 unique developers from dozens of countries and hundreds of organizations contribute to OpenStack, and the number of merged changes increased 26 percent year-over-year. The size and diversity of the OpenStack community is a huge strength, but like any large organization, scale presents its own set of challenges.

  • OpenStack® Board Elects Huawei as Platinum Member and H3C as Gold Member of the Foundation
  • Community leadership planning, new board members, and more OpenStack news
  • Open project collaboration from elementary to university classrooms

    In this article, we share our experiences: two examples of fostering creative collaboration among students from elementary school to higher education. Aria F. Chernik, an open educator and director of OSPRI (Open Source Pedagogy, Research + Innovation) at Duke University, introduces an open-by-design, learning innovation project at Duke. Anna Engelke, a tinkering and technology educator, speaks about using open pedagogy to design a Scratch-based maker club at a local elementary school.

  • Rcpp 0.12.10: Some small fixes

    The tenth update in the 0.12.* series of Rcpp just made it to the main CRAN repository providing GNU R with by now over 10,000 packages. Windows binaries for Rcpp, as well as updated Debian packages will follow in due course. This 0.12.10 release follows the 0.12.0 release from late July, the 0.12.1 release in September, the 0.12.2 release in November, the 0.12.3 release in January, the 0.12.4 release in March, the 0.12.5 release in May, the 0.12.6 release in July, the 0.12.7 release in September, the 0.12.8 release in November, and the 0.12.9 release in January --- making it the fourteenth release at the steady and predictable bi-montly release frequency.

Graphics in Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Audacity 2.1.3 Released with Minor New Features
  • Kodi Is Getting A Proper Netflix Plugin

    The Kodi HTPC software will soon have a "real" Netflix plugin/add-on for making a better show/movie watching experience.

  • See Lyrics for Any Song on Spotify with This Ubuntu App

    It’s been several months since Spotify removed the lyrics function from it’s apps, and it shows no signs of returning soon. If you liked being able to tap a button to instantly see lyrics for the currently playing song, we’ve found a nifty little indicator applet that can help.

  • WordGrinder: Distraction-Free Writing From the Command Line

    A few months back while perusing the latest news from the open source media, I came across an article listing five favorite command line tools, or some such nonsense. It turned out that one of the items on the list was a command line “word processor,” WordGrinder, which the article’s writer claimed to be an uber-easy way to write from the command line.

    As it happened, I’d been looking for that very thing, so I immediately looked in the Mint/Ubuntu repositories, found it, installed it and took a look. Unfortunately, at the time I was busy, facing a couple of deadlines, so when I couldn’t figure the first thing out about it in five seconds or less, I closed the terminal and went to Bluefish to finish an article I was writing, while vowing to return to look further into WordGrinder as soon as I finished.

  • Calibre 2.82 Open-Source Ebook Manager Launches with Various Improvements

    Calibre developer Kovid Goyal announced a new maintenance update of his open-source, free, cross-platform and powerful ebook library management software, versioned 2.82.

    Calibre 2.82 comes just one week after the previous point release, namely Calibre 2.81, which means that it's mostly a bugfix update that addresses various of the issues reported by users lately, and updates the supported news sources.

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
  • Some thoughts on 'Codex of Victory', the mix of turn-based and real time strategy

    It's a mix of turn-based battles with some real-time base building. The base building aspect is a little like XCOM 2 with a side-on view as you dig out rooms. The whole game feels like it was inspired by XCOM 1 & 2, as you send over units to different regions to perform missions. You even speed up time at will when outside of missions, so it's all very familiar.

  • Overload, the shiny new six-degree-of-freedom shooter has entered Early Access

    The game was funded thanks to Kickstarter, where the developers nabbed $306,537 from helpful people wanting to see it become a reality. It's also nice that another Kickstarter team actually managed day-1 Linux support.

    The team behind Overload actually has some of the originally Descent team and the co-founder of the studio even worked on Freespace 1 & 2, which are my two all time favourite space shooters. I'm really not surprised the game has already turned out so well!

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Hire a DDoS service to take down your enemies

    According to Neustar, almost three quarters of all global brands, organizations and companies have been victims of a DDoS attack. And more than 3,700 DDoS attacks occur each day.

  • Apollo Lake 3.5-incher doubles down on security

    Kontron’s Linux-friendly, Intel Apollo Lake based “3.5″-SBC-APL” SBC features triple display support, a TPM 2.0 chip, and optional security services.

  • Leading Linux distros dawdle as kernel flaw persists

    A local privilege esclation flaw has been fixed in the Linux kernel, but several upstream distributions have yet to release updates. Administrators should plan on mitigating the vulnerability on Linux servers and workstations themselves and monitor the distributions for their update plans.

First Hint at Ubuntu 17.10 Codename Revealed?

Filed under
Ubuntu

With Ubuntu 17.04 'Zesty Zapus' bringing us to the end of the alphabet, many in the Ubuntu community have wondered what the Ubuntu 17.10 name will be.

Read more

Also: Orange Pi can draw on Ubuntu snaps

EC study recommends that policies emphasise open source

Filed under
OSS

Europe’s public administrations should support the use of open source in all sectors of the economy and in public administration, a study for the European Commission’s Directorate-General for Communications Networks, Content and Technology recommends. The report by German and French ICT researchers, concludes that “open source is important for the future of the European software industry.”

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Yap Wen Jiun - the Android scientist

Filed under
Android
Interviews

WE live in a world where technology surrounds us.

The biggest piece of technology we use is possibly the smartphone. It’s like a computer in your hand and it’s handy for communication. The smartphone engine, which most people take for granted, is the operating system (OS). A local Android OS developer, Yap Wen Jiun, shares his thoughts on his field of choice.

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today's leftovers

  • Linux Kernel Podcast for 2017/03/21
  • Announcing the Shim review process [Ed: accepting rather than fighting very malicious things]
    However, a legitimate criticism has been that there's very little transparency in Microsoft's signing process. Some people have waited for significant periods of time before being receiving a response. A large part of this is simply that demand has been greater than expected, and Microsoft aren't in the best position to review code that they didn't write in the first place.
  • rtop – A Nifty Tool to Monitor Remote Server Over SSH
    rtop is a simple, agent-less, remote server monitoring tool that works over SSH. It doesn’t required any other software to be installed on remote machine, except openSSH server package & remote server credentials.
  • Chakra GNU/Linux Users Get KDE Plasma 5.9.3 and KDE Applications 16.12.3, More
    Neofytos Kolokotronis from the Chakra GNU/Linux project, an open-source operating system originally based on Arch Linux and the KDE Plasma desktop environment, announced the availability of the latest KDE updates in the distro's repositories. Those of you using Chakra GNU/Linux as your daily drive will be happy to learn that the stable repos were filled with numerous up-to-date packages from the recently released KDE Plasma 5.9.3 desktop environment, KDE Applications 16.12.3 software suite, and KDE Frameworks 5.32.0 collection of over 70 add-on libraries for Qt 5.
  • YaST Team: Highlights of YaST development sprint 32
    One of the known limitations of the current installer is that it’s only able to automatically propose an encrypted schema if LVM is used. For historical reasons, if you want to encrypt your root and/or home partitions but not to use LVM, you would need to use the expert partitioner… and hope for the best from the bootloader proposal. But the new storage stack is here (well, almost here) to make all the old limitations vanish. With our testing ISO it’s already possible to set encryption with just one click for both partition-based and LVM-based proposals. The best possible partition schema is correctly created and everything is encrypted as the user would expect. We even have continuous tests in our internal openQA instance for it. The part of the installer managing the bootloader installation is still not adapted, which means the resulting system would need some manual fixing of Grub before being able to boot… but that’s something for an upcoming sprint (likely the very next one).
  • Debian stretch on the Raspberry Pi 3 (update) (2017-03-22)
    I previously wrote about my Debian stretch preview image for the Raspberry Pi 3.
  • Asus Tinker Board – Chromium YouTube Performance
    One of the many strengths of the Asus Tinker Board is its multimedia support. This 4K video capable machine is a mouthwatering prospect for the multimedia enthusiast. The machine has a respectable 1.8GHz ARM Cortex-A17 quad-core processor. It’s only 32-bit (unlike the Raspberry Pi 3) but has a higher clock speed. The Tinker Board also sports an integrated ARM-based Mali T764 graphics processor (GPU).

Microsoft vs GNU/Linux

Netflix and GNU/Linux

today's howtos