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Thursday, 27 Nov 14 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Limp Bizkit lead claims hackers stole his sex video srlinuxx 2 05/03/2005 - 4:43am
Story New OSI President Steps Down srlinuxx 2 05/03/2005 - 5:04am
Story Cronkite denounces the war on drugs. srlinuxx 3 05/03/2005 - 6:07am
Story Texas Gaming Festival: Quick Peek at the LAN Party srlinuxx 06/03/2005 - 3:16pm
Story The Rock solidifies Doom movie role srlinuxx 2 08/03/2005 - 2:29am
Story Bumbling Bully srlinuxx 2 08/03/2005 - 2:30am
Story A Week with KDE 3.4rc1 srlinuxx 5 08/03/2005 - 3:46pm
Story Student in High School zombie terror threat srlinuxx 1 08/03/2005 - 4:00pm
Story European democracy bogus, says Open Source Consortium srlinuxx 2 08/03/2005 - 4:27pm
Story Linux Making Inroads into Automotive Industry srlinuxx 1 08/03/2005 - 4:59pm

Tizen based Samsung TV SDK 1.0 has been released

Filed under
Linux

The Tizen based Samsung TV SDK 1.0 has been released today. This follows the beta that was previously released at the start of July.

The SDK provides developers with the tools they need to begin developing for the Tizen-based Samsung TV platform. The toolset includes an Integrated Development Environment (IDE) and a Web Simulator for testing TV apps on a PC.

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There's New In-Fighting Over The Future Of Compiz

Filed under
Development
Misc

Unless you're a user of Ubuntu with Unity 7, you probably haven't heard much about Compiz in quite some time. However, some developers are looking to further revive its development but not everyone is in agreement.

There's been an uptick in bickering amongst developers on the Compiz mailing list lately. A controversial developer often involved in these fights, Scott Moreau, declared himself the maintainer of upstream 0.8 stable branches.

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PC-BSD 10.1 review

Filed under
Reviews
BSD

The last PC-BSD release I reviewed was the 9.1 edition, and that was back in December 2012 (see PC-BSD 9.1 preview). That’s almost two years ago, But that’s because I’ve been very disappointed with subsequent releases after that, so I never bothered to write another review, though I was each testing each release privately.

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Android game console runs on quad-core Cortex-A17

Filed under
Android

Ugoos announced a “micro game console” spin-off of its Android-based quad-core Cortex-A17 UT3 media player, and released an Ubuntu 14.10 build for the UT3.

The Ugoos “G-box” micro game console appears to use the same design as the company’s Android-based, 4Kx4K ready UT3 media player, which sells for as low as $130. The G-box follows another similar, but OEM-focused UG-CX-998 media player with 4Kx2K resolution announced in September (see farther below).

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How the Linux Foundation's CII Is Securing the Internet

Filed under
Linux

The Heartbleed flaw that was first publicly disclosed in April of this year, was in some respects a black eye on the open-source community. Heartbleed is a flaw in the open-source OpenSSL cryptographic library that had wide ranging impact across the infrastructure of the Internet. In the aftermath of Heartbleed, a new effort emerged called the Core Infrastructure Initiative (CII) to help fund developers wanting to improve security across critical open-source infrastructure technologies.

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JVC KENWOOD Corporation, Linaro and OpenSynergy Join the AGL – Automotive Grade Linux

Filed under
Linux

The Linux Foundation has announced that the JVC KENWOOD Corporation, Linaro and OpenSynergy are joining the Linux Foundation to collaborate on Automotive Grade Linux (AGL). This brings the total amount of companies working on AGL to forty six.

The AGL is a collaborative open source project developing a common, Linux-based software stack for the connected car. The members are committed to the goal of developing a common and open automotive platform for OEMs and suppliers to utilize, contribute to and build commercial products and technologies upon. The AGL reference model is based on Tizen.

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Top 10 Linux Holiday Gifts for 2014 (Slideshow)

Filed under
Linux

In 2012, the Top 10 Linux Gift Guide set the upper limit at $500, and last year it dropped to $400. This year, the cut-off dips to $350, reflecting the ongoing price reductions in consumer electronics, as well as my not entirely successful attempt to live up to Mr. Money Moustache's guidelines for living on the cheap. (Click the Gallery link below to see a slide show and descriptions of the Top 10 Linux gifts.)

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Cutelyst 0.5.0

Filed under
KDE

A bit more than one year after the initial commit, Cutelyst makes it’s 5th release.

It’s now powering 3 commercial applications, the last one recently got into production and is the most complex of them, making heavy use of Grantlee and Cutelyst capabilities.

Speaking of Grantlee if you use it on Qt5 you will get hit by QTBUG-41469 which sadly doesn’t seems to get fixed in time for 5.4, but uWSGI can constrain your application resources so your server doesn’t go out of memory (worth the leak due to it’s usefulness).

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Professional Samsung NX1 Tizen Smartcamera hits the US

Filed under
Linux

The Tizen based Samsung NX1 Smartcamera is the company’s answer to DSLR Professional shooting in a Mirror-Less Compact Systems Camera (CSC). The NX1 is capable of shooting 4K video and a staggering autofocus time of only 0.055sec. Originally the NX1 was supposed to hit the US last month, but that clearly didn’t happen.

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Sponsored Tiles now live in Firefox

Filed under
Moz/FF

That Sponsored Tiles program from Mozilla, which I first wrote about in Mozilla to sell ads in Firefox browser via the Directory Tiles program, has gone live.

To refresh your memory, back in February (2014), Mozilla announced that some of the tiles in a new tab page in Firefox will be sponsored. In other words, ads from Mozilla partners. Note that you need to be using Firefox 33.1 to see sponsored tiles. They’re not available in Firefox 33.0 and earlier.

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Cinnamon 2.4.4 Arrives with Various Refinements

Filed under
Linux

Cinnamon, a Linux desktop environment developed by the same team that is also building Linux Mint, has been updated yet again, although this time it's a rather small progression.

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Android drone tracks you by computer vision

Filed under
Android

Kickstarter is showing an $899, Android-based “Mind4″ follow-me drone that tracks you entirely by computer vision, and interprets full-body gestures.

Like fellow Kickstarter drone projects AirDog and Hexo+, as well as 3D Robotics’s Iris+, AirMind’s Mind4 quadcopter is designed as a “follow-me” drone for recording videos of a moving target. Unlike these products, however, which don’t run Android or Linux, the Mind4 runs Android on a quad-core, 2GHz ARM processor, giving it the brainpower to run advanced vision recognition algorithms. As a result, Mind4 can track you solely via computer vision via its VAPS (vision augmented piloting system) engine rather than depending on less reliable GPS or tricky manual controls.

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ArrayFire Accelerated Compute Library Open-Sourced

Filed under
OSS

The ArrayFire GPU compute library that allows for simplified GPU computing via targeting its own optimized library and API for GPGPU kernel generation than writing your own CUDA/OpenCL kernels, has been open-sourced.

ArrayFire is advertised as being faster than other acceleration libraries like Armadillo, Intel Math Kernel Library, etc. ArrayFire supports OpenCL GPUs -- and hardware like the Intel Xeon Phi MIC -- as well as NVIDIA GPUs via CUDA. Last but not least there's also a C programming back-end.

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Wormhole in Interstellar Movie Designed with a Linux OS – Gallery

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The Interstellar movie has been released not long ago and it was an instant success, despite some of the criticism that has been expressed by a number of physicists. To make thinks even more interesting, at least for Linux users, it looks like the production team used Linux to built the black hole in the movie.

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Pear OS Linux Concept Revived as Pearl Linux 1.0 – Screenshot Tour

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Mac

Pear OS Linux was a very successful Linux distribution based on Ubuntu that wanted to provide an experience similar to Mac OS X. That operating system is gone now, but Pearl Linux wants to replace it.
Pear OS Linux managed to have quite an impact on the community, despite the fact that it was offering an almost identical experience to the Mac OS X desktop.

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We have a winner! Fresh Linux Mint 17.1 – hands down the best

Filed under
Reviews

Linux Mint 17.1 is the first example of what the Mint project team can do when they're focused on their own system rather than on making the latest Ubuntu work with Mint.

That’s because Mint 17.1 sticks with the Ubuntu released earlier this year – the first time this desktop Linux has not gone with the more recent Ubuntu.

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6 tips for adopting open source

Filed under
OSS

Open source code drives collaborative innovation from a larger pool of developers at a lower cost, which is why federal agencies are adopting the "open source first" model. In fact Sonny Hashmi, CIO of the General Services Administration, recently announced that implementing open source software is among his top priorities this year.

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Linux admins: It's time to relearn the art of compiling apps

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

It used to be that open source software was released only as source code and had to be compiled wherever it was needed. Obviously, that's changed. Today, some will even tell you that compiling source is an improper and problematic way to install software. Tomorrow, it may become more standard than they think.

While compiling source is still the basis of many BSDs (though you can get binary packages easily enough), package management came to Linux early on with RPM and branched out everywhere ever since. Package support on Debian and Ubuntu is simply massive. Fedora has a huge number of packages, as do RHEL and CentOS, though the packages available for the latter are generally far older for legacy and stability reasons.

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Dirt-cheap laptops might be this year's stocking stuffer

Filed under
Android
GNU
Linux
Google

Chromebooks, the low-cost compute devices that run Google’s Chrome OS, haven’t necessarily been showcased in Black Friday circulars, but they’re making an impression nonetheless. Although prices vary, Chromebooks generally range from $200 to $350 or so, and now come loaded with up to 1TB of Google Drive storage, too.

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I GIve Up On Systemd

Filed under
Linux

After many hours of reading/fiddling/reconfiguring I’ve given up on Systemd.

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