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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 29 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story CA confirms plans for open source patent pledge srlinuxx 03/03/2005 - 4:06pm
Story Intel PR Department Hard at Work srlinuxx 03/03/2005 - 4:08pm
Story ChoicePoint was victim of ID theft in '02 srlinuxx 03/03/2005 - 4:25pm
Story amoroK LiveCD srlinuxx 03/03/2005 - 6:01pm
Story Gentoo Linux 2005.0 Security Rebuild srlinuxx 03/03/2005 - 11:25pm
Story Hacker taps into business school files" srlinuxx 04/03/2005 - 2:11pm
Story Judge hits amazon.com with fine srlinuxx 04/03/2005 - 2:46pm
Story One in four 'touched' by ID fraud srlinuxx 2 04/03/2005 - 5:03pm
Story Big Brother is Watching your Toyota Sienna srlinuxx 1 05/03/2005 - 4:17am
Story Limp Bizkit lead claims hackers stole his sex video srlinuxx 2 05/03/2005 - 4:43am

Debian and Tails (Based on Debian)

Filed under
Debian
  • Debian Project to Shut Down Its Public FTP Services, Developers Are Not Affected

    The Debian Project, a group of developers from all over the world who create one of the most popular and used free operating systems on the planet, Debian GNU/Linux, announced that they're shutting down their FTP servers for users.

  • LinuxAndUbuntu Distro Review Of The Week Debian Linux 8.7 (Jessie)

    ​I have always been a Ubuntu guy. I use Ubuntu or some other derivatives like Mint or elementary but never have I tried Debian. Well not anymore. I tested Debian and I must say I really like it. The thing with Debian is that stability is prioritized over all other factors. So if you are looking for the latest updates to packages, Debian is not the one. Debian is very popular amongst Linux users and rightly so. It enjoys a very superior community support compared to many other distros and most importantly the stability. So my experience? Let's start the distro review of the week, Debian 8.7.

  • Improve Your Online Security with Tails

    The popular image of online dangers is scary bad guys trying to steal our stuff. This image is accurate if you remember to include unfettered corporate interests as the scary bad guys.

    Our protections against our good friends the telcos and cable companies have never been strong, and now they're nearly non-existent. Repealing Broadband Privacy Rules, Congress Sides with the Cable and Telephone Industry sums it up beautifully: "Internet providers will be given new powers to harvest your personal information in extraordinarily creepy ways." And buy and sell it with no oversight or accountability, and law enforcement will get their hands on it as surely as road apples draw flies.

    What can we do about it? I believe that the best solution is legislative. I prefer technical solutions for protecting ourselves from hostile and predatory interests, but there aren't many, and they're incomplete. Internet access is a requirement for many routine aspects of our daily lives, and even if you avoid going online you have no knowledge or control of the information the vendors and service providers that you use are collecting and trading, or what people share about you on social media. Stores, electric and gas utilities, healthcare providers, tradespeople, private clubs, non-profit organizations, charitable groups, banks, insurance companies, and on and on. They all collect information about you, and many trade it freely. Of course, it's not fair to assume that everyone is venal, but even when a vendor has a heart of gold they may be lacking in technical competence.

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Thunderbird 'redesign'

Prototype of eParticipation portal shared as open source

Filed under
OSS

The EU’s Publication Office has just published the source code for a prototype of an eParticipation portal, allowing citizens to help draft EU legislative proposals. The code for the prototype is the result of a so-called pilot project, launched by the European Parliament in 2015. Such pilot projects are tacked onto the Parliaments’ approval of the annual budget for the European Commission.

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Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software

Leftovers: Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Snap creation tool 'snapcraft' has a new release with the groundwork for collaboration
  • Mobile Ubuntu Gamble to Fizzle Out in June
  • The Pop GTK Theme Brings Ubuntu with GNOME to Life

    If you’re looking to give your newly minted GNOME desktop a bit of a makeover look no further than the Pop GTK theme. Created by the popular Ubuntu computer seller System76, the Pop GTK theme puts a modern spin on the Ubuntu brown and orange colour scheme (which also happen to be the colours used in the System76 logo).

  • 2017 will be the year of the Linux desktop... for GNOME on Ubuntu

    A few weeks ago, Mark Shuttleworth, now CEO of Canonical, announced that the Unity desktop shell would be abandoned in favour of GNOME. While we were told that GNOME would be used by Ubuntu 18.04, we weren't sure whether it'd be included in Ubuntu 17.10, the next release. Following a meeting on IRC, we now know that GNOME will ship by default in the next release.

  • Ubuntu GNOME merged into mainline Ubuntu

    Ubuntu has been using the Unity environment developed by Caonical Ltd. since the netbook edition of Ubuntu 10.10, initially released on June 9, 2010. However, it has been decided that the Unity environment would no longer be the standard environment used for the popular GNU/Linux distro.

    In a blog post by Mark Shuttleworth, founder of Ubuntu and Canonical, he says, "We are wrapping up an excellent quarter and an excellent year for the company, with performance in many teams and products that we can be proud of. As we head into the new fiscal year, it’s appropriate to reassess each of our initiatives. I’m writing to let you know that we will end our investment in Unity8, the phone and convergence shell. We will shift our default Ubuntu desktop back to GNOME for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS."

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

Mesa 17.0.5

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Raspberry WebKiosk 6.0 released

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Raspberry WebKiosk 6.0 has been released today with a complete update of its underlying operating system, from Raspbian Wheezy to Raspbian Jessie Lite (a Debian Jessie derived OS for the Raspberry Pi microcomputer).

Raspberry WebKiosk is designed for the cheapest possible web kiosks and multi-user web workstations (think about using it in cafès, offices, schools, hotels, hospitals, libraries) with the Raspberry Pi base, where people can surf the web with a normal browser. It’s a port of the more powerful Instant WebKoisk system for PCs.

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Best Linux Distros for Gaming in 2017

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming

Gaming in Linux has evolved a lot in the past few years. Now, you have dozens of distros pre-optimized for gaming and gamers. We tested all of them and hand-picked the best. There are a few other articles and lists of this type out there, but they don’t really go into detail and they are pretty outdated. This is an up-to-date list with any info you’d need.

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GNOME 3.26 Desktop Environment to Offer Todoist Integration, Quarter Tiling

Filed under
GNOME

They came much faster than we expected, and it looks like more features of the upcoming GNOME 3.26 desktop environment for GNU/Linux distribution have been revealed.

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Project Halium Seeks A Unified Mobile GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

New forks of GNU/Linux come out all the time, but some, like the newly unveiled Project Halium, actively seek to unite a given landscape. In this case the mobile world. Rather than being yet another version of Linux on mobile devices, like SailfishOS or Ubuntu Touch, Project Halium’s goal is to create a base that anybody can work off of to integrate all sorts of Linux code into the Android stack smoothly. Ideally, Project Halium wants to not only build out a base framework that anybody can use to hook their Linux project into Android’s soft underbelly of code and run it on an Android device, but they want to be the de facto example of such, in much the same way that saying the word “Linux” out in public will make many people immediately think of Ubuntu.

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3 Linux questions from the community

Filed under
Linux

In the last The Queue, I flipped the script and asked you questions as opposed to answering them. It was so well received, I'm going to keep it going with three more questions this month. I'll resume answering next month, so don't forget you can fill the queue with your questions about Linux, building and maintaining communities, contributing to an open source project, and anything else you'd like to know. While the previous two questions were a bit philosophical, this month we'll keep it fun.

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Flatpak 0.9.3 Linux App Sandboxing Framework Released with Many Builder Changes

Filed under
Linux

Alex Larsson from the Flatpak team announces the release and immediate availability of the third maintenance update to the Flatpak 0.9 series of the open-source Linux application sandboxing and distribution framework.

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New CloudLinux 7 Beta Linux Kernel Available for Testing, Two Crashes Addressed

Filed under
Linux

CloudLinux's Mykola Naugolnyi announced today, April 26, 2017, the availability of a new Beta kernel for users of the CloudLinux 7 operating system series, addressing various vulnerabilities discovered lately.

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5 more open source companies to watch in 2017

Filed under
OSS

An exciting class of startups with a focus on enterprise IT are those built on open source foundations, in some cases commercializing and adding value to an already popular open source project.

We recently highlighted 5 such open source-oriented companies, and below we introduce you to 5 more. Note that this list only contains companies that have announced funding over the past year or so, and isn't intended to be an all-inclusive compilation. Without further ado…

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Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) Linux OS Is Now Officially Open for Development

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical's Adam Conrad announced the other day that the upcoming Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system, due for release on October 19, 2017, is now officially open for development.

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Also: Canonical Releases a Technology Preview of Ubuntu Server 17.04's New Installer

Canonical Outs Major Kernel Update to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, 10 Vulnerabilities Fixed

Canonical Releases Snapcraft 2.29 Snap Creator Tool for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS & 17.04

Linux CLI Launcher Transforms Your Home Screen Into A Terminal

Filed under
Android
GNU
Linux

The Google Play Store features many launchers of all kinds ready to make your life easier. Whether it’s Nova Launcher, Apex Launcher, or Evie Launcher, there are a ton of third-party launchers out there for you to try out. At the base level, though, these launchers start out thematically quite similar although you can customize them with beautiful icon packs, themes, widgets, and more. As you might know, Android is built on the Linux kernel. Thus it has a hidden shell functionality which fans of GNU/Linux might be pleased to try. A full Linux terminal environment on an Android phone? That sure sounds interesting. But what if you could replace your stock launcher with a launcher that mimics the Linux terminal interface? Luckily, you can thanks to the Linux CLI Launcher.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat Financial News

Leftovers: Gaming

  • Unreal Engine 4.16 Enters Public Preview State
    Epic Games on Friday released the first public preview of the upcoming Unreal Engine 4.16. There are many changes to find with Unreal Engine 4.16 while some of the highlights include volumetric fog support, a new clothing solver, optimized distance field lighting, garbage collection improvements, and more.
  • Unreal Engine 4.16 Preview
    A Preview of the upcoming 4.16 release is available now on the Launcher and Github. We have made this Preview available so that our developer-community can help us catch issues before the final release. As fixes are implemented, we will release updated previews throughout the development cycle. Please be aware that the preview releases are not fully quality tested, that they are still under heavy active development, and that they should be considered as unstable until the final release. Developers should not convert their projects for active development on preview releases. Please test on copies of your project instead.
  • Watch this highlight reel of iAlwaysSin's Alien Isolation livestreams!
    Last Thursday the newest member of the GOL Livestream Team, iAlwaysSin, completed her live playthrough of the extremely scary Alien Isolation. And, to commemorate this achievement (and all the deaths that occurred in the process) I decided to download and edit all the VODs together into a nice highlight reel. With my sarcastic remarks, of course.

Kernel and Graphics in Linux

Manjaro Linux: Reliable and Up to Date, Geekdom Optional

Regular readers can pretty much ignore this one. We’ll be back to cartoons, O’s baseball and the usual inanity soon, tomorrow in fact. I just wanted to revisit my dedication to Linux, prompted by a recent mixed bag of experiences that left me feeling even more positive about a relative newcomer to the distro scene: Manjaro. It all started a few days ago, when I decided to finally try to update the eight remaining Linux installs on my main desktop PC. I’ve been using Linux Mint (18.1 Cinnamon) as my daily driver for several months, originally in an attempt to keep my bandwidth usage to a reasonable level, and then due to inertia/lack of issues. I could have gone with my trusty Debian stable install, my go-to for years up till then, but I guess I was just getting bored. Read more