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Monday, 15 Oct 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story CA confirms plans for open source patent pledge srlinuxx 03/03/2005 - 4:06pm
Story Intel PR Department Hard at Work srlinuxx 03/03/2005 - 4:08pm
Story ChoicePoint was victim of ID theft in '02 srlinuxx 03/03/2005 - 4:25pm
Story amoroK LiveCD srlinuxx 03/03/2005 - 6:01pm
Story Gentoo Linux 2005.0 Security Rebuild srlinuxx 03/03/2005 - 11:25pm
Story Hacker taps into business school files" srlinuxx 04/03/2005 - 2:11pm
Story Judge hits amazon.com with fine srlinuxx 04/03/2005 - 2:46pm
Story One in four 'touched' by ID fraud srlinuxx 2 04/03/2005 - 5:03pm
Story Big Brother is Watching your Toyota Sienna srlinuxx 1 05/03/2005 - 4:17am
Story Limp Bizkit lead claims hackers stole his sex video srlinuxx 2 05/03/2005 - 4:43am

Getting started with Minikube: Kubernetes on your laptop

Filed under
HowTos

Minikube is advertised on the Hello Minikube tutorial page as a simple way to run Kubernetes for Docker. While that documentation is very informative, it is primarily written for MacOS. You can dig deeper for instructions for Windows or a Linux distribution, but they are not very clear. And much of the documentation—like one on installing drivers for Minikube—is targeted at Debian/Ubuntu users.

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Tumbleweed Gets Plasma 5.14, Frameworks 5.50

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SUSE

Four openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots this week brought new versions of software along with new versions of KDE’s Plasma and Frameworks as well as python-setuptools and many other packages.

The most recent snapshot, 20181009, updated KDE’s Plasma 5.14. The new Plasma version has several new features like the new Display Configuration widget for screen management, which is useful for presentations. The Audio Volume widget has a built in speaker test feature moved from Phonon settings and the Network widget now works for SSH VPN tunnels again. The Global menu now supports GTK applications as well. Mozilla Firefox 62.0.3 fixed a few Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures including a vulnerability in register allocation of JavaScript that can lead to type confusion, which allows for an arbitrary read and write. The cpupower package, which is a collection of tools to examine and tune power, was updated to version 4.19 and deleted some patches that are now part of the mainline. Source-control-management system mercurial 4.7.2 fixed a potential out-of-bounds read in manifest parsing C code. Other packages including in the snapshot were inxi 3.0.26, lftp 4.8.4, libinput 1.12.1, okteta 0.25.4 and vm-install 0.10.04

Snapshot 20181004 included several package updates as well. NetworkManager-openvpn 1.8.6 fixed an endless loop checking for encrypted certificate. The open source antivirus engine clamav 0.100.2 disabled the opt-in minor feature of OnAccess scanning on Linux systems and will re-enabled in a future release. Users who enabled the feature in clamd.conf will see a warning informing them that the feature is not active. The Linux Kernel was updated to 4.18.11 and had several fixes for Ext4. Developers using python-setuptools 40.4.3 will see a few changes from the previous 40.2.0 version that was in Tumbleweed like the vendored pyparsing in pkg_resources to 2.2.1. Those using Samba will see a fix for cluster CTDB configuration with the 4.9.1 version. Caching proxy squid 4.3 updated systemd dependencies in squid.service and vlc 3.0.4 improve support for broken HEVC inside MKV.

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Librem 5 ❤️ GNOME 3.32

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GNOME

I am glad to announce that the tooling I am working on since the beginning of the year is ready to be used!

Thanks to new features introduced into libhandy 0.0.3 and 0.0.4 and thanks to a few fixes to Adwaita in GTK+ 3.24.1, you can make GTK+ 3 apps adaptive to work both on the desktop and on the upcoming GNOME-based Librem 5 phone.

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Also: Purism's Privacy-Focused Librem 5 Linux Phone Will Ship with GNOME 3.32 Desktop

Purism Is Hoping GNOME 3.32 Will Be In Great Shape For Their Librem 5 Smartphone

Krita 4.1.5 Released

Filed under
KDE

Coming hot on the heels of Krita 4.1.3, which had an unfortunate accident to the TIFF plugin, we’re releasing Krita 4.1.5 today! There’s a lot more than just that fix, though, since we’re currently celebrating the last week of the Krita Fundraiser by having a very productive development sprint in Deventer, the Netherlands.

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Openwashing Leftovers

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

Security: Updates, US Weapons Systems, and Voting Risks

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Thursday
  • US Weapons Systems Are Easy Cyberattack Targets, New Report Finds

    Specifically, the report concludes that almost all weapons that the DOD tested between 2012 and 2017 have “mission critical” cyber vulnerabilities. “Using relatively simple tools and techniques, testers were able to take control of systems and largely operate undetected, due in part to basic issues such as poor password management and unencrypted communications,” the report states. And yet, perhaps more alarmingly, the officials who oversee those systems appeared dismissive of the results.

  • Election security groups warn of cyber vulnerabilities for emailed ballots

    Experts from both the private and public sector have warned about the vulnerabilities of online voting for years, but the report comes at a time of heightened alarm about election interference from hostile nation-states or cyber criminals.

Games: Commodore 64, Steam, OCTOPTICOM, Geneshift, RimWorld, Unreal Engine, XCOM, Robocraft, Cities: Skylines - Industries

Filed under
Gaming
  • Internet Archive launches repository of 15,000 playable Commodore 64 games

    The Commodore 64 becomes the third in-browser collection after the Commodore Amiga and a range of arcade games from LCD pocket to full cabinet were released over the last few years.

    The site uses an adaptation of the Vice emulator, compiled in Emscripten, and there are already 10,500 titles available, which the Archive confirms is a growing number. In fact, at time of writing it already seems to have exceeded 15,000.

  • The recent Steam Play beta is now out for everyone, plus a minor beta update

    If it doesn't show up for you, restart Steam. Hopefully in future the stable updates won't require this, I imagine an improved update flow will be worked on eventually although it's not much hassle to quickly restart Steam.

    Additionally, there's a very minor 3.7-8 beta available which only notes that it has "Minor compatibility fixes in preparation for future Proton versions.". While minor, the wording has piqued my interest to see what they're going to be doing.

  • Programming puzzler 'OCTOPTICOM' adds Linux support

    For those of you who love programming and puzzle games, OCTOPTICOM looks like it might actually be quite good.

  • Geneshift has expanded the Battle Royale mode to support playing with a friend

    Geneshift, the top-down shooter recently gained a Battle Royale mode that's really damn fun and the developer has continued to roll out improvements.

  • RimWorld 1.0 is going to release on October 17th next week

    After being in development for over five years, the developer has now announced the final release. They've said that the game will be save-compatible going from the most recent version as long as you haven't installed any mods. It's not going to be much different to the most recent beta, since it will largely be a bug-fix release. Although, they did mention "a new food restriction system", which lets you restrict what your colonists and any prisoners are allowed to eat.

  • Epic Games have rolled out Unreal Engine 4.21 preview, with Linux improvements

    Overall, it seems like a pretty good step up for Unreal Engine with a lot of new features, bug fixes and general code cleanups. It has improved IPv6 support, improvements to DDoS Detection and Mitigation, experimental support for the SteamVR Input subsystem, improved performance of the Unreal asset cooking process, loads of animation system updates and the list goes on and on.

  • The XCOM 2 'Tactical Legacy Pack' DLC shows how much love Firaxis has for the series and the fans

    As a long time XCOM fan, the Tactical Legacy Pack for XCOM 2 certainly feels like fan service and it's really quite good. XCOM 2 was already good, difficult as hell but engrossing. The War of the Chosen expansion released last year expanded the game in a lot of ways and it became an even better experience. This was especially true, because of all the new story elements to the game which changed the direction of it quite a lot.

    Now we have the Tactical Legacy Pack which includes new game modes, new maps, new weapons and armour and plenty more it's certainly not short on features. While not a complete game changer, it offers up enough to make it worth a purchase in my opinion. Enough to make me put down my new addiction to Rocket League for quite a number of hours, it's just that good.

  • Free to play robot battler 'Robocraft' adds a wave-based singleplayer mode

    Robocraft, the rather good free to play robot building and battling game just added a an early version of their wave-based campaign mode.

    I've tried it out and it's actually not bad at all, a pretty good way to really test your design skills against increasing waves of difficult enemies along with some more powerful boss robots.

  • Cities: Skylines - Industries expansion announced, releasing October 23rd

    Paradox have announced the Cities: Skylines - Industries expansion due for release on October 23rd and as usual the DLC will work fine on Linux.

    From the press release we got sent:

    “With this expansion, players can make more meaningful choices in their cities’ industry by managing their production chains from grain to bread.” said Sandra Neudinger, Product Manager from Paradox Interactive. “The players have been asking for an industrial expansion for a while, so we’re excited to finally offer a full featured approach.”

Git GUI Front-Ends And IDE Support - Git Series Part 4

Filed under
Linux

Developers have created third-party software (free or otherwise) that gives users a GUI to use for interacting with a repository. Here is an overview of a few programs that you can use. This is so you can have an idea of what you can expect from a GUI git client.

Read<br />
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Plex Media Server Is Now Available as a Snap App for Ubuntu, Other Linux Distros

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Ubuntu

Already available as binary packages for Debian- and Red Hat-based operating systems using the DEB and RPM package format, the Plex Media Server over-the-top (OTT) media service used by millions worldwide is now easier to install across a multitude of GNU/Linux distributions as a Snap app from Canonical's Snap Store.

"The biggest appeal of Snaps is the simple installation mechanism," said Tamas Szelei, Software Engineer at Plex. "Canonical's Snap Store provides an easy and secure way to distribute our software to an increasing number of consumers. What's more, Snaps help cater to the more technical Plex user, who benefits from confined applications and the added sense of software security."

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Hands On & Initial Benchmarks With An Ampere eMAG 32-Core ARM Server

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Especially with Qualcomm's Centriq efforts going quiet in recent months, one of the most interesting ARM server efforts at the moment is Ampere Computing -- the company founded by former Intel president Renee James and with several other ex-Intel employees on staff. They started off with the acquired assets from what was AppliedMicro and their X-Gene ARMv8 IP and for the past year have been improving it into their recently announced eMAG processors.

The eMAG processors announced back in September by Ampere are up to 32-core with a 3.3GHz turbo while having a launch price of $850 USD. Their second processor is a 16-core model with 3.3GHz turbo for $550. Both processors support eight DDR4-2667MHz memory channels, SATA 3.0 storage connectivity, 42 PCI Express 3.0 lanes, and these 16nm FinFET processors have a 125 Watt TDP. Lenovo and other ODMs will be manufacturing servers with eMAG processors although the expected pricing information isn't yet announced.

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Debian-Based Raspbian OS Gets Raspberry Pi PoE HAT Support, Latest Updates

Filed under
Linux
Debian

Running the long-term supported Linux 4.14.71 kernel, the Raspbian 2018-10-09 release comes with support for Raspberry Pi Foundation's Raspberry Pi PoE (Power over Ethernet) HAT, a small accessory for the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ SBC that allows users to power the board via an Ethernet cable.

Raspbian 2018-10-09 also updates the startup wizard by implementing support for assigning keyboard layouts by country, a new option to use the US keyboard layout in preference to country-specific option, the ability to display the computer's IP address on first page, and support for checking for Wi-Fi networks.

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Also: Raspberry Pi's Raspbian OS Updated With New Kernel, Startup Wizard Improvements

Linux Kernel 4.14 LTSI Is Now Officially Available for All Hardware Vendors

Filed under
Linux

The Long Term Support Initiative (LTSI) project aims to provide hardware vendors using the Linux kernel in their products with support for at least 2-3 years, which is the typical lifetime of a consumer device, in an attempt to remove the fragmentation of the various Linux kernel versions used by device vendors and GNU/Linux distributions.

It also makes it easier for device vendors to upstream their improvements into the main Linux kernel branches more easily. Coming a year after the Linux 4.9 kernel series, which was released as an LTSI kernel on September 21, 2017, the Linux 4.14.75 LTS kernel is now the latest and most advanced LTSI kernel for hardware vendors.

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FOSS Project Spotlight: Tutanota, the First Encrypted Email Service with an App on F-Droid

Filed under
GNU

Seven years ago, we started building Tutanota, an encrypted email service with a strong focus on security, privacy and open source. Long before the Snowden revelations, we felt there was a need for easy-to-use encryption that would allow everyone to communicate online without being snooped upon.

As developers, we know how easy it is to spy on email that travels through the web. Email, with its federated setup is great, and that's why it has become the main form of online communication and still is. However, from a security perspective, the federated setup is troublesome—to say the least.

End-to-end encrypted email is difficult to handle on desktops (with key generation, key sharing, secure storing of keys and so on), and it's close to impossible on mobile devices. For the average, not so tech-savvy internet user, there are a lot of pitfalls, and the probability of doing something wrong is, unfortunately, rather high.

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Kernel: LWN Coverage (No Longer Paywalled) and Initial HDMI 2.0 Support With Nouveau Slated For The Next Linux Kernel

Filed under
Linux
  • Revenge of the modems

    Back in the halcyon days of the previous century, those with a technical inclination often became overly acquainted with modems—not just the strange sounds they made when connecting, but the AT commands that were used to control them. While the AT command set is still in use (notably for GSM networks), it is generally hidden these days. But some security researchers have found that Android phones often make AT commands available via their USB ports, which is something that can potentially be exploited by rogue USB devices of various sorts.

    A paper [PDF] that was written by a long list of researchers (Dave (Jing) Tian, Grant Hernandez, Joseph I. Choi, Vanessa Frost, Christie Ruales, Patrick Traynor, Hayawardh Vijayakumar, Lee Harrison, Amir Rahmati, Michael Grace, and Kevin R. B. Butler) and presented at the 27th USENIX Security Symposium described the findings. A rather large number of Android firmware builds were scanned for the presence of AT commands and many were found to have them. That's not entirely surprising since the baseband processors used to communicate with the mobile network often use AT commands for configuration. But it turns out that Android vendors have also added their own custom AT commands that can have a variety of potentially harmful effects—making those available over USB is even more problematic.

    They started by searching through 2018 separate Android binary images (it is not clear how that number came about, perhaps it is simply coincidental) from 11 different vendors. They extracted and decompressed the various pieces inside the images and then searched those files for AT command strings. That process led to a database of 3500 AT commands, which can be seen at the web site for ATtention Spanned—the name given to the vulnerabilities.

  • XFS, LSM, and low-level management APIs

    The Linux Security Module (LSM) subsystem allows security modules to hook into many low-level operations within the kernel; modules can use those hooks to examine each requested operation and decide whether it should be allowed to proceed or not. In theory, just about every low-level operation is covered by an LSM hook; in practice, there are some gaps. A discussion regarding one of those gaps — low-level ioctl() operations on XFS filesystems — has revealed a thorny problem and a significant difference of opinion on what the correct solution is.

    In late September Tong Zhang pointed out that xfs_file_ioctl(), the 300-line function that dispatches the various ioctl() operations that can be performed on an XFS filesystem, was making a call to vfs_readlink() without first consulting the security_inode_readlink() LSM hook. As a result, a user with the privilege to invoke that operation (CAP_SYS_ADMIN) could read the value of a symbolic link within the filesystem, even if the security policy in place would otherwise forbid it. Zhang suggested that a call to the LSM hook should be added to address this problem.

  • Initial HDMI 2.0 Support With Nouveau Slated For The Next Linux Kernel

    Days after Nouveau DRM maintainer Ben Skeggs began staging changes for this open-source NVIDIA driver ahead of the next kernel cycle, this evening Ben Skeggs submitted the DRM-Next pull request to queue this work for the Linux 4.20/5.0 kernel cycle.

    As covered in that previous article, there isn't a whole lot on the Nouveau kernel driver front at this time. Skeggs summed up these open-source NVIDIA driver changes as: "Just initial HDMI 2.0 support, and a bunch of other cleanups."

  • Device-to-device memory-transfer offload with P2PDMA

    One of the most common tasks carried out by device drivers is setting up DMA operations for data transfers between main memory and the device. Often, data read into memory from one device will be immediately written, unchanged, to another device. Common examples include carrying the image between the camera and screen on a mobile phone, or downloading files to be saved on a disk. Those transfers have an impact on the CPU even if it does not use the data directly, due to higher memory use and effects like cache trashing. There are cases where it is possible to avoid usage of the system memory completely, though. A patch set (posted by Logan Gunthorpe with contributions by Christoph Hellwig and Steve Wise) has been in the works for some time that addresses this case for PCI devices using peer-to-peer (P2P) transfers, with a focus on offering an offload option for the NVMe fabrics target subsystem.

Graphics: Proton/RADV, AMD, NVIDIA/Vulkan and X.Org Developers Conference (XDC)

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Proton 3.7 Updated, More RADV Fixes To Help Steam Play Gaming

    Overnight Valve promoted their Proton 3.7-7 build with better alt-tab handling and full-screen behavior for many games. There is also fixed mouse behavior and DXVK 0.80 is now used for the Direct3D-11-over-Vulkan translation to yield better Steam Play gaming performance.

    Steam Play 3.7-8 is also now available in beta with minor compatibility fixes, which Valve says is in preparation for future Proton versions.

  • AMD Stages A Number Of Fixes Ahead Of Linux 4.20~5.0 - Plus Vega 20 "MGPU Fan Boost"

    Following several interesting and exciting feature pull requests for the next Linux kernel (to be released as either version 4.20 or 5.0), AMD developers have moved onto stabilizing this massive amount of new feature code.

    The first "fixes" pull request was submitted today to DRM-Next focusing on stabilizing and fixing issues stemming from all this new code. As a reminder, that feature code ranges from AMD Picasso APU support along with Raven 2, a lot of Vega 20 enablement code including compute support, initial xGMI support, VCN dynamic power gating, DC display code enhancements, VCN JPEG engine support, Raven Ridge GFXOFF support, GPUVM virtual memory performance improvements, and a variety of other interesting work.

  • NVIDIA's Guide For Getting Started With RTX Ray-Tracing In Vulkan

    Last month's Vulkan 1.1.85 release brought NVIDIA's experimental ray-tracing extension (VK_NVX_raytracing) while for those curious how this fits into the Vulkan workflow, NVIDIA today published a guide for getting started with ray-time ray-tracing in the Vulkan space.

  • Freedesktop.org: its past and its future

    At the 2018 X.Org Developers Conference (XDC) in A Coruña, Spain, Daniel Stone gave an update on the status of freedesktop.org, which serves multiple projects as a hosting site for code, mailing lists, specifications, and more. As its name would imply, it started out with a focus on free desktops and cross-desktop interoperability, but it lost that focus—along with its focus in general—along the way. He recapped the journey of fd.o (as it is often known) and unveiled some idea of where it may be headed in the future.

    The talk was billed with Keith Packard as co-presenter, but Packard could not make it to XDC; Stone said that he sent Packard a copy of the slides and heard no complaints, so he left Packard on the slide deck [PDF]. Stone wanted to start with the history of fd.o, because there are lots of new contributors these days—"which is great"—who may not know about it.

Exploring the Linux kernel: The secrets of Kconfig/kbuild

Filed under
Linux

The Linux kernel config/build system, also known as Kconfig/kbuild, has been around for a long time, ever since the Linux kernel code migrated to Git. As supporting infrastructure, however, it is seldom in the spotlight; even kernel developers who use it in their daily work never really think about it.

To explore how the Linux kernel is compiled, this article will dive into the Kconfig/kbuild internal process, explain how the .config file and the vmlinux/bzImage files are produced, and introduce a smart trick for dependency tracking.

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OSS/Microsoft Openwashing Leftovers

Brave and Firefox Latest

  • Brave Browser Team Up With Tor
     

    TOR [sic] or The Onion Router uses technology that separates your computer from the website you’re viewing by routing the network traffic through 3 seperate servers before it reaches your computer. That being said Brave Core Beta hasn’t been fully tested yet so “users should not rely on it for serious use just yet,” Brave said.

  •  
  • Your RSS is grass: Mozilla euthanizes feed reader, Atom code in Firefox browser, claims it's old and unloved
    When Firefox 64 arrives in December, support for RSS, the once celebrated content syndication scheme, and its sibling, Atom, will be missing. "After considering the maintenance, performance and security costs of the feed preview and subscription features in Firefox, we’ve concluded that it is no longer sustainable to keep feed support in the core of the product," said Gijs Kruitbosch, a software engineer who works on Firefox at Mozilla, in a blog post on Thursday. RSS – which stands for Rich Site Summary, RDF Site Summary, or Really Simple Syndication, as you see fit – is an XML-based format for publishing and subscribing to web content feeds. It dates back to 1999 and for a time was rather popular, but been disappearing from a variety of applications and services since then. Mozilla appears to have gotten the wrecking ball rolling in 2011 when it removed the RSS button from Firefox. The explanation then was the same as it is now: It's just not very popular.
  • Cameron Kaiser: It's baaaaa-aaack: TenFourFox Intel
    It's back! It's undead! It's ugly! It's possibly functional! It's totally unsupported! It's ... TenFourFox for Intel Macs! Years ago as readers of this blog will recall, Claudio Leite built TenFourFox 17.0.2 for Intel, which the update check-in server shows some determined users are still running to this day on 10.5 and even 10.4 despite various problems such as issue 209. However, he didn't have time to maintain it, and a newer version was never built, though a few people since then have made various attempts and submitted some patches. One of these attempts is now far enough along to the point where I'm permitted to announce its existence. Riccardo Mottola has done substantial work on getting TenFourFox to build and run again on old Intel Macs with a focus on 32-bit compatibility, and his patches have been silently lurking in the source code repository for some time. Along with Ken Cunningham's additional work, who now also has a MacPorts portfile so you can build it yourself (PowerPC support in the portfile is coming, though you can still use the official instructions, of course), enough functions in the new Intel build that it can be used for basic tasks.

Security: 'Smart' Locks, Windows in Weapons

Android Leftovers