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Saturday, 03 Dec 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story OpenSuSE 11.2 KDE: Actually quite nice srlinuxx 24/11/2009 - 7:48pm
Story A review of GNOME Do srlinuxx 24/11/2009 - 7:49pm
Story Latest OpenShot Release Gains Enhancements srlinuxx 24/11/2009 - 7:51pm
Story Finally: rebranding KDE srlinuxx 24/11/2009 - 7:53pm
Story Repositioning the KDE Brand srlinuxx 24/11/2009 - 9:56pm
Story Open source revolution in the public sector srlinuxx 24/11/2009 - 10:13pm
Story Microsoft: ”Do it our way, or not at all”? srlinuxx 24/11/2009 - 10:15pm
Story 9 Hilarious Websites To Visit When You Need To Kill Time srlinuxx 24/11/2009 - 10:18pm
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 25/11/2009 - 5:58am
Story Inkscape 0.47 Released With a Batch of Cool Improvements srlinuxx 25/11/2009 - 12:22pm

Ubuntu Slip of the Tongue

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu Linux is a free Open Source operating system with office software, intended to empower the Third World by freeing it from dependence on Western software companies. It shares its name with a humanist ideology promoted by people such as Nelson Mandela and Desmond Tutu.

NVIDIA 100.14.03 Display Driver

Filed under
Software

We have been waiting and waiting for NVIDIA to release their new Linux display drivers and today we can report that they finally did. Sneaking out of the NVIDIA camp on Friday night was the 100.14.03 Beta driver for Linux. However, at this time there is no 100.14.03 equivalent for FreeBSD or Solaris users.

Microsoft Office rivals advance

Filed under
OOo

Rivals to Microsoft's Office productivity suite are sharpening up their game. The OpenOffice.org community is planning to add reports to its database, while SoftMaker is to extend its productivity line-up with a database, presentation tool and scripting language.

US company in talks with Indian IT firms to push Linux system

Filed under
Linux

Open Invention Network (OIN), a US firm funded by six companies, including IBM and Red Hat, is exploring possibilities of popularising the Linux operating system for computers in India.

The company is trying to spur innovation and protect the Linux system, which is widely seen as a slow but certain challenge to Microsoft's proprietary Windows operating system.

getting started with foresight linux user guide

Filed under
Linux

I’m pleased to announce the 1.0 release of the Getting Started with Foresight Linux User Guide:

The User Guide provides a high level overview of Foresight Linux, including:

* Download and Installing Foresight Linux
* Post-Installation Configuration
* Using Applications
* Updating Foresight / Adding & Removing Programs
* Getting Help
* Getting Involved with Foresight Linux

Microsoft admits Vista failure

Filed under
Microsoft

WITH TWO OVERLAPPING events, Microsoft admitted what we have been saying all along, Vista, aka Windows MeII, is a joke that no one wants. It did two unprecedented things this week that frankly stunned us.

Ubuntu 7.04 Upgrade First Impressions

Filed under
Ubuntu

Today I upgraded my machine from Ubuntu 6.10 to Ubuntu 7.04, and just like my previous upgrade from Ubuntu 6.06 to 6.10, the whole process went very smoothly. Apart from a couple of minor issues with the new desktop effects, which I’ll go into more detail later in this post, everything else went fine.

Starting, Stopping, and Replacing Users' Cron Jobs

Filed under
HowTos

When performing system maintenance, we often disable certain users' cron jobs temporarily. When the maintenance activities are complete, the original crontab files are restored. To facilitate these tasks, we developed two Bourne shell scripts, stop_cron and start_cron.

Microsoft's anti-Linux whisper game

Filed under
Linux

Well, Microsoft never committed to play fair. The company has entered into two more patent agreements with Fuji and Samsung, as reported by Matthew Aslett.

Ubuntu and Sun vs. Red Hat and JBoss?

Filed under
Software

In chess, there is a tactical motif called an x-ray. In it, the effect of an attacking piece is felt primarily not by the piece that's actively being attacked, but by the piece that is shielded from the direct attack by the attacked piece.

The Laptop Crusade

Filed under
OLPC

Within the next 12 months, as many as 10 million laptop computers will be distributed to children in Argentina, Brazil, Libya, Nigeria, Pakistan, Rwanda, and Uruguay. Countless youngsters who live in remote villages, perhaps without electricity, who may not have access to clean water or health care, will suddenly have computing power pretty close to that of businesspeople and college students.

Stallman: Free software is matter of good vs. evil

Filed under
OSS

Students at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County got a lecture today about morals, ethics and politics from radical software developer Richard M. Stallman, a founder of the free-software movement.

Java on Fiesty Ubuntu - will anyone notice?

Filed under
Ubuntu

I've been busy working on our Web 2.0 release so didn't have time to update my laptop until now. I was generally happy with my Ubuntu breezy 64bit install, I had the JDK on there, Java worked in firefox 32bit, I could remotely display my screen to a projector and my broadcom wireless card even worked with ndiswrapper.

Red Hat's JBoss to Adopt Fedora Model

Filed under
Software

Red Hat's JBoss division is planning to move in June to a model similar to that used by RHEL/Fedora model, said sources close to the company.

The move would mean that JBoss would deliver a Fedora-like community edition of its core software that only looks forward. As with the Fedora Linux project, no backward compatibility is guaranteed—Fedora is focused on the future and new features.

HowTo - Install World of Warcraft in Ubuntu Fiesty Fawn

Filed under
HowTos

People seemed to like my article on installing WoW in Fedora, and with the release of the new Ubuntu, I thought I’d write another one. Read on for my HowTo complete with screenshots of the progress (I’m writing this article as I install it!).As I mentioned in my last article, you need to have the drivers installed and working before you do this. First thing to do is install wine.

Fear and anger erupt over $3 Microsoft Suite

Filed under
Microsoft

By now, most people have heard that Microsoft will be selling a $3 version of Windows XP Starters Edition along with Office and some other educational software to students in the third world, but fear and anger have erupted in some circles in the Internet community. The two primary concerns I'm hearing across the forums are:

* Isn't this illegal dumping and unfair to open source solutions?

OLPC and Markets

Filed under
OLPC

Alex Singleton, President of the Globalisation Institute, a European think tank, argues against the OLPC and says that computers should be left to the market economy. “The very worst idea in international development circles is the One Laptop Per Child scheme being fronted by academic Nicholas Negroponte. ”

It Ain't All About Ubuntu

Filed under
OSS

So many things to talk about this week, I hardly know where to begin. Let's call this a potpourri column this week, with some short comments on a lot of different issues.

By far, the biggest news in the community was the release of Thunderbird 2.0. Except that is got buried under the avalanche of media by that whats-its-name distribution from the Isle of Man.

Ubuntu “Feisty Fawn” upgrade was a breeze

Filed under
Ubuntu

I just completed the easiest operating system upgrade I've ever experienced: Ubuntu Edgy Eft to Feisty Fawn. I directed the entire process over VNC, and did not have to leave the GUI at any time. Only a single restart was required, I did not have to edit any config files, and there does not seem to be anything left to clean up.

Upgrading

when netcat act as telnet client, it becomes better

Filed under
HowTos

have an experience on using netcat (nc) as telnet client which I would like to share about this discovery. I have heard few of my friends saying, netcat can be a “hacker” tool, it is also known as “Swiss army knife”. It is true, netcat can transform into a server, a various of tcp client, a port scanner, chat medium, file transfering, remote control etc.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • How fast is KVM? Host vs virtual machine performance!
  • Kernel maintenance, Brillo style
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  • Reviewing Project Management Service `Wrike` And Seems Interesting
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  • World Wine News Issue 403
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  • GNOME Core Apps Hackfest 2016
    This November from Friday 25 to Sunday 27 was held in Berlin the GNOME Core Apps Hackfest. My focus during this hackfest was to start implementing a widget for the series view of the Videos application, following a mockup by Allan Day.
  • Worth Watching: What Will Happen to Red Hat Inc Next? The Stock Just Declined A Lot
  • Vetr Inc. Lowers Red Hat Inc. (RHT) to Buy
  • Redshift functionality on Fedora 25 (GNOME + Wayland). Yes, it's possible!
    For those who can't live without screen colour shifting technology such as Redshift or f.lux, myself being one of them, using Wayland did pose the challenge of having these existing tools not working with the Xorg replacement. Thankfully, all is not lost and it is possible even right now. Thanks to a copr repo, it's particularly easy on Fedora 25. One of the changes that comes with Wayland is there is currently no way for third-party apps to modify screen gamma curves. Therefore, no redshift apps, such as Redshift itself (which I recently covered here) will work while running under Wayland.
  • My Free Software Activities in November 2016
  • Google's ambitious smartwatch vision is failing to materialise
    In February this year, Google's smartwatch boss painted me a rosy picture of the future of wearable technology. The wrist is, David Singleton said, "the ideal place for the power of Google to help people with their lives."
  • Giving Thanks (along with a Shipping Update)
    Mycroft will soon be available as a pre-built Raspberry Pi 3 image for any hobbyist to use. The new backend we have been quietly building is emerging from beta, making the configuration and management of you devices simple. We are forming partnerships to get Mycroft onto laptops, desktops and other devices in the world. Mycroft will soon be speaking to you throughout your day.
  • App: Ixigo Indian Rail Train PNR Status for Tizen Smart Phones
    Going on a train journey in India? Ixigo will check the PNR status, the train arrival and departure & how many of the particular tickets are left that you can purchase. You can also do a PNR status check to make sure that your seat is booked and confirmed.

Networking and Servers

  • How We Knew It Was Time to Leave the Cloud
    In my last infrastructure update, I documented our challenges with storage as GitLab scales. We built a CephFS cluster to tackle both the capacity and performance issues of NFS and decided to replace PostgreSQL standard Vacuum with the pg_repack extension. Now, we're feeling the pain of running a high performance distributed filesystem on the cloud.
  • Hype Driven Development
  • SysAdmins Arena in a nutshell
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Desktop GNU/Linux

  • PINEBOOK Latest News: Affordable Linux Laptop at Only $89 Made by Raspberry Pi Rival, PINE
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  • Some thoughts about options for light Unix laptops
    I have an odd confession: sometimes I feel (irrationally) embarrassed that despite being a computer person, I don't have a laptop. Everyone else seems to have one, yet here I am, clearly behind the times, clinging to a desktop-only setup. At times like this I naturally wind up considering the issue of what laptop I might get if I was going to get one, and after my recent exposure to a Chromebook I've been thinking about this once again. I'll never be someone who uses a laptop by itself as my only computer, so I'm not interested in a giant laptop with a giant display; giant displays are one of the things that the desktop is for. Based on my experiences so far I think that a roughly 13" laptop is at the sweet spot of a display that's big enough without things being too big, and I would like something that's nicely portable.
  • What is HiDPI and Why Does it Matter?

Google and Mozilla

  • Google Rolls Out Continuous Fuzzing Service For Open Source Software
    Google has launched a new project for continuously testing open source software for security vulnerabilities. The company's new OSS-Fuzz service is available in beta starting this week, but at least initially it will only be available for open source projects that have a very large user base or are critical to global IT infrastructure.
  • Mozilla is doing well financially (2015)
    Mozilla announced a major change in November 2014 in regards to the company's main revenue stream. The organization had a contract with Google in 2014 and before that had Google pay Mozilla money for being the default search engine in the Firefox web browser. This deal was Mozilla's main source of revenue, about 329 million US Dollars in 2014. The change saw Mozilla broker deals with search providers instead for certain regions of the world.