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Saturday, 21 Oct 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story first experience with Archlinux srlinuxx 18/10/2009 - 11:46am
Story Closed Design or No Design? Something is better than nothing. srlinuxx 18/10/2009 - 11:47am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 18/10/2009 - 3:52pm
Story some odds & ends: srlinuxx 18/10/2009 - 3:58pm
Story few more howtos & stuff srlinuxx 18/10/2009 - 5:41pm
Story Review: Parsix GNU Linux 3.0 Kev srlinuxx 18/10/2009 - 11:29pm
Story Ubuntu Linux powers up srlinuxx 1 19/10/2009 - 9:16am
Story 10 things to do after installing Linux srlinuxx 1 19/10/2009 - 9:18am
Story today's leftovers & howtos: srlinuxx 1 19/10/2009 - 9:20am
Story Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #164 srlinuxx 1 19/10/2009 - 9:28am

Linux takes over Wall Street, but business concerns linger

Filed under
Linux

Matt Asay: I laughed when I read Network World's headline: "Wall Street Becoming Linux Stronghold." Is it 1999 or 2008, I wondered? Linux has long found a warm reception on Wall Street, where enterprises view IT as a source for competitive advantage.

Gobuntu Changes Going Back Into Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

phoronix.com: The release of Ubuntu 8.10 Alpha 1 is running a few days behind schedule, but an interesting announcement has come out of the Canonical camp this morning. The news coming out of the Canonical camp is that developers will be trying to merge as many of Gobuntu's changes back into the mainline Ubuntu code-base as possible.

Bringing a Windows mindset to a GNU/Linux world

Filed under
Misc

cydeweys.com/blog: I just ran across a level of stupid so off the charts I had to immediately comment on it here lest my inaction unwittingly foster an environment tolerant of such stupidity.

Legacy Extensions in Firefox 3.0

Filed under
Moz/FF

socializedsoftware.com: I have been resisting using any of the Firefox 3.0 beta’s because of my reliance on Firefox extensions not yet ready for 3.0 . However my dependency on extensions was to much to bear so I decided to look for some way to defeat Firefox’s extension checking.

The Case for Linux in the Classroom

Filed under
Linux

teachertechblog.com: A lot of people tend to shy away at the mention of even the word Linux, myself included. Being raised on a Windows machine, and pampered by an easy visual interface, I was nervous about trying out something that used so much of the command line.

Dimdim Open Source is a bright-bright solution for Web conferencing

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Dimdim Web conferencing software, which competes with services like WebEx and GoToMeeting, provides almost all the important features you need for conducting a conference over the Web. It's available in three flavors -- a feature-limited but usable Web-based free version, a no-holds-barred fee-based Enterprise version, and an almost Enterprise clone Open Source Community Edition that you can host in your network.

Firefox 3.1 (Shiretoko) planned features draft

Filed under
Moz/FF

mozillalinks.org: As Firefox 3 approaches its grand debut this next Tuesday, for Mozilla developers it means the end of a development cycle and the start of another. A very early draft of planned features reveals that as expected, this release will be mainly about landing stuff that didn’t make it on time for the Firefox 3.

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 26

Filed under
SUSE

ssue #26 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out. In this issue: People of openSUSE: Cornelius Schumacher, Sneak Peeks at openSUSE 11.0, and Tips and Tricks: Jigish Gohil: Useful openSUSE One-Click installs from command line.

UCK! Eight steps to a new distribution

Filed under
Software

blogs.ittoolbox: When I see those three letters, UCK, it immediately comes to mind that something nasty happened. However in this instance this UCK'y thing is actually quite sweet.

sash - the Stand Alone SHell for system recovery

Filed under
Software

screenage.de/blog: Let me introduce you today to a package that is quite unknown as you hopefully never need it. But when you need it and have not thought about it before, it is probably already too late. I am talking about “sash” - the “Stand Alone SHell”. Yet another shell? Yes and no.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Screenlets

  • 2.6.26-rc6, "A Few Less Regressions"
  • Four little Security tools you should install in Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Developer Channel: Packaging 101 Video
  • Linux maintainers woo device developers
  • Make Ubuntu a simple "Gateway" Distribution, make switching to something else easy
  • Debian Installer Lenny Beta 2 released
  • Comparison of Windows and Linux
  • Mark Shuttleworth: Interview with Linux-Magazine Italia
  • Record Your Desktop With recordMyDesktop, Part 2
  • Time to Switch to Linux?
  • Open source snub in UK schools
  • Government CIOs 'do not understand open source'

Dell E and E Slim revealed, taking on Eee and Air in one fell swoop

Filed under
Hardware

engadget.com: We got a nice helping of slides dropped on our virtual doorstep this evening, fleshing out Dell's upcoming netbook -- which they seem to be calling the "Dell E." Um, Eeenteresting name choice, but that doesn't seem set in stone, and there's plenty else going on here to ponder over.

The Neuros OSD

Filed under
Hardware

ericsbinaryworld: The Neuros OSD is a device created by Neuros Technology. This is a device I am REALLY excited about buying. I first heard about it in the latest issue of Linux Format Magazine, which gave it a rating of 9/10. What’s so awesome about this device? It runs Linux! “So what?”

Prevent RSI with Workrave

Filed under
Software

opencomputer.net: Workrave is a Windows and Linux only program that can help prevent dreaded repetitive strain injuries. Unfortunately techies are quite familiar with RSI. Once installed, Workrave runs silently in the background monitoring how much time you’re using the computer.

Dolphin

Filed under
Software

digested.blogspot: I hate graphical file managers. Not only graphical. I hated the text mode filemanagers of yore. I feel deep comfort seeing the lonely and stark command prompt. Using Dolphin the other day to browse through my drives, I realized why.

Opera 9.5 review

Filed under
Software

pcmag.com: Opera is hoping to steal some of Firefox's thunder, with a launch timed to fall just before the open-source darling's version 3 unveiling. Although I found a few sites that didn't fully support it, and occasionally ran into a stability issue, Opera's problems are minor. Opera is a one-stop Internet shop, and it's faster, safer, and more compatible than ever.

is it a desktop?

Filed under
Software

Aaron J. Seigo: Havoc Pennington wrote recently in his blog about reinvigorating GNOME development and reflects upon the idea of delivering yet another "desktop system" to the market. There are two problems with his statement.

Standalone OSS revenue to reach $4.83 billion by 2012

Filed under
OSS
  • Standalone OSS revenue to reach $4.83 billion by 2012

  • Open source as industrial policy
  • The Subtle Art of Open Source Migrations
  • ISO: there can be only one
  • Open source tour of Europe: Turkey
  • Yahoo's open-source search man to leave

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Google search in command line

  • Speed up your Ubuntu Linux boot
  • Fedora 9: Rsyslog - Most Advanced Log Server
  • Better font display in Firefox 3 on Ubuntu
  • How to prevent a package from being updated in Debian
  • ASCII Pronunciation Rules for Programmers
  • Headless torrent downloads with rTorrent and Screen
  • Howto Increase video performance in Ubuntu
  • Using NTSYSV To Manage Linux Services

Wall Street becoming Linux stronghold

Filed under
Linux

networkworld.com: Wall Street firms increasingly are buying into Linux, but some still need convincing that open source licensing and support models won't make using the technology more trouble than its worth.

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More in Tux Machines

Today in Techrights

Android Leftovers

GNU/Linux on Desktop/Phone: System76, DeX, Librem

  • Pop!_OS Is Finally Here — System76’s Ubuntu-based Operating System For Developers
    The first ever stable release of Pop!_OS is finally here. You can go ahead and download it from this link. Don’t forget to share your feedback. Earlier this year in June, we reported that System76 is creating its own Linux distro called Pop!_OS.
  • Samsung DeX Promises to Bring the Linux PC Experience to Your Mobile Device
    After unveiling its next-generation Bixby 2.0 intelligent assistant, Samsung today announced that it plans to bring the Linux PC experience to the Samsung DeX ecosystem.
  • Steps toward a privacy-preserving phone
    What kind of cell phone would emerge from a concerted effort to design privacy in from the beginning, using free software as much as possible? Some answers are provided by a crowdfunding campaign launched in August by Purism SPC, which has used two such campaigns successfully in the past to build a business around secure laptops. The Librem 5, with a five-inch screen and radio chip for communicating with cell phone companies, represents Purism's hope to bring the same privacy-enhancing vision to the mobile space, which is much more demanding in its threats, technology components, and user experience. The abuse of mobile phone data has become a matter of worldwide concern. The capture and sale of personal data by apps is so notorious that it has been covered in USA Today; concerns over snooping contribute to the appeal of WhatsApp (which has topped 1.3 billion users) and other encrypted and privacy-conscious apps. But apps are only one attack vector. I got in touch with Todd Weaver, founder and CEO of Purism, to find out what the company is doing to plug the leaks in mobile devices.

Servers: DockerCon Coverage, MongoDB IPO

  • DockerCon EU 17 Panel Debates Docker Container Security
    There are many different security capabilities that are part of the Docker container platform, and there are a number of vendors providing container security offerings. At the DockerCon EU 17 conference in Copenhagen, Denmark, eWEEK moderated a panel of leading vendors—Docker, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Aqua Security, Twistlock and StackRox—to discuss the state of the market. To date, there have been no publicly disclosed data breaches attributed to container usage or flaws. However, that doesn't mean that organizations using containers have not been attacked. In fact, Wei Lien Dang, product manager at StackRox, said one of his firm's financial services customers did have a container-related security incident.
  • DockerCon EU: Tips and Tools for Running Container Workloads on AWS
    Amazon Web Services wants to be a welcome home for developers and organizations looking to deploy containers. At the DockerCon EU conference here, a pair of AWS technical evangelists shared their wisdom on the best ways to benefit from container deployments. The terms microservices and containers are often used interchangeably by people. Abby Fuller, technical evangelist at AWS, provided the definition of microservices coined by Adrian Crockford, VP of Cloud Architecture at AWS and formerly the cloud architect at Netflix.
  • Docker CEO: Embracing Kubernetes Removes Conflict
    Steve Singh has ambitious plans for Docker Inc. that are nothing less than transforming the world of legacy applications into a modern cloud-native approach. Singh was named CEO of Docker on May 2 and hosted his first DockerCon event here Oct. 16-19. The highlight of DockerCon EU was the surprise announcement that Docker is going to support the rival open-source Kubernetes container orchestration system. In a video interview with eWEEK, Singh explained the rationale behind the Kubernetes support and provided insight into his vision for the company he now leads.
  • MongoDB's IPO Beats the Market Out of the Gate
    The folks at MongoDB raised a whole lot of money today in their debut on NASDAQ. Yesterday the open source company announced it was going to be asking $24 a share for the 8 million Class A shares it was letting loose in its IPO, which had some Wall Street investors scratching their heads and wondering if the brains at Mongo were suffering from some kind of undiagnosed damage. Analysts had been estimating an opening price of between $20-22 per share, and on October 6 the company had estimated an opening price in the range of $18-20.