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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 03 Dec 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Cube Gears srlinuxx 09/10/2009 - 10:59am
Story Puppy Linux 4.3 (step by step installation with screenshots) srlinuxx 1 09/10/2009 - 12:30pm
Story Updates on Mandriva partitioning srlinuxx 09/10/2009 - 1:27pm
Story On the future of Open Source thought leadership srlinuxx 09/10/2009 - 1:30pm
Story The problem with Gentoo srlinuxx 09/10/2009 - 1:32pm
Story Stallman slams Microsoft's Codeplex Foundation srlinuxx 09/10/2009 - 4:32pm
Story Simple gui backup tool backerupper srlinuxx 09/10/2009 - 4:34pm
Story Ubuntu 9.10 (Karmic Koala) Beta srlinuxx 09/10/2009 - 4:35pm
Story Bazaar 2.0.0: interview with Martin Pool srlinuxx 09/10/2009 - 6:29pm
Story Are Linux distros downplaying the Gnome 3.0 preview? srlinuxx 09/10/2009 - 6:30pm

Novell statement on Microsoft’s GPLv3 position

Filed under
OSS

Novell Open PR: Shortly after the GPLv3 license was released, Microsoft issued a statement in which they expressed their view that Microsoft is not a party to the GPLv3 and it is therefore not applicable to them. For those customers who will obtain their Linux via a certificate from Microsoft, Novell will provide them with a regular SUSE Linux Enterprise Server subscription, regardless of the terms of the certificate provided by Microsoft.

An overview of the Nvidia video driver for Linux

Raiden's Realm: The larger Linux distros now allow the user to download and install the Nvidia accelerated driver directly from repositories. While this is convienent, we tend to lose perspective as to the details of the driver package.

How To Utilize Your New Multimedia Keyboard Under Linux

Filed under
HowTos

element14: Xbindkeys is a program that allows you to launch shell commands with your keyboard or your mouse under X Window. It links commands to keys or mouse buttons, using its configuration file.

Interview with FSFE President Georg Greve by Sean Daly

Filed under
Interviews

Groklaw: Sean Daly had the opportunity to meet up in Brussles with George Greve, President of the Free Software Foundation Europe, on July 2nd, and naturally he wanted to ask him about GPLv3.

Setting up a dial up connection in Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

Chxta's World: Ubuntu includes some useful utilities to get your dial-up connection up and running. Here are the ways you can connect to your dialup connection:

Feds snub open source for 'smart' radios

Filed under
OSS

ZDNet: Anew federal rule set to take effect Friday could mean that radios built on "open-source elements" may encounter a more sluggish path to market--or, in the worst case scenario, be shut out altogether.

Compiz Fusion on Ubuntu Feisty

Filed under
HowTos

theopensourcerer: Here’s how I installed the latest Compiz Fusion on Ubuntu Feisty. A member of the Compiz Fusion team has set up a repository for Ubuntu. But to simplify it here are the steps for Ubuntu Feisty i386.

A frontier spirit

Filed under
Ubuntu

iafrica.com: He’s probably best known for space travel. The scale of Mark Shuttleworth’s ambition is, therefore, like space itself — constantly expanding in infinite measure. But for the sake of more earthly conversation, we can take his latest measure of progress — Ubuntu.

Help choose the 2007 SourceForge.net Community Choice Award winners

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Now that the SourceForge.net community has selected the nominees, you can vote for the projects you think represent "the cream of the crop on SourceForge.net."

Linux robots descend on Atlanta

Filed under
Linux

LinuxDevices: Linux-powered robots are flocking to Atlanta this week to compete in the Robocup scientific competition. The eleventh annual event has attracted at least two Linux-based designs aiming to replace Sony's Aibo as the de facto hardware platform for standard Robocup league play.

A Review of openSUSE 10.2

Filed under
Reviews
SUSE

Just Another Tech Blog: In this review, I'll take a look at the latest openSUSE release, 10.2, and see how it stacks up to its previous versions and other distros.

2008: Year of the Linux Desktop

Filed under
Linux

MaximumPC: When Evans Data released its survey on Tuesday showing a sharp shift toward Linux (and away from Windows) among developers in North America, the Linux world went wild. Wistful pengiun heads heralded the coming Open Source Age.

NTFS-3G Install and Usage Guide

Filed under
HowTos

Raiden's Realm: This tutorial will teach you how to install and use NTFS-3G on your PC. Make Sure To Read All Of This Post Before Doing Anything, If You Don't Understand It ALL, Do Not Continue

MS: Dancing as fast as it can to try to get away from GPLv3

Filed under
Microsoft

Groklaw: Want to laugh? Microsoft Says It Is Not Bound by GPLv3" -- they think they can so declare, like an emperor, and it becomes fiat. It's not so easy. I gather Microsoft's lawyers have begun to discern the GPL pickle they are in.

KDE 4.0 Alpha 2 features new shell

Filed under
KDE

DesktopLinux: The KDE development team, gathered at the aKademy event in Glasgow, Scotland on July 4 announced the immediate availability of the second alpha release of the K Desktop Environment v. 4.0. The eight-day-long aKademy continues through July 7 at the University of Strathclyde.

Trying Another OS? Use Your Windows Knowledge as a Fast Track to the Commands You Need

Filed under
Linux

MaximumPC: Thanks to virtualization environments like Microsoft Virtual PC 2007 and bootable LiveDistro (Live CD) Linux distros, it's easier than ever to test-drive another operating system without blowing away your current favorite. You'd probably appreciate an easy way to learn its commands.

2009: year of the dirt-cheap, $50 OLPC XO?

Filed under
OLPC

arstechnica: The success or failure of the One Laptop Per Child Project hinges critically on the cost of the XO laptop, which governments are expected to purchase on behalf of their citizens in developing countries. While we know that the XO will be debuting at $175, there has been renewed speculation of where the laptop project might land if sales are successful.

Linux developers considering move to Eclipse

Filed under
Linux

Linux-Watch: When you're talking Linux development tools, chances are you're talking about decades-old programming editors like vi and EMACS. These are fine for an older generation of programmers, but today's developers, weaned on Microsoft Visual Studio want integrated development environments.

The Apple way and the Linux way

Filed under
OS

Jem Report: Today I tried to help a Mac user save some pictures to a DVD. There were more than 1GB of photos, so it made more sense to use a DVD than two CDs. Unfortunately, Mac OS X thinks that you need to make movies when you insert a blank DVD disc -- it has no idea that you want to save data to it. What you, the user, want to do does not matter. All that matters is that you do what Apple says a computer should do. This is "the Apple way," and some people find it enjoyable.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • How fast is KVM? Host vs virtual machine performance!
  • Kernel maintenance, Brillo style
    Brillo, he said, is a software stack for the Internet of things based on the Android system. These deployments bring a number of challenges, starting with the need to support a different sort of hardware than Android normally runs on; target devices may have no display or input devices, but might well have "fun buses" to drive interesting peripherals. The mix of vendors interested in this area is different; handset vendors are present, but many more traditional embedded vendors can also be found there. Brillo is still in an early state of development.
  • Reviewing Project Management Service `Wrike` And Seems Interesting
    I have been testing some services for our project and found this amazing service, thought why not share it with you guys, it might be useful for you. Project management is a term that in some respects appears common, yet in practice still seems to be limited to large companies. While this may be true, the foundations of project management are actually rather simple and can be adopted by anyone, in any industry. One of the major requirements you need to consider when selecting a good project management software is the ability to run and operate it on the go via your mobile devices. Other factors include the ability to access the software from any platform whether it be Linux, Mac, or Windows. This can be achieved when the project management software is web-based. Wrike is a software that does of all this.
  • World Wine News Issue 403
  • OSVR on Steam, Unity drops legacy OpenGL, and more gaming news
  • GNOME Core Apps Hackfest 2016
    This November from Friday 25 to Sunday 27 was held in Berlin the GNOME Core Apps Hackfest. My focus during this hackfest was to start implementing a widget for the series view of the Videos application, following a mockup by Allan Day.
  • Worth Watching: What Will Happen to Red Hat Inc Next? The Stock Just Declined A Lot
  • Vetr Inc. Lowers Red Hat Inc. (RHT) to Buy
  • Redshift functionality on Fedora 25 (GNOME + Wayland). Yes, it's possible!
    For those who can't live without screen colour shifting technology such as Redshift or f.lux, myself being one of them, using Wayland did pose the challenge of having these existing tools not working with the Xorg replacement. Thankfully, all is not lost and it is possible even right now. Thanks to a copr repo, it's particularly easy on Fedora 25. One of the changes that comes with Wayland is there is currently no way for third-party apps to modify screen gamma curves. Therefore, no redshift apps, such as Redshift itself (which I recently covered here) will work while running under Wayland.
  • My Free Software Activities in November 2016
  • Google's ambitious smartwatch vision is failing to materialise
    In February this year, Google's smartwatch boss painted me a rosy picture of the future of wearable technology. The wrist is, David Singleton said, "the ideal place for the power of Google to help people with their lives."
  • Giving Thanks (along with a Shipping Update)
    Mycroft will soon be available as a pre-built Raspberry Pi 3 image for any hobbyist to use. The new backend we have been quietly building is emerging from beta, making the configuration and management of you devices simple. We are forming partnerships to get Mycroft onto laptops, desktops and other devices in the world. Mycroft will soon be speaking to you throughout your day.
  • App: Ixigo Indian Rail Train PNR Status for Tizen Smart Phones
    Going on a train journey in India? Ixigo will check the PNR status, the train arrival and departure & how many of the particular tickets are left that you can purchase. You can also do a PNR status check to make sure that your seat is booked and confirmed.

Networking and Servers

  • How We Knew It Was Time to Leave the Cloud
    In my last infrastructure update, I documented our challenges with storage as GitLab scales. We built a CephFS cluster to tackle both the capacity and performance issues of NFS and decided to replace PostgreSQL standard Vacuum with the pg_repack extension. Now, we're feeling the pain of running a high performance distributed filesystem on the cloud.
  • Hype Driven Development
  • SysAdmins Arena in a nutshell
    Sysadmins can use the product to improve their skills or prepare for an interview by practicing some day to day job scenarios. There is an invitation list opened for the first testers of the product.

Desktop GNU/Linux

  • PINEBOOK Latest News: Affordable Linux Laptop at Only $89 Made by Raspberry Pi Rival, PINE
    PINE, the rival company of Raspberry Pi and maker of the $20 Pine A64, has just announced its two below $100-priced Linux laptops, known as PINEBOOK. The affordable Linux laptop is powered by Quad-Core ARM Cortex A53 64-bit processor and comes with an 11.6" or 14" monitor.
  • Some thoughts about options for light Unix laptops
    I have an odd confession: sometimes I feel (irrationally) embarrassed that despite being a computer person, I don't have a laptop. Everyone else seems to have one, yet here I am, clearly behind the times, clinging to a desktop-only setup. At times like this I naturally wind up considering the issue of what laptop I might get if I was going to get one, and after my recent exposure to a Chromebook I've been thinking about this once again. I'll never be someone who uses a laptop by itself as my only computer, so I'm not interested in a giant laptop with a giant display; giant displays are one of the things that the desktop is for. Based on my experiences so far I think that a roughly 13" laptop is at the sweet spot of a display that's big enough without things being too big, and I would like something that's nicely portable.
  • What is HiDPI and Why Does it Matter?

Google and Mozilla

  • Google Rolls Out Continuous Fuzzing Service For Open Source Software
    Google has launched a new project for continuously testing open source software for security vulnerabilities. The company's new OSS-Fuzz service is available in beta starting this week, but at least initially it will only be available for open source projects that have a very large user base or are critical to global IT infrastructure.
  • Mozilla is doing well financially (2015)
    Mozilla announced a major change in November 2014 in regards to the company's main revenue stream. The organization had a contract with Google in 2014 and before that had Google pay Mozilla money for being the default search engine in the Firefox web browser. This deal was Mozilla's main source of revenue, about 329 million US Dollars in 2014. The change saw Mozilla broker deals with search providers instead for certain regions of the world.