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Wednesday, 20 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Cube Gears srlinuxx 09/10/2009 - 10:59am
Story Puppy Linux 4.3 (step by step installation with screenshots) srlinuxx 1 09/10/2009 - 12:30pm
Story Updates on Mandriva partitioning srlinuxx 09/10/2009 - 1:27pm
Story On the future of Open Source thought leadership srlinuxx 09/10/2009 - 1:30pm
Story The problem with Gentoo srlinuxx 09/10/2009 - 1:32pm
Story Stallman slams Microsoft's Codeplex Foundation srlinuxx 09/10/2009 - 4:32pm
Story Simple gui backup tool backerupper srlinuxx 09/10/2009 - 4:34pm
Story Ubuntu 9.10 (Karmic Koala) Beta srlinuxx 09/10/2009 - 4:35pm
Story Bazaar 2.0.0: interview with Martin Pool srlinuxx 09/10/2009 - 6:29pm
Story Are Linux distros downplaying the Gnome 3.0 preview? srlinuxx 09/10/2009 - 6:30pm

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Compro Technology responds to GPL accusations

  • Multi-Pointer X Merged To X.Org Master
  • Donnie Berkholz speaks with LinuxCrazy
  • Operation OOXML, Part 7 x 10512: The Appeals Arrive
  • Arora, a WebKit browser in Qt
  • Dependence, entitlement, victimhood
  • Linux Users: no MSDN downloads for you
  • GPL-Violations.org and FTF to work more closely together
  • Wikindx facilitates academic writing in a browser
  • Flock is top browser in PC World’s 100 Best Products
  • Open-Source ATI Driver Achieves Major R500 3D Success
  • What is KDE4 meaning to me (parody)
  • Linux green activists unite

Free software vs. software-as-a-service: Is the GPL too weak for the Web?

Filed under
OSS

freesoftwaremagazine.com: You’ve read the GPL’s preamble, you can name the Four Freedoms, and you do your best to keep proprietary bits off our computers. But what’s the future of free software in the era of Flickr, Google Apps, and Facebook?

Bluewhite64 Linux 12.1 "LiveDVD" just screwed my evening

Filed under
Linux

beranger.org: Linux is already the same piece of shit as Windows. Period. Nothing stable. Nothing that would work in the next version. Bluewhite64 Linux 12.1 "LiveDVD" just screwed my evening. The problem is that the previous Bluewhite64 Linux 12.0 "LiveDVD" just worked, and now the 12.1 LiveDVD is a PITA.

OpenSUSE 11 Beta 3

Filed under
SUSE

lazytechguy.com: OpenSUSE 11 Beta 3 marks the end of Beta series of OpenSUSE 11. With final version scheduled to release in 22 days on 19th June 2008; I felt its time to test what is in-store for us. I was specially interested in the KDE4 version and the new installer.

Nonprofit chooses Ubuntu for servers, OpenOffice for desktops

Filed under
Ubuntu

techtarget.com: Oxford Archaeology, one of the largest independent excavation firms in Britain, has twin missions: discovering and preserving historical artifacts that might otherwise be destroyed by construction projects, and sharing its finds and experiences with visitors to increase their appreciation of archaeology and history.

2.6.26-rc4, "Things Are Calming Down"

Filed under
Linux

kerneltrap.org: "You know the drill by now: another week, another -rc," began Linux creator, Linus Torvalds, announcing the 2.6.26-rc4 kernel. "There's a lot of small stuff in here", he continued, "most people won't even notice. "

Open source on the wire

Filed under
OSS

idg.no: Once upon a time, using open-source servers and applications for business was frowned upon in many circles. Today, you'd be hard pressed to find any sizeable infrastructure that doesn't leverage open-source code in some form or another.

EeePC 900 running 8.04 OOTB from ZaReason

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

ubuntu-rocks.org/blog: I picked up an Asus EeePC 900 from ZaReason and it arrived today. Now, on the order form it says Xandros but I mentioned in a comment that it would soon be running Ubuntu. Within two minutes of placing the order they replied saying they can put a basic Ubuntu install on it, so I said “heck yeah!”.

GNOME file manager gets tabbed file browsing

Filed under
Software

arstechnica.com: Although Nautilus—the GNOME file manager—includes many useful features and offers an excellent implementation of the spatial paradigm, its browser mode is less impressive and is missing some must-have functionality. The Nautilus developers are about to deliver a big improvement, however, with the addition of full support for tabbed browsing.

Paying The "Linux Tax"

Filed under
Linux

informationweek.com/blog: Most of us know about the "Windows Tax" -- the extra cash you shell out to pay for the cost of a Windows license when you buy a new PC. But what about a (so-called) "Linux Tax," the cost incurred by an ordinary user switching to Linux from Windows?

Mozilla makes Firefox 3.0 bug-fix decision

Filed under
Moz/FF

computerworld.com: Mozilla Corp. decided today to roll out a second release candidate for Firefox 3.0 that will include fixes for about 40 bugs. The alternative was to declare the open-source browser good "as is," then patch the problems with a later update.

Also: Mozilla Developer News May 27

Why the pre-loaded Linux Desktop is important

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

practical-tech.com: I will never cease to be amazed at how fast things change and how quickly people forget. Today’s example is a Slashdot posting with the title, “Why Buy a PC Preloaded with Linux?” Specifically, the dotter—slasher really doesn’t give the right tone—wants to know “‘Why should I buy a PC preloaded with Linux?’

RIP, Levanta

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: It seemed like such a great idea. Linux is moving from edge and departmental servers to the data center, so why not offer Linux data center automation, complete with virtualization Linux lifecycle management? Well, maybe it's still a great business idea, but Levanta wasn't able to make a go of it.

Penny Arcade: Linux Screenshots

Filed under
Gaming

polishlinux.org: Hothead Games together with Penny Arcade released a very interesting game called “Penny Arcade Adventures: On the Rain-Slick Precipice of Darkness”. It can be purchased at $20 in Greenhouse Internet store, which is a counterpart of more known Steam Games. Nothing peculiar, you say? And you’d be right if not for one small detail: the game is available also for GNU/Linux.

LinuxWorld Expo to Offer Installfest for Needy Schools

Filed under
Linux

ostatic.com: As the LinuxWorld Expo conference, slated for August 4th to 7th in San Francisco, starts to take shape, more news is emerging about events to happen there. At LinuxWorld, Untangle is organizing an Installfest event to donate open source (Ubuntu) computers to schools in need of technology resources.

30 Similarities between PowerPoint and Impress

Filed under
OOo

fanaticattack.com: This article is to emphasize the similarities between the OpenOffice.org Impress and Microsoft Office PowerPoint presentation tools. These are the things you can instantly do with no relearning. I hope that not only will this show some of the similarities but will show you some shortcuts you might not have known about in either program.

Multiple live CDs in one DVD

Filed under
Software

share4vn.com: Live CDs do a great job of advertising Linux distributions. In addition to general-purpose live CD distributions, there are lots of task-oriented live CDs. Wouldn’t it be great if you could carry multiple live CDs on one DVD disc?

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Secure and anonymous browsing with Firefox and TorK

  • Bash Regular Expressions
  • Using Perl On Linux To Do Mass Synchronization Of File Time Stamps
  • How to use the easiest Linux version
  • Edit and compare giant binary files with lfhex
  • Conky: A Quick Guide
  • Using your 3G/CDMA plug-and-play usb modems for mobile broadband
  • How to Lock Down GNOME
  • Tip: Sound in Tremulous under Ubuntu PulseAudio
  • Blogging with Movable Type 4.1
  • How To Downgrade To Firefox 2 In Ubuntu Hardy
  • Building a New Computer - Part 2: Putting it Together

KDE 4.1 Beta1 Released

Filed under
KDE

kde.org: The KDE Project is proud to announce the first beta release of KDE 4.1. Beta 1 is aimed at testers, community members and enthusiasts in order to identify bugs and regressions, so that 4.1 can fully replace KDE 3 for end users.

Novell hopping with news, but it’s not all good

Filed under
SUSE

blogs.techtarget.com: Recently, Novell Inc. has been the beneficiary of generally good news. First, Microsoft gave Novell the nod to write open source extensions to its new System Center, which signals Microsoft’s move toward greater interoperability. This will benefit all open source vendors, but Novell in particular, because these extensions are built on Novell’s ZENworks management software. Score one for Novell.

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Android Leftovers

Linux-driven Sitara SiP module shrinks to 21mm square

Octavo’s OSD335x-SM is a 40 percent smaller version of its AM335x-based OSD335x SiP that adds a 4KB EEPROM. There’s also a compact, open-spec dev board. Last year, Octavo Systems added a new twist to BeagleBone development when it released its 27 x 27mm OSD335x System-In-Package (SiP) module. The OSD335x, which went on to form the basis of the BeagleBone Black Wireless and BeagleBone Blue SBCs, packs a Texas Instruments Sitara AM335x SoC and nearly all the functions of a BeagleBone Black SBC into a BGA module. Octavo has now followed up with a 40 percent smaller OSD335x-SM variant that measures 21 x 21mm (441 sq. mm). Read more

today's leftovers

  • Black screen of death after Win10 update? Microsoft blames HP
    Microsoft is pointing the finger of blame at HP's factory image for black screens of death appearing after a Windows Update. Scores of PC owners took to the HP forums last week to report that Windows 10 updates released September 12 were slowing down the login process. Users stated that once they downloaded the updates and entered their username and password, they only saw black screens for about five to 10 minutes. The forum members said that clean installs or disabling a service called "app readiness", which "gets apps ready for use the first time a user signs in to this PC and when adding new apps" seemed to fix the delay. Today, a Microsoft spokesperson told The Register: "We're working to resolve this as soon as possible" and referred affected customers to a new support post.
  • GNOME 3.26 Released! Check Out the New Features
    GNOME 3.26 is the latest version of GNOME 3 released six months after the last stable release GNOME 3.24. The release, code-named “Manchester”, is the 33rd stable release of the free, open-source desktop.
  • Arch Arch and away! What's with the Arch warriors?
    If you choose to begin your Linux adventures with Arch Linux after trying Ubuntu for a month, you're probably doing it wrong. If there's a solid reason why you think Arch is for you; awesome! Do it. You will learn new things. A lot of new things. But hey, what's the point in learning what arch-chroot does if you can't figure out what sudo is or what wpa_supplicant does?
  • Setting a primary monitor for launching games in a dual monitor rig
  • AMD Zen Temperature Monitoring On Linux Is Working With Hwmon-Next
    If you want CPU temperature monitoring to work under Linux for your Ryzen / Threadripper / EPYC processor(s), it's working on hwmon-next. The temperature monitoring support didn't make it for Linux 4.14 but being published earlier this month were finally patches for Zen temperature monitoring by extending the k10temp Linux driver.
  • Fanless Skylake computer offers four PCI and PCIe slots
    Adlink’s MVP-6010 and MVP-6020 embedded computers run Linux or Windows on Intel 6th Gen CPUs, and offer 4x PCI/PCIe slots, 6x USB ports, and 4x COM ports. If Adlink’s new MVP-6010/6020 Series looks familiar, that’s because it’s a modified version of the recent MVP-5000 and last year’s MVP-6000 industrial PCs. The top half appears to be identical, with the same ports, layout, and Intel 6th Gen Core “Skylake” TE series processors. Like the MVP-6000, it adds a PCI and PCIe expansion unit on the bottom, but whereas the MVP-6000 had two slots, the MVP-6010 and MVP-6020 have four.
  • How Qi wireless charging works, and why it hasn’t taken over yet
    Qi has been an Android staple for a while, and now it’s coming to iPhones, too.
  • W3C DRM appeal fails, votes kept secret
    Earlier this summer, the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) — the organization responsible for defining the standards that make up the Web — decided to embrace DRM (aka "EME") as a web standard. I wasn’t happy about this. I don’t know many who were. Shortly after that, the W3C agreed to talk with me about the issue. During that discussion, I encouraged the W3C to increase their level of transparency going forward — and if there is an appeal of their DRM decision, to make that process completely open and visible to the public (including how individual members of the W3C vote on the issue). The appeal happened and has officially ended. I immediately reached out to the W3C to gather some details. What I found out was highly concerning. I’ll include the most interesting bits below, as un-edited as possible.

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