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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 25 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Cube Gears srlinuxx 09/10/2009 - 10:59am
Story Puppy Linux 4.3 (step by step installation with screenshots) srlinuxx 1 09/10/2009 - 12:30pm
Story Updates on Mandriva partitioning srlinuxx 09/10/2009 - 1:27pm
Story On the future of Open Source thought leadership srlinuxx 09/10/2009 - 1:30pm
Story The problem with Gentoo srlinuxx 09/10/2009 - 1:32pm
Story Stallman slams Microsoft's Codeplex Foundation srlinuxx 09/10/2009 - 4:32pm
Story Simple gui backup tool backerupper srlinuxx 09/10/2009 - 4:34pm
Story Ubuntu 9.10 (Karmic Koala) Beta srlinuxx 09/10/2009 - 4:35pm
Story Bazaar 2.0.0: interview with Martin Pool srlinuxx 09/10/2009 - 6:29pm
Story Are Linux distros downplaying the Gnome 3.0 preview? srlinuxx 09/10/2009 - 6:30pm

Are these Dell's Ubuntu PCs?

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DesktopLinux: Dell reportedly will release its new Ubuntu-powered computers on May 24. In his blog, founder Jeremy Garcia writes that a Dell staffer told him, "We will be launching a Linux based OS (Ubuntu) on the E520, 1505 and XPS 410 starting next Thursday, 5/24."

PCLinuxOS 2007, USR5411 MaxG Wireless Primer

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HowTos So you’ve just installed PCLinuxOS 2007 TR4 on your laptop and your wireless card is detected! Finally, a distro gets it right! However, you’re not too sure how to proceed you manage the device through the PCLinuxOS Control Center? Do you start another program and work that way? Do you use KDE’s built in applet to monitor things? What’s next?

QEMU 0.9 with acceleration on SUSE 10.2

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HowTos QEMU version 0.9 is already out for some time, but AFAIK no official package is available for openSUSE Linux 10.2 yet. Here are some steps I did to have QEMU 0.9 with accelerator (kqemu) on SUSE 10.2. The motivation is simple: I'd like to have a faster system for filter development.

Using traceroute

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FOSSwire: If you’re trying to diagnose a misbehaving network or you’re just plain curious about what machines handle your requests to the internet, you might be interested in a tool called traceroute.

Debian Etch (4.0) Review

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LinuxReviews: I thought i should do a review of quite possibly my FAVORITE linux distro, Debian…note this might be a little bit biased, here we go:

How to share files and folders in Ubuntu

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simplehelp: Sharing files and folders across your network from your Ubuntu PC is every bit as easy as sharing files in Windows (arguably, it’s easier). This brief tutorial will outline how to enable file sharing in Ubuntu.

PowerTop and Battery Life

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austin's blog: Intel recently released a very slick little tool to audit and improve power consumption. This is great for me, because I'm a road warrior (take my laptop everywhere), but I like to travel light, so I rarely bring the power supply with me.

Moglen's Slides and Talk on SUSE Vouchers & GPLv3 Available

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groklaw: Yesterday, we got the stunning news that the SUSE vouchers have no expiration date, a legal oversight that looks to be the wooden stake in the Novell-Micorosoft patent peace agreement's heart. This is what will happen when someone turns in a voucher after GPLv3 code is available under the new license, which Moglen says is sure to happen:

Watch Moon and Venus together after sunset on Saturday, May 19, 2007

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iTWire: At sunset look to the west and the waxing crescent Moon and the planet Venus will be within one degree of each other, being the two brightest objects in the evening sky.

The HIG Hunting Season Continues

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KDE The HIG Hunting Season for KDE 4 continues. This week we focus is on the written word with a new checklist on text and fonts. Are you impatiently waiting for KDE 4? Would you like to help KDE make this release a full success? Then get involved!

Yoper Linux 3.0 RC1 LiveCD Screenshots

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Phoronix: When we heard Yoper Linux 3.0 RC1 was available, we immediately started downloading it. Yoper has been quiet recently -- to the fact where it dropped to the 69th position at DistroWatch -- but Yoper 3.0 Limenite looks promising.

Indy 500 Qualifying, Stephan's Injury, and Tux500

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Linux Due to concern over the effect of Stephan Gregoire’s injury in yesterday’s practice session and how it may affect our participation in the Indianapolis 500 on Sunday, May 27, we thought it would be helpful to clarify the qualifying procedure for the race and explain why there is little reason for concern regarding our participation as a result of this incident.

What is a distro?

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Linux I sat through an interesting debate recently on the Austin Linux Group mailing list over the meaning of the term "distro." Some LUG members felt "distro" implies Linux, while others took a wider view, claiming it could be any one of several possible platforms, including OpenSolaris.

Reviews - Ubuntu Studio

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performance pc: A weakness in multimedia production (or at least the perception of) has long been the Achilles’ heel of Linux. Yes, major Hollywood productions use Linux and there are a smattering of graphics and audio programs, but there has never been a comprehensive and cohesive collection of media creation tools for the average user—until now.

Guide to installing a LAMPP Server with GUI

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synergymx: With the latest release Ubuntu Linux I set about moving my PHP web sites from my Windows 2003 Server to a LAMPP (Linux Apache MySQL PHP Python) server. I tell you I have succeeded in both the improved performance of Linux while retaining my drug like addiction to easy to use GUIs.

'One Laptop Per Child' now reality in 1 South American classroom

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Associated Press: The machines are the first in South America from the much-publicized "One Laptop Per Child" project, which hopes to put low-cost portable PCs in the hands of children in developing countries. Still in a pilot phase, the group has also placed machines at one school in Nigeria and another in Thailand.

Kubuntu 7.04 A Desktop For Everyone

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Linux Loader: Welcome to the Kubuntu 7.04 How-to. This is intended for new users, but it has something for everyone. We will go from install to a complete XP/Vista replacement!!!

Three Scenarios For How Microsoft's Open Source Threat Could End

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InformationWeek: From peace in software to blowing up in Microsoft's face, here's where this brinkmanship could lead.

My Great Linux System Repair Adventure

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Linux-Watch: Thunder storms in the Blue Ridge Mountains can come fast. That's why my main Linux desktop system was still up when one, two, three lightning bolts slammed near my home. Thus began my Great Linux System Repair Adventure.

Some howtos:

  • A Better svndiff

  • Set a password on the GRUB boot loader
  • Dwm howto/tutorial
  • Howto Set Windows as Default OS in grub
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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Leftovers: KDE


  • 4 Useful Cinnamon Desktop Applets
    The Cinnamon desktop environment is incredibly popular, and for good reason. Out of the box it offers a clean, fast and well configured desktop experience. But that doesn’t mean that you can’t make it a little better with a few nifty extras. And that’s where Cinnamon Applets come in. Like Unity’s Indicator Applets and GNOME Extensions, Cinnamon Applets let you add additional functionality to your desktop quickly and easily.
  • GNOME Core Apps Hackfest
    The hackfest is aimed to raise the standard of the overall core experience in GNOME, this includes the core apps like Documents, Files, Music, Photos and Videos, etc. In particular, we want to identify missing features and sore points that needs to be addressed and the interaction between apps and the desktop. Making the core apps push beyond the limits of the framework and making them excellent will not only be helpful for the GNOME desktop experience, but also for 3rd party apps, where we will implement what they are missing and also serve as an example of what an app could be.
  • This Week in GTK+ – 21
    In this last week, the master branch of GTK+ has seen 335 commits, with 13631 lines added and 37699 lines removed.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Puppet Unveils New Docker Build and Phased Deployments
    Puppet released a number of announcements today including the availability of Puppet Docker Image Build and a new version of Puppet Enterprise, which features phased deployments and situational awareness. In April, Puppet began helping people deploy and manage things like Docker, Kubernetes, Mesosphere, and CoreOS. Now the shift is helping people manage the services that are running on top of those environments.
  • 9 reasons not to install Nagios in your company
  • Top 5 Reasons to Love Kubernetes
    At LinuxCon Europe in Berlin I gave a talk about Kubernetes titled "Why I love Kubernetes? Top 10 reasons." The response was great, and several folks asked me to write a blog about it. So here it is, with the first five reasons in this article and the others to follow. As a quick introduction, Kubernetes is "an open-source system for automating deployment, scaling and management of containerized applications" often referred to as a container orchestrator.
  • Website-blocking attack used open-source software
    Mirai gained notoriety after the Krebs attack because of the bandwidth it was able to generate — a record at well over 600 gigabits a second, enough to send the English text of Wikipedia three times in two seconds. Two weeks later, the source code for Mirai was posted online for free.
  • Alibaba’s Blockchain Email Repository Gains Technology from Chinese Open Source Startup
    Onchain, an open-source blockchain based in Shanghai, will provide technology for Alibaba’s first blockchain supported email evidence repository. Onchain allows fast re-constructions for public, permissioned (consortium) or private blockchains and will eventually enable interoperability among these modes. Its consortium chain product, the Law Chain, will provide technology for Ali Cloud, Alibaba’s computing branch. Ali Cloud has integrated Onchain’s Antshares blockchain technology to provide an enterprise-grade email repository. Onchain provides the bottom-layer framework for Ali Cloud, including its open-source blockchain capabilities, to enable any company to customize its own enterprise-level blockchain.
  • Netflix on Firefox for Linux
    If you're a Firefox user and you're a little fed up with going to Google Chrome every time in order to watch Netflix on your Linux machine, the good news is since Firefox 49 landed, HTML5 DRM (through the Google Widevine CDM (Content Decryption Manager) plugin) is now supported. Services that use DRM for HTML5 media should now just work, such as Amazon Prime Video. Unfortunately, the Netflix crew haven't 'flicked a switch' yet behind the scenes for Firefox on Linux, meaning if you run Netflix in the Mozilla browser at the moment, you'll likely just come across the old Silverlight error page. But there is a workaround. For some reason, Netflix still expects Silverlight when it detects the user is running Firefox, despite the fact that the latest Firefox builds for Linux now support the HTML5 DRM plugin.
  • IBM Power Systems solution for EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server
    The primary focus of this article is on the use, configuration, and optimization of PostgreSQL and EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server running on the IBM® Power Systems™ servers featuring the new IBM POWER8® processor technology. Note: The Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 7.2 operating system was used. The scope of this article is to provide information on how to build and set up of PostgreSQL database from open source and also install and configure EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server on an IBM Power® server for better use. EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server on IBM Power Systems running Linux® is based on the open source database, PostgreSQL, and is capable of handling a wide variety of high-transaction and heavy-reporting workloads.
  • Valgrind 3.12 Released With More Improvements For Memory Debugging/Checking
  • [Valgrind] Release 3.12.0 (20 October 2016)
  • Chain Launches Open Source Developer Platform [Ed: If it’s openwashing, then no doubt Microsoft is involved]
  • LLVM Still Looking At Migration To GitHub
    For the past number of months the LLVM project has been considering a move from their SVN-based development process to Git with a focus on GitHub. That effort continues moving forward.
  • Lumina Desktop 1.1 Released With File Manager Improvements
    Lumina is a lightweight Qt-based desktop environment for BSD and Linux. We show you what's new in its latest release, and how you can install it on Ubuntu.
  • Study: Administrations unaware of IT vendor lock-in
    Public policy makers in Sweden have limited insight on how IT project can lead to IT vendor lock-in, a study conducted for the Swedish Competition Authority shows. “An overwhelming majority of the IT projects conducted by schools and public sector organisations refer to specific software without considering lock-in and different possible negative consequences”, the authors conclude.
  • How open access content helps fuel growth in Indian-language Wikipedias
    Mobile Internet connectivity is growing rapidly in rural India, and because most Internet users are more comfortable in their native languages, websites producing content in Indian languages are going to drive this growth. In a country like India in which only a handful of journals are available in Indian languages, open access to research and educational resources is hugely important for populating content for the various Indian language Wikipedias.
  • Where to find the world's best programmers
    One source of data about programmers' skills is HackerRank, a company that poses programming challenges to a community of more than a million coders and also offers recruitment services to businesses. Using information about how successful coders from different countries are at solving problems across a wide range of domains (such as "algorithms" or "data structures" or specific languages such as C++ or Java), HackerRank's data suggests that, overall, the best developers come from China, followed closely by Russia. Alarmingly, and perhaps unexpectedly, the United States comes in at 28th place.