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Friday, 22 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Tex Says It's Ready srlinuxx 2 18/02/2005 - 11:45pm
Story IBM Pledges $100 Million for Linux srlinuxx 2 19/02/2005 - 4:07pm
Story New Robots More Humanlike srlinuxx 2 19/02/2005 - 4:22pm
Story Brightest Galactic Flash Ever Detected Hits Earth srlinuxx 2 19/02/2005 - 4:23pm
Story PCLinuxOS Guided Tour srlinuxx 2 21/02/2005 - 3:00pm
Story A Week with KDE 3.4beta2 srlinuxx 1 21/02/2005 - 4:34pm
Story PCLinuxOS forms alliance with Codeweavers Texstar 1 23/02/2005 - 5:42am
Blog entry Mdk 10.2 beta 3 srlinuxx 2 24/02/2005 - 6:20pm
Story Snapshots of KDE_3.4rc1 srlinuxx 2 28/02/2005 - 6:02am
Story O'Reilly Releases "Linux in a Windows World" srlinuxx 01/03/2005 - 4:13pm

Graphics: NVIDIA Progress, VC4/VC5, Intel's Linux Driver & Mesa

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • NVIDIA 384.90 Linux Driver Brings Fixes, Quadro P5200 Support

    One day after releasing updated GeForce Linux legacy drivers, NVIDIA is now out with an update to their long-lived 384 branch.

    The NVIDIA 384 Linux series is the current latest series for their proprietary driver. Coming out today is the 384.90 update that is primarily comprised of bug fixes but also includes Quadro P5200 support.

  • NVIDIA Continues Prepping The Linux Desktop Stack For HDR Display Support

    Besides working on the new Unix device memory allocator project, they have also been engaged with upstream open-source Linux developers over preparing the Linux desktop for HDR display support.

    Alex Goins of the NVIDIA Linux team presented on their HDR ambitions for the Linux desktop and the work they are still doing for prepping the X.Org stack for dealing with these next-generation computer displays. This is a project they have also been looking at for more than one year: NVIDIA Is Working Towards HDR Display Support For Linux, But The Desktop Isn't Ready.

  • The State Of The VC4 Driver Stack, Early Work On VC5

    ric Anholt of Broadcom just finished presenting at XDC2017 Mountain View on the state of the VC4 driver stack most notably used by the Raspberry Pi devices. Additionally, he also shared about his early work on the VC5 driver for next-generation Broadcom graphics.

  • Intel's Linux Driver & Mesa Have Hit Amazing Milestones This Year

    Kaveh Nasri, the manager of Intel's Mesa driver team within the Open-Source Technology Center since 2011, spoke this morning at XDC2017 about the accomplishments of his team and more broadly the Mesa community. Particularly over the past year there has been amazing milestones accomplished for this open-source driver stack.

Software: Samba, Cockpit, Termius, Remmina, Krita, Sublime Text, Slack Inside Emacs

Filed under
Software
  • Samba 4.7.0 (Samba AD for the Enterprise)

    Enterprise distributions like Red Hat or SUSE are required to ship with MIT Kerberos. The reason is that several institutions or governments have a hard requirement for a special Kerberos implementation. It is the reason why the distributions by these vendors (Fedora, RHEL, openSUSE, SLES) only package Samba FS and not the AD component.

    To get Samba AD into RHEL some day it was clear, that we need to port it to MIT Kerberos.

    In 2013 we started to think about this. The question which arise first was: How do we run the tests if we port to MIT Kerberos? We want to start the krb5kdc daemon. This was more or less the birth of the cwrap project! Think of cwrap like it is “The Matrix” where reality is simulated and everything is a lie. It allows us to create an artificial environment emulating a complete network to test Samba. It took nearly a year till we were able to integrate the first part of cwrap, socket_wrapper, into Samba.

  • Cockpit 151

    The User menu’s Authentication dialog now supports entering arbitrary paths to SSH keys for adding to the SSH authentication agent. Previously this only offered keys present in the standard ~/.ssh home directory.

  • Termius A Reliable SSH Client for Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    Termius is a client terminal which has built-in Telnet and SSH, it was formerly known as Serverauditor, and it is cross-platform available for Linux, Windows, Mac, iOS and Android, it offers full Terminal emulation on all your devices. You can run multiple concurrent terminal sessions with SSH, Telnet and Mosh. It has a robust emulation environment with full Emacs, Vim and MC support. Special characters, colors and command line tools work exactly how you’d expect them to.

    You don't have to worry about infrastructure and credentials, since they are organized very well and logically. It comes with powerful organization features. Combine a collection of hosts into a group with shared settings, easily configured at the top level. Effortlessly find what you’re looking for with tagging, search and rich previews.

  • Remmina Remote Desktop Application for Linux

    Remmina is a free and open-source remote desktop application, it is written in C and GTK+, released under GNU GPL license, and only available for Unix/Linux based systems. Basically it aims to be useful for system administrators and for those who need to access remote computers. It supports multiple network protocols in an integrated and consistent UI, at the moment RDP, VNC, NX, SPICE, XDMCP and SSH protocols are supported. You can install Remmina plugins: RDP, VNC, NX, XDMCP, SSH, Telepathy

  • Krita 3.3.0 – first release candidate

    Less than a month after Krita 3.2.1, we’re getting ready to release Krita 3.3.0. We’re bumping the version because there are some important changes for Windows users in this version!

  • Sublime Text 3.0 is Here! See, How to Install it on Linux

    The major changes to be seen in Sublime Text 3.0 are the Goto Definition, the new UI, syntax highlighting engine and an expanded API. Spell-check and word wrapping work better now.

  • Chap tames Slack by piping it into Emacs

    Emacs enthusiast Artur Malabarba has put the text editor to work taming Slack.

    Malabarba likes Slack and feels it's a fine tool for intra-office chat, but also feels that “it’s also a powerful source of distractions.”

    But he can't turn it off all day, so decided to “keep the spam in check.”

    Doing so proved quite simple. There's already a Slack client for Emacs here on GitHub and Malabarba put it to work alongside “Alerts”, a “Growl-like alerts notifier for Emacs.”

CRYENGINE 5.4 and Unreal Engine 4.18 Preview 1

Filed under
Gaming
  • CRYENGINE 5.4 Major Release

    Many of you have helped us bring CE 5.4 to release by participating in our Github-powered beta program and test our preview builds. Your feedback, pull requests and open discussions about the builds were invaluable and we want to thank you for your lively participation and collaboration. This is your release as well as ours and we are looking forward to your feedback and ongoing participation in development of CRYENGINE. You are true CryENGINEERS and we are proud and happy to have such a great community by our side.

  • CryENGINE 5.4 Now Available With Vulkan Beta Support

    Crytek today has shipped the exciting CryENGINE 5.4 game engine update.

  • Unreal Engine 4.18 Preview 1 Is Ready For Game Developers

    Besides the CryENGINE 5.4 release happening today, Epic Games has made public their first preview release of the upcoming Unreal Engine 4.18.

  • Unreal Engine 4.18 Preview 1 Released

    The release of Unreal Engine 4.18 is rapidly approaching, with many fantastic updates for you to try out. The first Preview build is now available on the Epic Games launcher, so you can experiment with brand new changes, such as volumetric lightmaps, enhanced static skylight directionality, major clothing tool upgrades, the revamped Physics Asset Editor and Media Framework 3.0. In addition, you can access improved support for both Google's ARCore and Apple's ARKit. The desktop forward renderer on iOS, used in the Wingnut AR demo at WWDC 2017, is now available as well (recommended for devices with an A10 or later processor running iOS 10.3 or newer).

GNOME: PlayStation 4 Controller Support, Global App Menu GNOME Update

Filed under
GNOME
  • PlayStation 4 controller support for Fedora Linux

    GNOME developer Bastien Nocera has implemented enhancements to the Bluetooth stack of the Fedora Linux operating system, reported Softpedia.

    The improvements are set to enhance the use of PlayStation 3 DualShock controllers in the GNOME desktop environment.

    The controller is now easier to connect to a PC, but still requires an initial connection via USB.

  • Nifty GNOME Global Menu Extension Is ‘Discontinued For the Moment’

    The developer behind the popular Global App Menu GNOME extension has announced it is “discontinued for the moment”.

    Explaining the reasons for his decision on Github, Lester Carballo cites the shift to Wayland (the extension doesn’t work in Wayland for a whole spaghetti heap of technical and ideological reasons) as being the primate motivator to move on.

    Canonical also has no plans to support the unity-gtk-module under Wayland (a crucial component that this extension, and similar app menu implementations, rely on).

Security: Patches, CCleaner, Equifax Story Changes, 'Trusted IoT Alliance', Kali Linux 2017.2 and NBN

Filed under
Security

OSS: Open Source Strategies, Symphony Software Foundation, FOSS History, ROS, Ericsson, Harald Welte and Collaborative Knowledge Foundation (Coko)

Filed under
OSS
  • Open source strategies bring benefits, but don't rush in

    When organizations adopt open source strategies, they rarely intend to dive into the source code. That would require hiring internal miracle workers -- an expensive proposition. Instead, they contract for support, usually with a vendor that's a primary contributor to the open source project.

    Often, but not always, this is the company that has many of the original open source project contributors on staff, and continues to make the most commits back to the code base. Sometimes, like with big data analytics, this gets competitive, resulting in several downstream distributions -- each from a different vendor.

  • The Symphony Software Foundation: Bringing Open Source To Wall Street

    Whenever banks merge, they typically bring along their overlapping, proprietary software platforms as luggage.

    “In most cases, they don’t merge ... because it’s a massive business and technological endeavor,” Gabriele Columbro, 35, the executive director of the Symphony Software Foundation, told Benzinga.

    “Rather than undertaking massive consolidation projects, open source gives you a way to leapfrog it.”

    It’s one area in the financial services universe in which the nonprofit arm of the messaging platform Symphony Communications is working to bring wider adoption of open source software.

  • Unix to GitHub: 10 Key Events in Free and Open Source Software History
  • Engineer Spotlight: Brian Gerkey of Open Robotics Talks ROS and Robotics

    This year marks the 10th anniversary of the inception of the Robotic Operating System (ROS) — an open source robotics platform being used around the world in research, industrial, and recreational settings. The premise of ROS is simple: to simplify and standardize robotic programming, enabling faster development of robotic systems through the spirit of open source collaboration.

    On September 21st and 22nd, the Open Robotics (formerly the Open Source Robotics Foundation) will convene for the fifth time for ROSCon 2017. Delegates ranging from students, researchers, industry representatives, and hobbyists/enthusiasts will meet, discuss, and present on a range of topics related to the development of ROS. Even though ROSCon is still a relatively young event, every year it has continued to grow in both number of attendees and sponsors.

  • Ericsson CTO: Open source is good but fragmentation, not so much

    Open source, just like standards, can be a good thing as long as there aren’t too many of them, because that can result in fragmentation and too many resources being spread across too many groups, according to Ericsson Group CTO Erik Ekudden.

    “We can’t spread ourselves too thin, so we are focusing of course on open source as it’s relevant to network platforms”—and that includes everything from the cloud side to management and control, he told FierceWirelessTech on the sidelines of Mobile World Congress Americas (MWCA).

  • The Faces of Open Source: Harald Welte

    Harald is the original GPL enforcer. He reached out to companies and brought the GPL to court for the first time, way back in the early 2000s. His activities, initially seen as controversial, ultimately led to much greater and improved dialogue between companies and the community-at-large, not least because it cast the GPL as a solid, simple legal document, with terms that a court could rule on.

    One of Harald's most noticeable characteristics is his calm, measured, and carefully considered approach to matters. His passion for free software is genuine, but he is not driven by passion alone. He has clear, thoughtful arguments for issues that he engages with, and he often provides insight in an accessible manner. While he is far too modest to use the term, Harald is a thought-leader in open source, and this is one of the interviews I was most excited to shoot.

  • eLife and Coko partner to deliver open-source submission and peer-review platform

    The new platform will help streamline communications between authors, editors and reviewers at all stages of the submission and review process.

    eLife and the Collaborative Knowledge Foundation (Coko) have announced a partnership to build a user-driven, open-source submission and peer-review platform.

  •  

Events: Randa, Open Source Summit, Ceph Meetup Berlin, SUSECON and DerbyCon

Filed under
OSS

IBM open sources WebSphere Liberty code

Filed under
Development
Server
OSS

GPUVis in the News

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Intel: Graphics Changes For Linux 4.15 and Clear Containers 3.0

Filed under
Hardware
  • Intel Preps Their First Batch Of Graphics Changes For Linux 4.15

    The first batch of drm-intel-next changes are ready to be queued in DRM-Next as feature work for eventually merging to mainline come the Linux 4.15 merge window.

  • Announcing Intel® Clear Containers 3.0!

    The Clear Containers team has been working on the next generation of Clear Containers and today that work culminates in the release of Clear Containers 3.0!

    Today’s release presents a generational and architectural shift to utilize virtcontainers, a modular and hypervisor agnostic library for hardware virtualized containers. Clear Containers 3.0 is written in Go language and boasts an OCI* compatible runtime implementation (cc-runtime ) that works both on top of virtcontainers, and as a platform for deployment.

  • Intel Unleashes Clear Containers 3.0, Written In Go

    Clear Containers 3.0 as Intel's latest Linux container tech is now written in the Go programming language rather than C. They are also now making use of virtcontainers as a modular and hypervisor agnostic library for hardware-virtualized containers. Clear Containers 3.0 also adds support for a virtio-blk storage back-end and other improvements for security and performance.

Chromium and Firefox: New Features

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
  • Chromebook Owners Will Soon Be Able to Monitor CPU and RAM Usage in Real-Time

    Chromium evangelist François Beaufort announced today that Google's Chrome OS engineers have managed to implement a new feature that will let Chromebook owners monitor the CPU usage, RAM, and zRam statistics in real-time.

    The feature was implemented in the Chrome Canary experimental channel and can be easily enabled by opening the Google Chrome web browser and accessing the chrome://flags/#sys-internals flag. There you'll be able to monitor your Chromebook's hardware and see what's eating your memory or CPU during heavy workloads, all in real-time.

    "Chrome OS users can monitor in real-time their CPU usage, memory and zRam statistics thanks to the new internal page chrome://sys-internals in the latest Canary," said François Beaufort in a Google+ post. "For that, enable the experimental chrome://flags/#sys-internals flag, restart Chrome, and enjoy watching real-time resource consumption."

  • Tracking Protection for Firefox for iOS Plus Multi-Tasking in Focus for Android New Today

    Across the industry, September is always an exciting month in mobile, and the same is true here at Mozilla.

    Today, we’re launching the newest Firefox for iOS alongside an update for the popular Firefox Focus for Android, which we launched in June.

Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) Is Now Powered by Linux Kernel 4.13, GCC 7.2

Filed under
Ubuntu

Greg Kroah-Hartman published on Wednesday new maintenance updates for various of the supported Linux kernel branches that he maintains, including the Linux 4.12 series, which appears to have reached end of life.

Read more

The ISS just got its own Linux supercomputer

Filed under
Linux

A year-long project to determine how high-performance computers can perform in space has just cleared a major hurdle -- successfully booting up on the International Space Station (ISS).

This experiment conducted by Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) and NASA aims to run a commercial off-the-shelf high-performance computer in the harsh conditions of space for one year -- roughly the amount of time it will take to travel to Mars.

Read more

Qt 5.6.3 Released

Filed under
KDE

I am pleased to inform that Qt 5.6.3 has been released today. As always with a patch release Qt 5.6.3 does not bring any new features, just error corrections. For details of the bug fixes in Qt 5.6.3, please check the change logs for each module.

Read more

Games: Quantum Replica, Shotgun Farmers, Ashworld and More

Filed under
Gaming

A New Era for Free Software Non-Profits

Filed under
OSS
Legal

The US Internal Revenue Service has ushered in a new and much more favorable treatment for free software projects seeking to have 501c3 tax exempt non-profit organizations of their own. After years of suffering from a specially prejudicial environment at IRS, free software projects—particularly new projects starting out and seeking organizational identity and the ability to solicit and receive tax-deductible contributions for the first time—can now do so much more easily, and with confident expectation of fast, favorable review. For lawyers and others counseling free software projects, this is without question “game-changing.”

At SFLC, we have ridden all the ups and downs of the US tax law’s interaction with free software non-profits. When I formed SFLC—which in addition to being a 501c3 tax-deductible organization under US federal tax law is also a non-profit educational corporation under NY State law—in 2005, we acquired our federal 501c3 determination in less than 70 days. Over our first several years of operation, we shepherded several of our clients through the so-called “1023 process,” named after the form on which one applies for 501c3 determination, as well as creating several 501c3-determined “condominium” or “conservancy” arrangements, to allow multiple free software projects to share one tax-deductible legal identity.

But by the middle of the Obama Administration’s first term, our ability to get new 501c3 determinations from the IRS largely ceased. The Service’s Exempt Organizations Division began scrutinizing certain classes of 1023’s particularly closely, forming task forces to centralize review of—and, seemingly, to prevent success of—these classes of application. In our practice on behalf of free software projects seeking legal organization and tax exemption, we began to deal with unremitting Service pushback against our clients’ applications. Sometimes, the determination to refuse our clients’ applications seemed to indicate a fixed political prejudice against their work; more than once we were asked by IRS examiners “What if your software is used by terrorists?”

Read more

City of Rennes to tackle IT vendor lock-in

Filed under
OSS

Rennes, France’s eleventh largest city, aims to get rid of IT vendor lock-in. To begin with, the city will switch to Zimbra, an open source-based collaboration and email solution. Next year, it will commence a feasibility study into other free and open source software applications, including office productivity tools.

Read more

Via: Thin Edge Of The Wedge

Red Hat's Patent Pledge, Openwashing, and Imminent Positive Results

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Red Hat expands its pioneering patent promise to the open source community

    Open source software business Red Hat this morning announced a big expansion of its patent promise, its commitment to not assert its patents against free and open source software which it launched in 2002. The expansion of the promise means that it now extends to all of Red Hat’s patents and so offers further defensive cover to the open source community.

    Red Hat claims that the new promise is significantly broader than the original agreement with the new version covering more than 99% of open source software compared with 35% for the original. The new promise also specifically covers permissive licences which, in recent years, have over taken copyleft licences as the most popular type of open source agreement.

  • Red Hat’s Patent Promise covers permissively-licensed code, offering broad protection for open innovation

    Red Hat announced on Thursday a significant revision of its Patent Promise, helping to protect open innovation. That promise, originating in 2002, was based on Red Hat’s intention not to enforce its patents against free and open source software.

    The expanded Patent Promise, while consistent with Red Hat’s prior positions, breaks new ground in expanding the amount of software covered and otherwise clarifying the scope of the promise. Red Hat believes its updated Patent Promise represents the broadest commitment to protecting the open source software community to date.

  • Red Hat Announces Broad Expansion to Open Source Patent Promise [Ed: Red Hat should toss out all the software patents, in case of takeover]

    Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT), the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced a significant revision of its Patent Promise. That promise, originating in 2002, was based on Red Hat’s intention not to enforce its patents against free and open source software. The new version significantly expands and extends Red Hat’s promise, helping to protect open innovation.

    In its original Patent Promise, Red Hat explained that its patent portfolio was intended to discourage patent aggression against free and open source software. The expanded version published today reaffirms this intention and extends the zone of non-enforcement. It applies to all of Red Hat’s patents, and all software licensed under well-recognized open source licenses.

    The expanded Patent Promise, while consistent with Red Hat’s prior positions, breaks new ground in expanding the amount of software covered and otherwise clarifying the scope of the promise. Red Hat believes its updated Patent Promise represents the broadest commitment to protecting the open source software community to date.

  • How 10,000 people helped us rediscover our purpose [Ed: Red Hat openwashing again]
  • Red Hat (RHT) to Report Q2 Earnings: Will it Beat Estimates?
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