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Sunday, 26 May 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Beginning of the End? srlinuxx 2 11/02/2005 - 6:24am
Story KDE 3.4beta2 Released! srlinuxx 3 11/02/2005 - 6:06pm
Forum topic Thank You. srlinuxx 13/02/2005 - 5:10pm
Story Firefox Putting on the Pressure srlinuxx 2 13/02/2005 - 6:17pm
Story More Competition srlinuxx 2 13/02/2005 - 6:22pm
Story LA County Considering Open Source srlinuxx 2 14/02/2005 - 2:31am
Story Cheech and Chong Didn't Inhale? srlinuxx 3 15/02/2005 - 3:32am
Story Danes accused Microsoft of blackmail srlinuxx 2 15/02/2005 - 6:35pm
Story HA! rm -rf Contest at Mad Penguin srlinuxx 2 15/02/2005 - 6:36pm
Story Is PCLOS 8.1 Close? srlinuxx 4 18/02/2005 - 6:46am

Fedora 31 Planning To Upgrade To RPM 4.15 For Faster Builds, Other Improvements

Filed under
Red Hat

RPM 4.15 is due out this year as the latest RPM4 update and Fedora 31 is planning to make prompt use of RPM 4.15 given its new/improved features.

RPM 4.15 is expected to provide faster build performance, a dynamic build dependency generator, experimental chroot operations for non-root users, improved ARM detection, and a whole lot of fixes.

Read more

More Fedora: Sirko Kemter: Khmer Translation Sprint 3

4 Ways to Run Linux Commands in Windows

Filed under
Software

Here are several ways to run Linux bash commands in Windows.
Read more

Programming/Development: Python Natural Language Processing, DevNation Federal, KTextEditor/Kate, Blender3D

Filed under
Development
  • Top 10 Python NLP Libraries For 2019

    With the help of Natural Language Processing, an organisation can gain valuable insights, patterns, and solutions. Python is one of the widely used languages and it is implemented in almost all fields and domains. In this article, we list down 10 important Python Natural Language Processing Language libraries.

  • DevNation Federal brings open source to the Beltway

    On June 27th, Red Hat will not only be hosting one of the best technical gatherings of 2019, but it will be doing so in Washington D.C. — not San Francisco, Seattle, or ... DevNation Federal conference will bring together industry experts and key maintainers of popular open source projects in a one-day immersive conference for federal developers.

  • KTextEditor/Kate Bugs – Help Appreciated

    The bug report count of KTextEditor (implementing the editing part used in Kate/KWrite/KDevelop/Kile/…) and Kate itself reached again some value over 200.

    If you have time and need an itch to scratch, any help to tackle the currently open bugs would be highly appreciated.

    The full list can be found with this bugs.kde.org query.

    [...]

    The team working on the code is small, therefore please be a bit patient if you wait for reactions. I hope we have improved our reaction time in the last months but we still are lacking in that respect.

  • Blender3D User interface and API Freeze

    In the last month, we’ve polished the user interface and added the last planned features to Blender 2.80. The details can be found in the weekly development notes.

    Now we are freezing the user interface, so that there is a stable base for creating documentation and tutorials. Settings will stay in the same place and screenshots should remain valid for the final 2.80 release. A handful of menu entries may be added, or a tooltip might be improved, but nothing major that would break documentation.

  • Blender 2.80 Reaches Its API & UI Freeze

    In order to meet the July release target for Blender 2.80, there is now an API and user-interface freeze on this next feature update for this leading open-source, cross-platform 3D modeling software.

    Blender 2.80 has now entered its UI and API freeze milestone for the 2.80 release. The Blender settings should also be maintained now moving forward for the Blender 2.80 release and its Python API compatibility, including for add-ons.

FreeBSD 11.3 Beta 1

Filed under
BSD
  • FreeBSD 11.3 BETA

    24 May: The first BETA build for the FreeBSD 11.3 release cycle is now available. ISO images for the amd64, armv6, arm64, i386, powerpc, powerpc64, and sparc64 architectures are available on most of our FreeBSD mirror sites.

  • FreeBSD 11.3-BETA1 Now Available

    The first BETA build of the 11.3-RELEASE release cycle is now available.

    Installation images are available for:

    o 11.3-BETA1 amd64 GENERIC
    o 11.3-BETA1 i386 GENERIC
    o 11.3-BETA1 powerpc GENERIC
    o 11.3-BETA1 powerpc64 GENERIC64
    o 11.3-BETA1 sparc64 GENERIC
    o 11.3-BETA1 armv6 BANANAPI
    o 11.3-BETA1 armv6 BEAGLEBONE
    o 11.3-BETA1 armv6 CUBIEBOARD
    o 11.3-BETA1 armv6 CUBIEBOARD2
    o 11.3-BETA1 armv6 CUBOX-HUMMINGBOARD
    o 11.3-BETA1 armv6 RPI-B
    o 11.3-BETA1 armv6 RPI2
    o 11.3-BETA1 armv6 PANDABOARD
    o 11.3-BETA1 armv6 WANDBOARD
    o 11.3-BETA1 aarch64 GENERIC

    Note regarding arm SD card images: For convenience for those without
    console access to the system, a freebsd user with a password of
    freebsd is available by default for ssh(1) access. Additionally,
    the root user password is set to root. It is strongly recommended
    to change the password for both users after gaining access to the
    system.

  • FreeBSD 11.3 Enters Beta Ahead Of July Release

    While FreeBSD 12 is the latest and greatest stable series since the end of last year, for those still on FreeBSD 11 there is the 11.3 update due out for release in July while this weekend the first beta was issued.

    FreeBSD 11.3 offers up the latest security updates and other stable bug fixes over FreeBSD 11.2 that was released nearly one year ago. But for those craving all the latest features and functionality, FreeBSD 12 is in release form or there is also FreeBSD 13-CURRENT.

Best Command-Line FTP Clients for Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

File Transfer Protocol (FTP) is a network protocol used for transferring files between a client and a server on a computer network. The very first FTP applications were made for the command line before GUI Operating Systems even became a thing and while there are several GUI FTP clients, developers still make CLI-based FTP clients for users who prefer using the old method.

Here’s a list of the best command-line based FTP clients for Linux.

Read more

Why Windows Containers Are Less Attractive Than Linux Containers

Filed under
Linux
Server

The fact that you can run Docker containers on Windows as well as Linux is amazing. Yet, I sometimes struggle to see a clear use case for Windows containers. Compared to Linux containers, there are fewer obvious reasons to run containers on Windows.

I know that’s a somewhat controversial statement, so let me walk through the various reasons why Windows containers are much less attractive than Linux containers.

Read more

Also: Streamlining Software Development and Distribution with Containers [Ed: Paid-for SPAM from EMC. “Buying the news”… the new “biz model”? Companies literally buying not only the narratives but also the space and the staff?]

Android and GNU/Linux Software on Chrome OS

Filed under
OS
Android
GNU
Linux
Google
  • Chrome OS 76 adds a flag to enable GPU support for Linux apps

    The new feature was first noticed by Keith I Myers. It is available in Chrome OS 76.0.3789.0, which is the first dev build of Chrome OS 76. It goes without saying that the feature is unstable right now. It is in the very early stages, so bugs and stability issues are to be expected. Also, keep in mind that GPU acceleration is only supported on a handful of Chromebooks...

  • Google working on new way to run Android apps in Chrome OS called ‘ARCVM’

    For the past few years, it’s been possible on many Chromebooks to install the Play Store and run Android apps. This opened the door for Chromebooks to become more than just glorified web browsers. Now, Google is looking to make some major under-the-hood changes to Chrome OS’s Android apps support, which may allow for a long-requested feature.

AMD Staging Another Fix To Try Correcting Some Raven Ridge Systems On Linux

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

AMD Raven Ridge APUs have been out for more than one year now and at least under Linux can still be quite problematic depending upon the particular motherboard BIOS and other factors. Fortunately, while Raven 2 and Picasso APU support is appearing to be in better shape, the AMD open-source developers haven't forgot about these problematic Raven 1 systems.

Out today is the latest patch trying to help those with original Raven Ridge systems. This latest hopeful fix is now skipping over loading the DMCU firmware for Raven Ridge. DMCU in this context is the Display Micro-Controller Unit and is the micro-controller used for Panel Self Refresh (PSR) and similar functionality.

Read more

Also: Intel 19.20.13008 Open-Source Compute Stack Restores Broadwell To Production Quality

Graphics: Intel, XWayland and Vulkan

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Intel Linux Graphics Driver Adding Support For The Mule Creek Canyon PCH

    Mule Creek Canyon is the PCH to be paired with Intel Elkhart Lake processors. Elkhart Lake as a reminder is the Gemini Lake SoC successor that will feature Gen11 class graphics and now thanks to the open-source Intel Linux graphics driver we know that new PCH is the Mule Creek Canyon.

    Mule Creek Canyon doesn't appear to be widely publicized up to this point but appeared in today's latest open-source development activity. Mule Creek Canyon is the new PCH for Elkhart Lake and required some minor changes around Port-C remapping that differ from other Icelake graphics hardware.

  • XWayland Receive An EGL-Based GLX Provider, Helping Various Games On Linux

    A notable improvement was merged into the "xserver" Git tree for the eventual X.Org Server 1.21 release that will improve the support for various Linux games relying on XWayland for running under a Wayland compositor.

  • Vulkan 1.1.109 Released With Two New Intel Extensions

    Vulkan 1.1.109 was released today as the latest update to this graphics/compute specification ahead of the US holiday weekend.

    With two weeks having passed since Vulkan 1.1.108 there are a few different documentation corrections/clarifications. There are also two new vendor extensions contributed by Intel.

Rob Szumski’s Keynote and Abby Kearns Interview at CloudNativeCon & KubeCon

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat

GNOME: Theming, Mutter and Sprint 1

Filed under
GNOME
  • App Devs Ask Linux Distros to “Stop Theming Our Apps”

    A group of independent Linux app developers have written an open letter to ask wider GNOME community to ask: “stop theming our apps”.

    The letter is addressed to the maintainers of Linux distributions who elect to ship custom GTK and icons themes by default in lieu of upstream defaults.

    By publicising the issues they feel stem from the practice of “theming” it’s hoped that distros and developers might work together to create a “healthier GNOME third party app ecosystem”.

  • A Group of Independent Linux App Developers Has Asked Wider GNOME Community To 'Stop Theming' Its Apps
  • GNOME's Mutter Makes Another Step Towards X11-Less, Starting XWayland On-Demand

    GNOME 3.34 feature development continues at full-speed with a lot of interesting activity this cycle particularly on the Mutter front. On top of the performance/lag/stuttering improvements, today Mutter saw the merging of the "X11 excision" preparation patches.

    The Mutter patches by longtime GNOME developer Carlos Garnacho around preparing for X11 excision were merged minutes ago.

  • Georges Basile Stavracas Neto: New Background panel, Calendar search engine, GTK4 shortcut engine (Sprint 1)

    GNOME To Do is full GTK4 these days. Which means it’s both a testbed for new GTK4 features, and also a way to give feedback as an app developer for the GTK team. Unfortunately, it also means To Do is blocked on various areas where GTK4 is lacking.

    One of these areas is keyboard shortcut.

    Last year, Benjamin wrote a major revamp for keyboard shortcuts. As part of this cycle, I decided to rebase and finish it; and also make To Do use the new API. Unfortunately, I failed to achieve what I set myself to.

    Turns out, adding a shortcuts engine to GTK4 is more involving and requires way more context than I had when trying to get it up to speed. I failed to predict that one week would have not been enough to finish it all.

    However, that does not mean all the efforts were wasted! The rebasing of the shortcuts engine was a non-trivial task successfully completed (see gtk!842), and I also fixed a few bugs while working on it. I also got a working prototype of GNOME To Do with the new APIs, and confirmed that it’s well suited — at least for a simpler application such as To Do.

    In retrospect, I believe I should have been more realistic (and perhaps slightly pessimistic) about the length and requirements of this task.

Programming: SVE2, Graphical Interface, Guile, Python and More

Filed under
Development
  • Arm SVE2 Support Aligning For GCC 10, LLVM Clang 9.0

    Given the significant performance benefits to Arm's Scalable Vector Extension 2 (SVE2), they are working on ensuring the open-source Linux compiler toolchains support these new CPU instructions ahead of SoCs shipping that support this big addition.

    Arm announced Scalable Vector Extension 2 (SVE2) recently as their latest advancement around SIMD programming and increasing data-level parallelism in programs. SVE2 is designed to ultimately deliver better SIMD performance than their long-available Neon extensions and to scale the performance with vector length increases as well as enabling auto-vectorization techniques. More details in this post on SVE2.

  • Intake: Discovering and Exploring Data in a Graphical Interface

    Do you have data that you’d like people to be able to explore on their own? Are you always passing around snippets of code to load specific data files? These are problems that people encounter all the time when working in groups and using the same datasources or when trying to distribute data to the public. Some users are comfortable interacting with data entirely programatically, but often it is helpful to use a GUI (Graphical User Interface) instead. With that in mind we have reimplemented the Intake GUI so that in addition to working in a jupyter notebook, it can be served as a web application next to your data, or at any endpoint.

  • lightening run-time code generation

    The upcoming Guile 3 release will have just-in-time native code generation. Finally, amirite? There's lots that I'd like to share about that and I need to start somewhere, so this article is about one piece of it: Lightening, a library to generate machine code.

  • Python Language Creator: “Male Attitude” Is Hurting The Programming Space

    Guido van Rossum is a famous name in the programming world. He is the creator of the Python programming language which was developed back in 1989. It is only since the last few years when this general-purpose programming language started gaining popularity.

    The number of Python users has increased significantly and it was not only named as the best programming language by IEEE but also the most asked-about language on Stack Overflow, overthrowing JavaScript — the all-time winner for decades.

  • Avant-IDLE: an experiment

Dear Ubuntu: Please Stop Packaging Epiphany If You Won’t Do It Properly

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

When users try Epiphany on Ubuntu, they receive a sub-par, broken browser. If you’re not willing to do this right, please just remove Epiphany from your repositories. We’d all be happier this way. You are the most popular distributor of Epiphany by far, and your poor packaging is making the browser look bad.

Read more

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Friday
  • Episode 19: Democratizing Cybersecurity

    Katherine Druckman and Doc Searls talk to Alex Gounares of Polyverse Linux about Cybersecurity for everyone.

  • Introducing the Librem Tunnel

    You probably know by now that the Librem Tunnel is part of Librem One, a suite of privacy-protecting, no-tracking apps and services created by our team at Purism, which also includes Librem Mail, Librem Chat and Librem Social.

    Librem Tunnel offers an encrypted, no-logging, virtual private network tunnel, making sure all your network traffic is secure and your privacy fully protected. This means you can safely and conveniently use any public hotspot and not have to worry about how private your connection really is, using standards-based OpenVPN with any compatible client. You are not the product in Librem Tunnel: you will not be tracked, we do not sell your data, and we don’t advertise.

  • Trump Explains Why He Banned Huawei, And It’s Not Convincing

    The world’s two biggest economies are indulged in a trade war and the toll is being paid by the Chinese company Huawei, which is being erased from existence in the US.

    The US government has already blacklisted Huawei, causing a big blow to its growing smartphone business across the globe. After the temporary license ends in August, it won’t be able to do any business with US-based companies unless the ban is lifted.

  • Snort Alerts

    It was previously explained on LinuxHint how to install Snort Intrusion Detection System and how to create Snort rules. Snort is an Intrusion Detection System designed to detect and alert on irregular activities within a network. Snort is integrated by sensors delivering information to the server according to rules instructions.
    In this tutorial Snort alert modes will be explained to instruct Snort to report over incidents in 5 different ways (ignoring the “no alert” mode), fast, full, console, cmg and unsock.

    If you didn’t read the articles mentioned above and you don’t have previous experience with snort please get started with the tutorial on Snort installation and usage and continue with the article on rules before continuing this lecture. This tutorial assumes you have Snort already running.

Fedora: Bodhi 4, Packit and More

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Bodhi 4.0.0 released

    After about 5 months of development time, the Fedora Infrastructure team has finally tagged Bodhi 4.0.0. This is a major release with many backwards incompatible changes, and results in a simpler codebase which should ease future development and maintenance.

  • Packit – auto-package your projects into Fedora

    Packit (https://packit.dev/) is a CLI tool that helps you auto-package your upstream projects into the Fedora operating system. But what does it really mean?

    As a developer, you might want to add or update your package in Fedora. If you’ve done it in the past, you know it’s no easy task. If you haven’t let me reiterate: it’s no easy task.

    And this is exactly where packit can help: with just one configuration file in your upstream repository, packit will automatically package your software into Fedora and update it when you update your source code upstream.

    Furthermore, packit can synchronize downstream changes to a SPEC file back into the upstream repository. This could be useful if the SPEC file of your package is changed in Fedora repositories and you would like to synchronize it into your upstream project.

    Packit also provides a way to build an SRPM package based on an upstream repository checkout, which can be used for building RPM packages in COPR.

    Last but not least, packit provides a status command. This command provides information about upstream and downstream repositories, like pull requests, release and more others.

    Packit provides also another two commands: build and create-update.

  • Niharika and Divyansh: Improving modular packages and container security

    This post is the fourth and final introduction to the Fedora Summer Coding interns Class of Summer 2019. In this interview, we’ll meet Niharika Shrivastava and Divyansh Kamboj, who are working on projects to improve Fedora module metadata and add additional security hardening to containers, respectively.

  • [Fedora] FPgM report: 2019-21

    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora Program Management this week.

    I have weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.

2018 Open Source Initiative Annual Report and Licensing Discussions

Filed under
OSS
  • 2018 Open Source Initiative Annual Report

    Welcome to the Open Source Initiative’s 2018 annual report. In this year's report you’ll learn about the organization’s activities from the past year, which captures the hard work of employees, contractors, volunteers, and those passionate about open source. I hope this will give you some context on why this work happened and what makes it so important. The Open Source Initiative was started in 1998 by a group of people interested in seeing ethics applied to the creation and distribution of software. This approach was built on a foundation of ideals – a specific philosophy on the rights and responsibilities of software users and creators. More than twenty years later, I am writing as a director of the OSI, which has grown into a robust organization with record numbers of individual and affiliate members, a dedicated all volunteer board, and the incredible support of volunteers and open source enthusiasts around the world.

    2018 brought amazing successes for the OSI. We celebrated our 20th anniversary, which took us around the world where we were able to look back on thousands of victories for open source. Every line of code or translation; every piece of documentation and version controlled repository; every successful business, happy user, and committed contributor, continues to shape a movement that has changed the face of technology, business, and community. It was also a year in which Microsoft acquired GitHub, one of the largest distributors of open source licensed code, and IBM purchased open source business giant Red Hat, showing that the companies that built their success around proprietary software see the need for an open source future.

  • OSI License Discuss and Review: Evolution and Improvement

    The directors of the board of the Open Source Initiative recognize the process for discussion and review of new licenses proposed for approval by the organization can use improvement and would benefit from evolution. In particular, it does not appear as though all points of view on open source licensing are represented in the discussion here. To address this situation we have created a Board Committee for license approval to evaluate responses on-list, appointed more moderators, and will devise a new moderation strategy.

    [...]

    Changes to the Website
    We have also made a minor change to the language describing the license review process on https://opensource.org/approval. The page formerly said “Approve, if (a) there is sufficient consensus emerging from community discussion that approval is justified, and (Cool the OSI determines that the license conforms to the Open Source Definition and guarantees software freedom." The page now says “Approve if, after taking into consideration community discussion, the OSI determines that the license conforms to the Open Source Definition and guarantees software freedom.”

5 best apps on the Snap store on Linux

Filed under
Software

Users can access the Snap store on Linux with the help of the Snap runtime. The runtime doesn’t come pre-configured on any Linux distribution except for Ubuntu. So, if you want to install any of the applications we cover in this list, do yourself a favor and install the Snap package system on your Linux PC.

Installing the Snap runtime is pretty straightforward. Open up the package manager on your Linux PC, install the “snapd” package and enable it to get going with it. Or, if you need help check out our tutorial on how to set up Snap packages on Linux!

Can’t install the Snap runtime on your Linux PC? Consider switching over to Ubuntu Linux instead. It’s an excellent OS, and it comes with Snaps enabled out of the box!

Read more

Also: GUI To Batch Rename Files On Linux With Exif And Music Tags Support: Inviska Rename

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More in Tux Machines

KDE Usability & Productivity: Week 72

Week 72 in Usability & Productivity initiative is here and it’s chock-full of goodies! We continue to polish Plasma 5.16 ahead of its release in two weeks. There was one point in time when veteran KDE developer and author of the new notifications system Kai Uwe Broulik was literally committing fixes faster than I could add them to this blog post! In addition, features for Plasma 5.17 as well as many of our apps are starting to trickle in. Check it out... Read more

Iran & Iraq Are Embracing GNU Health Project | Dr Axel Braun

In this episode of Let’s Talk, Dr Axel Braun talks about the new features and updates of the GNU Health project. He also talked about the increasing adoption of the project. Read more Also: The Man Behind OpenSUSE Conference – Douglas DeMaio

GNOME 3.33.2 released!

Hello GNOME developers,

GNOME 3.33.2 is now available. This is the second unstable release
leading to 3.34 stable series.

I had to disable gnome-contacts, gnome-calendar and gnome-maps because of the not-very-well coordinated evolution-data-server transition.

If you want to compile GNOME 3.33.2, you can use the official
BuildStream project snapshot.

https://download.gnome.org/teams/releng/3.33.2/gnome-3.33.2.tar.xz

The list of updated modules and changes is available here:

https://download.gnome.org/core/3.33/3.33.2/NEWS

The source packages are available here:

https://download.gnome.org/core/3.33/3.33.2/sources/

WARNING!
--------
This release is a snapshot of development code. Although it is
buildable and usable, it is primarily intended for testing and hacking
purposes. GNOME uses odd minor version numbers to indicate development
status.

For more information about 3.34, the full schedule, the official module
lists and the proposed module lists, please see our 3.33 wiki page:

https://www.gnome.org/start/unstable


Cheers,

Abderrahim Kitouni,
GNOME Release Team
Read more Also: GNOME 3.33.2 Released As Another Step Towards The GNOME 3.34 Desktop

Security Leftovers

  • Serious Security: Don't let your SQL server attack you with ransomware [Ed: Article focuses on things like Windows and RDP. SQL Server is proprietary software that runs on a platform with NSA back doors. So if you choose it, then you choose to have no security at all, only an illusion of it. Why does the article paint Windows issues as pertaining to MySQL?]
    Tales from the honeypot: this time a MySQL-based attack. Old tricks still work, because we're still making old mistakes - here's what to do. [...] As regular readers will know, one of the popular vehicles for malware crooks at the moment is Windows RDP, short for Remote Desktop Protocol.
  • How Screwed is Intel without Hyper-Threading?
    As it stands Microsoft is pushing out OS-level updates to address the four MDS vulnerabilities and you’ll get those with this month's Windows 10 1903 update. However, this doesn’t mitigate the problem entirely, for that we need motherboard BIOS updates and reportedly Intel has released the new microcode to motherboard partners. However as of writing no new BIOS revisions have been released to the public. We believe we can test a worst case scenario by disabling Hyper-Threading and for older platforms that won’t get updated this might end up being the only solution.
  • SandboxEscape drops three more Windows 10 zero-day exploits

    SandboxEscaper also indicated that she was in the market to sell flaws to "people who hate the US", a move made in apparent response to FBI subpoenas against her Google account.

  • Huawei can’t officially use microSD cards in its phones going forward

    The SD Association is also by no means the first to cut ties: Google, ARM, Intel, Qualcomm, and Broadcom are also among the companies that have stopped working with Huawei due to the ban. The Wi-Fi Alliance (which sets Wi-Fi standards across the industry) has also “temporarily restricted” Huawei’s membership due to the US ban, and Huawei has also voluntarily left JEDEC (a semiconductor standards group best known for defining RAM specifications) over the issues with the US as well, according to a report from Nikkei Asian Review. All this could severely hamper Huawei’s ability to produce hardware at all, much less compete in the US technology market.

  • Huawei barred from SD Association: What’s that mean for its phones and microSD cards?

    As such, companies that aren’t on the SD Association’s list of members can’t officially produce and sell devices with SD card support that use the SD standards. According to SumahoInfo, the member page showed Huawei a few weeks ago, but no longer lists the firm this week.