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Sunday, 24 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Beginning of the End? srlinuxx 2 11/02/2005 - 6:24am
Story KDE 3.4beta2 Released! srlinuxx 3 11/02/2005 - 6:06pm
Forum topic Thank You. srlinuxx 13/02/2005 - 5:10pm
Story Firefox Putting on the Pressure srlinuxx 2 13/02/2005 - 6:17pm
Story More Competition srlinuxx 2 13/02/2005 - 6:22pm
Story LA County Considering Open Source srlinuxx 2 14/02/2005 - 2:31am
Story Cheech and Chong Didn't Inhale? srlinuxx 3 15/02/2005 - 3:32am
Story Danes accused Microsoft of blackmail srlinuxx 2 15/02/2005 - 6:35pm
Story HA! rm -rf Contest at Mad Penguin srlinuxx 2 15/02/2005 - 6:36pm
Story Is PCLOS 8.1 Close? srlinuxx 4 18/02/2005 - 6:46am

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Why leading DevOps may get you a promotion

    Gene Kim, author of The Phoenix Project and leading DevOps proponent, seems to think so. In a recent interview with TechBeacon's Mike Perrow, Kim notes that of "the nearly 100 speakers at DevOps Enterprise Summits over the last two years, about one in three have been promoted."

  • Cloud Vendors, The Great Disruptors, Face Disruption From Blockchain
  • SWORDY, a local party brawler could come to Linux if Microsoft allow it

    SWORDY is a rather fun looking local party brawler that has just released on Steam in Early Access. It could see a Linux release too, if Microsoft allow it.

  • System Shock remake has blasted past the Linux stretch goal, officially coming to Linux

    The Linux stretch goal was $1.1 million and it's pleasing to see it hit the goal, so we won't miss out now. I am hoping they don't let anyone down, as they have shown they can do it already by providing the demo. There should be no reason to see a delay with Linux now.

  • GammaRay 2.5 release

    GammaRay 2.5 has been released, the biggest feature release yet of our Qt introspection tool. Besides support for Qt 5.7 and in particular the newly added Qt 3D module a slew of new features awaits you, such as access to QML context property chains and type information, object instance statistics, support for inspecting networking and SSL classes, and runtime switchable logging categories.

  • GammaRay 2.5 Released For Qt Introspection

    KDAB has announced the release of GammaRay 2.5, what they say is their "biggest feature release yet", the popular introspection tool for Qt developers.

  • The new Keyboard panel

    After implementing the new redesigned Shell of GNOME Control Center, it’s now time to move the panels to a bright new future. And the Keyboard panel just walked this step.

  • Debian on Seagate Personal Cloud and Seagate NAS

    The majority of NAS devices supported in Debian are based on Debian's Kirkwood platform. This platform is quite dated now and can only run Debian's armel port.

    Debian now supports the Seagate Personal Cloud and Seagate NAS devices. They are based on Marvell's Armada 370, a platform which can run Debian's armhf port. Unfortunately, even the Armada 370 is a bit dated now, so I would not recommend these devices for new purchases. If you have one already, however, you now have the option to run native Debian.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software

How To Setup A Web Server And Host Website On Your Own Linux Computer

Filed under
Linux

Welcome to small tutorial series of hosting website on Linux machine. This series of articles will teach how to setup a web server on Linux computer and make it available online. The website we'll host on our personal computer can be accessed from around the globe. In this article(Part 1), we are going to install all the required tools to setup web server. So let's get started and start our own setup web server. ​

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more

Embedded News

Filed under
Linux
  • Zephyr OS, a ‘Secure IoT RTOS,’ You Say?

    Earlier this year, the Zephyr project was launched to a world justifiably skeptical of self-anointed “secure” technologies, jaded by the sloganeering of all things IoT, and seemingly saturated by the proliferation and fragmentation of no-size-fits-all microcontroller RTOS platforms. Given those circumstances it is only reasonable that I find myself asked what we could possibly be thinking in launching a new “secure IoT RTOS platform.” Or, should I say, why are we launching yet another one.

  • Rugged mini-ITX based box-PC goes all out on expansion
  • Bay Trail and Braswell COMs tap new Qseven 2.1 spec

    Advantech’s Linux-friendly SOM-3567 and SOM-3568 COMS offer Intel Bay Trail and Braswell chips, respectively, and adopt the Qseven 2.1 form factor.

    Advantech’s SOM-3567 and SOM-3568 computer-on-modules are the first we’ve seen to use Qseven 2.1. This is the Qseven computer-on-module standard’s first update since version 2.0 hit in Sep. 2012, and eight years after the debut of Qseven 1.0.

Mozilla News

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Firefox is latest browser to kill off Adobe Flash support

    MOZILLA HAS become the latest browser company to turn off the ageing Adobe Flash plug-in.

    The Firefox browser will turn off "not essential" Flash content by default starting in August, but sites that require the plug-in for heritage functionality will be excepted.

    "These and future changes will bring Firefox users enhanced security, improved battery life, faster page load and better browser responsiveness," said Mozilla in a blog post.

  • Mozilla’s Dave Herman on Building an Open Source Research Lab

    Listen to a very interesting talk by Dave Herman, Director of Strategy at Mozilla Research, explaining how research and practice can better talk to each other. Among other things, Dave is the author of the popular book “Effective JavaScript: 68 Specific Ways to Harness the Power of JavaScript.”

    His thesis for this talk is: “An open research lab is a research group that engages directly with the market and works via open collaboration to close the feedback loop between ideas and practice.”

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

GNOME 3.21.4

Filed under
GNOME
  • GNOME 3.21.4 released
  • GNOME 3.21.4 Released

    GNOME 3.21.4 was announced today as the latest development release of this desktop environment leading up to September's release of GNOME 3.22.

    Core changes in GNOME 3.21.4 include an improved annotation properties dialog UI in Evince, a structured logging API for GLib, support for joysticks with GNOME Bluetooth, support for alarms in GNOME Calendar, support for Snaps in GNOME Software, support for authenticating in plugins with GNOME Software, and various GTK+ toolkit improvements. There are also the previously talked about Mutter improvements with a new screen capture API, support for NVIDIA's vRAM robustness extension, and significant frame-buffer/display changes for working on multi-DPI desktop support.

  • The state of gamepad support in Games

    Gamepad support has now been merged into GNOME Games v3.21.4 !!! This means that you can play your favorite retro games using a gamepad!!!Gamepad support has now been merged into GNOME Games v3.21.4 !!! This means that you can play your favorite retro games using a gamepad!!!

Wine 1.9.15

Filed under
Microsoft
Software

Linux Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Security News

Filed under
Security
  • As a blockchain-based project teeters, questions about the technology’s security

    There’s no shortage of futurists, industry analysts, entrepreneurs and IT columnists who in the past year have churned out reports, articles and books touting blockchain-based ledgers as the next technology that will run the world.

  • Fix Bugs, Go Fast, and Update: 3 Approaches to Container Security

    Containers are becoming the central piece of the future of IT. Linux has had containers for ages, but they are still maturing as a technology to be used in production or mission-critical enterprise scenarios. With that, security is becoming a central theme around containers. There are many proposed solutions to the problem, including identifying exactly what technology is in place, fixing known bugs, restricting change, and generally implementing sound security policies. This article looks at these issues and how organizations can adapt their approach to security to keep pace with the rapid evolution of containers.

  • Preventing the next Heartbleed and making FOSS more secure [Ed: Preventing the next Microsoft-connected trademarked bug for FOSS and making FOSS more secure from Microsoft FUD]

    David Wheeler is a long-time leader in advising and working with the U.S. government on issues related to open source software. His personal webpage is a frequently cited source on open standards, open source software, and computer security. David is leading a new project, the CII Best Practices Badging project, which is part of the Linux Foundation's Core Infrastructure Initiative (CII) for strengthening the security of open source software. In this interview he talks about what it means for both government and other users.

Ubuntu Forums Hacked! Here Is What Hacker Stole?

Filed under
Linux
News

The forums of the most popular Linux distributions, Ubuntu, was hacked. The news was reported yesterday by Jane Silber on Ubuntu insights. Although he has confirmed that not any password was hacked in the plain text, rather hashed and salted strings which are of no use for the hacker. But, the hacker successfully downloaded other users' information.

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Intro to LimeSurvey: An open source, feature-rich polling platform

Filed under
OSS

LimeSurvey is released under the GPL, and a number of companies provide commercial hosting and support, so you can use it without having to set it up on a system of your own. LimeSurvey's installation instructions are clear and easy, and the list of dependencies is not strenuous—MySQL or PostgreSQL, PHP 5.5 or higher, and a web server of your choice. There is a short list of PHP modules that are needed, all of which are easily installable via your package mananger.

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How I use Linux for theoretical physics

Filed under
Linux

In 2008, I started studying physics and got in contact with Linux, since a bunch of people used it for data analysis and simulations. Comprehension came fast and easy with such people around, and I was strongly encouraged to get things done with Linux. I installed Ubuntu on my notebook, and soon got familiar with Bash and the standard tools.

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Hands-On: Updating Fedora 23 to 24 via Gnome Software

Filed under
HowTos

It feels like it has been even more than a month since the release of Fedora 24 was announced. I have already installed the new release from scratch on most of my laptops, but I specifically held back my Acer Aspire Z3 all-in-one desktop system so that I could try out the promised upgrade using the Gnome Software utility.

I have been checking the Software utility periodically, and I finally saw the notice today that an update for Gnome 3.20 was available which would make it possible to upgrade to Fedora 24.

Read more

Keeweb A Linux Password Manager

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
Security

Today we are depending on more and more online services. Each online service we sign up for, let us set a password and this way we have to remember hundreds of passwords. In this case, it is easy for anyone to forget passwords. In this article I am going to talk about Keeweb, a Linux password manager that can store all your passwords securely either online or offline.

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So when Ubuntu and Canonical revealed they were partnering with actual, big manufacturers for Ubuntu mobile devices, a spark of hope was rekindled in my heart. Let it be clear, I am by no means an Ubuntu user, not even a fan. I left the fold nearly a decade ago, after having spent quite some time using and contributing to Kubuntu (to the point of becoming a certified “member” even, though I never ascended to the Council). In terms of loyalties and usage, I am a KDE user (and “helper”) foremost. I use Fedora because it just works for me, for now. So, yes, an Ubuntu Touch device would be another compromise for me, but it would be the smallest one. Or so I hoped. Read more

today's leftovers

Phoronix on Graphics