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Tuesday, 12 Nov 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Repliessort icon Last Post
Story Diamonds are a girl's best friend srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:45pm
Story AMD not out of the Race yet srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:53pm
Story techiemoe rants: srlinuxx 10/08/2009 - 7:01pm
Story More BS from the Evil One. srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:27pm
Story Doom3 for those with little or no PC! srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 12:49am
Story Linux leaders at open-source summit srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:35pm
Story This months Cosmo srlinuxx 06/02/2005 - 4:03am
Story Mandrake's Clustering Again srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:58pm
Story No Case - No Problem srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 5:35am
Story ATI has released 64-Bit drivers srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:38pm

WordPress 5.3 “Kirk”

Filed under
Server
OSS

5.3 expands and refines the block editor with more intuitive interactions and improved accessibility. New features in the editor increase design freedoms, provide additional layout options and style variations to allow designers more control over the look of a site.

This release also introduces the Twenty Twenty theme giving the user more design flexibility and integration with the block editor. Creating beautiful web pages and advanced layouts has never been easier.

Read more

Proprietary Software From OnlyOffice and Microsoft

Filed under
Software
  • OnlyOffice, the Open Source Office Suite Apis Now Available on Flathub

    Big fan of productivity software? If so, you may be interested to know that the OnlyOffice Desktop Editors are now available on Flathub.

    Yes, Flathub, aka the de facto app store for Flatpak, the cross-distro containerised app distribution method.

  • ONLYOFFICE Desktop Editors Now Available To Install On Linux From Flathub

    ONLYOFFICE Desktop Editors, a free and open source office suite that offers text, spreadsheet and presentation editors for the Linux, Windows and macOS desktops, is now available on Flathub for easy installation (and update) on Linux distributions that support Flatpak.

    Flathub is an app store and build service for Linux that distributes applications as Flatpak packages, which allows them to run on almost any Linux distribution.

    ONLYOFFICE Desktop Editors allows creating, viewing and editing text documents, spreadsheets and presentations with support for most popular formats like .docx, .odt, .xlsx., .ods, .pptx, .csv and .odp. Its website claims it has the "highest compatibility with Microsoft Office formats".

  • How to get Microsoft core fonts on Linux

    Linux is an open-source operating system. As a result, it is missing some critical components that users of proprietary operating systems enjoy. One big thing that all Linux operating systems miss out on is proprietary fonts.

    The most used proprietary fonts out there today are the Microsoft Core Fonts. They’re used in many apps, development, and even graphics design projects. In this guide, we’ll go over how to set them up on Linux.

    Note: not using Ubuntu, Debian, Arch Linux, Fedora, or OpenSUSE? Download the generic font package here and install the fonts by hand.

IEI's and Arbor Technology's Linux-Ready Devices

Filed under
Hardware
  • IEI ITG-100AI DIN-Rail Rugged mini PC Comes with a Myriad X AI Accelerator Module
  • Compact Kaby Lake signage player has dual 4K HDMI ports

    Arbor’s rugged, Linux-friendly “IEC-3900” signage player has a 7th Gen U-Series Core CPU, dual independent 4K HDMI ports, 4x USB 3.0 ports, M.2 SATA storage, and a 130 x 124 x 35mm footprint.

    Arbor Technology, which recently introduced a rugged ELIT-1930 signage player based on Intel’s 8th Gen Coffee Lake, has now launched an even more rugged signage system with a much more compact form factor that runs on a 7th Gen Kaby Lake processor. The 130 x 124 x 35mm, 0.73 kg IEC-3900 runs Linux or Win 10 on a dual-core, 2.8GHz/3.9GHz Core i7-7600U or 2.6GHz/3.5GHz Core i5-7300U.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Openwashing and Linux Foundation Openwash

Filed under
OSS
  • Huobi’s ‘Regulator-Friendly’ Blockchain Goes Open Source

    Huobi Chain, the regulator-facing public blockchain of exchange Huobi Group, is now open source and publicly available to all developers on GitHub, the firm said Tuesday.

    Nervos, a blockchain development startup, is providing part of the technical infrastructure for the project.

    The firms are developing pluggable components for the network that could enable regulators to supervise contract deployments, asset holdings and transfers, as well as the enforcement of anti money laundering regulations, Bo Wang, a Nervos researcher, told CoinDesk.

    The components will also allow financial institutions, such as banks and regulatory agencies, to freeze assets and accounts in case of emergencies via sidechains, according to Wang.

  • Is Open Source Broken?

    The movement to develop software applications and all manner of IT services through the open source model is fundamentally rooted in the notion of community contribution, but things have shifted.

  • Managing all your enterprise's APIs with new management gateways for review
  • See you at KubeCon!

    It’s that time of year again! We’re getting ready to head on out to San Diego for KubeCon + CloudNativeCon NA. For me, KubeCon always makes for an exciting and jam-packed week. 

  • Amazon Web Services, Genesys, Salesforce Form New Open Data Model

    To accelerate digital transformation, organizations in every industry are modernizing their on-premises technologies by adopting cloud-native applications. According to the International Data Corporation (IDC), global spend on cloud computing will grow from $147 billion in 2019 to $418 billion by 2024. Almost half of that investment will be tied to technologies that help companies deliver personalized customer experiences.

    One major challenge of this shift to cloud computing is that applications are typically created with their own data models, forcing developers to build, test, and manage custom code that’s necessary to map and translate data across different systems. The process is inefficient, delays innovation, and ultimately can result in a broken customer experience.

  • The Linux Kernel Mentorship program was a life changing experience

    Operating systems, computer architectures and compilers have always fascinated me. I like to go in depth to understand the important software components we depend on! My life changed when engineers from IBM LTC (Linux Technology Center) came to my college to teach us the Linux Kernel internals. When I heard about the Linux Kernel Mentorship program, I immediately knew that I wanted to be a part of it to further fuel my passion for Linux.

    One of the project in the lists of projects available to work during the Linux Kernel Mentorship program was on “Predictive Memory Reclamation”. I really wanted the opportunity to work on the core kernel, and I began working with my mentor Khalid Aziz immediately during the application period where he gave me a task regarding the identification of anonymous memory regions for a process. I learned a lot in the application period by reading various blogs, textbooks and commit logs.

    During my mentorship period, I worked to develop a predictive memory reclamation algorithm in the Linux Kernel. The aim of the project was to reduce the amount of time the Linux kernel spends in reclaiming memory to satisfy processes requests for memory when there is memory pressure, i.e not enough to satisfy the memory allocation of a process. We implemented a predictive algorithm that can forecast memory pressure and proactively reclaim memory to ensure there is enough available for processes.

GNU Guix: Spreading the news

Filed under
OS
GNU

Developers keep adding crazy features, fixing bugs, and generally improving things. But how good is it if users aren’t aware of these new things? As an example, since June, our build farm has been offering lzip-compressed binaries, which results in better performance when installing software. But to take advantage of that, users need to be aware of its existence, and they need to upgrade their Guix daemon. Likewise, how do we get people to learn about the new guix deploy command that’s now available at their fingertips, about security issues that were fixed, about important infrastructure changes, new options added to existing commands, and so forth?

Our (frustrating!) experience has been that release notes, blog posts, and mailing list announcements aren’t quite enough to get the word out. There’s always people who’ll miss important info and realize when it’s already late, sometimes too late. Hence this simple idea: wouldn’t it be nice if important information would reach users right in their terminal?

[...]

Since it was applied a bit more than a month ago, we’ve already put the news mechanism to good use on quite a few occasions: giving users instructions on how to deal with locales after the last glibc upgrade, giving them upgrade info for CVE-2019-18192, telling them about new command-line options, and more.

In parallel, given that reading the mailing lists is akin to “drinking from a fire hose” as they say, Christopher Baines has been thinking about how to provide regular development updates to interested users and developers. Chris announced last week a prototype of a “Guix Weekly News” web site that would aggregate information about package updates automatically extracted from the Guix Data Service, along with manually written updates. It would seem that this service could readily grab info from channel news as well.

Read more

Events: FSF, GStreamer, LibreOffice, Qt World Summit

Filed under
OSS
  • Hang out with the FSF staff in Seattle, November 15

    We are hosting this get-together to show our appreciation for your support of the FSF's work and to provide an opportunity to meet other FSF members and supporters in the area. We'll give updates on what the FSF is currently working on and we are curious to hear your thoughts, as well as answer any questions you may have.

  • GStreamer Conference 2019
  • GStreamer Conference 2019 Videos Now Available Online

    Taking place at the end of October during the Linux Foundation events in Lyon, France was the GStreamer Conference to align with the annual developer festivities.

    GStreamer Conference 2019 was once again livestreamed by the fantastic folks at Ubicast.tv with their great quality video/audio recordings of the conference now for many years.

  • Event report: Google Summer of Code presentation in Ankara, Turkey

    The Google Summer of Code – aka GSoC – is a global programme focused on bringing more student developers into free and open source software development. In 2019, LibreOffice was once again a participating project, and we describe the results here.

  • Qt World Summit 2019

    We also had a dedicated table for our mobile effort where we showcased our KDE apps for Android and of course Plasma Mobile. The latter of which we had running on a good ol’ Nexus 5X and more importantly the Librem 5 Dev Kit by Purism. Unfortunately, the Pinephone developer kits we were hoping to show as well weren’t shipped in time for the event. Anyway, if you’re interested in learning more about what’s going on with Plasma Mobile go check out our new weekly blog series!

Python Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development

Fedora: Updates, Upgrade and Fedora Women’s Day in Peru

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Fedora status updates: October 2019

    The Fedora Silverblue team was not able to get the necessary changes into Fedora 31 to support having Flatpak pre-installed. They are looking at the possibility of re-spinning the Silverblue ISO to incorporate the changes. But they did update the Fedora 31 Flatpak runtime. The team updated the Flatpak’ed GNOME applications to GNOME 3.34 and built them against the Fedora 31 runtime.

  • Upgrade Fedora 30 to Fedora 31
  • Fedora Women’s Day (FWD) 2019

Security Patches and the Kernel (Linux)

Filed under
Linux
Security
  • Security updates for Tuesday

    Security updates have been issued by Fedora (community-mysql, crun, java-latest-openjdk, and mupdf), openSUSE (libssh2_org), and SUSE (go1.12, libseccomp, and tar).

  • New ZombieLoad Side-Channel Attack Variant: TSX Asynchronous Abort

    In addition to the JCC erratum being made public today and that performance-shifting Intel microcode update affecting Skylake through Cascade Lake, researchers also announced a new ZombieLoad side-channel attack variant dubbed "TSX Asynchronous Abort" or TAA for short.

    ZombieLoad / MDS (Microarchitectural Data Sampling) was announced back in May by researchers while today Cyberus Technology has announced a new variant focused on Intel processors with TSX (Transactional Synchronization Extensions). TSX Asynchronous Abort is a new ZombieLoad variant that was actually discovered back as part of Cyberus' originally discoveries but faced an extended embargo.

  • Linux Kernel Gets Mitigations For TSX Aync Abort Plus Another New Issue: iITLB Multihit

    The Linux kernel has just received its mitigation work for the newly-announced TSX Asynchronous Abort (TAA) variant of ZombieLoad plus revealing mitigations for another Intel CPU issue... So today in addition to the JCC Erratum and ZombieLoad TAA the latest is iITLB Multihit (NX) - No eXcuses.

    The mainline Linux kernel received mitigations for ZombieLoad TAA that work in conjunction with newly-published Intel microcode. The mitigations also now expose /sys/devices/system/cpu/vulnerabilities/tsx_async_abort for reporting the mitigation status plus a new tsx_async_abort kernel parameter. With the TAA mitigation, the system will clear CPU buffers on ring transitions.

  • LinuxBoot Continues Maturing - Now Able To Boot Windows

    LinuxBoot is approaching two years of age as the effort led by Facebook and others for replacing some elements of the system firmware with the Linux kernel.

    Chris Koch of Google presented at last month's Platform Security Summit 2019 on the initiative. The Platform Security Summit 2019 took place at the start of October at Microsoft's facilities in Redmond. LinuxBoot in recent months has been able to begin booting Windows 10, which is related to the recent reports on kexec'ing Windows from Linux. But not only is Windows booting but VMware and Xen are also now working in a LinuxBoot environment.

Volla Phone Promises to Support Ubuntu Touch, Gets Kickstarter Campaign

Filed under
Ubuntu

Founded by Dr. Jörg Wurzer, an experienced entrepreneur with more than 20 years of experience in research and development in user experience, machine learning, natural language processing, artificial intelligence, and product management, Volla Phone promises to be a privacy-focused mobile phone powered by a free and open source operating system.

At its heart, the Volla Phone device will use Nemo Mobile, an OS based on the Android Open Source Project (AOSP) promising increased security and privacy features, as well as simplicity for the everyday user. For developers, Volla Phone also promises to support an alternative, free, and open-source operation system like Ubuntu Touch.

Read more

Also: Ubuntu 18.04.4 LTS- Expected Release Date & More

Programming: DevNation, Python, RcppAnnoy and More

Filed under
Development
  • Plumbing Kubernetes CI/CD with Tekton

    Our first DevNation Live regional event was held in Bengaluru, India in July. This free technology event focused on open source innovations, with sessions presented by elite Red Hat technologists.

    In this session, Kamesh Sampath introduces Tekton, which is the Kubernetes-native way of defining and running CI/CD. Sampath explores the characteristics of Tekton—cloud-native, decoupled, and declarative—and shows how to combine various building blocks of Tekton to build and deploy a cloud-native application.

  • Coverage 5.0 beta 1

    I want to finish coverage.py 5.0. It has some big changes, so I need people to try it and tell me if it’s ready. Please install coverage.py 5.0 beta 1 and try it in your environment.

    I especially want to hear from you if you tried the earlier alphas of 5.0. There have been some changes in the SQLite database that were needed to make measurement efficient enough for large test suites, but that hinder ad-hoc querying.

  • How to get current date and time in Python?

    In this article, you will learn to get today's date and current date and time in Python. We will also format the date and time in different formats using strftime() method.

    There are a number of ways you can take to get the current date. We will use the date class of the datetime module to accomplish this task.

  • RcppAnnoy 0.0.14

    A new minor release of RcppAnnoy is now on CRAN, following the previous 0.0.13 release in September.

    RcppAnnoy is the Rcpp-based R integration of the nifty Annoy library by Erik Bernhardsson. Annoy is a small and lightweight C++ template header library for very fast approximate nearest neighbours—originally developed to drive the famous Spotify music discovery algorithm.

    This release once again allows compilation on older compilers. The 0.0.13 release in September brought very efficient 512-bit AVX instruction to accelerate computations. However, this could not be compiled on older machines so we caught up once more with upstream to update to conditional code which will fall back to either 128-bit AVX or no AVX, ensuring buildability “everywhere”.

  • The Royal Mint eyes fresh IT talent to power digital drive

    The Royal Mint has been manufacturing coins for 1,100 years, originally from the Tower of London and, since 1967, from its current site in South Wales. Today, it is the world’s largest export mint, printing 3.3 billion coins and blanks a year, and now is looking to expand its digital reach to serve retail customers online.

  • Google plans to give slow websites a new badge of shame in Chrome

    A new badge could appear in the future that’s designed to highlight sites that are “authored in a way that makes them slow generally.” Google will look at historical load latencies to figure out which sites are guilty of slow load times and flag them, and the Chrome team is also exploring identifying sites that will load slowly based on device hardware or network connectivity.

  • Moving towards a faster web

    In the future, Chrome may identify sites that typically load fast or slow for users with clear badging. This may take a number of forms and we plan to experiment with different options, to determine which provides the most value to our users.

    Badging is intended to identify when sites are authored in a way that makes them slow generally, looking at historical load latencies. Further along, we may expand this to include identifying when a page is likely to be slow for a user based on their device and network conditions.

  • The Maturing of QUIC

    QUIC continues to evolve through a collaborative and iterative process at the IETF — of adding features, implementing them, evaluating them, reworking or discarding them because they don’t stand up to continued scrutiny, and refining them. And in doing so, QUIC has matured in more ways than we imagined, yielding a protocol that is remarkably different and substantially better than it was in the beginning. So, keeping your arms and legs inside the ride at all times, let us take you on this journey of how QUIC has gone from an early experiment to a standard poised to modernize the [Internet].

  • HEADS UP: ntpd changing [in OpenBSD]

    Probably after 6.7 we'll delete the warning. Maybe for 6.8 we'll remove -s and -S from getopt, and starting with those options will fail.

"Wireshark For The Terminal" Termshark 2.0 Adds Stream Reassembly, Piped Input And Dark Mode

Filed under
Software

Termshark, a Wireshark-like terminal interface for TShark written in Go, was updated to version 2.0.0. This release includes support for dark mode, piped input, and stream reassembly, as well as performance optimizations that make the tool faster and more responsive.

Read more

Red Hat Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • GitHub report surprises, serverless hotness, and more industry trends

    Now, let's discuss how developers can use Quarkus to bring Java into serverless, a place where previously, it was unable to go. Quarkus introduces a comprehensive and seamless approach to generating an operating system specific (aka native) executable from your Java code, as you do with languages like Go and C/C++. Environments such as event-driven and serverless, where you need to start a service to react to an event, require a low time-to-first-response, and traditional Java stacks simply cannot provide this. Knative enables developers to run cloud-native applications as serverless containers in seconds and the containers will go down to zero on demand.

    In addition to compiling Java to Knative, Quarkus aims to improve developer productivity. Quarkus works out of the box with popular Java standards, frameworks and libraries like Eclipse MicroProfile, Apache Kafka, RESTEasy, Hibernate, Spring, and many more. Developers familiar with these will feel at home with Quarkus, which should streamline code for the majority of common use cases while providing the flexibility to cover others that come up.

  • When Quarkus Meets Knative Serverless Workloads

    Daniel Oh is a principal technical product marketing manager at Red Hat and works CNCF ambassador as well. He's well recognized in cloud-native application development, senior DevOps practices in many open source projects and international conferences.

  • Making things Go: Command Line Heroes draws infrastructure

    Most of our episodes feature languages that have clear arcs. "The Infrastructure Effect" was different. By all accounts, COBOL is a language heading the way of Latin. There are only a few specialists who are proficient COBOL coders. But it’s still vital to many long-lasting institutions that affect millions: the banking industry, the IRS, and manufacturing. And the world of tech infrastructure is moving on—to Go. Where does that leave COBOL in the next few years? And how do you tease all of that in an image?

    We had to decide what visual themes could we use to depict each language—and then, how to combine them into a single, coherent frame. COBOL and Go have a similar function, so we wanted to make sure each language had clear, distinct imagery. We decided to rely on some of their real-world applications: the bank and subways for COBOL, and the cloud-based applications for Go.

  • Using the Red Hat OpenShift tuned Operator for Elasticsearch

    I recently assisted a client to deploy Elastic Cloud on Kubernetes (ECK) on Red Hat OpenShift 4.x. They had run into an issue where Elasticsearch would throw an error similar to:

    Max virtual memory areas vm.max_map_count [65530] likely too low, increase to at least [262144]
    According to the official documentation, Elasticsearch uses a mmapfs directory by default to store its indices. The default operating system limits on mmap counts are likely to be too low, which may result in out of memory exceptions. Usually, administrators would just increase the limits by running:

    sysctl -w vm.max_map_count=262144
    However, OpenShift uses Red Hat CoreOS for its worker nodes and, because it is an automatically updating, minimal operating system for running containerized workloads, you shouldn’t manually log on to worker nodes and make changes. This approach is unscalable and results in a worker node becoming tainted. Instead, OpenShift provides an elegant and scalable method to achieve the same via its Node Tuning Operator.

  • bcc-tools brings dynamic kernel tracing to Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1

    In Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1, Red Hat ships a set of fully supported on x86_64 dynamic kernel tracing tools, called bcc-tools, that make use of a kernel technology called extended Berkeley Packet Filter (eBPF). With these tools, you can quickly gain insight into certain aspects of system performance that would have previously required more time and effort from the system and operator.

    The eBPF technology allows dynamic kernel tracing without requiring kernel modules (like systemtap) or rebooting of the kernel (as with debug kernels). eBPF accomplishes this while maintaining minimal overhead for each trace point, making these tools an ideal way to instrument running kernels in production.

  • What open communities teach us about empowering customers

    When it comes to digital transformation, businesses seem to be on the right track improving their customers' experiences through the use of technologies. Today, so much digital transformation literature describes the benefits of "delivering new value to customers" or "delivering value to customers in new ways."

Leaving Apple & Google – /e/ mobile OS next steps: a Roadmap for 2020

Filed under
OS
Gadgets

As the /e/ OS remains quite complex to install, we have partnered with a refurbisher to offer a range of smartphones pre-installed with /e/OS. It’s been available since summer 2019 in the EU, and with Australia/New Zealand coming very shortly. Arrangements for offering this in the US are also underway.

Read more

Audiocasts/Shows: Linux in the Ham Shack, Jill Bryant Ryniker and Python Podcast

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • LHS Episode #310: DMR Deep Dive

    Welcome to Episode 310 of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this episode, the hosts take an in-depth look at the world of Digital Mobile Radio, otherwise known as DMR. It's a topic that could take volumes or multiple episodes but the idea here is to give you enough information to understand the basics of the technology, acquire appropriate hardware and get on the air using digital FM. We hope that has been accomplished. Thank you for listening.

  • Brunch with Brent: A Chat with Jill Bryant Ryniker | Jupiter Extras 31

    Brent sits down with Jill Bryant Ryniker, long time linux aficionado, for a connective conversation exploring her deep involvement in linux and open source, from community to professional animation and more.

    Jill wears many complimentary hats, a few of which include: co-host of Linux Weekly Daily Wednesday. regular community guest on Linux Unplugged, Linux Chicks LA co-organizer, professional animator and teacher, ...and more! Grab a seat and join us..

  • Automate Your Server Security With GrapheneX

    The internet is rife with bots and bad actors trying to compromise your servers. To counteract these threats it is necessary to diligently harden your systems to improve server security. Unfortunately, the hardening process can be complex or confusing. In this week's episode 18 year old Orhun Parmaksiz shares the story of how he and his friends created the GrapheneX framework to simplify the process of securing and maintaining your servers using the power and flexibility of Python. If you run your own software then this is definitely worth a listen.

    Summary

    The internet is rife with bots and bad actors trying to compromise your servers. To counteract these threats it is necessary to diligently harden your systems to improve server security. Unfortunately, the hardening process can be complex or confusing. In this week’s episode 18 year old Orhun Parmaksiz shares the story of how he and his friends created the GrapheneX framework to simplify the process of securing and maintaining your servers using the power and flexibility of Python. If you run your own software then this is definitely worth a listen.

Mozilla: Librsvg, Bytecode Alliance, and Extensions in Firefox 71

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • CSS in librsvg is now in Rust, courtesy of Mozilla Servo

    Summary: after an epic amount of refactoring, librsvg now does all CSS parsing and matching in Rust, without using libcroco. In addition, the CSS engine comes from Mozilla Servo, so it should be able to handle much more complex CSS than librsvg ever could before.

  • Librsvg Continues Rust Conquest, Pulls In CSS Parsing Code From Mozilla Servo

    For about three years now GNOME's SVG rendering library has been transitioning to Rust. This library, librsvg, now makes further use of Rust around its CSS parsing code and Mozilla's Servo is doing some of that heavy lifting.

    Librsvg is employing the CSS engine from Mozilla's Servo engine in order to be written in Rust while also having the benefit of being able to handle more complex CSS code than the previous implementation.

  • Announcing the Bytecode Alliance: Building a secure by default, composable future for WebAssembly

    Today we announce the formation of the Bytecode Alliance, a new industry partnership coming together to forge WebAssembly’s outside-the-browser future by collaborating on implementing standards and proposing new ones. Our founding members are Mozilla, Fastly, Intel, and Red Hat, and we’re looking forward to welcoming many more.

  • New Bytecode Alliance Brings the Security, Ubiquity, and Interoperability of the Web to the World of Pervasive Computing

    The Bytecode Alliance is a newly-formed open source community dedicated to creating new software foundations, building on standards such as WebAssembly and WebAssembly System Interface (WASI). Mozilla, Fastly, Intel, and Red Hat are founding members.

    The Bytecode Alliance will, through the joint efforts of its contributing members, deliver a state-of-the-art runtime environment and associated language toolchains, where security, efficiency, and modularity can all coexist across the widest possible range of devices and architectures. Technologies contributed and collaboratively evolved through the Alliance leverage established innovation in compilers, runtimes, and tooling, and focus on fine-grained sandboxing, capabilities-based security, modularity, and standards such as WebAssembly and WASI.

  • Mozilla + Intel + Red Hat Form The Bytecode Alliance To Run WebAssembly Everywhere

    Mozilla, Fastly, Intel, and Red Hat have announced the Bytecode Alliance as a new initiative built around WebAssembly and focused on providing a secure-by-default bytecode that can run from web browsers to desktops to IoT/embedded platforms.

    "Together, we’re putting in solid, secure foundations that can make it safe to use untrusted code, no matter where you’re running it—whether on the cloud, natively on someone’s desktop, or even on a tiny IoT device," announced Mozilla.

  • Extensions in Firefox 71

    Firefox 71 is a light release in terms of extension changes. I’d like to tell you about a few interesting improvements nevertheless.

    Thanks to Nils Maier, there have been various improvements to the downloads API, specifically in handling download failures. In addition to previously reported failures, the browser.downloads.download API will now report an error in case of various 4xx error codes. Similarly, HTTP 204 (No Content) and HTTP 205 (Reset Content) are now treated as bad content errors. This makes the API more compatible with Chrome and gives developers a way to handle these errors in their code. With the new allowHttpErrors parameter, extensions may also ignore some http errors when downloading. This will allow them to download the contents of server error pages.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Openwashing and Linux Foundation Openwash

  • Huobi’s ‘Regulator-Friendly’ Blockchain Goes Open Source

    Huobi Chain, the regulator-facing public blockchain of exchange Huobi Group, is now open source and publicly available to all developers on GitHub, the firm said Tuesday. Nervos, a blockchain development startup, is providing part of the technical infrastructure for the project. The firms are developing pluggable components for the network that could enable regulators to supervise contract deployments, asset holdings and transfers, as well as the enforcement of anti money laundering regulations, Bo Wang, a Nervos researcher, told CoinDesk. The components will also allow financial institutions, such as banks and regulatory agencies, to freeze assets and accounts in case of emergencies via sidechains, according to Wang.

  • Is Open Source Broken?

    The movement to develop software applications and all manner of IT services through the open source model is fundamentally rooted in the notion of community contribution, but things have shifted.

  • Managing all your enterprise's APIs with new management gateways for review
  • See you at KubeCon!

    It’s that time of year again! We’re getting ready to head on out to San Diego for KubeCon + CloudNativeCon NA. For me, KubeCon always makes for an exciting and jam-packed week. 

  • Amazon Web Services, Genesys, Salesforce Form New Open Data Model

    To accelerate digital transformation, organizations in every industry are modernizing their on-premises technologies by adopting cloud-native applications. According to the International Data Corporation (IDC), global spend on cloud computing will grow from $147 billion in 2019 to $418 billion by 2024. Almost half of that investment will be tied to technologies that help companies deliver personalized customer experiences. One major challenge of this shift to cloud computing is that applications are typically created with their own data models, forcing developers to build, test, and manage custom code that’s necessary to map and translate data across different systems. The process is inefficient, delays innovation, and ultimately can result in a broken customer experience.

  • The Linux Kernel Mentorship program was a life changing experience

    Operating systems, computer architectures and compilers have always fascinated me. I like to go in depth to understand the important software components we depend on! My life changed when engineers from IBM LTC (Linux Technology Center) came to my college to teach us the Linux Kernel internals. When I heard about the Linux Kernel Mentorship program, I immediately knew that I wanted to be a part of it to further fuel my passion for Linux. One of the project in the lists of projects available to work during the Linux Kernel Mentorship program was on “Predictive Memory Reclamation”. I really wanted the opportunity to work on the core kernel, and I began working with my mentor Khalid Aziz immediately during the application period where he gave me a task regarding the identification of anonymous memory regions for a process. I learned a lot in the application period by reading various blogs, textbooks and commit logs. During my mentorship period, I worked to develop a predictive memory reclamation algorithm in the Linux Kernel. The aim of the project was to reduce the amount of time the Linux kernel spends in reclaiming memory to satisfy processes requests for memory when there is memory pressure, i.e not enough to satisfy the memory allocation of a process. We implemented a predictive algorithm that can forecast memory pressure and proactively reclaim memory to ensure there is enough available for processes.

GNU Guix: Spreading the news

Developers keep adding crazy features, fixing bugs, and generally improving things. But how good is it if users aren’t aware of these new things? As an example, since June, our build farm has been offering lzip-compressed binaries, which results in better performance when installing software. But to take advantage of that, users need to be aware of its existence, and they need to upgrade their Guix daemon. Likewise, how do we get people to learn about the new guix deploy command that’s now available at their fingertips, about security issues that were fixed, about important infrastructure changes, new options added to existing commands, and so forth? Our (frustrating!) experience has been that release notes, blog posts, and mailing list announcements aren’t quite enough to get the word out. There’s always people who’ll miss important info and realize when it’s already late, sometimes too late. Hence this simple idea: wouldn’t it be nice if important information would reach users right in their terminal? [...] Since it was applied a bit more than a month ago, we’ve already put the news mechanism to good use on quite a few occasions: giving users instructions on how to deal with locales after the last glibc upgrade, giving them upgrade info for CVE-2019-18192, telling them about new command-line options, and more. In parallel, given that reading the mailing lists is akin to “drinking from a fire hose” as they say, Christopher Baines has been thinking about how to provide regular development updates to interested users and developers. Chris announced last week a prototype of a “Guix Weekly News” web site that would aggregate information about package updates automatically extracted from the Guix Data Service, along with manually written updates. It would seem that this service could readily grab info from channel news as well. Read more

Events: FSF, GStreamer, LibreOffice, Qt World Summit

  • Hang out with the FSF staff in Seattle, November 15

    We are hosting this get-together to show our appreciation for your support of the FSF's work and to provide an opportunity to meet other FSF members and supporters in the area. We'll give updates on what the FSF is currently working on and we are curious to hear your thoughts, as well as answer any questions you may have.

  • GStreamer Conference 2019
  • GStreamer Conference 2019 Videos Now Available Online

    Taking place at the end of October during the Linux Foundation events in Lyon, France was the GStreamer Conference to align with the annual developer festivities. GStreamer Conference 2019 was once again livestreamed by the fantastic folks at Ubicast.tv with their great quality video/audio recordings of the conference now for many years.

  • Event report: Google Summer of Code presentation in Ankara, Turkey

    The Google Summer of Code – aka GSoC – is a global programme focused on bringing more student developers into free and open source software development. In 2019, LibreOffice was once again a participating project, and we describe the results here.

  • Qt World Summit 2019

    We also had a dedicated table for our mobile effort where we showcased our KDE apps for Android and of course Plasma Mobile. The latter of which we had running on a good ol’ Nexus 5X and more importantly the Librem 5 Dev Kit by Purism. Unfortunately, the Pinephone developer kits we were hoping to show as well weren’t shipped in time for the event. Anyway, if you’re interested in learning more about what’s going on with Plasma Mobile go check out our new weekly blog series!