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Sunday, 16 Jun 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Repliessort icon Last Post
Story Linux Starts to Take a More Central IT Role srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:27am
Story Is KDE 3.4.0-rc1 out? srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 6:29am
Story Open Source Getting More Attention srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:24am
Story KDE 3.4rc1 Announced? srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 6:25am
Story ID Thieves Robbing the Cradle srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:24am
Story Music to My Eyes srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:24am
Story 77th Annual Academy Awards Winners srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:22am
Story Gentoo Linux Is Coming into Its Own srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 6:34am
Story The Business Case for Linux srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:20am
Story Yahoo! goes Hollywood srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:20am

DragonFlyBSD Now Defaulting To HAMMER2 File-System and Playing Bluetooth Audio with OpenBSD

Filed under
BSD
  • DragonFlyBSD Now Defaulting To HAMMER2 File-System By Default

    After being an experimental option in DragonFlyBSD for more than the past half-decade, HAMMER2 is the new default file-system of this FreeBSD derivative. 

  • Playing Bluetooth Audio with OpenBSD

     

    OpenBSD removed Bluetooth support in 2014, so officially there is no way to connect a Bluetooth to your OpenBSD system. However, jcs@ posted on Twitter that he found a simple way to play audio via Bluetooth. He recommended the Creative BT-W2 USB dongle.

Programming/Development: Outreachy, Python, AWS and AWK

Filed under
Development

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Report: Response to the Consultation on the Government's regulatory proposals regarding consumer Internet of Things (IoT) security

    Open Rights Group (ORG) is a UK-based digital campaigning organisation working to protect fundamental rights to privacy and free speech online. With over 3,000 active supporters, we are a grassroots organisation with local groups across the UK.

    We are a project partner to Values and Ethics in Responsible Technology in Europe (VIRT-EU) – a European project funded by the Horizon 2020 program. VIRT-EU’s mission is to foster ethical thinking in IoT development. The following comments stem predominantly from our experience accumulated in the course of that project.

    We address the consultation questions in order below, omitting questions 7, 8 and 9 as these lie outside our remit.

    1. Do you agree that the Government should take powers to regulate on the security of consumer IoT products? If yes, do you agree with the proposed legislative approach?

    We welcome the proposal to create primary legislation to introduce enhanced security for consumers using IoT devices. We also support the approach of making some requirements mandatory in the first instance with a longer strategy.

  • 'This Is a Bombshell': Facial Recognition Data Collected by US Customs Agency Hacked

    "This is a bombshell," said Evan Greer, deputy director of the advocacy group Fight fight for the Future, in response to the reporting. "Even if you 100% trust the US government with your biometric information (which you shouldn't) this is a reminder that once your face is scanned and stored in a database, it's easily shared across government agencies, stolen by hackers, other governments, etc."

    Buzzfeed, also among the first to report on the breach on Monday, noted that the "cyberattack comes amid the ongoing rollout of CBP's "biometric entry-exit system," the government initiative to biometrically verify the identities of all travelers crossing US borders." As BuzzFeed News reported Citing earlier reporting, Buzzfeed pointed out that "CBP is scrambling to implement the initiative with the goal of using facial recognition technology on '100 percent of all international passengers,' including American citizens, in the top 20 US airports by 2021."

  • What you need to know about the MDS vulnerability and Red Hat Virtualization

    A new series of vulnerabilities in Intel processors, known as Microarchitectural Data Sampling, or more simply MDS, was recently made public and Red Hat released information about how the vulnerabilities affect our software and how to protect your organization.

    In the simplest terms, MDS is a vulnerability in Intel processors similar to Spectre and Meltdown; it allows a guest to read protected memory from anywhere on the host or guest. To mitigate the risks exposed by MDS, a combination of updated microcode, updated kernel(s), patches, and administrator action will need to be taken for both the hypervisors and virtual machines in your Red Hat Virtualization deployment. Unlike some similar vulnerabilities, simply disabling SMT and/or hyper-threading is not enough to protect your applications.

  • 5 reasons chaos engineering is indispensable to the CISO

    Security leaders, including the chief information security officer (CISO), are challenged to continuously demonstrate their role within the company's value stream as part of improving security. In doing so, a growing number of security organizations are shifting toward a more "applied security mode," leading many to rethink our traditional practices and question their effectiveness in today's high-velocity, software-driven world.

  • Wireless Security | Roadmap to Securing Your Infrastructure
  • IPFire on AWS: Update to IPFire 2.23 - Core Update 132

    Today, we have updated IPFire on AWS to IPFire 2.23 - Core Update 132 - the latest official release of IPFire.

    This update brings you the new Intrusion Prevention System out-of-the-box as well as updates to the whole system.

  • Amitabh Bachchan’s Twitter Account “Hacked” And DP Got Changed

Securing the Kernel Stack

Filed under
Linux
Security

The Linux kernel stack is a tempting target for attack. This is because the kernel needs to keep track of where it is. If a function gets called, which then calls another, which then calls another, the kernel needs to remember the order they were all called, so that each function can return to the function that called it. To do that, the kernel keeps a "stack" of values representing the history of its current context.

If an attacker manages to trick the kernel into thinking it should transfer execution to the wrong location, it's possible the attacker could run arbitrary code with root-level privileges. Once that happens, the attacker has won, and the computer is fully compromised. And, one way to trick the kernel this way is to modify the stack somehow, or make predictions about the stack, or take over programs that are located where the stack is pointing.

Protecting the kernel stack is crucial, and it's the subject of a lot of ongoing work. There are many approaches to making it difficult for attackers to do this or that little thing that would expose the kernel to being compromised.

Read more

Also: AMD Zen 2 + Radeon RX 5700 Series For Linux Expectations

Games: WHAT THE GOLF?, UnderMine, Starmancer, Ribbiting Saga, SkateBIRD, Stoneshard

Filed under
Gaming

First Arch Linux ISO Snapshot Powered by Linux Kernel 5.1 Is Now Available

Filed under
Linux

Now that Linux kernel 5.0 reached end of life, which means that it will no long receive maintenance updates, the Arch Linux 2019.06.01 is here as the first ISO snapshot of the acclaimed Linux-based operating system to ship with a kernel from the latest Linux 5.1 series, namely Linux kernel 5.1.5.

Linux kernel 5.1 was released last month and comes with great additions, including more preparations for the year 2038, more scalable and faster asynchronous I/O, support for configuring Zstd compression levels in the Btrfs file system, better file system monitorization, and a new cpuidle governor called TEO.

Read more

Plasma 5.16 by KDE is Now Available

Filed under
KDE

Say hello to Plasma 5.16, a the newest iteration of KDE's desktop environment, chock-a-block with new features and improvements.

Let’s start with Dolphin, Plasma's file and folder manager. It now opens folders you click on in new tabs instead of new windows, keeping everything together. You can try this out by clicking the Home folder icon on your desktop (which will open Dolphin and show the contents of Home), and then clicking the Trash can folder also on your desktop. The Trash can folder will open in a new tab of the existing Dolphin window. You can, of course, choose to open more than one Dolphin window -- after all, it wouldn't be Plasma without options -- but this is a feature that will keep things nice and tidy.

Talking about tidy: check out the new notification system! Not only can you mute notifications altogether with the Do Not Disturb mode, but the system also groups notifications by app. Like this, when you run through the history of past notifications, you can see all the messages from KDE Connect in one category, the download information in another, email alerts in a third, and so on.

Discover, Plasma's software manager, is also cleaner and clearer as it now has two distinct areas for downloading and installing software on the Update page. Besides, when updating, the completion bar now works correctly and the packages disappear from the list as the software manager completes their installation.

Read more

10 Best Open Source Accounting Software for Linux

Filed under
Software

An Accounting Software is an complex application that enables businesses of any size to manage data especially financial data and ensure that all resources end up in the right place.

Any such software that is good has the ability to gather, analyze, summarize, and report financial data and some even go an extra mile to automate certain tasks, implement contingency strategies, and allow for custom functions.

Here is a list of the best accounting software for Linux platforms that are not only open source but also free or low-cost.

Read more

Why containers and Kubernetes have the potential to run almost anything

Filed under
Server

The future of Kubernetes is bright, and like virtualization before it, workload expansion is inevitable. Learning how to drive Kubernetes is probably the biggest investment that a developer or sysadmin can make in their own career growth. As the workloads expand, so will the career opportunities. So, here's to driving an amazing dump truck that's very elegant at moving dirt...

Read more

Converting fedmsg consumers to fedora-messaging

Filed under
Red Hat

So in case you hadn’t heard, the Fedora infrastructure team is currently trying to nudge people in the direction of moving from fedmsg to fedora-messaging.

Fedmsg is the Fedora project-wide messaging bus we’ve had since 2012. It backs FMN / Fedora Notifications and Badges, and is used extensively within Fedora infrastructure for the general purpose of “have this one system do something whenever this other system does something else”. For instance, openQA job scheduling and result reporting are both powered by fedmsg.

Over time, though, there have turned out to be a few issues with fedmsg. It has a few awkward design quirks, but most significantly, it’s designed such that message delivery can never be guaranteed. In practice it’s very reliable and messages almost always are delivered, but for building critical systems like Rawhide package gating, the infrastructure team decided we really needed a system where message delivery can be formally guaranteed.

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Stacer: An All in One System Optimizer and App Monitoring Tool for Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

Most probably, you have heard the name of CCleaner for Windows system which comes handy when a user needs to monitor system processes or resources. Actually, system optimizer application is quite familiar in Windows or mobile platform including Android or iOS. But for Linux system, sometimes, pro users prefer to use command line tools for optimizing or monitoring the system. Then what’s about the beginners like me who want to control or monitor the system using a simple and intuitive user interface? For them, Stacer plays a vital role which comes with a handful of features to better optimize the Linux system.

It’s one of the best CCleaner alternatives for the Linux system. Stacer, Linux Task Manager, is packed with advantages like real-time system processes and resource monitor, start-up software control, the ability to clear the system cache, ability to remove software, and control to start or stop any processes or services.

Read more

The Current Radeon RX Vega 64 / Radeon VII Linux OpenCL Performance Against NVIDIA

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Recently I provided a fresh look at the Radeon VII Linux gaming performance (as well as comparing AMDVLK vs. RADV) now that I have a Vega 20 graphics card running great under Linux after the pre-production VII had failed. One of the other areas I was curious to see how the Linux performance evolved in the few months since the original Radeon VII Linux benchmarks was checking on the ROCm OpenCL performance. Here are those results up against NVIDIA with their proprietary Linux graphics driver.

This article is to serve as some fresh Radeon VII OpenCL benchmark figures on Linux while also tossing in the Radeon RX Vega 64 and Radeon RX 580 as some reference figures. These tests were done on ROCm 2.4 while just before the weekend ROCm 2.5 shipped. Unfortunately due to an E3 event I didn't have the time to test ROCm 2.5 yet, but no OpenCL performance changes are noted. Anyhow, as soon as I'm back will be some ROCm 2.5 tests. The NVIDIA tests meanwhile were using the current 430 series driver while testing the GeForce GTX 1060, GTX 1080, GTX 1650, GTX 1660 Ti, RTX 2060, RTX 2070, RTX 2080, RTX 2080 Ti, and TITAN RTX for a wide-range of NVIDIA OpenCL Linux performance metrics.

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What is a Linux user?

Filed under
Linux

In only two years, the Linux kernel will be 30 years old. Think about that! Where were you in 1991? Were you even born? I was 13! Between 1991 and 1993 a few "proper" Linux distributions were created, and at least three of them—Slackware, Debian, and Red Hat–provided the backbone the Linux movement was built on.

Getting a copy of a Linux distribution and installing and configuring it on a desktop or server was very different back then than today. It was hard! It was frustrating! It was an accomplishment if you got it running! We had to fight with incompatible hardware, configuration jumpers on devices, BIOS issues, and many other things. Even if the hardware was compatible, many times, you still had to compile the kernel, modules, and drivers to get them to work on your system.

If you were around during those days, you are probably nodding your head. Some of you might even go as far as calling them the "good old days," because choosing to use Linux meant you had to learn about operating systems, computer architecture, system administration, networking, and even programming, just to keep the OS functioning.

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EFF and Open Rights Group Defend the Right to Publish Open Source Software to the UK Government

Filed under
OSS
Security
Legal

EFF and Open Rights Group today submitted formal comments to the British Treasury, urging restraint in applying anti-money-laundering regulations to the publication of open-source software.

The UK government sought public feedback on proposals to update its financial regulations pertaining to money laundering and terrorism in alignment with a larger European directive. The consultation asked for feedback on applying onerous customer due diligence regulations to the cryptocurrency space as well as what approach the government should take in addressing “privacy coins” like Zcash and Monero. Most worrisome, the government also asked “whether the publication of open-source software should be subject to [customer due diligence] requirements.”

We’ve seen these kind of attacks on the publication of open source software before, in fights dating back to the 90s, when the Clinton administration attempted to require that anyone merely publishing cryptography source code obtain a government-issued license as an arms dealer. Attempting to force today’s open-source software publishers to follow financial regulations designed to go after those engaged in money laundering is equally obtuse.

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Tux Machines Over the Past 15 Years

Filed under
Site News

2005

Tux Machines site in 2005

2010

Tux Machines site in 2010

2012

Tux Machines site in 2012

2013

Tux Machines site in 2013

Late 2013

Tux Machines site in late 2013

2014

Tux Machines site in 2014

2015

Tux Machines site in 2015

2019

Tux Machines site in 2019

AMD Zen 2 + Radeon RX 5700 Series For Linux Expectations

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

This weekend I was out the AMD E3 event learning more about their third-generation Ryzen processors as well as their equally exciting AMD Radeon RX 5700 series Navi hardware. Being at the event, one could reasonably deduce the Linux support will be great and it does appear to be that way building upon their improvements of earlier GPUs and Zen processors. It does appear to be that way while obviously we will begin testing soon of these new processors and graphics cards. At least for the Zen 2 processors, I am confident in their Linux support while on the Navi side we are awaiting Linux driver support but I am optimistic it will work out nicely. Now that the initial embargo has expired, here are more details on these new AMD products launching 7 July and my Linux information at this time.

Read more

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The best, until OpenMandriva does better: released OMLx 4.0

Exciting news! Shortly after the release candidate we are very proud to introduce you the fruit of so much work, some visible and much more behind the scenes and under the hood. OpenMandriva Lx is a cutting edge distribution compiled with LLVM/clang, combined with the high level of optimisation used for both code and linking (by enabling LTO, and profile guided optimizations for some key packages where reliable profile data is easy to generate) used in its building. OMLx 4.0 brings a number of major changes since 3.x release... Read more Also: OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 Released With AMD Zen Optimized Option, Toolchain Updates

Today in Techrights

today's leftovers

  • Georges Basile Stavracas Neto: Calendar management dialog, archiving task lists, Every Detail Matters on Settings (Sprint 2)
    This was a long-time request, and something that I myself was missing when using To Do. Since it fits well with the product vision of the app, there was nothing preventing it from being implemented. Selecting this feature to be implemented during the week was a great choice – the task was self contained, had a clear end, and was just difficult just enough to be challenging but not more than that. However, I found a few issues with the implementation, and want to use the next round to polish the feature. Using the entire week to polish the feature might be too much, but it will give me some time to really make it great.
  • Open Source Answer To Dropbox And OneDrive: Meet Frank Karlitschek
    During the OpenSUSE Conference in Nurnberg (German), Nextcloud founder Frank Karlitschek appeared on “Let’s Talk’ to talk about the importance of fully open source file sync and storage solutions for enterprise customers. As one of the early contributors to desktop Linux he also talked about the reasons why desktop Linux has not succeeded.
  • Load-Bearing Internet People
    Some maintainers for critical software operate from a niche at a university or a government agency that supports their effort. There might be a few who are independently wealthy.
  • Robert Helmer: Vectiv and the Browser Monoculture
    So, so tired of the "hot take" that having a single browser engine implementation is good, and there is no value to having multiple implementations of a standard. I have a little story to tell about this. In the late 90s, I worked for a company called Vectiv. There isn't much info on the web (the name has been used by other companies in the meantime), this old press release is one of the few I can find. Vectiv was a web-based service for commercial real estate departments doing site selection. This was pretty revolutionary at the time, as the state-of-the-art for most of these was to buy a bunch of paper maps and put them up on the walls, using push-pins to keep track of current and possible store locations. The story of Vectiv is interesting on its own, but the relevant bit to this story is that it was written for and tested exclusively in IE 5.5 for Windows, as was the style at the time. The once-dominant Netscape browser had plummeted to negligible market share, and was struggling to rewrite Netscape 6 to be based on the open-source Mozilla Suite.

OSS Leftovers

  • Letter of Recommendation: Bug Fixes
    I wouldn’t expect a nonprogrammer to understand the above, but you can intuit some of what’s going on: that we don’t need ImageMagick to scale images anymore, because the text editor can scale images on its own; that it’s bad form to spell-check hex values, which specify colors; that the bell is doing something peculiar if someone holds down the alt key; and so forth. But there’s also something larger, more gladdening, about reading bug fixes. My text editor, Emacs, is a free software project with a history going back more than 40 years; the codebase itself starts in the 1980s, and as I write this there are 136,586 different commits that get you from then to now. More than 600 contributors have worked on it. I find those numbers magical: A huge, complex system that edits all kinds of files started from nothing and then, with nearly 140,000 documented human actions, arrived at its current state. It has leaders but no owner, and it will move along the path in which people take it. It’s the ship of Theseus in code form. I’ve probably used Emacs every day for more than two decades. It has changed me, too. It will outlive me. Open source is a movement, and even the charitably inclined would call it an extreme brofest. So there’s drama. People fight it out in comments, over everything from semicolons to codes of conduct. But in the end, the software works or it doesn’t. Politics, our personal health, our careers or lives in general — these do not provide a narrative of unalloyed progress. But software, dammit, can and does. It’s a pleasure to watch the code change and improve, and it’s also fascinating to see big companies, paid programmers and volunteers learning to work together (the Defense Department is way into open source) to make those changes and improvements. I read the change logs, and I think: Humans can do things.
  • The Top 17 Free and Open Source Network Monitoring Tools
    Choosing the right network monitoring solution for your enterprise is not easy.
  • Hedge-fund managers are overwhelmed by data, and they're turning to an unlikely source: random people on the internet
    Alternative data streams of satellite images and cellphone-location data are where managers are now digging for alpha, as new datasets are created every day. And hedge funds have been spending serious cash searching for those who can take all this information and quickly find the important pieces. Now, as margins shrink and returns are under the microscope, hedge funds are beginning to consider a cheaper, potentially more efficient way to crunch all this data: open-source platforms, where hundreds of thousands of people ranging from finance professionals to students, scientists, and developers worldwide scour datasets — and don't get paid unless they find something that a fund finds useful.
  • TD Ameritrade Is Taking Its First Steps Towards Major Open Source Contributions
    STUMPY is a python library to identify the patterns and anomalies in time series data. STUMPY has benefited from open source as a means to shorten development roadmaps since the early 2000s and it represents a new opportunity for TD Ameritrade to give back to the developer community.
  • The Future of Open Source Big Data Platforms
    Three well-funded startups – Cloudera Inc., Hortonworks Inc., and MapR Technologies Inc. — emerged a decade ago to commercialize products and services in the open-source ecosystem around Hadoop, a popular software framework for processing huge amounts of data. The hype peaked in early 2014 when Cloudera raised a massive $900 million funding round, valuing it at $4.1 billion.
  • No Easy Way Forward For Commercial Open Source Software Vendors
    While still a student in 1995, Kimball developed the first version of GNU Image Manipulation Program (GIMP) as a class project, along with Peter Mattis. Later on as a Google engineer, he worked on a new version of the Google File System, and the Google Servlet Engine. In 2012, Kimball, Mattis, and Brian McGinnis launched the company Viewfinder, later selling it to Square.
  • 6 Reasons Why Developers Should Contribute More To Open Source
    Even by fixing minor things like a bug in a library or writing a piece of documentation can also help the developers to write readable or maintainable code. They can independently suggest to the community and generally tend to stick by the rules of writing a code that is easy to understand. The fact that the code will be exposed to everyone naturally makes them write focus on making it readable.
  • WIDE Project, KDDI develop router with open-source software, 3.2T-packet transmission
    The WIDE Project has adopted a router developed by Japanese operator KDDI. The router runs open-source software, and will be used with the networks operated and managed by the WIDE Project. The router will use open-source software with up to 3.2T-packet transmission. For this project, KDDI plans to start tests this month to verify the practical utility and interoperability of these routers when put to use in the actual service environment. The WIDE Project will be in charge of network administration and definition of requirements for router implementation.
  • Lack of progress in open source adoption hindering global custody’s digitisation
    Custody industry is lagging behind the rest of the financial services sector for open source projects, according to industry experts.
  • TNF: Industry should be focusing on open source development
    According to O'Shea, open source and the community are helping firms to find and attract experienced technology talent “uber engineers”.
  • Google Open Sources TensorNetwork , A Library For Faster ML And Physics Tasks
    “Every evolving intelligence will eventually encounter certain very special ideas – e.g., about arithmetic, causal reasoning and economics–because these particular ideas are very much simpler than other ideas with similar uses,” said the AI maverick Marvin Minsky four decades ago. Mathematics as a tool to interpret nature’s most confounding problems from molecular biology to quantum mechanics has so far been successful. Though there aren’t any complete answers to these problems, the techniques within domain help throw some light on the obscure corners of reality.
  • Open source to become a ‘best practice’
    There are many magic rings in this world… and none of them should be used lightly. This is true. It is also true that organisations in every vertical are now having to work hard and find automation streams that they can digitise (on the road to *yawn* digital transformation, obviously) and start to apply AI and machine learning to. Another key truth lies in the amount of codified best practices that organisations now have the opportunity to lay down. One we can denote a particular set of workflows in a particular department (or team, or group, or any other collective) to be deemed to be as efficient as possible, then we can lay that process down as a best practice.
  • 10 Open-Source and Free CAD Software You Can Download Right Now
    Many CAD software products exist today for anyone interested in 2D or 3D designing. From browser tools to open-source programs, the market is full of free options available for hobbyists or small companies just starting out.