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Wednesday, 22 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Repliessort icon Last Post
Story Mandrakesoft and Conectiva Merger srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:20am
Story Ebay Sued srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:20am
Story FBI Being Spoofed in Email srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:19am
Story Nvidia to release 75 series driver srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:19am
Story NVIDIA Unleashes 6800 Mobile GPU srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:18am
Story Newest Vulnerabilities in php apps srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:18am
Story aKademy 2005 Logo Contest Launched srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 6:29am
Story SCO and The Titanic srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:28am
Story IBM backs open-source Web software srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:27am
Story Who will take home the Gold? srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:25am

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Ubuntu MATE 16.04.2 LTS Out Now for Raspberry Pi 3 and 2 with MATE 1.16.1

Filed under
Ubuntu

As part of today's unexpected release of the Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system, all the official flavors have also been brought up-to-date, including Ubuntu MATE 16.04.2 LTS for Raspberry Pi 2 and Raspberry Pi 3 devices.

Martin Wimpress proudly announced a few moments ago the availability of the Ubuntu MATE 16.04.2 LTS operating system for Raspberry Pi 2 Model B and Raspberry Pi 3 Model B single-board computers, an optimized build that features the latest stable MATE 1.16.1 desktop environment and supports Bluetooth and Wi-Fi on the Raspberry Pi 3.

Read more

Also: System76 refreshes Ubuntu Linux laptops with Intel Kaby Lake, NVIDIA GTX 10 series, and 4K

Radiotray-NG: A Simple Radio Player for Ubuntu

Security News

Filed under
Security
  • OpenSSL project releases patch to fix critical bug
  • Microsoft's monthlong patch delay could pose risks [Ed: Microsoft is in no hurry because there are back doors it knows about but keeps secret anyway]

    Microsoft has decided to bundle its February patches together with those scheduled for March, a move that at least some security experts disagree with.

    "I was surprised to learn that Microsoft wants to postpone by a full month," said Carsten Eiram, the chief research officer at vulnerability intelligence firm Risk Based Security, via email. "Even without knowing all the details, I find such a decision very hard to justify. They are aware of vulnerabilities in their products and have developed fixes; those should always be made available to customers in a timely fashion."

    Microsoft took everyone by surprise on Tuesday when it announced that this month's patches had to be delayed because of a "last minute issue" that could have had an impact on customers. The company did not initially specify for how long the patches will be postponed, which likely threw a wre

  • Zero-day flaw around, but Microsoft updates delayed by a month
  • Microsoft misses regular security fix date

    Microsoft has delayed the release of a security update that would have fixed a vulnerability cyber thieves are known to be exploiting.

    The fix was to be released as part of Microsoft's regular monthly security update for its Windows software.

  • How Google reinvented security and eliminated the need for firewalls

    In some ways, Google is like every other large enterprise. It had the typical defensive security posture based on the concept that the enterprise is your castle and security involves building moats and walls to protect the perimeter.

    Over time, however, that perimeter developed holes as Google’s increasingly mobile workforce, scattered around the world, demanded access to the network. And employees complained about having to go through a sometimes slow, unreliable VPN. On top of that, Google, like everyone else, was moving to the cloud, which was also outside of the castle.

  • No Firewalls, No Problem for Google

    On Tuesday at RSA Conference, Google shared the seven-year journey of its internal BeyondCorp rollout where it affirms trust based on what it knows about its users and devices connecting to its networks. And all of this is done at the expense—or lack thereof—of firewalls and traditional network security gear.

  • Android Phone Hacks Could Unlock Millions of Cars

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat
  • DLT captures $133.4M Red Hat Navy deal

    DLT Solutions will provide the Navy with Red Hat software and services under a five-year, $133.4 million blanket purchase agreement.

    The BPA includes an enterprise license agreement for Red Hat Enterprise Linux, add-ons, and management and provisioning tools such as Red Hat Satellite.

  • Bluetooth in Fedora

    So… Bluetooth. It’s everywhere now. Well, everywhere except Fedora. Fedora does, of course support bluetooth. But even the most common workflows are somewhat spotty. We should improve this.

  • PHP version 7.0.16 and 7.1.2
  • North America and Fedora: Year in Review

    The past year has proven to be both challenging and demanding for our Ambassadors. During the past year there have been a lot of new ideas proposed and more events that are being sought out attempting to expand our base. Many of the ventures have been with hack-a-thons in several states. This has been a relatively new venture in those areas. Since our involvement in these types of events, we quickly discovered that Fedora and the associated spins were a new tool for most of these individuals attending and participating. That was a surprising fact within the community that the young and impressionable individuals seemed to be using Windows more than any other operating system available. Since those few we (Fedora) attended, there has been an increase in the open source software utilization across the board at these types of events, a total and undeniable success.

  • 2016 – My Year in Review

    Before looking too far ahead to the future, it’s important to spend time to reflect over the past year’s events, identify successes and failures, and devise ways to improve. Describing my 2016 is a challenge for me to find the right words for. This post continues a habit I started last year with my 2015 Year in Review. One thing I discover nearly every day is that I’m always learning new things from various people and circumstances. Even though 2017 is already getting started, I want to reflect back on some of these experiences and opportunities of the past year.

    [...]

    Towards the end of summer, in the beginning of August, I was accepted as a speaker to the annual Fedora Project contributor conference, Flock. As a speaker, my travel and accommodation were sponsored to the event venue in Kraków, Poland.

Android Leftovers

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Android

Ubuntu Leftovers and Devices/PCs With Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

Linux Lite Among The Best Lightweight Linux Distributions

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Linux

Today, we will look at Linux lite 3.2. This is neither a distro aiming to be a lightweight distro nor a distro trying to unleash the power of Linux with all apps preloaded. Instead, It tries to strike that perfect balance between them. Now, almost all of the distros aim to do that then, what is so special about this distro which makes it unique. Well, let me introduce to the distro first and I think why it achieved so much more than other distros becomes clear after that.

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more

Linux Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • What's Still Left TODO With The Intel ANV Vulkan Driver

    With yesterday having marked one year since the release of Vulkan as well as one year since the ANV Vulkan driver code was open-sourced, here's a look at some of what's still left to be tackled by this open-source Vulkan Linux driver for HD/Iris Graphics.

  • Nouveau Changes Prepped For Linux 4.11 Kernel

    Ben Skeggs has queued up the planned open-source NVIDIA (Nouveau) driver changes for the imminent Linux 4.11 cycle.

    He now has a linux-4.11 Git branch with the Nouveau DRM driver changes expected for this next kernel cycle.

  • A Lot Of The OpenGL Shader Cache Code Has Landed In Mesa

    Timothy Arceri, who is now working for Valve (on the open-source AMD driver stack after leaving Collabora), has landed significant portions of his work built upon others for providing an on-disk shader cache within Mesa.

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

KDE in Slackware, Cutelyst 1.4.0 Ready

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KDE
Slack
  • KDE 5_17.02 for Slackware-current is available

    I am happy to announce my February 2017 release of the ‘ktown’ packages: KDE 5_17.02. What you get in this new release is: KDE Frameworks 5.31.0, Plasma 5.9.2 and Applications 16.12.2. All built on top of Qt 5.7.1.
    Soon, I will compile this version of Plasma 5 on Slackware 14.2 (only 64bit) as well, but I gave priority last few days to the new LibreOffice packages and a new PLASMA5 Live image. The packages that I am releasing today are for Slackware-current only (both 32bit and 64bit). As stated in my previous post, I will no longer be releasing Plasma 5 packages for 32bit Slackware 14.2.

  • New Slackware PLASMA5 Live ISO (with Plasma 5.9)

    To conclude this week’s batch of updates in my repositories I have re-generated the ISO for PLASMA5 Slackware Live Edition – it is based on liveslak 1.1.6.2 and using Slackware-current dated “Mon Feb 13 06:21:22 UTC 2017“.

    If you already use PLASMA5 Live on a USB stick that you do not want to re-format, you should use the “-r” parameter to the “iso2usb.sh” script. The “-r” or refresh parameter allows you to refresh the liveslak files on your USB stick without touching your custom content.

  • Cutelyst 1.4.0 released, C100K ready.

    Thanks to the last batch of improvements and with the great help of jemalloc, cutelyst-wsgi can do 100k request per second using a single thread/process on my i5 CPU. Without the use of jemalloc the rate was around 85k req/s.

    This together with the EPoll event loop can really scale your web application, initially I thought that the option to replace the default glib (on Unix) event loop of Qt had no gain, but after increasing the connection number it handle them a lot better. With 256 connections the request per second using glib event loop get’s to 65k req/s while the EPoll one stays at 90k req/s a lot closer to the number when only 32 connections is tested.

GNOME 3.24's Mutter and GNOME Shell

Filed under
GNOME
  • GNOME 3.24's Mutter Window Manager to Improve HiDPI and EGLStream Support

    Now that we've told you all about the goodies coming to the GNOME Shell user interface when the GNOME 3.24 desktop environment will be released next month on March 22, it's time to see what improvements landed for the Mutter window manager.

    We believe that Mutter is the second most important component of the open-source GNOME desktop environment, and the upcoming major release got a first Beta milestone the other day, bringing us a bunch of interesting improvements. Among these, there's better EGLStream support, along with HiDPI support for the window menu placement.

  • GNOME Shell to Get Night Light Indicator in Status Area for GNOME 3.24 Desktop

    As part of yesterday's GNOME 3.24 Beta desktop environment release, last minute updates for the GNOME Shell user interface and Mutter window manager landed as well with numerous improvements.

    In this article, we'd like to tell you about the new features and improvements that have been implemented in the first Beta release of GNOME Shell, which is the most important component of GNOME 3.24 because without it users couldn't even interact with the desktop environment.

FOSS in surveillance/data collection

Filed under
OSS
  • Why Open Source is Driving the Big Data Market

    The big data market is moving at lightning speed. But when it comes to solutions, there’s a widening chasm between the legacy approach and next-generation developers and vendors.
    While the legacy approach has worked well over the years and still has its place in what is becoming a huge market, there are many signs that open source solutions will be better placed to help business optimise the advantages that big data analysis brings.

    But first who are the legacy vendors? Typically, they have their own large internal teams, dedicated to building proprietary, bespoke software. They have solid products, reliable technology and well-funded research and development projects.

  • IBM partners with open-source solution provider

    At its annual PartnerWorld Leadership Conference, IBM announced a new partnership with open-source solution provider Hortonworks. The provider primarily deals in Hadoop deployments.

    This new relationship will bring the Hortonworks Data Platform (HDP) to IBM’s Elastic Storage Server (ESS) and Spectrum Scale storage offerings. Essentially, this will eliminate the need for customers to copy data from enterprise storage to a separate analytics platform. This would then ideally lower the time it takes for those customers to respond to data-based queries.

CruxEX 3.3 (CRUX 3.3)

Filed under
GNU
Linux

KDE Applications 17.04 Schedule

Filed under
KDE
  • KDE Applications 17.04 Announced for April 20, Here's the Final Release Schedule

    KDE developer Albert Astals Cid announced that the release date of the upcoming KDE Applications 17.04 open-source software suite for KDE Plasma desktop environments, along with the final release schedule.

    We were just wondering when KDE Applications 17.04 will be released when the current KDE Applications 16.02 series received its second maintenance update, and we were right to believe at the point in time that the final release is coming in April, and, according to the release schedule, it looks like KDE Applications 17.04 lands April 20, 2017.

  • KDE Applications 17.04 To Be Released 20 April

    The release schedule for the upcoming KDE Applications 17.04 has been firmed up.

    The KDE Applications 17.04 release is scheduled to happen on 20 April. For that to happen, the planned dependency freeze is 16 March, the beta release on 23 March, KDE applications 17.04 Release Candidate on 6 April, and prepping for the actual 17.04 release beginning on 13 April.

Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS Officially Released with Linux Kernel 4.8 from Ubuntu 16.10

Filed under
Ubuntu

After a long wait, Canonical released today the second point release of the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system, which is the first to include an HWE stack from a newer Ubuntu version, in this case Ubuntu 16.10.

As expected, Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS is nothing but a collection of all the latest security patches and software updates that have been released by Canonical for the long-term supported Ubuntu 16.04 (Xenial Xerus) series since the July 2016 launch of Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS.

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Also: Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS Released; Ubuntu 17.04 In Feature Freeze

Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) Has Entered Feature Freeze, Beta Lands February 23

Enlightenment 0.21.6 Desktop Environment Adds New Wayland Improvements, Bugfixes

Filed under
GNU
Linux

It's been two months since its last update and the Enlightenment 0.21 desktop environment and window manager for Linux-based operating systems has received today a new point release, the sixth in the stable series.

Enlightenment 0.21.6 is a bugfix and stability release that attempts to address various of the issues discovered by the development team behind the open-source software or reported by users since the last update. A total of 28 changes were included in the new version, some of them bringing improvements for the Wayland display server.

Read more

Leftovers: GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • New And Best Features Of Linux Kernel 4.10

    Back in December, 2016, Linux boss Linus Torvalds rolled out Linux kernel 4.9. Thanks to tons of code due to Project Ara’s ‘greybus’ and AMD GPU register definition files, it was the biggest ever kernel release in terms of commits. The release also opened the Linux kernel 4.10 merge window. Kernel 4.10 is expected to be released this weekend–most probably on February 19.

  • Renesas joins industrial Linux organisation

    Starting with the RZ/G series of microcontrollers (1.5GHz ARM, 3D graphics, HD video), it plans to develop an embedded platform for industrial applications incorporating the project’s industrial-grade Linux operating system (OS).

  • Open source industrial software gets momentum with Civil Infrastructure Platform
  • Best Linux distros for small businesses in 2017

    Running a small business is no easy task. The last thing you need is extra complexity in your IT infrastructure – so why turn to Linux? Well, it could (if you're lucky) actually turn out to be a less complex choice for many tasks, depending on the distribution you select. And, critically, Linux is free; at least if you don't figure in support costs. That's an overhead ticked off the list.

    So what's the best choice for your small business? We've approached this selection with a few criteria in mind. Stability is first and foremost, because if you're putting a distro to work, uptime is critical, and solid support provision comes a close second.

  • Kernels Becoming Tumbleweed Norm, Grub 2 Gets Release Candidate

    Two Linux Kernels per week in openSUSE Tumbleweed is becoming the norm as the rolling release is providing daily snapshots of new software that are closely aligned with upstream development.

    Kernel 4.9.8 and 4.9.9 were released in the 20170208 and 20170212 snapshots respectively and the later brought a fix for a Btrfs system call.

Networking and Servers

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server
  • Your OpenStack Cloud Is Only As Good As The Linux You Install It On

    OpenStack services and drivers require a robust and integrated Linux operating system for top-performing functionality.

    OpenStack is not (just) an operating system; it’s cloud infrastructure.

    Open source developers and technologists from around the world collaborate on OpenStack to create infrastructure and tools for building and managing public and private clouds. According to the overview provided by the OpenStack Foundation, OpenStack is a “cloud operating system” that is designed to control and manage large pools of compute, storage, and networking resources.

    In more practical terms, OpenStack is a framework of at least 10 independent core services that all function together as the foundation for cloud infrastructure. At its very basic level, OpenStack is a set of services provided via a group of Python-written scripts that work in conjunction with another. Like any script, service, or plugin, they require an operating system (OS) to run, function, and perform. In OpenStack’s case, the OS of choice is Linux.

  • The Basics: Explaining Kubernetes, Mesosphere, and Docker Swarm

    Containers, a lightweight way to virtualize applications, are an important element of any DevOps plan. But how are you going to manage all of those containers? Container orchestration programs—Kubernetes, Mesosphere Marathon, and Docker Swarm—make it possible to manage containers without tearing your hair out.

    Before jumping into those, let's review the basics. Containers, according to 451 Research, are the fastest growing cloud-enabling technology. The reason for their appeal is that they use far fewer system resources than do virtual machines (VMs). After all, a VM runs not merely an operating system, but also a virtual copy of all the hardware that the OS needs to run. In contrast, containers demand just enough operating system and system resources for an application instance to run.

  • What's the difference between NFV automation and NFV orchestration?

    NFV automation is the ability to transfer manual network configuration to technology; NFV orchestration creates the deployment and automation blueprint.

  • AT&T, Intel, Google, Microsoft, Visa, and More to Speak at Open Networking Summit 2017

    The Linux Foundation has announced keynote speakers and session highlights for Open Networking Summit, to be held April 3-6, 2017 in Santa Clara, CA.

    ONS promises to be the largest, most comprehensive and most innovative networking and orchestration event of the year. The event brings enterprises, carriers, and cloud service providers together with the networking ecosystem to share learnings, highlight innovation and discuss the future of open source networking.

  • Developing open source software defined standards

    The Open Networking Foundation (ONF) is announcing its new Open Innovation Pipeline made possible through the aligned operations of ONF and Open Networking Lab (ON.Lab) as these two organizations finalize their pending merger.

    ON.Lab, with CORD and ONOS, successfully brought together operators, vendors and integrators to build solutions for carrier networks by leveraging SDN, NFV and Cloud technologies through an open source approach to solution creation. Operators have embraced the approach, and the industry is in the midst of a resulting transformation revolutionizing how solutions will be built for 5G mobile, ultra broadband and other next-generation networks.

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Ten Years as Desktop Linux User: My Open Source World, Then and Now

I've been a regular desktop Linux user for just about a decade now. What has changed in that time? Keep reading for a look back at all the ways that desktop Linux has become easier to use -- and those in which it has become more difficult -- over the past ten years. I installed Linux to my laptop for the first time in the summer of 2006. I started with SUSE, then moved onto Mandriva and finally settled on Fedora Core. By early 2007 I was using Fedora full time. There was no more Windows partition on my laptop. When I ran into problems or incompatibilities with Linux, my options were to sink or swim. There was no Windows to revert back to. Read more