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Saturday, 28 May 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Repliessort icon Last Post
Story Mandrakesoft and Conectiva Merger srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:20am
Story Ebay Sued srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:20am
Story FBI Being Spoofed in Email srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:19am
Story Nvidia to release 75 series driver srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:19am
Story NVIDIA Unleashes 6800 Mobile GPU srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:18am
Story Newest Vulnerabilities in php apps srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:18am
Story aKademy 2005 Logo Contest Launched srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 6:29am
Story SCO and The Titanic srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:28am
Story IBM backs open-source Web software srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:27am
Story Who will take home the Gold? srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:25am

Linux Kernel 3.12.60 LTS Released with ARM and PowerPC Fixes, Updated Drivers

Filed under
Linux

Linux kernel developer Jiri Slaby today, May 24, 2016, announced the release and general availability of the sixtieth maintenance build in long-term supported Linux 3.12 kernel series.

Read more

BQ Aquaris M10 Ubuntu Edition review

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

THE BQ AQUARIS M10 is the first Ubuntu-powered tablet and Canonical's attempt to bring its Linux-based operating system to the masses.

It's also the first tablet to offer a fully converged experience, according to Canonical, as the BQ Aquaris M10 can transform from a tablet to a fully-fledged PC.

Ubuntu OS can change from a touch-based to a desktop interface via an HDMI connection, trumping Microsoft's Continuum feature in Windows 10 on paper at least, and apps switch from full-screen to floating windows that can be resized and moved around.

Read more

Ubuntu MATE 16.10 In Development, Software Boutique and Welcome Get New Features

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu MATE lead developer and maintainer Martin Wimpress announced earlier today, May 24, 2016, that the Ubuntu MATE 16.10 operating system is now open for development.

Read more

Ask Safia: How do I move from a proprietary software background into open source?

Filed under
OSS

Your inexperience with open source tools definitely is not going to prevent you from participating in the open source community. Regardless of the closed nature of the platforms that you’ve worked with previously, you have all the skills needed to be a valuable open source contributor. If you’ve learned a thing or two about documentation, consider addressing documentation issues on projects. If you had experience in QA or testing, you can start off by user testing the software and identifying areas for improvement or for improving code coverage. Valuing your skill set and the nature of the environments that you have worked in is important.

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How Do You Support Your Distro?

Filed under
Linux

I think of them as our own little personal supernovas. There’s a brilliant flash when a Linux distro tosses in the towel and calls it quits. But whenever a distro goes away, it leaves behind the people who’ve used and worked with it on a daily basis. While there’s no formation of a black hole, there is hole at the center of users’ work schedules and that disruption can do serious damage to those relying upon the distro’s stability. And while getting a new distro installed and running isn’t the nightmare it used to be, it’s still a pain.

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Rygel Open-Source Media Server Gets Hack to Support AVI Playback on Philips TVs

Filed under
OSS

The open-source Rygel DLNA (Digital Living Network Alliance) media server software has been updated earlier, May 23, 2016, to stable version 0.30.3 and development build 0.31.1.

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GNOME News

Filed under
GNOME
  • GNOME.Asia Summit 2016

    This year summit held at Manav Rachna International University (MRIU), which is located in the Faridabad district Delhi, it’s a quiet, beautiful and very very hot place. It gave me a lot of wonderful memories.

  • Endless and Codethink team up for GNOME on ARM

    A couple of months ago Alberto Ruiz issued a Call to Arms here on planet GNOME. This was met with with an influx of eager contributions including a wide variety of server grade ARM hardware, rack space and sponsorship to help make GNOME on ARM a reality.

  • External Plugins in GNOME Software (5)

    There’s a lot of flexibility in the gnome-software plugin structure; a plugin can add custom applications and handle things like search and icon loading in a totally custom way. Most of the time you don’t care about how search is implemented or how icons are going to be loaded, and you can re-use a lot of the existing code in the appstream plugin. To do this you just save an AppStream-format XML file in either /usr/share/app-info/xmls/, /var/cache/app-info/xmls/ or ~/.local/share/app-info/xmls/. GNOME Software will immediately notice any new files, or changes to existing files as it has set up the various inotify watches.

  • External Plugins in GNOME Software (6)

    This is my last post about the gnome-software plugin structure. If you want more, join the mailing list and ask a question. If you’re not sure how something works then I’ve done a poor job on the docs, and I’m happy to explain as much as required.

  • Week 1 of May-August Outreachy

    The Outreachy internship requires that interns maintain a blog, writing at least every other week. This shouldn't be a problem for the usability project. For the first few weeks, I'll essentially give a research topic for Diana, Ciarrai and Renata to look into and write about on their blogs. I've structured the topics so that we'll build up to building our usability tests.

Android Leftovers

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Android

MATE 1.14 Desktop Finally Lands in Manjaro Linux's Repo, New MATE Edition Is Out

Filed under
Linux

Manjaro leader Philip Müller announced this past weekend that the major MATE 1.14 desktop environment has finally landed in the main software repositories of the Arch Linux-based distribution.

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openSUSE Tumbleweed Needs Your Help to Make GCC 6 the Default Compiler

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SUSE

We reported at the beginning of the month that the openSUSE Tumbleweed developers are preparing a massive package rebuild to make the GCC (GNU Compiler Collection) 6 the default compiler for the rolling operating system.

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Google reveals nationalities of students in open source-focused Summer of Code 2016

Filed under
Google
OSS

Every summer, many students get excited for some well-deserved time off from studies; well, if their region practices such a vacation, that is. In some cultures, school is year-round. While this is unfortunate from the standpoint of socializing and having fun, it arguably keeps the students on track for great success.

For students that are particularly motivated and education-focused, Google hosts its legendary Summer of Code. This program pairs future developers with open source projects. Not only do these young folks learn, but they get to contribute to the projects as well. Today, the search giant shares the nationalities of the students participating in Summer of Code 2016. For the first time ever, Albania has a representative -- woo-hoo! This may surprise you, but the USA is not the most-represented nation. The top country, however, may shock you -- or not.

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Meet UDOO X86, a Maker Board That's 10 Times More Powerful Than Raspberry Pi 3

Filed under
Linux

Today we would like to introduce our readers to an upcoming maker board that features some very powerful components and aims to overpower every SBC (single-board computer) in its path.

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Watch: Ubuntu Convergence in Action on Meizu PRO 5 Ubuntu Edition with Miracast

Filed under
Ubuntu

Earlier today, May 23, 2016, the Ubuntu Community Manager at Canonical, Mr. Alan Pope, received his Meizu PRO 5 Ubuntu Edition smartphone, so he immediately ran some tests to see the Ubuntu convergence with his own eyes.

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Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Roundcube Webmail 1.2.0 released

    We proudly announce the stable version 1.2.0 of Roundcube Webmail which is now available for download. It introduces new features since version 1.1 covering security and PGP encryption topics...

  • Roundcube Webmail 1.2 Adds PGP Encryption

    For those using the open-source Roundcube software for your webmail needs, Roundcube 1.2 is now available as the latest stable version.

  • Systemd 230 Opens Up A New Graphics Vulnerability & FBDEV Still Should Die

    A change made in the recent release of systemd 230 makes it easy for rogue user processes to be able to spy on your desktop, assuming a few conditions are met.

    If you are using FBDEV, such as with Wayland's Weston FBDEV back-end, other user processes can now read from the frame-buffer device. The change in systemd is, "Framebuffer devices (/dev/fb*) and 3D printers and scanners (devices tagged with ID_MAKER_TOOL) are now tagged with 'uaccess' and are available to logged in users."

  • systemd 230 Launches with DNSSEC Enabled by Default in systemd-resolved, More
  • 7 Best Command Line Navigation Tools

    The desktop environment with its bundle of programs sharing a common graphical user interface (GUI) remains a firm favorite with users. Not surprising really given that a good desktop environment makes computing fun and simple. The graphical desktop environment has become so ingrained in almost everyone's computer activities that it might seem the command line will wither away. Yet, there is still an important role to play for the humble command-line interface (CLI).

  • GNU Parallel 20160522 ('TTIPleaks') released

    GNU Parallel 20160522 ('TTIPleaks') has been released.

GNU/Linux Leftovers

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • From Windows 10, Linux, iPads, iPhones to HoloLens: The tech astronauts use on the ISS

    From the first days of the station, NASA astronauts have used Linux-based laptops to interact with the avionics, the critical systems that keep the station in orbit and the air breathable.

  • Cloud Native Computing Foundation Plots a Path to the Future

    Chris Aniszczyk, interim executive director of Cloud Native Computing Foundation, discusses how the Linux Foundation Collaborative project is coming together to help define the cloud era.
    Back in July, the Linux Foundation announced the formation of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation as an effort to advance cloud application management and interoperability. Today, the CNCF is still in its formative stages, defining its processes, projects and even itself. Helping to lead the CNCF forward is its interim executive director, Chris Aniszczyk, who is well-known in the technology community as the former head of open source at Twitter, where he worked from 2011 to 2015.

  • Series Highlights Top Cloud Technologies and Container Tools
  • Fancy is a $225 compact PC that runs Chromium, Ubuntu, or Android

    The developer behind Chromium OS for SBC offers software that makes it easy to effectively turn a $35 Raspberry Pi into a Chromebox.

    But if you want a more powerful computer, developer Dylan Callahan has announced another option: a small computer called Fancy which measures about 8.7″ x 8.4″ x 3.1″ and which has an AMD quad-core x86 processor.

  • Year of the Linux Desktop

    As some of you already know, xdg-app project is dead. The Swedish conspiracy members tell me it’s a good thing and should turn your attention to project Flatpak.

    Flatpak aims to solve the painful problem of the Linux distribution...

Calculate Linux 15.17

Filed under
Reviews

SUSE Leftovers

Filed under
SUSE
  • Developers Conference 2016, day 3 with openSUSE bug hunting

    I had my «openSUSE bug hunting» presentation scheduled at 09h30 this morning. I’m usually very lazy on Sundays but the enthusiasm of the Developers Conference is just an amazing feeling. Though we live on a small island, we get to meet some people maybe just once a year during this fun event. I picked up Shelly on the way and we reached Voilà Hotel at 09h05. Right at the hotel entrance Yash was waiting, he might have seen us coming. We went upstairs chatting and met JoKi. My presentation was scheduled at the Accelerator and I thought I’d just go and test the gear. Aargh! The TV had only HDMI cable and my ThinkPad had VGA & a Mini DisplayPort. That said, I needed an adapter. Joffrey who came around greeting everyone had a HDMI to VGA cable, which he lent me. At that same time JoKi also came with a Mini DisplayPort to HDMI convertor. Great! Then I had an adapter plus a backup.

  • YodaQA’s abilities are enlarged by traffic domain

    Everybody driving a car needs the navigation to get to the destination fast and avoid traffic jam. One of the biggest problems is how to enter fast the destination and how to find where are the congestions, what is the traffic situation. YodaQA Traffic is a project attempting to answer the traffic related questions quickly and efficiently. Drivers may ask questions in natural language like: “What is the traffic situation in the Evropská street?” or “What is the fastest route from Opletalova street to Kafkova street?” You can try out the prototype (demo available only for limited time) – try to ask for example “traffic situation in the Wilsonova street” .

  • openSUSE helps jump-start new summit

    Last week, members of The GNOME Project announced a new conference in the United States northwest to enhance the GNU/Linux application ecosystem.

    The Libre Application Summit, which will take place in Portland, Oregon, from Sept. 19 – 23, aims to empower application developers both big and small as well as enhance app developers collaboratation with major Linux distributions.

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Agenda and Keynote Speakers Announced for Red Hat Summit 2016

    More than 200 breakout sessions across 14 tracks - Sessions, presented by subject-matter experts including Red Hat associates, customers, partners, and developers, will offer attendees an opportunity to dive into the latest product innovations and hear best practices from experts across industries.

  • Advancing communications innovation through open source communities

    As the open source expert, Red Hat promotes collaboration between the telecommunications industry and the open source community. By helping the community implement telecommunications requirements in a way that allows innovation to be shared across industry verticals, Red Hat allows the industry to take greater advantage of open source technologies.

  • Stock under consideration today: Red Hat Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • RHT Makes Bullish Cross Above Critical Moving Average
  • Yum Extender – A Graphical frontend tool for YUM/DNF

    Yum Extender, also known as yumex, is a graphical frontend for Yum/DNF package manager. It makes the process of installing, removing, upgrading, and updating packages much easier with a simple, yet fully functional graphical user interface. Yumex is written using Python programming language. For those who don’t like the command line way can use YUM Extender or yumex.

  • Write for the Fedora Magazine

    Know an awesome piece of Fedora news? Have a good idea for a Fedora how-to? Do you or someone you know use Fedora in an interesting way? We’re always looking for new contributors to write awesome, relevant content. The Magazine is run by the Fedora community — and that’s all of us. You can help too!

  • spice OpenGL/virgl acceleration on Fedora 24

    New in Fedora 24 virt is 3D accelerated SPICE graphics, via Virgl. This is kinda-sorta OpenGL passthrough from the VM up to the host machine. Much of the initial support has been around since qemu 2.5, but it's more generally accessible now that SPICE is in the mix, since that's the default display type used by virt-manager and gnome-boxes.

    I'll explain below how you can test things on Fedora 24, but first let's cover the hurdles and caveats. This is far from being something that can be turned on by default and there's still serious integration issues to iron out. All of this is regarding usage with libvirt tools.

Development News

Filed under
Development
  • Discharge rate estimate in new battery statistics collector for Debian

    Yesterday I updated the battery-stats package in Debian with a few patches sent to me by skilled and enterprising users. There were some nice user and visible changes. First of all, both desktop menu entries now work. A design flaw in one of the script made the history graph fail to show up (its PNG was dumped in ~/.xsession-errors) if no controlling TTY was available. The script worked when called from the command line, but not when called from the desktop menu. I changed this to look for a DISPLAY variable or a TTY before deciding where to draw the graph, and now the graph window pop up as expected.

  • Repurposing Old Smartphones for Home Automation

    At the recent Embedded Linux Conference and OpenIoT Summit, Mozilla Technical Evangelist Dietrich Ayala proposed a simple and affordable solution to home automation: A discarded smartphone can handle some of the most useful home automation tasks without requiring expensive hubs and sensors -- or risking data security in the cloud.

    “With a smartphone you can detect motion, sound, presence, and the absence of radio services,” said Ayala in his presentation, “Turning Sensors into Signals: Humanizing IoT with Old Smartphones and the Web.”

  • Turning Sensors into Signals: Humanizing IoT with Old Smartphones and the Web by Dietrich Ayala
  • GNU Make 4.2 Released!
  • DevOps and Culture: The Evolution of DevOps in the Tech Industry
  • Linux 4.7 Gets a Security Boost with ChromeOS Feature

    We're currently inside of the two week merge window where code is being pulled in to form the Linux 4.7 kernel. One of the GIT pull requests came from Linux kernel developer James Morris and includes at least one really interesting new security feature, by way of a new Linux Security Module (LSM).

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More in Tux Machines

UbuCon Paris Party Starts Today In Celebration of the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Release

Yesterday we reported on the fact that even if Canonical unveiled the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system last month, on April 21, several LoCos are still organizing release parties. Read more

Why I won’t use Dropbox’s Project Infinite if it’s not open source

Why not Dropbox? Because the open source community can’t see the Dropbox source code, there is no way to know what Dropbox does to my stuff. Experts should be able to audit Dropbox source code to ensure there are no security vulnerabilities, that there are no back doors. Beyond that, I am not comfortable with making any company a co-owner of my files. I don’t want to be at the mercy of a company that can revoke access to my data for whatever reason. I am not comfortable with the idea that my data could be subject to scanning and privacy-invading laws that otherwise don’t apply to my local data. Read more

Open-source vs. Proprietary – Keeping Ideology Out of the Equation

Open-source really means no more and no less than making the source code readily available to anyone. Thus, open-source makes no statement as to the licensing conditions for using the software, whether there are charges for using the software, whether the software is supported, or actively developed, or any good, and so on. Closed-source means that source code is not readily available, but makes no comment on issues like licensing, costs, support, and quality. Read more

NetOS Enterprise Linux 8 Promises to Be a Worthy Alternative to Chrome OS

Black Lab Software CEO Roberto J. Dohnert informs Softpedia today about the general availability of the NetOS Enterprise Developer Preview 8 operating system. Designed as a replacement for the Linux kernel-based Chrome OS or Chromium OS operating systems, Black Lab Software's upcoming NetOS distribution is using the same technologies that have been implemented in the Enterprise Edition of the Black Lab Linux OS. Read more