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Saturday, 03 Dec 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Repliessort icon Last Post
Story Mandrakesoft and Conectiva Merger srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:20am
Story Ebay Sued srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:20am
Story FBI Being Spoofed in Email srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:19am
Story Nvidia to release 75 series driver srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:19am
Story NVIDIA Unleashes 6800 Mobile GPU srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:18am
Story Newest Vulnerabilities in php apps srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:18am
Story aKademy 2005 Logo Contest Launched srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 6:29am
Story SCO and The Titanic srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:28am
Story IBM backs open-source Web software srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:27am
Story Who will take home the Gold? srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:25am

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

ArchBang Linux Review: Easy, Minimal, Arch-Based OS

Filed under
Linux

There are so many distros popping out of everywhere. But for most distros out there, they use Debian or Fedora as Base. And In Recent times, we see Arch being the new alternative to those two ages old distros.

Read<br />
more

HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.16.11 Supports openSUSE Leap 42.2 and Fedora 25

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat
SUSE

Today, November 28, 2016, the developers behind the HP Linux Imaging and Printing (HPLIP) software, an open source print, scan and fax driver solution for HP printers and scanners on Linux-based operating systems, announced the release of HPLIP 3.16.11.

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Missing Linux Components: Possible Fixes

Filed under
Linux

In many ways, the Linux desktop is as close as I can get to the perfect computing experience. Don't misunderstand, there are missing components that affect me on a daily basis. But for the most part it's as good as I can make it.

This article will address a negative aspect of something that usually provides me with a great deal of satisfaction – Linux. Despite my preference for the platform, today's distros are by no means perfect.

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Time is running out for NTP

Filed under
OSS

There are two types of open source projects: those with corporate sponsorship and those that fall under the “labor of love” category. Actually, there’s a third variety: projects that get some support but have to keep looking ahead for the next sponsor.

Some open source projects are so widely used that if anything goes wrong, everyone feels the ripple effects. OpenSSL is one such project; when the Heartbleed flaw was discovered in the open source cryptography library, organizations scrambled to identify and fix all their vulnerable networking devices and software. Network Time Protocol (NTP) arguably plays as critical a role in modern computing, if not more; the open source protocol is used to synchronize clocks on servers and devices to make sure they all have the same time. Yet, the fact remains that NTP is woefully underfunded and undersupported.

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Ubuntu 17.04 Slated for Release on April 13, 2017, Final Beta Lands March 23

Filed under
Ubuntu

Today we have some great news for our Ubuntu Linux readers, as Canonical recently published the release schedule for the upcoming Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) operating system.

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Also: Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS Lands January 19, 2017, with Ubuntu 16.10's Linux 4.8 Kernel

You Can Now Package Your Apps as Snaps without Bundling Their Dependencies

New LibreOffice Extensions/Templates Site Coming Soon, LibreOffice 5.3 Hits Beta

Filed under
LibO

Plone advocate and LibreOffice developer Andreas Mantke reports on the upcoming availability of a brand new LibreOffice extensions and templates website, and the migration of the content from the current website to the new one.

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Raspberry Pi shields offer 3G, 4G, GPRS, GPS, and XBee support

Filed under
Linux

Sixfab has launched an open source “Raspberry Pi IoT Shield Family” of RPi communications shields, including GPS, XBee, GPRS, 3G, and 4G add-ons.

Sixfab, which is known for its Arduino-compatible Tinylab maker boards and kits, several of which integrate ESP8266 wireless SoCs, has now turned to the Raspberry Pi shield market with its Raspberry Pi IoT Shield Family. The Turkish-born, Syracuse, N.Y.-based company has gone to Kickstarter to sell the GPS, XBee, GSM/GPRS, 3G, and 4G/LTE shields separately at up to half-off prices ranging from $19 to $99, with shipments due in March. Sixfab needs about $8,000 in the next 18 days to meet its $50,000 goal.

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Google to Award 10,000 Android Developer Scholarships for EU Residents

Filed under
Android
Google

Google will offer up to 10,000 scholarships to individuals in the European Union interested in acquiring Android application development skills.

Up to 9,000 of the scholarships will be reserved for an Android Basics course designed for individuals with no previous programming skills. The remaining 1,000 scholarships have been earmarked for a new Associate Android Developer Fast Track program for developers with at least one year of Java programming experience.

Google will deliver the Android scholarship program in collaboration with Bertelsmann, a global media and education services giant and e-learning company Udacity.

Matt Brittin, Google's vice president of sales and operations for Northern and Central Europe, described the initiative as a response to a worsening digital skills shortage in Europe.

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Best Cheap Android Smartphones [2016]

Filed under
Android

Throughout 2015 cheap Android smartphones were released by the dozens. This year there are more choices than ever before. Devices like the Moto G, ZTE Axon 7, OnePlus 3 and others. Cheap phones that can easily rival the best of the best. With that in mind, these are some of the absolute best cheap Android smartphones you can buy right now. Including the new OnePlus 3T.

Those who don’t need a high-end Android phone, want to sign a 2-year contract, or pay over $600 for a smartphone have other options. And if you’re one of the millions looking for a cheaper route you’ll be happy to know plenty of great phones won’t break the bank.

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Linux on Servers

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server
  • Docker 1.13.0 RC2 Supports Building of Docker DEBs for Ubuntu 16.10 on PPC64LE

    Two weeks ago, we discussed here the upcoming features of the Docker 1.13.0 open-source and cross-platform application container engine as part of the new version's first Release Candidate build.

    And now, Developer Victor Vieux announced the availability of the second RC version for the Docker 1.13.0 release, which appears to bring lots of improvements and bug fixes. Notable changes include support for labels on volumes, the ability to filter volumes by label, along with the ability to purge data from a deleted volume using the "--force" parameter in the "docker volume rm" command.

  • AWS Launches Amazon Linux Container Image

    AWS recently launched a Docker container image for its Amazon Linux operating system, complementing the EC2 specific Amazon Linux AMI with a versatile deployment option for custom cloud and on-premise environments. The image is available through the Amazon EC2 Container Registry (Amazon ECR), and also as an official repository on Docker Hub.

    The Amazon Linux AMI is a "supported and maintained Linux image provided by Amazon Web Services" that is designed to "provide a stable, secure, and high performance execution environment for applications running on Amazon EC2". It has long been the base image for most of AWS' Linux based offerings, such as the AWS Elastic Beanstalk platforms, the Amazon Elastic MapReduce releases, and the Amazon EC2 Container Service instances.

  • 3 Emerging Cloud Technologies You Should Know

    In previous articles, we’ve discussed four notable trends in cloud computing and how the rise of microservices and the public cloud has led to a whole new class of open source cloud computing projects. These projects leverage the elasticity of the public cloud and enable applications designed and built to run on it.

    Early on in cloud computing, there was a migration of existing applications to Amazon Web Services, Google, and Microsoft’s Azure. Virtually any app that ran on hardware in private data centers could be virtualized and deployed to the cloud. Now with a mature cloud market, more applications are being written and deployed directly to the cloud and are often referred to as being cloud native.

    Here we’ll explore three emerging cloud technologies and mention a few key projects in each area. For a more in-depth explanation and to see a full list of all the projects across six broad categories, download our free 2016 Guide to the Open Cloud report.

  • Why the fuss about serverless?

    To explain this, I’m going to have to recap on some old work with a particular focus on co-evolution.

Leftovers: Software for GNU/Linux

Kernel Space: Linux, Graphics

Leftovers: Gaming (X-Plane and 'Battle Chasers: Nightwar')

Filed under
Gaming
  • X-Plane 11 Beta Now Available, Demo Too

    Laminar Research has released their first public beta of the massive X-Plane 11.0 flight simulator update. It's a huge update and expect some bugs at this stage, but should be a very exciting release.

  • X-Plane 11 now in beta, also has a demo available

    X-Plane 11 is nearing release, so the developers have put up a beta and a demo of the beta for you to try before you buy.

  • 'Battle Chasers: Nightwar' is a visually stunning RPG inspired by a comic, that might be released next year

    I can count with the fingers of a single hand the number of comics I read in my whole life, and the Battle Chasers aren't the exception; though, if this upcoming game is being loyal to their style and tone, I have to say I would be more tempted to do so. Personally, I don't expect for games to have state-of-the-art technology behind their graphics, but I care a lot about the artistic design, and this one truly seems to deliver on that. Plus, if you check this news on the official site, after a successful Kickstarter campaign they announced to be completely funded by Nordic Games without sacrificing the creative control of the project, so basically the quality of the game now simply relies on how talented they are and how well they spend the budget on the game.

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • The Systemd-Free Debian Fork Celebrates Its Second Birthday

    Devuan, the Debian fork that frees the system of systemd, is now two years old.

    Yesterday marked two years since the announcement of the systemd-free Debian fork, Devuan.

    Two years going, this Linux OS that aims for "Init Freedom" isn't the most vibrant distribution out there. When's the last time you've heard of Devuan or even used it yourself? This year much of the systemd "hate" seems to have calmed down compared to prior years, although new features continue to be tacked onto systemd. Here's an interesting Google Trends comparison for those interested.

  • Debian with three monitors under low cost graphics interface

    Since 2008 I use two monitors in my desktop. Yesterday I bought a new graphics interface and a third monitor. Some time I was looking for a low cost graphics interface. Ok, I am using GeForce GT 740 which has three output ports: VGA, DVI and HDMI. In Brazil this interface card can be found around R$ 400 (US$ 117, but my card was US$ 87 in Brazilian Black Friday). In Amazon.com, it is between US$ 51 and US$ 109. The chosen manufacturer was Zotac, but all GT 740 and 750 will work fine (I tested the GT 750 too).

  • Canonical Announces the Availability of Ubuntu Advantage VG on AWS Marketplace

    Canonical, through Udi Nachmany, head of the Ubuntu Certified Public Cloud program, was proud to announce the availability for purchase of Ubuntu Advantage Virtual Guests on the AWS marketplace.

  • Mir is not only about Unity8

    Mir is a project to support the management applications on the display(s) of a computer. It can be compared to the more familiar X-Windows used on the current Ubuntu desktop (and many others). I’ll discuss some of the motivation for Mir below, but the point of this post is to clarify the relationship between Mir and Unity8.

  • Mir/Ubuntu Developer Talks Up Mir Outside Of Unity 8

    Most talk these days of Ubuntu's Unity 8 next-gen desktop experience and their Mir display server goes hand-in-hand since the change-over is planned in-step before Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, but there's a new Ubuntu Insights blog post up working to promote Mir as more than just tech for the Unity 8 desktop.

    Canonical engineer Alan Griffith has written a blog post today about Mir outside of Unity 8. Mir's abstraction layer is providing libmiral.so as a stable library to Mir providing window manager, the miral-shell providing both traditional and tiling window manager, and miral-kiosk as a sample "kiosk" with basic window management.

  • What’s New in Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) – Overview

    Ubuntu 17.04, code named Zesty Zapus, is the future release that will succeed Ubuntu 16.10, and even though it’s End of life date has been scheduled for January 2018, the development team aims to bring a lot of upgrades, fixes, and additions in this release.

Phones/Devices With Linux

  • The Raspberry Pi Hits Important New Milestones

    As we've noted here before, when it comes to top open source stories of the past couple of years, it's clear that one of the biggest is the proliferation of tiny, inexpensive Linux-based computers at some of the smallest form factors ever seen. The diminutive, credit card-sized Raspberry Pi, which has been priced at only $25 and $35, has grabbed most of the headlines in this space, and has recently hit some new milestones.

  • Apple iOS Is Losing to a Homegrown Competitor in China

    As sales keep dropping. Apple iOS sales will be topped by Alibaba's YunOS in what was once the U.S. tech behemoth's growth engine. YunOS is set to take 14% of the smartphone shipments in mainland China...

  • Ten years anniversary of Openmoko

    In 2006 I first visited Taiwan. The reason back then was Sean Moss-Pultz contacting me about a new Linux and Free Software based Phone that he wanted to do at FIC in Taiwan. This later became the Neo1973 and the Openmoko project and finally became part of both Free Software as well as smartphone history.

    Ten years later, it might be worth to share a bit of a retrospective.

    It was about building a smartphone before Android or the iPhone existed or even were announced. It was about doing things "right" from a Free Software point of view, with FOSS requirements going all the way down to component selection of each part of the electrical design.

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • Nomulus: Google’s open-source TLD registry platform

    In mid-October, Google open-sourced the core software behind their TLD registry: Nomulus. This software allows creation and management of new top-level domains (TLDs) in the cloud, enabling current businesses in the Internet real-estate market to expand into the new, rapidly growing generic TLD (gTLD) space, as well as reducing the technological barrier for prospective newcomers.

    Nomulus provides a wealth of core features out of the box. Because it is designed to run on Google App Engine, Nomulus is cloud-based and can scale quickly and efficiently as domains leased increase in popularity and number of registrations or inquiries.

  • Contribute To Open Source On #OpenCyberMonday

    Today is Cyber Monday, the day when everyone in the US goes back to work after Thanksgiving. Cyber Monday is a celebration of consumerism, and the largest online shopping day of the year. Right now, hundreds of thousands of office workers are browsing Amazon for Christmas presents, while the black sheep of the office are on LiveLeak checking out this year’s Black Friday compartment syndrome compilations.

  • Pentaho’s Quentin Gallivan: Open-Source Framework, Analytics Tools Key to Agencies’ Data Integration Efforts

    Quentin Gallivan, CEO of Hitachi Data Systems’ Pentaho subsidiary, has said government agencies should develop a “centralized” plan that seeks to leverage the use of business analytics tools and an open-source framework like Hadoop in order to facilitate data integration and access.

    Gallivan wrote that agencies should adopt an open-source framework that includes governance practices on the use of data and works to support big data processing operations.

  • Bitcoin in 5 minutes

    Blockstream's Eric Martindale opened his five-minute All Things Open lightning talk with a bold claim: "Bitcoin is one on the most significant innovations of our time."

  • 3 alternative reasons why you should test Nextcloud 11 Beta

    On the Nextcloud blog I just published about the beta for Nextcloud 11. The release will deliver many improvements and is worth checking out in itself, plus I put a nice clickbait-style title and gave three reasons to test it.

  • The Glass Room: Looking into Your Online Life

    It’s that time of year! The excitement of Black Friday carries into today – CyberMonday – the juxtaposition of the analog age and the digital age. Both days are fueled by media and retailers alike and are about shopping. And both days are heavily reliant on the things that we want, that we need and what we think others want and need. And, all of it is powered by the data about us as consumers. So, today – the day of electronic shopping – is the perfect day to provoke some deep thinking on how our digital lives impact our privacy and online security. How do we do this?

  • phpMyAdmin security issues

    You might wonder why there is so high number of phpMyAdmin security announcements this year. This situations has two main reasons and I will comment a bit on those.

    First of all we've got quite a lot of attention of people doing security reviews this year. It has all started with Mozilla SOS Fund funded audit. It has discovered few minor issues which were fixed in the 4.6.2 release. However this was really just the beginning of the story and the announcement has attracted quite some attention to us. In upcoming weeks the security@phpmyadmin.net mailbox was full of reports and we really struggled to handle such amount. Handling that amount actually lead to creating more formalized approach to handling them as we clearly were no longer able to deal with them based on email only. Anyway most work here was done by Emanuel Bronshtein, who is really looking at every piece of our code and giving useful tips to harden our code base and infrastructure.

  • Time is running out for NTP

    Everyone benefits from Network Time Protocol, but the project struggles to pay its sole maintainer or fund its various initiatives

  • KDE End of Year Fundraising

    Have you ever felt that you wanted to give back to the KDE project? As the season of giving draws near there's never been a better time to support KDE and help the project continue to bring free software to millions of lives worldwide.

    By participating in the end of year fundraiser, you can help us in our mission. Your donations are used to pay for transport and accomodation for developers to attend sprints as well as to support the server infrastructure required to keep the project running.

  • The Latest On C++17, Early Work For C++20

    There was a C++ standards meeting recently in Issaquah, Washington and a report on it is now available with the latest on C++17 and early work around what will form C++20.

    This meeting resulted in the C++17 committee draft as the first feature-complete draft of the C++17 specification.Various tweaks to the language and library were accepted at this meeting. C++17 remains on track for seeing its official spec out in 2017.

  • From Concept to License: Stewarding Your Own Open Source Project

    Are you of a mind to launch an open source project or are you in the process of doing so? Doing it successfully and rallying community support can be more complicated than you think, but a little up-front footwork and howework can help things go smoothly. Beyond that, some planning can also keep you out of legal trouble. Issues pertaining to licensing, distribution, support options and even branding require thinking ahead if you want your project to flourish. In this post, you'll find our newly updated collection of good, free resources to pay attention to if you're doing an open source project.

  • Open source virtual reality, a new board for electronics testing, Fedora 25, and more news

    In this week's edition of our open source news roundup, we take a look at open source virtual reality, a new board for electronics testing, Fedora 25, and more.

  • Switzerland to create an open food data programme

    Opendata.ch, which represents the Open Knowledge Foundation in Switzerland, has launched the Business Innovation food.opendata.ch programme, with the goal of building an open and public database on food and nutrition data. The programme is also funded by the Swiss food industry, represented by Migros – via its funding arm Engagement Migros.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • How fast is KVM? Host vs virtual machine performance!
  • Kernel maintenance, Brillo style
    Brillo, he said, is a software stack for the Internet of things based on the Android system. These deployments bring a number of challenges, starting with the need to support a different sort of hardware than Android normally runs on; target devices may have no display or input devices, but might well have "fun buses" to drive interesting peripherals. The mix of vendors interested in this area is different; handset vendors are present, but many more traditional embedded vendors can also be found there. Brillo is still in an early state of development.
  • Reviewing Project Management Service `Wrike` And Seems Interesting
    I have been testing some services for our project and found this amazing service, thought why not share it with you guys, it might be useful for you. Project management is a term that in some respects appears common, yet in practice still seems to be limited to large companies. While this may be true, the foundations of project management are actually rather simple and can be adopted by anyone, in any industry. One of the major requirements you need to consider when selecting a good project management software is the ability to run and operate it on the go via your mobile devices. Other factors include the ability to access the software from any platform whether it be Linux, Mac, or Windows. This can be achieved when the project management software is web-based. Wrike is a software that does of all this.
  • World Wine News Issue 403
  • OSVR on Steam, Unity drops legacy OpenGL, and more gaming news
  • GNOME Core Apps Hackfest 2016
    This November from Friday 25 to Sunday 27 was held in Berlin the GNOME Core Apps Hackfest. My focus during this hackfest was to start implementing a widget for the series view of the Videos application, following a mockup by Allan Day.
  • Worth Watching: What Will Happen to Red Hat Inc Next? The Stock Just Declined A Lot
  • Vetr Inc. Lowers Red Hat Inc. (RHT) to Buy
  • Redshift functionality on Fedora 25 (GNOME + Wayland). Yes, it's possible!
    For those who can't live without screen colour shifting technology such as Redshift or f.lux, myself being one of them, using Wayland did pose the challenge of having these existing tools not working with the Xorg replacement. Thankfully, all is not lost and it is possible even right now. Thanks to a copr repo, it's particularly easy on Fedora 25. One of the changes that comes with Wayland is there is currently no way for third-party apps to modify screen gamma curves. Therefore, no redshift apps, such as Redshift itself (which I recently covered here) will work while running under Wayland.
  • My Free Software Activities in November 2016
  • Google's ambitious smartwatch vision is failing to materialise
    In February this year, Google's smartwatch boss painted me a rosy picture of the future of wearable technology. The wrist is, David Singleton said, "the ideal place for the power of Google to help people with their lives."
  • Giving Thanks (along with a Shipping Update)
    Mycroft will soon be available as a pre-built Raspberry Pi 3 image for any hobbyist to use. The new backend we have been quietly building is emerging from beta, making the configuration and management of you devices simple. We are forming partnerships to get Mycroft onto laptops, desktops and other devices in the world. Mycroft will soon be speaking to you throughout your day.
  • App: Ixigo Indian Rail Train PNR Status for Tizen Smart Phones
    Going on a train journey in India? Ixigo will check the PNR status, the train arrival and departure & how many of the particular tickets are left that you can purchase. You can also do a PNR status check to make sure that your seat is booked and confirmed.

Networking and Servers

  • How We Knew It Was Time to Leave the Cloud
    In my last infrastructure update, I documented our challenges with storage as GitLab scales. We built a CephFS cluster to tackle both the capacity and performance issues of NFS and decided to replace PostgreSQL standard Vacuum with the pg_repack extension. Now, we're feeling the pain of running a high performance distributed filesystem on the cloud.
  • Hype Driven Development
  • SysAdmins Arena in a nutshell
    Sysadmins can use the product to improve their skills or prepare for an interview by practicing some day to day job scenarios. There is an invitation list opened for the first testers of the product.

Desktop GNU/Linux

  • PINEBOOK Latest News: Affordable Linux Laptop at Only $89 Made by Raspberry Pi Rival, PINE
    PINE, the rival company of Raspberry Pi and maker of the $20 Pine A64, has just announced its two below $100-priced Linux laptops, known as PINEBOOK. The affordable Linux laptop is powered by Quad-Core ARM Cortex A53 64-bit processor and comes with an 11.6" or 14" monitor.
  • Some thoughts about options for light Unix laptops
    I have an odd confession: sometimes I feel (irrationally) embarrassed that despite being a computer person, I don't have a laptop. Everyone else seems to have one, yet here I am, clearly behind the times, clinging to a desktop-only setup. At times like this I naturally wind up considering the issue of what laptop I might get if I was going to get one, and after my recent exposure to a Chromebook I've been thinking about this once again. I'll never be someone who uses a laptop by itself as my only computer, so I'm not interested in a giant laptop with a giant display; giant displays are one of the things that the desktop is for. Based on my experiences so far I think that a roughly 13" laptop is at the sweet spot of a display that's big enough without things being too big, and I would like something that's nicely portable.
  • What is HiDPI and Why Does it Matter?

Google and Mozilla

  • Google Rolls Out Continuous Fuzzing Service For Open Source Software
    Google has launched a new project for continuously testing open source software for security vulnerabilities. The company's new OSS-Fuzz service is available in beta starting this week, but at least initially it will only be available for open source projects that have a very large user base or are critical to global IT infrastructure.
  • Mozilla is doing well financially (2015)
    Mozilla announced a major change in November 2014 in regards to the company's main revenue stream. The organization had a contract with Google in 2014 and before that had Google pay Mozilla money for being the default search engine in the Firefox web browser. This deal was Mozilla's main source of revenue, about 329 million US Dollars in 2014. The change saw Mozilla broker deals with search providers instead for certain regions of the world.