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Sunday, 22 Oct 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Repliessort icon Last Post
Story Mandrakesoft and Conectiva Merger srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:20am
Story Ebay Sued srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:20am
Story FBI Being Spoofed in Email srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:19am
Story Nvidia to release 75 series driver srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:19am
Story NVIDIA Unleashes 6800 Mobile GPU srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:18am
Story Newest Vulnerabilities in php apps srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:18am
Story aKademy 2005 Logo Contest Launched srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 6:29am
Story SCO and The Titanic srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:28am
Story IBM backs open-source Web software srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:27am
Story Who will take home the Gold? srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:25am

The origin and evolution of FreeDOS

Filed under
OS

Over the years, developers have shared with me how they use FreeDOS to run embedded systems. My all-time favorite example is a developer who used FreeDOS to power a pinball machine. FreeDOS ran an application that controlled the board, tallied the score, and updated the back display. I don't know exactly how it was built, but one way such a system could work is to have every bumper register a "key" on a keyboard bus and the application simply read from that input. I thought it was cool.

People sometimes forget about legacy software, but it pops up in unexpected places. I used to be campus CIO of a small university, and once a faculty member brought in some floppy disks with old research data on them. The data wasn't stored in plaintext files, rather as DOS application data. None of our modern systems would read the old data files, so we booted a spare PC with FreeDOS, downloaded a shareware DOS program that could read the application data, and exported the data to plaintext.

Read more

U.S. makes renewable energy software open source

Filed under
OSS

As a longtime proponent of open source solar photovoltaic development, I am happy that the U.S. National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL) has shared all the source code for System Advisor Model (SAM), its most powerful renewable energy economic analysis software.

SAM is now SAM Open Source. It is a performance and financial model designed to help make decisions about renewable energy. This is perfect timing, as the costs of solar have dropped so far that the levelized cost of electricity for solar power is less than what you are probably paying for electricity from your utility.

Read more

Solus Gets Driverless Printing, Improvements to Linux Steam Integration, More

Filed under
OS
Linux

Solus' communications manager Joshua Strobl is reporting today on the latest goodies and software updates that landed recently in the software repositories of the Linux-based operating system.

Read more

Canonical Adds Last-Minute Finishing Touches to Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark)

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu contributor Didier Roche shares today with the community some of the last minute finishing touches that he and the Ubuntu Desktop team had to add to the forthcoming Ubuntu 17.10 release.

Read more

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • 20 Most Promising Open Source Solution Providers - 2017

    Open source has become an imperative part of every developer’s arsenal. The potential to gather assistance from the community and the capacity to link into a range of systems and solutions make open source incredibly powerful. As open source software becomes ubiquitous, and used by the vast majority of enterprises throughout the world, 2017 is all set for vendors of application delivery controller (ADC) to start providing improved and tighter integration packages for various open source projects, especially surrounding ADC-generated telemetry. Companies have been extensively using their analytics and machine learning capabilities for quite some time to identify actionable patterns from the collected data. With the rising demand for business intelligence, this year is foreseen to be the year of information superiority with businesses, leveraging data as a key differentiator. In the past couple of years, containers have been emerging as an imminent trend. As the business focus starkly shifts on rightsizing of resources, containers are expected to become a common phenomenon, giving businesses the ability to leverage highly portable assets and make the move into micro services much simpler. Adjacently, automation has become essential now. Mostly intensified by DevOps adoption, the automation of software delivery and infrastructure changes have freed developers to spend more time creating and less time worrying about infrastructure.

  • DevOps pros and open source: Culturally connected

    Like chocolate and peanut butter, DevOps and open source are two great tastes that taste great together. For many DevOps pros, it's the perfect cultural and technical match.

  • Interoperability: A Case For Open Source - GC@PCI Commentary

    He continues: “An open source model allows companies to see the assumptions behind the calculation and lowers the cost of entry into the cat modeling business. More importantly, the standardized and interoperable hazard, vulnerability and financial modules included in a true open source model facilitate the collaboration of data from insurers, reinsurers, entrepreneurs, scientists, computer programmers and individuals, all of which may result in a new generation of cat models.”

  • DevOps Skills Are Key to Collaboration within Organizations

    DevOps is one of the most highly sought skills employers are seeking to fill among 57 percent of respondents in the 2017 Open Source Jobs Report, from Dice and The Linux Foundation. Specifically, firms are looking for developers (73 percent) and DevOps engineers (60 percent).

  • Projects You Can Help With For Advancing Open-Source NVIDIA "Nouveau" Graphics

    Longtime Nouveau contributor Karol Herbst has been working on an updated list of project ideas for new contributors or those that may be wanting to participate in an Endless Vacation of Code / Google Summer of Code.

  • Join The Linux Foundation at Open Source Summit EU for Booth Swag, Project Updates, and More

    Going to Open Source Summit EU in Prague? While you’re there, be sure stop by The Linux Foundation training booth for fun giveaways and a chance to win one of three Raspberry Pi kits.

  • Oracle Promises To Open Source Oracle JDK And Improve Java EE

    Oracle had already announced it would be moving Java EE to the Eclipse Foundation, and the announcements at JavaOne move the language further to a more vendor-neutral future. It's worth noting that the keynote was preceded by a Safe Harbor disclaimer in which Oracle said it could not be held to plans made during the speech, so nothing is actually certain.

  • Linux Kernel Community Enforcement Statement
  • Linux Kernel Gets An "Enforcement Statement" To Deal With Copyright Trolls

    Greg Kroah-Hartman on the behalf of the Linux Foundation Technical Advisory Board has today announced the Linux Kernel Community Enforcement Statement. This statement is designed to better fend off copyright trolls.

    Among the copyright troll concerns is how a Netfilter developer has been trying to enforce his personal copyright claims against companies for "in secret and for large sums of money by threatening or engaging in litigation."

  • An enforcement clarification from the kernel community

    The Linux Foundation's Technical Advisory board, in response to concerns about exploitative license enforcement around the kernel, has put together this patch adding a document to the kernel describing its view of license enforcement. This document has been signed or acknowledged by a long list of kernel developers. In particular, it seeks to reduce the effect of the "GPLv2 death penalty" by stating that a violator's license to the software will be reinstated upon a timely return to compliance.

Devices: Aaeon, Corvalent, and Renesas Electronics

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Red Hat and Servers: India, China, Docker and Kubernetes

Filed under
Red Hat
Server

GNOME: LVFS and Epiphany

Filed under
GNOME
  • Richard Hughes: Shaking the tin for LVFS: Asking for donations!

    Nearly 100 million files are downloaded from the LVFS every month, the majority being metadata to know what updates are available. Although each metadata file is very small it still adds up to over 1TB in transfered bytes per month. Amazon has kindly given the LVFS a 2000 USD per year open source grant which more than covers the hosting costs and any test EC2 instances. I really appreciate the donation from Amazon as it allows us to continue to grow, both with the number of Linux clients connecting every hour, and with the number of firmware files hosted. Before the grant sometimes Red Hat would pay the bandwidth bill, and other times it was just paid out my own pocket, so the grant does mean a lot to me. Amazon seemed very friendly towards this kind of open source shared infrastructure, so kudos to them for that.

    At the moment the secure part of the LVFS is hosted in a dedicated Scaleway instance, so any additional donations would be spent on paying this small bill and perhaps more importantly buying some (2nd hand?) hardware to include as part of our release-time QA checks.

  • Epiphany 3.28 Development Kicks Off With Safe Browsing, Better Flatpak Handling

    Epiphany 3.27.1 was released a short time ago as the first development release of this web-browser for the GNOME 3.28 cycle.

    For being early in the development cycle there is already a fair number of improvements with Epiphany 3.27.1. Some of the highlights include Google Safe Browsing support, a new address bar dropdown powered by libdazzle, and improvements to the Flatpak support.

  • Safe Browsing in Epiphany

    I am pleased to announce that Epiphany users will now benefit from a safe browsing support which is capable to detect and alert users whenever they are visiting a potential malicious website. This feature will be shipped in GNOME 3.28, but those who don’t wish to wait that long can go ahead and build Epiphany from master to benefit from it.

    The safe browsing support is enabled by default in Epiphany, but you can always disable it from the preferences dialog by toggling the checkbox under General -> Web Content -> Try to block dangerous websites.

Desktop: HP, TERES-I, and Munich (LiMux)

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • HP Rolls Out The First "Raven Ridge" Zen+Vega APU Notebook

    AMD has announced the world's first "Raven Ridge" APU with this notebook being powered by Ryzen 5 CPU cores paired with Vega graphics.

    [...]

    The Raven Ridge testing has been up and coming already within the AMDGPU code the past few cycles: Raven Ridge does require AMDGPU DC support so you'll be looking for a Linux 4.15+ based kernel.

  • TERES-I DIY ARM 64-Bit Linux Laptop Released For 240 EUR

    The TERES-I has been released as a do-it-yourself ARM 64-bit Linux laptop. The price isn't bad, but it's also not targeted as being a high-end/performance-oriented laptop.

    The TERES-I is designed around an Allwinner A64 SoC with quad-core Cortex-A53 processor. This laptop has an 11.6-inch 1366x768 laptop, 2GB DDR3L system memory, 16GB eMMC flash memory, WiFi/Bluetooth, HDMI, dual USB, and a 9500mAh laptop. The laptop weighs 980 grams.

  • Munich takes further steps to ditch Linux and go back to Windows

    The City Council was forced in an article entitled ‘Penguin, Adieu!' to admit to the German Federation of Taxpayers that things weren't going to work out.

  • Linux faces a Munich crisis [Ed: It's not a "Munich crisis" but Microsoft corruption]

Security: Equifax, Grafeas, Updates and Open Source Security Podcast

Filed under
Security

Conservancy Applauds Linux Community's Promotion of Principled Copyleft Enforcement

Filed under
GNU
Legal

Software Freedom Conservancy congratulates the Linux community for taking steps today to promote principled, community-minded copyleft enforcement by publishing the Linux Kernel Enforcement Statement. The Statement includes an additional permission under Linux's license, the GNU General Public License (GPL) version 2 (GPLv2). The additional permission, to which copyright holders may voluntarily opt-in, changes the license of their copyrights to allow reliance on the copyright license termination provisions from the GNU General Public License version 3 (GPLv3) for some cases 1.

Conservancy also commends the Linux community's Statement for reaffirming that legal action should be last resort for resolving a GPL violation, and for inviting noncompliant companies who work their way back into compliance to become active participants in the community. By bringing clarity to GPLv2 enforcement efforts, companies can adopt software with the assurance that these parties will work in a reasonable, community-centric way to resolve compliance issues.

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DragonFly BSD 5.0 Operating System Debuts Next-Generation HAMMER2 File System

Filed under
BSD

More than six months after the release of the 4.8 series, the BSD-derived DragonFly BSD operating system has been updated today to version 5.0, a major new stable series that introduces new features and numerous improvements.

Read more

also: DragonFlyBSD 5.0 Released With Initial HAMMER2 Support, Support For 900k+ Processes

LinuxAndUbuntu Review Of BunsenLabs Linux

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
Ubuntu

Once upon a time there was Crunchbang Linux, and then it was no more, and then the community brought it back to life in another form known as BunsenLabs Linux. This distribution offers a lightweight and easily customizable Openbox desktop.

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Linux Kernel Community Enforcement Statement FAQ

Filed under
Linux

Based on the recent Linux Kernel Community Enforcement Statement and the article describing the background and what it means , here are some Questions/Answers to help clear things up. These are based on questions that came up when the statement was discussed among the initial round of over 200 different kernel developers.

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Raspberry Pi: Adding an SSD drive to the Pi-Desktop kit

Filed under
Linux

In my previous post, I wrote about assembling and using the Farnell element 14 Pi-Desktop kit. I limited that post to the basic installation, configuration and use of the Pi-Desktop enclosure itself. Now I am going to look at one of the optional expansion possibilities of that kit, adding an mSATA SSD (Solid State Disk).

The first thing to consider, though, is why you would want to do this. There are three obvious reasons:

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KDE: KDE Frameworks 5.39.0, New Kubuntu ISOs, Krita Interview

Filed under
KDE
  • Release of KDE Frameworks 5.39.0

    KDE Frameworks are 70 addon libraries to Qt which provide a wide variety of commonly needed functionality in mature, peer reviewed and well tested libraries with friendly licensing terms. For an introduction see the Frameworks 5.0 release announcement.

  • KDE Frameworks 5.39 Brings KWayland, Kirigami Updates

    KDE Frameworks 5.39.0 was released this weekend as the latest complementary add-ons/libraries to Qt.

  • Updated Kubuntu 17.10 RC ISOs now available

    Following on from yesterday’s 1st spin of the 17.10 RC images by the ubuntu release team, today the RC images (marked Artful Final on the QA tracker) have been re-spun and updated.

    Please update your ISOs if you downloaded previous images, and test as before.

    Please help us by testing as much as you have time for. Remember, in particular we need i386 testers, on “bare metal” rather than VMs if possible.

  • Interview with Cillian Clifford

    I consider digital painting to be one of my weakest areas of art skills, so I spend a lot of time trying to improve it. Other areas of digital art I’m interested in include CAD, 3d modeling, digital sculpting, vector animation, and pixel art.

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Tried Elementary OS 0.4.1 Loki again - Negatory

The Linux desktop needs a reset. We're now in a post-Ubuntu world, with Unity gone, and we're back in sad and forlorn 2005. There isn't a single major project out there where you can look and say, wow, there's gonna be a fun and exciting year ahead of us. Well, maybe one or two. The rest? Just run-of-the-mill stuff. The forums are quiet, because there isn't anything to report, and rehashing kernel versions and desktop versions isn't really worth anyone's time. I think elementary OS represents this crisis quite well. On its own, it's a badly cobbled release, with too many issues and inconsistencies and a dreadful approach to ergonomics, making it useless to most people, all other things notwithstanding. But it was too buggy for me to even attempt to install it. Not going well. Alas, unless something cardinal changes, I cannot recommend this one at all. The combo of visual glitches, mediocre performance and middling hardware support does not warrant a longer adventure. Perhaps one day this will change, but for now, you're better off with stock Ubuntu. And by that I mean up to Zesty, ad I haven't tried Aardvark yet. Take care, and stay golden. Read more Also: Newbie's Guide to Ubuntu 17.10 Part 3

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How To Install Wine And Run Windows Apps In Linux

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