Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Saturday, 23 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Repliessort icon Last Post
Story Linux: Ready, willing and able srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:27am
Story Microsoft's IT security plans spark controversy srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:27am
Story Paris Hilton's sidekick hacked srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:27am
Blog entry Weird *ss Weather srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:26am
Story Greetings From the Most Connected Place on Earth srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:26am
Story Get Into the Flame War ...please! srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:26am
Story Linux kernel to include IPv6 firewall srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:25am
Story Linux For The Future srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:25am
Story M$ Not Ready to Settle Yet srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:24am
Story security breach affects every state srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:24am

​The best Linux laptop: The 2016 Dell XPS 13

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Make no mistake about it. The 2016 Dell XPS 13 Developer Edition laptop is wonderful. It's fast, its display is gorgeous, and, at less than three pounds, you can carry and code with it anywhere. But, oh, that price tag!

Read more

Also: Hands-on with the Linux-ready Dell XPS 13 Developer Edition

ZTE ZMAX PRO is a premium Android smartphone with a shockingly low $99 price

Filed under
Android

Inexpensive Android smartphones are nothing new. Getting premium quality phones at a low price is fairly new, however. While some folks hail these respectable wallet-friendly devices as a win for consumers, others -- such as yours truly -- view it as a race to the bottom which could ultimately harm the Android market overall.

Today, ZTE announces the ZMAX PRO Android smartphone. This device is chock full of premium features, such as an octa-core Snapdragon 617 processor, 2GB of RAM, expandable storage, and a fingerprint reader. The truly amazing aspect, however, is the price -- a shockingly low $99.

Read more

Respinning Linux

Filed under
Linux

It started back in 2009, the first year of Lynn Bender’s fantastic brainstorm “Linux Against Poverty.” Lynn’s idea and subsequent involvement with our organization, then named The HeliOS Project, would infuse our effort with an energy and inventory we still rely on today.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Microsoft Releases Patch to Block Linux from Running on the Original Surface RT [Ed: but Microsoft loves Linux]

    The Register claims that MS16-094 fixes a loophole that allowed users to install other operating systems on Windows RT devices, including here Linux. With Windows RT becoming an OS with no future, many have looked into ways to install a different operating system on the Surface RT, but most attempts failed because of the locked bootloader and the other security systems that Microsoft put in place.

  • Hardware Design for Linux Engineers by Grant Likely

    At the Embedded Linux Conference, Grant Likely -- who is a Linux kernel engineer, and maintainer of the Linux Device Tree subsystem used by many embedded systems -- described his embedded hardware journey in a presentation called “Hardware Design for Linux Engineers” -- or as he put it, “explaining stuff I only learned six months ago.”

  • Hello!

    Machinery is a command line application for creating descriptions of Linux systems and working with them.

  • Opera Software’s $1.2 Billion Takeover by a Chinese Group Has Failed

    A $1.24 billion agreed takeover of Norwegian online browser and advertising company Opera Software by a Chinese consortium of internet firms has failed, Opera said on Monday, after warning last week the deal had yet to win regulatory approval.

    As an alternative, the consortium, which includes search and security business Qihoo 360 Technology and Beijing Kunlun Tech, a distributor of online and mobile games, will take over certain parts of Opera’s consumer business for $600 million, Opera said in a statement.

    Regulatory approval had not been received in time of a final deadline for the deal last Friday, the chairman of Opera Software said on Monday.

  • Opera sells open-source Chromium browser for $600m to Chinese bods
  • Opera agrees to sell its browser business to group of Chinese buyers for $600 million
  • Chinese takeover of Norway's Opera fails, alternative proposed
  • Chinese Consortium's $1.2 Billion Deal to Buy Opera's Ad Business Falls Through
  • Chinese US$1.2B takeover of Norway's Opera fails
  • Ten minute hacks: Hacking airplane headphones
  • And the winner is….

    We have completed the artwork contest and would like to extend our thanks to everyone that took part, there were some excellent pieces submitted and choosing the winners was a tough task.

    We would like to congratulate Jacques Daugeron on winning the background contest, the runners up will be available in the extra theme package as well.

    Here is the signature background for Mageia 6, it will be included in the next updates to the theme packages.

  • Breeze everywhere

    The first half of this year, I had the chance to work on icon and design for two big free-software projects.

    First, I’ve been hired to work on Mageia. I had to refresh the look for Mageia 6, which mostly meant making new icons for the Mageia Control Center and all the internal tools.

  • Ubuntu Demo Wireless Convergence on Bq M10 Tablet

    A video demoing wireless convergence on the Bq M10 Ubuntu Edition tablet has been shared by Canonical today.

    Ubuntu phone fans will know that wireless display technology was made available to users of the Meizu PRO 5 Ubuntu phone in last month’s OTA-11 update.

    But for its latest over-the-air update Ubuntu is bringing it to the Bq Aquaris M10 Ubuntu Edition slate, which went on sale earlier in the year.

    “Our latest OTA-12 has just landed and we’re excited that you can now wirelessly connect your M10 tablet to a monitor,” Canonical say in the description accompanying the video.

    OTA 12 is, at the time of writing, scheduled to begin phased roll out from July 27, so don’t panic if you don’t get the update just yet!

  • Rugged, fanless computer runs Ubuntu on Haswell

    Perfectron’s rugged “SR10M” system offers a 4th Gen Core CPU, four GbE ports, stackable expansion, -40 to 70° operation, and MIL-STD-810G ruggedization.

    The SR10M is the latest in Perfectron’s Stackrack series of rugged, MIL-STD-rated stackable embedded computers equipped with Intel Haswell CPUs and designed primarily for military vehicles. The SR10M is built around an OXY5737A EBX form-factor single board computer (see farther below) equipped with the quad-core, 2.4GHz (3.4GHz turbo) Intel Core i7-4700EQ of the fourth “Haswell” generation of Core CPUs. It also offers an Intel QM76 chipset.

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
  • System Shock Remaster Linux Demo Released, System Requirements Shared

    Earlier this year a Kickstarter campaign was started to develop a System Shock remaster from the ground up. Not only has that campaign been fully funded now, it has 10 days to reach its stretch goal of $1.1 million that would allow developers to create a Linux and Mac OS port of the game. Right now the game is above $1 million so the campaign only has to raise less than $0.1 million to make this port a reality.

  • Gallium3D Optimizations Published For BioShock Infinite

    Marek Olšák of AMD has been working on some Gallium3D optimizations for boosting the performance of the popular BioShock Infinite game on Linux.

Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE
  • KDE Neon OS, a review

    After hopping between Red Hat Linux, CentOS, Fedora, and Ubuntu LTS over the past decade, I recently decided to give KDE Neon a shot.

    The potential of a cutting edge desktop environment on a stable 16.04 Ubuntu base really attracted me, the first because I'm a stickler for a good GUI based UX, and the latter because most current software is built against RHEL/Ubuntu.

    However I should preface this by saying that I spend more time on Windows than the GNU/*nix based OS's combined, and so my perspective in this review may be different than how you feel.

  • System Settings help needed

    First of all I need help, but before you help me I’d like to show you what a user without development skills can do to make plasma better.

    I already post about the system settings redesign and cause developer are busy with other tasks, I reviewed the existing modules and update them to fit (more) our vision. I know it’s not how I would prefere in the end but I did the changes without development skills (no compiling, no new code). I use qt-creator for edit the ui files and play around with qml.

    The Mouse cursor theme was updated, by move the buttons to bottom as in most other kcm’s. The height of the resolution depandant button will be change soon. (left plasma 5.7 right 5.8)

  • Current status for mailrendering in kube & kmail
  • From LaTeX to ConTeXt

    Every year I start to create a new book, every year I delete the book folder because I think it’s going into the wrong direction, and ths year is no different, I’m starting to write a book about Qt5 programming with C++11, I hope this time things can go different. And what I usually do is setup my LaTeX enviroment (kile, texlive, a few libraries and all that) – but I was hitting a UTF8 issue that \includepackage[utf8 or utf8-x][inputenc] didn’t solved… And if you are not well versed in Tex debugging things can go hairwire in just no time.

Fedora: The Latest

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Korora 22 Is About to Reach EOL

    As Korora uses Fedora as the base for our distribution and thus follow the Fedora Project's life cycle, Korora 22 Selina will reach it's End Of Life status on 22nd July.

  • Fedora APAC budget FAD

    Last week I attended the Fedora APAC budget planning FAD for FY’18. Ie. planning for Fedora activities that we expect to conduct between Mar 2017 – Feb 2018 and requisite budget for the same. Last year with Fedora.next reforms, we adopted a new approach to regional budget planning with an aim to increase transparency in the process. In this, each geographical region(ex. APAC) elects three delegates who handle major regional responsibilities. The Treasurer manages regional finance. The Logistician takes care of swag/media/banner production, dispatch and general coordination for Fedora presence at various events. And the Storyteller would collate information about regional events/activities and their impact/benefits to the Fedora project and report the same to the Fedora Community Action and Impact Lead(FCL) and the Fedora Council.

  • Design Prototypes - Week 2
  • FESCo Elections: Interview with Dominik Mierzejewski (rathann)

    I have a degree in software engineering. For over 12 years, I’ve worked as a Unix system administrator, with a short stint as a software engineer. Currently, I work for Citi as a senior IT infrastructure analyst. My primary responsibility at work is expert-level support of a heterogeneous environment consisting of RHEL, Solaris and AIX systems, both physical and virtual machines. Working at Citi while simultaneously being a Fedora developer allowed me to see both ends of the distribution development process and made me appreciate the excellent work of Fedora contributors even more. My past jobs include development of a particle detector model at CERN and system and network administration at the supercomputing centre of the University of Warsaw.

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS

Leftovers: BSD

Filed under
BSD
  • Why we use OpenBSD at VidiGuard

    At VidiGuard, we care a lot about physical security. In fact, it’s our job. But equally important to physical security is the security of our customers’ data. We also need a robust, reliable platform that can run with minimal interaction. To make both of those happen, we employ OpenBSD in our on-premise equipment and our data infrastructure. Why OpenBSD?

  • Building a home firewall: review of pfsense

    For some time now, I’ve been running OpenWRT on an RT-N66U device. I initially set that because I had previously been using my Debian-based file/VM server as a firewall, and this had some downsides: every time I wanted to reboot that, Internet for the whole house was down; shorewall took a fair bit of care and feeding; etc.

    I’ve been having indications that all is not well with OpenWRT or the N66U in the last few days, and some long-term annoyances prompted me to search out a different solution. I figured I could buy an embedded x86 device, slap Debian on it, and be set.

  • LLVM 3.9 Has Been Branched, LLVM 4.0 Will Be Up Next

    Right on schedule the LLVM 3.9 code was branched today in preparation for its formal release next month.

    LLVM 3.9 is another six-month feature update to the LLVM compiler stack. We'll have more on its features and performance in the weeks ahead, in addition to the LLVM Clang benchmarks we already do daily with it at LinuxBenchmarking.com.

Development News

Filed under
Development
  • The Slashdot Interview With Larry Wall

    I run firefox on Linux, and chrome on my ancient Google phone, but I'm not a browser wonk. Maybe I'll have more opinions on that after our JS backend is done for Perl 6...

  • Pulp 2.8.6 Generally Available

    This release includes a small number of fixes to severe bugs in Pulp Platform, the RPM plugin, and the Docker plugin.

  • 11 Programming Languages For DevOps Success

    DevOps uses languages for software development and languages for deployment automation. If you want to be successful with either side of DevOps, these languages will help.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

Mageia 6 Wallpaper, OpenMandriva 3 RC, Desktop Blunders

Filed under
-s

Today in Linux news the Mageia project announced the winner of their artwork contest for upcoming version 6 as well as some of the other being included. OpenMandriva 3.0 Release Candidate 1 is available for download although the project has yet to announce it and Korora 22 is nearing the end of support. Matt Hartley identified the top six Linux desktop blunders and several Linux reviews caught my eye today.

Read more

Lenovo G50 & CentOS 7.2 Xfce - As good as it gets

Filed under
Red Hat

CentOS 7.2 Xfce is the most satisfactory distribution on the market today, alongside Trusty. Not perfect, not plug-n-play, but it is supported, stable and quite friendly. I did need several hours to sort things out, and that's the price for converting a server distro into a home operating system.

In this guise, it works well, with a few small exceptions, one or two outstanding niggles that need fixing, and the knowledge that I needed some third-party gear to achieve the level of productivity that I normally seek. That precludes CentOS 7 from being perfect or a candidate for my production setup, but it might be just the thing for you. If you're not as bothered as I am around unofficial repos and adding some extra software on your own, then look no further. CentOS 7.2 Xfce is a slick, modern, good-looking choice with all the goodies for a healthy modern life. It is better than KDE and Gnome flavors, and comes with the unbeatable blend of simplicity and functionality.

If anyone out there is interested in making the perfect home distro, based on Red Hat, please consider my words as a template for what needs doing. Drivers (signed), third-party software, basic customization. And that's it. So simple. Then again, so difficult. But this is the most sensible formula for desktop use you will have seen in a long, long time. Enjoy.

Read more

Security News

Filed under
Security
  • Two Million Passwords Breached in Ubuntu Hack
  • VBulletin flaw exploited in breach of Ubuntu Forums

    A known SQL injection vulnerability affecting vBulletin software was exploited by an attacker to breach the Ubuntu Forums database.

  • Ubuntu Forums data breach exposes 2 million users

    Ubuntu aficionados beware, as a data breach of the Ubuntu Forum has resulted in the leak of information for two million users. It should be noted that the breach has not hit Canonical Ltd., which runs the Ubuntu operating system, but rather the forum, so other services are still safe.

    The notice from Canonical explains that the breach was made possible through an SQL injection vulnerability in the forum’s Forumrunner add-on, which had not been patched. By injecting certain formatted SQL into the forum database, the hacker could then reach any table, particularly the “user” table.

  • Ubuntu Forum Hack Exposes 2 Million Users

    Ubuntu Linux developer Canonical has confirmed that a data breach exposed personal information of two million users of its forum.

  • How to scam $750,000 out of Microsoft Office: Two-factor auth calls to premium-rate numbers

    Gaming two-factor authentication systems with premium rate phone numbers can be very profitable – or it was until the flaws got reported.

    Belgian security researcher Arne Swinnen noticed that the authentication systems used by Facebook-owned Instagram, Google and Microsoft allow access tokens to be received by a voice call as well as a text message. By linking accounts to a premium-rate phone number he controlled and could pocket money from, he was able to scam the three companies out of cash – in some cases potentially thousands of dollars a day.

  • How Do Hackers Easily Crack Your Strongest Passwords — Explained
  • Security Skills Give Open Source Professionals a Career Advantage

    In today’s market, open source professionals with security expertise are crucial players on an employer roster. The growing use of cloud and big data, as well as the overhaul and expansion of many companies’ tech infrastructures, are driving the demand and need for professionals with this skillset.

    According to the 2016 Open Source Jobs Report, 14 percent of hiring managers and recruiters surveyed believe security to be the most important open source skill to date, ranking third just behind cloud technologies (51 percent) and networking (21 percent). Employers aren’t the only ones that see the value in security; 16 percent of open source professionals surveyed cited security as the most important open source skill and the biggest driver for open source growth in 2016.

  • AT&T Unveils Powerful New Security Platform

    AT&T this week unveiled a new powerful security platform, using big data analysis based on a Hadoop architecture which allows the company to ingest and analyze 5 billion security events in less than ten minutes.

  • Software security: Does quality provide a blueprint for change?

    Software security has been in the news a lot lately, between various high profile social media hacks to massive data breaches it feels like people in the industry are always talking about security, or more appropriately, the lack thereof. While having a conversation with somebody from my company’s internal security team a few weeks ago I had a bit of an epiphany: security in 2016 is much like quality was in 1999.

    Let’s think back 17 years and remember what the quality process was like in 1999. Code was written in rather monolithic chunks with very little thought (if any) given to how that code was to be tested. Testers were on completely separate teams, often times denied access to early versions of the software and code. Testers would write massive sets of test cases from technical specifications and would accept large drops of code from developers only after a feature was considered completed. Automation was either a pipe dream or only existed for very stable features that had been around for a while. A manual testing blitz would then kick off, bugs would be filed, work thrown back over the wall, rinse and repeat. After several of these cycles it was the testers job to give a go/no-go on whether the product was good enough to ship, essentially acting as gatekeepers.

  • As a blockchain-based project teeters, questions about the technology’s security

    There’s no shortage of futurists, industry analysts, entrepreneurs and IT columnists who in the past year have churned out reports, articles and books touting blockchain-based ledgers as the next technology that will run the world.

    In the middle of all this hype is a small fire that threatens to put some of those words to ash: The hijacking last month of around US$40 million of dollars worth of a cryptocurrency called ether – named after its blockchain platform, Ethereum — from The DAO, a crowd-sourced investment vehicle that has so far raised over US$100 million in the digital currency. Instead, the DAO has become paralyzed and on the verge of collapse.

  • Sandia Labs Researchers Build DNA-Based Encrypted Storage

    Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories in New Mexico are experimenting with encrypted DNA storage for archival applications.

    Husband and wife team George and Marlene Bachand are biological engineers with a remarkable vision of the future.

    The researchers at the Sandia National Laboratories Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies foresee a time when a speck of DNA on a piece of paper the size of a millimeter could securely store the entire anthology of Shakespeare’s works.

Linux Kernel/Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Qt WebBrowser 1.0

Filed under
OSS
Web

We have recently open sourced Qt WebBrowser!

Read more

Also: Qt WebBrowser 1.0 Open-Sourced

Enter new tool for newbie: Handy Linux

Filed under
Debian

Handy Linux has come out with handy Linux its new weapon in its arsenal. It is quite a simplified version to use the Linux operating system on desktop. The Handy Linux surfaced at around three years ago, however in June the latest version was released.

The developers have made it easy to remove the layers of Handy Linux to reveal the more standard Linux environments which the users can learn. The users who do not need the IT installation tools included in the initial installation can delete them using Handy2Ddebian app from Handy’s main menu.

Handy Linux is a standard Debian based OS which is light and shows some mix of Xfce desktop ecosystem. The remixed desktop is the signature mark for the Handy Linux.

Read more

Also: Video: Systemd in Debian, a status update

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

today's leftovers

  • Why leading DevOps may get you a promotion
    Gene Kim, author of The Phoenix Project and leading DevOps proponent, seems to think so. In a recent interview with TechBeacon's Mike Perrow, Kim notes that of "the nearly 100 speakers at DevOps Enterprise Summits over the last two years, about one in three have been promoted."
  • Cloud Vendors, The Great Disruptors, Face Disruption From Blockchain
  • SWORDY, a local party brawler could come to Linux if Microsoft allow it
    SWORDY is a rather fun looking local party brawler that has just released on Steam in Early Access. It could see a Linux release too, if Microsoft allow it.
  • System Shock remake has blasted past the Linux stretch goal, officially coming to Linux
    The Linux stretch goal was $1.1 million and it's pleasing to see it hit the goal, so we won't miss out now. I am hoping they don't let anyone down, as they have shown they can do it already by providing the demo. There should be no reason to see a delay with Linux now.
  • GammaRay 2.5 release
    GammaRay 2.5 has been released, the biggest feature release yet of our Qt introspection tool. Besides support for Qt 5.7 and in particular the newly added Qt 3D module a slew of new features awaits you, such as access to QML context property chains and type information, object instance statistics, support for inspecting networking and SSL classes, and runtime switchable logging categories.
  • GammaRay 2.5 Released For Qt Introspection
    KDAB has announced the release of GammaRay 2.5, what they say is their "biggest feature release yet", the popular introspection tool for Qt developers.
  • The new Keyboard panel
    After implementing the new redesigned Shell of GNOME Control Center, it’s now time to move the panels to a bright new future. And the Keyboard panel just walked this step.
  • Debian on Seagate Personal Cloud and Seagate NAS
    The majority of NAS devices supported in Debian are based on Debian's Kirkwood platform. This platform is quite dated now and can only run Debian's armel port. Debian now supports the Seagate Personal Cloud and Seagate NAS devices. They are based on Marvell's Armada 370, a platform which can run Debian's armhf port. Unfortunately, even the Armada 370 is a bit dated now, so I would not recommend these devices for new purchases. If you have one already, however, you now have the option to run native Debian.

OSS Leftovers