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Wednesday, 17 Dec 14 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Repliessort icon Last Post
Story Linux: Ready, willing and able srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:27am
Story Microsoft's IT security plans spark controversy srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:27am
Story Paris Hilton's sidekick hacked srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:27am
Blog entry Weird *ss Weather srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:26am
Story Greetings From the Most Connected Place on Earth srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:26am
Story Get Into the Flame War ...please! srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:26am
Story Linux kernel to include IPv6 firewall srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:25am
Story Linux For The Future srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:25am
Story M$ Not Ready to Settle Yet srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:24am
Story security breach affects every state srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:24am

Ubuntu MATE Gets Superb New Theme in Official Repos

Filed under
Ubuntu

The Ubuntu MATE 14.04 LTS distro was released a few weeks ago and it was received with great interest by the community. Now, a new theme has been made available for the Linux distribution and it could be the best one made so far for this OS.

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GCC Has Been Ported To The Visium Architecture

Filed under
Development
GNU

Never heard of Visium before? Neither have we, but it's yet another platform where GCC can serve as the code compiler. Eric Botcazou of AdaCore explained Visium as "a 32-bit RISC architecture with an Extended Arithmetic Module implementing some 64-bit operations and an FPU designed for embedded systems...The Visium is a classic 32-bit RISC architecture whose branches have a delay slot and whose arithmetic and logical instructions all set the flags, and they comprise the moves between GP registers (which are inclusive ORs under the hood in the traditional RISC fashion)."

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A Walkthrough Of The New 32 System Open-Source Linux Benchmarking Test Farm

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
OSS

This week with the release of Phoronix Test Suite 5.4 we also announced LinuxBenchmarking.com, a collection of 32 systems running various upstream benchmarks on a daily basis in a fully automated manner. The daily upstream benchmarking ranges from the Linux kernel Git to Mesa to Arch/Antergos Linux to LLVM/Clang. Here's a walkthrough of the new lab housing this test farm where hundreds of benchmarks are run daily in looking for performance regressions and other changes with the upstream open-source code.

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Inside CoreOS Linux, Why Fleet and etcd Matter [VIDEO]

Filed under
OS
Linux

CoreOS has emerged over the course of 2014 to become an interesting approach to building and deploying a Linux distribution, focused on container deployment.

Helping lead the development of CoreOS is CTO Brandon Philips. In a video interview with ServerWatch, Philips explains how the key components of Linux ServerCoreOS, including Fleet and etcd, come together and how the Linux distribution works.

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LibreOffice 4.2.8 and Other Must-have Apps

Filed under
-s

The Document Foundation today announced the release of LibreOffice 4.2.8, the final update to the 4.2 branch. Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols brags on his favorite Linux applications and Chema Martin says "Fedora 21 absolutely rocks." And finally today, Chris Hoffman said "2014 shattered the myth of Linux impenetrability."

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Android Wear update: Everything you need to know

Filed under
Android

The Android Wear update has arrived, just in time for its new Pac-Man watch face to sway you into buying a smartwatch as a Christmas treat.

The update is rolling out to users right now (be patient: we haven't even seen it yet) and is a smart mixture of the watch faces we've been waiting for and genuinely useful new features and settings.

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KDE Frameworks 5.5.0 Officially Released

Filed under
KDE

The KDE Community has announced that KDE Frameworks 5.5.0 has been unveiled and the new release comes with a lot of interesting changes and fixes, just like all the previous versions.

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SparkyLinux 3.6 "Annagerman" Lands with LXDE, MATE, Razor-Qt, and Xfce Flavors

Filed under
Linux

SparkyLinux 3.6, a lightweight, fast, and simple Linux distribution designed for both old and new computers featuring customized LXDE, MATE, Razor-Qt, and Xfce desktops has been released and is now available for download.

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Nautilus Ported To New GTK Widgets For GNOME 3.16

Filed under
GNOME

GNOME's file manager, Nautilus, is seeing some much needed love for the GNOME 3.15 development cycle ahead of GNOME 3.16 next March.

The latest major work to the Nautilus file manager is that it's been ported to make use of GTK's GAction, GMenus, and Popovers widgets to improve the UI and workflow.

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Android Wear “Lollipop” First Look and Tour!

Filed under
Android

The new Android Wear “Lollipop” update is slowly (can’t stress “slowly” enough) rolling out to Android Wear users across the world. Thankfully, we already have the update on a Moto 360, so we can show you what to expect when it finally arrives on your device.

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today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

European Commission Finally Engaging with Open Source?

Filed under
OSS

Earlier this year, I wrote about the European Commission's stunning incompetence in procuring desktop software: it actually admitted that it was in a state of "effective captivity with Microsoft", and that it wasn't really going to try to do anything about it. Fortunately, a recent article on the Commission's "Joinup" site, by Gijs Hillenius, paints a rather brighter picture as far as the server side is concerned:

The European Commission wants to make it easier for its software developers to submit patches and add new functionalities to open source projects. Contributing to open source communities will be made central to the EC’s new open source policy, expects Pierre Damas, Head of Sector at the Directorate General for IT (DIGIT). “We use a lot of open source components that we adapt and integrate, and it is time that we contribute back.”

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12-Way AMD Catalyst 14.12 vs. NVIDIA 346 Series Linux GPU Comparison

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

This article is comparing twelve recent NVIDIA and AMD graphics cards when using these latest binary drivers on Ubuntu 14.10 64-bit. All tests were done on an Intel Core i7 5960X system.

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Calligra 2.8.7 is Out

Filed under
KDE

Packages for the release of KDE's document suite Calligra 2.8.7 are available for Kubuntu 14.10. You can get it from the Kubuntu Updates PPA. They are also in our development version Vivid.

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Linux 3.19 To Have Full Multi-Touch For More Logitech Devices

Filed under
Linux

Jiri Kosina has lined up his HID subsystem changes for the Linux 3.19 kernel that include more multi-touch device work and other input improvements.

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Also: XFS Has Improvements To Look Forward To With Linux 3.19

Linux Continues to Grow in the Cloud Computing and Implementation of Enterprise Applications

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The operating system of most famous open source is gaining ground in business particularly in cloud computing, according to a report from the Linux Foundation and Yeoman Technology Group.

The Linux Foundation has published a study called “2014 Enterprise End User Trends Report” that shows the steady growth of Linux in the market for large companies, especially in recent years driven by factors such as the growth of cloud computing, in addition to its known qualities in terms of safety, capacity deployment, costs or virtualization.

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Release of KDE Frameworks 5.5.0

Filed under
KDE

This release is part of a series of planned monthly releases making improvements available to developers in a quick and predictable manner.

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diff -u: What's New in Kernel Development

Filed under
Linux

Containers are very tricky to implement. Trying to isolate sets of resources from each other completely, so that they resemble a discrete system, and doing it in a secure way, has to be addressed on a feature-by-feature basis, with many caveats and uncertainties. Over time, this makes the core kernel code more secure and robust, but each individual feature may have surprising issues.

The whole namespace idea—corralling subsets of system resources like user IDs and group IDs, and performing on-the-fly translations between the resource names within the container and the corresponding names in the outer system—is tough to manage.

Recently, Marian Marinov noticed that process counters in the outer system counted processes as being owned by the same user if his or her UIDs (user IDs) were the same inside two separate containers. The same was true for GIDs (group IDs). He didn't like this, because the two containers represented two logically isolated systems, and in that context, the same UIDs could refer to different users entirely. They shouldn't be counted together.

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