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Thursday, 18 Sep 14 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Repliessort icon Last Post
Story Linux: Ready, willing and able srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:27am
Story Microsoft's IT security plans spark controversy srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:27am
Story Paris Hilton's sidekick hacked srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:27am
Blog entry Weird *ss Weather srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:26am
Story Greetings From the Most Connected Place on Earth srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:26am
Story Get Into the Flame War ...please! srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:26am
Story Linux kernel to include IPv6 firewall srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:25am
Story Linux For The Future srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:25am
Story M$ Not Ready to Settle Yet srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:24am
Story security breach affects every state srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:24am

FreeBSD 10.1-BETA1 Now Available

Filed under
BSD

The first BETA build of the 10.1-RELEASE release cycle is now available
on the FTP servers for the amd64, armv6, i386, ia64, powerpc, powerpc64
and sparc64 architectures.

The image checksums follow at the end of this email.

Installer images and memory stick images are available here:

ftp://ftp.freebsd.org/pub/FreeBSD/releases/ISO-IMAGES/10.1/

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Samsung to host first open-source conference

Filed under
OSS

SEOUL, Sept. 15 (Yonhap) -- South Korean tech giant Samsung Electronics Co. said Monday it will hold a two-day conference on open-source to allow developers to share ideas on the new industrial trend.

The Samsung Open Source Conference (SOSCON), which kicks off Tuesday, aims to cover various themes, such as the Internet of Things, cloud computing, and big data, and other sectors in relation to open-source. U.S.-based Intel Corp. and the Linux Foundation are also sponsors of the event.

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Linux 3.17-rc5

Filed under
Linux

So I should probably have delayed this until Wednesday for sentimental
reasons: that will be 23 years since I uploaded the 0.01 source tree.
But I'm not an overly sentimental person, so screw that. I'm doing my
normal Sunday release.

And as I mentioned in the rc4 notes, the previous rc was pretty small,
possibly because neither Greg nor Davem had sent in any updates that
week. Guess what? David's networking updates came in an hour after I
did rc4, and sure enough Greg came in this week too, so - surprise
surprise - rc5 isn't as small as rc4 was.

Oh well. It was too good to last.

I also got a report of an *old* performance regression in the dentry
cache (since 3.10 - positively ancient), and that in turn made me look
around some more, and there were a few other special cases that could
cause us to not do as well as we should. I fixed some of it, and Al
fixed the rest. So hopefully we not only fixed the reported
regression, but are actually doing better than we used to.

Anyway, the size of rc5 means that I'm certainly not cutting the
release early, which means that I will have to think about exactly
what I will do about the next merge window. Because it looks like it
might end up conflicting with my travel around LinuxCon EU. I haven't
quite decided what I'll do - I might release 3.17 normally, but then
just not open the merge window due to travel. Or, if there are more
issues than I think there will be, maybe I'll delay the 3.17 release.

We'll see.

Regardless - the rc5 changes is about half drivers (networking, gpu,
usb, input, ata..) with the rest being mostly a mix of filesystem
updates (the aforementioned performance thing in the core vfs layer,
but also some NFS export issues found by Al and misc other stuff),
architecture updates (arm, parisc, s390) and core networking. And a
smattering of other. Shortlog appended.

In other words, things look fairly normal, even if I'd have been
happier with rc5 being smaller. But with the bump from networking and
drivers, I'm not going to claim that this was either unexpected or
particularly scary. I'm hoping we're done now, and that rc6 and rc7
will be noticeably calmer.

Knock wood.

Linus

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Torvalds says he has no strong opinions on systemd

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

Linux creator Linus Torvalds is well-known for his strong opinions on many technical things. But when it comes to systemd, the init system that has caused a fair degree of angst in the Linux world, Torvalds is neutral.

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Hello World: Videos That Teach Linux To Kids

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Recently, they launched a new series, “Superusers: The Legendary GNU/Linux Show,” which stars Aramis, a gnu who bares a strange resemblance to Richard Stallman, and a penguin named Adelie. The pilot episode for this series, called “Help,” deals with the Linux command by the same name and features some clever wordplay, utilizing lyrics from the old Beatles song. This would be in keeping with the brothers’ idea of making sure their videos appeal to kids and adults alike.

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today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

SK Telecom to Open a New “Do-it-yourself” Era in Network Equipment

Filed under
Linux

The network operating system will be based on Linux, with that solution that can offer a variety of features such as switching, routing, load balancing, firewall, and distributed denial-of-service. In addition, network virtualization, software-defined network controller, and other related features will be made available. Atto Research, the specialist in software-defined networking, will take the job of development work.

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After the Fork: Financing Open Source Software

Filed under
OSS

One of the key moments in the history of free software was the rise of companies based around open source. After the first wave of startups based around offering distros and support for them - Red Hat being perhaps the most famous and successful example - there followed a second wave of companies offering open source versions of key enterprise software, many of them described in the early posts of this blog.

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Android Wear 'to dominate Apple Watch'

Filed under
Android
Mac

Android Wear is rapidly establishing itself as the de facto software platform for smartwatches, and will go on to dominate Apple's recently announced Apple Watch, analysts predict.

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Release of KDE Frameworks 5.2.0

Filed under
KDE

September 12, 2014. KDE today announces the release of KDE Frameworks 5.2.0.
KDE Frameworks are 60 addon libraries to Qt which provide a wide variety of commonly needed functionality in mature, peer reviewed and well tested libraries with friendly licensing terms. For an introduction see the Frameworks 5.0 release announcement.

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Intel Core i7 5960X CPU Core Scaling Under Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

With the Intel Core i7 5960X Haswell-E is an eight-core processor with Hyper Threading to yield sixteen logical threads, we're seeing how well this extreme Haswell processor really scales with modern open-source workloads as we benchmark the i7-5960X under Ubuntu Linux and see how the benchmarks scale with varying core counts.

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SystemRescueCd 4.3.1 Is a Powerful and Easy to Use Recovery OS

Filed under
GNU
Linux

François Dupoux said that a new release of his popular SystemRescueCd Linux-based operating system for rescue and recovery tasks has been made available, and the latest version now ready for download is 4.3.1.

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Meizu Confirms MX4 Ubuntu Touch Release for December 2014

Filed under
Ubuntu

The Ubuntu community has been asking this question ever since the Meizu, Bq, and Canonical partnership was announced. The developers didn't want to provide a clear answer to the launch question and only the launch window was provided, the fall of 2014.

The Ubuntu developers are working to promote an RTM (release to manufacturing) version of Ubuntu Touch and they are almost ready, but it looks like they still have a couple of months, at least, to polish it up. The operating system still needs a few more features, but above all it needs stability.

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NVIDIA Maxwell GPU Support On Nouveau Still Requires More Work

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

While the Maxwell-based GTX 900 series graphics cards are rumored to be launching in the weeks ahead, the GTX 750 Maxwell graphics cards on the open-source "Nouveau" Linux driver still need some more work before they'll play nicely when not using NVIDIA's proprietary Linux driver.

For NVIDIA Maxwell support within the open-source driver there's basic support within recent Linux kernel releases, the user-space code for Maxwell has landed within Nouveau's NVC0 Gallium3D driver, and there's xf86-video-nouveau support using GLAMOR. With the GLAMOR-required acceleration for Maxwell, the Nouveau DDX depends upon the built-in GLAMOR of X.Org Server 1.16 and newer (rather than the earlier independent GLAMOR acceleration library). With Ubuntu 14.10 now having X.Org Server 1.16 and is running the Linux 3.16 kernel (though with my tests for this Maxwell trial I already switched to Linux 3.17 Git), I pulled in the latest Mesa 10.4-devel packages and other updated components via the Oibaf PPA On Ubuntu 14.10.

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RadeonSI Gallium3D-Nine Can Beat AMD Catalyst With Some Wine Tests

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

The out-of-tree Direct3D 9.0 state tracker for Mesa's Gallium3D continues to show much potential for allowing Wine-based games to better perform on Linux with the open-source Gallium3D drivers.

There's a chance of this Direct3D 9 support being added to Mesa but Wine developers still appear uninterested in supporting this state tracker since it only covers Linux users, which itself is a subset of all Wine users with the program working on other programs too, and for the Linux support is bound just to those using the open-source Radeon and Nouveau Gallium3D drivers. For those going through the process of setting up "Gallium3D-Nine" and patching Wine, the D3D9 performance improvements tend to be dramatic over Wine's Direct3D-to-OpenGL translation layer.

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Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

"Evil" Linux Users Teach Mac OS X Fans How to Improve and Destroy Their System

Filed under
Linux
Mac

Apple systems are actually Unix-based, which means that numerous features that you find in a Linux OS are also present in Mac OS X. This is also true for various commands that can be used in a terminal.

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