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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 15 Dec 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Repliessort icon Last Post
Story 7 Things We Expect from Ubuntu in 2014 Rianne Schestowitz 28/01/2014 - 9:35am
Story Samsung rumoured to release ‘Galaxy Glass’ IFA Berlin 2014 Rianne Schestowitz 28/01/2014 - 9:50am
Story Paradox’ Runemaster and Hearts of Iron IV heading for Linux Rianne Schestowitz 28/01/2014 - 9:58am
Story Knoppix Review, Shotwell's Future, and 5 Insults Rianne Schestowitz 28/01/2014 - 10:05am
Story Ome: A New Cross-Platform Desktop Environment Rianne Schestowitz 28/01/2014 - 10:13am
Story Make Peace with pax Rianne Schestowitz 28/01/2014 - 10:22am
Story Ubuntu 14.04 vs. Debian 7.3 vs. Debian Jessie Preview Roy Schestowitz 28/01/2014 - 10:37am
Story 24-Way AMD Radeon vs. NVIDIA GeForce Linux Graphics Card Comparison Roy Schestowitz 28/01/2014 - 10:47am
Story Four must try Indie games on Linux Rianne Schestowitz 28/01/2014 - 11:04am
Story First ever CryEngine Game to head for Linux Roy Schestowitz 28/01/2014 - 12:17pm

Linux: Future Of ReiserFS Development

Filed under
Reiser

With Namesys founder Hans Reiser recently arrested as the prime suspect in the disappearance of his estranged wife, a brief thread on the lkml discussed the future of ReiserFS.

Linux gaming/PMP handheld gets more hackable

Filed under
Gaming

Gamepark Holdings is shipping a breakout board for its GP2X, a sub-$200 Linux-based handheld gaming platform and portable media player (PMP). The "Breakout Board" adds standard PC I/O, helping hobbyists build GP2X-based home DivX systems, MAME cabinets, MP3/OGG sound systems, or classic computer set-ups, the company suggests.

Linux saves the day by recovering data in Windows servers

Filed under
HowTos

One of the most frightening aspects of computer technology for any IT manager is the loss of data stored on mass storage devices (disk drives). This article will review some options for recovering data including a cool way to recover data from a Windows disk using a Linux server.

Firefox Party - Join the fun!

Filed under
Moz/FF

All over the world, we're celebrating the launch of Firefox 2. Join the fun by hosting or attending a party. We're targeting the weekend of October 27th for the shared celebration.

Network, Server statistics graphing Using Cacti in Ubuntu Server

Filed under
HowTos

Cacti is a complete network graphing solution designed to harness the power of RRDTool’s data storage and graphing functionality. Cacti provides a fast poller, advanced graph templating, multiple data acquisition methods, and user management features out of the box. All of this is wrapped in an intuitive, easy to use interface that makes sense for LAN-sized installations up to complex networks with hundreds of devices.

GIMP 2.3.12 Development Release

Filed under
Software

Version 2.3.12 is a snapshot of the development towards GIMP 2.4. We are mostly polishing things at this point, but a few features are still waiting to be added. Some new features include a Perspective Clone tool, panning the image view using the Space bar, and a Lens Distortion plug-in.

ApacheCon 2006: The state of the feather and more

Filed under
Software

ApacheCon US 2006 kicked off its general session this morning in Austin, Texas, following two days of tutorials. Apache Software Foundation (ASF) president Sander Striker opened the proceedings with his "State of the Feather" address. Cliff Stoll, the hacker-catching, planetary astronomer, author, and volunteer 7th grade science teacher, followed Striker with a keynote address which included a demonstration of how he taught a 7th grade science class to measure the speed of light.

The Evolving Windows Vs. Linux Battle

Filed under
OS

There's a popular notion swirling around the high-tech sector that Microsoft's dominant position in the industry and software bugs have customers scurrying for the cover of Linux.

EC boosts open source for public sector

Filed under
OSS

The European Commission is to open a new web portal to facilitate the use of shared open source software across the public sector.

Reiser filesystem development to continue

Filed under
Linux

Hans Reiser, the developer of the ReiserFS and Reiser4 filesystems, has been arrested. The effect on Reiser4 should not be all that bad. [Of] the people who are still working on it, many are very devoted to it and do not plan to drop their work until Reiser4 is actually merged into the vanilla kernel.

Book review: Beginning Ubuntu Linux: From Novice to Professional

Filed under
Reviews

Are you, or do you know, a non-techie? A non-techie who takes pride in their lack of techno-savvy, who still clings to the belief that while other people might use GNU/Linux, it’s a bit technological for the likes of them? Well here you go, ladies and gents.

Manage Linux Hardware with udev (Part 2)

Filed under
Linux

Last week we learned the basics of the udev filesystem, and how to dig up device names. Today we dive into writing custom udev rules. Why would you want to acquire this strange knowledge? Because, believe it or not, computers are not yet perfect, so sometimes we must fix them.

Book Review: Ubuntu Linux for Non-Geeks

Filed under
Reviews

Rickford Grant's book runs parallel to Gagné's, which I reviewed recently. They are both good books, though Grant is even more directed to the absolute newbie than Gagné.

Linux vs. Windows Vista: Is There a Contest?

Filed under
OS

We know we’ve said it before, but the answer to any question most often depends on whom you ask. Whether the bad press surrounding Windows Vista’s anti-piracy program will hurt Microsoft’s share of the OS market in favor of Linux is no exception.

UNIX tips: Become a better blogger with UNIX

Filed under
Linux

Did you know that blogging and UNIX go hand in hand? The native Web and text-processing tools of UNIX enable you to create your blogs quickly and easily. Discover command-line tools and some handy tips for improving your UNIX blogging skills.

Myah OS 2.3 Released

Filed under
Linux

Myah OS 2.3 SE is now available for download. Multimedia and Gaming has always been the focus, and 2.3 really brings that into focus. Firefox 2.0rc2 has been jam packed with support for Flash, Java and embedded video. But now embedded video is also available within Konqueror. 3D drivers for ATI and nVidia has also been optimized, both for ease of use and best performance.

LINUX XP ....boom or BUST!

Filed under
Linux

There are times when intrigue causes me to jump up, download a distribution. do an install and in some cases I am happy, while in other cases ...well! A few weeks ago, I was reading Distrowatch when I saw the announcement of a new distribution that really piqued my attention. LINUX XP.

Internet Explorer Usage Continues To Fall

Filed under
Moz/FF

Use of Internet Explorer is continuing to decline at the expense of Mozilla's Firefox, making the imminent launch of IE7 even more vital for Microsoft.

For Opera, smaller really is better

Filed under
Interviews

Wium Lie, who works out of the company's home base in Norway, recently visited San Francisco, where he caught up with CNET News.com editors to discuss the state of browser technology.

Linux for the supernewbie

Filed under
HowTos

This is the first of a four part series that will, if you decide you WANT TO, and only if you want to, introduce you to Linux, and by they end, you might just find yourself with Linux installed on your computer beside windows.

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More in Tux Machines

GNOME Development Leftovers

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    In this video, we are quickly looking at Nightly GNOME Apps and a sneak peek at New Adwaita GTK Theme.
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  • Opera Launches Built-in Cryptocurrency Wallet for Android, ManagedKube Partners with Google Cloud to Provide a Monitoring App for Kubernetes Cluster Costs, QEMU 3.1 Released, IoT DevCon Call for Presentations and GNOME 3.31.3 Is Out
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  • Firmware Attestation
    When fwupd writes firmware to devices, it often writes it, then does a verify pass. This is to read back the firmware to check that it was written correctly. For some devices we can do one better, and read the firmware hash and compare it against a previously cached value, or match it against the version published by the LVFS. This means we can detect some unintentional corruption or malicious firmware running on devices, on the assumption that the bad firmware isn’t just faking the requested checksum. Still, better than nothing. Any processor better than the most basic PIC or Arduino (e.g. even a tiny $5 ARM core) is capable of doing public/private key firmware signing. This would use standard crypto using X.509 keys or GPG to ensure the device only runs signed firmware. This protects against both accidental bitflips and also naughty behaviour, and is unofficial industry recommended practice for firmware updates. Older generations of the Logitech Unifying hardware were unsigned, and this made the MouseJack hack almost trivial to deploy on an unmodified dongle. Newer Unifying hardware requires a firmware image signed by Logitech, which makes deploying unofficial or modified firmware almost impossible.
  • Robert Ancell: Interesting things about the GIF image format
  • GIFs in GNOME
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Mozilla: Rust and WebAssembly, WebRender, MDN Changelog for November 2018, Things Gateway and Firefox 65 Beta 6 Testday

  • Rust and WebAssembly in 2019
    Compiling Rust to WebAssembly should be the best choice for fast, reliable code for the Web. Additionally, the same way that Rust integrates with C calling conventions and libraries on native targets, Rust should also integrate with JavaScript and HTML5 on the Web. These are the Rust and WebAssembly domain working group’s core values. In 2018, we made it possible to surgically replace performance-sensitive JavaScript with Rust-generated WebAssembly.
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  • MDN Changelog for November 2018
    Potato London started work on this shortly after one-time payments launched. We kicked it off with a design meeting where we determined the features that could be delivered in 4 weeks. Potato and MDN worked closely to remove blockers, review code (in over 25 pull requests), and get it into the staging environment for testing. Thanks to everyone’s hard work, we launched a high-quality feature on schedule. We’ve learned a lot from these payment experiments, and we’ll continue to find ways to maintain MDN’s growth in 2019.
  • K Lars Lohn: Things Gateway - a Virtual Weather Station
    Today, I'm going to talk about creating a Virtual Weather Station using the Things Gateway from Mozilla and a developer account from Weather Underground. The two combined enable home automation control from weather events like temperature, wind, and precipitation.
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  • Firefox 65 Beta 6 Testday, December 21th
    We are happy to let you know that Friday, December 21th, we are organizing Firefox 65 Beta 6 Testday. We’ll be focusing our testing on: and changes and UpdateDirectory. Check out the detailed instructions via this etherpad.

Fedora Developers Are Trying To Figure Out The Best Linux I/O Scheduler, Fedora 29 Review and Fedora Program Management

ARM's Work in Linux (Kernel)

  • Energy Model Management Framework Queued For Linux 4.21
    A new framework queued for introduction with the Linux 4.21 kernel is the ARM-developed Energy Model Management Framework. With different hardware and drivers exposing the processor/system energy consumption in different manners, the Energy Model Management Framework tries to provide a standardized way of accessing the power values for each performance domain in a system. This can help kernel drivers/schedulers and other code that could make smarter decisions based upon current energy use be able to do so via this standardized framework for acquiring the power information on capable systems.
  • ARM's AArch64 Adding Pointer Authentication Support To The Linux 4.21 Kernel
    The 64-bit ARM architecture code (a.k.a ARM64 / AArch64) with the Linux 4.21 kernel is seeing pointer authentication added as a new security feature. Pointer authentication can be supported by ARMv8.3 hardware and newer to allow for signing and authenticating of pointers against secret keys. The purpose of this pointer authentication is to mitigate ROP attacks and other potential buffer-overrun-style attacks. This ARM64_PTR_AUTH functionality will enable pointer authentication for all user-space processes and the presence of supported hardware is determined at run-time. ARM developers have been working on the plumbing for this Linux kernel support for it the past year.