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Monday, 27 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Repliessort icon Last Post
Story ut2004 Update Out srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:00am
Story Coolest Homepage Yet! srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:00am
Story IBM Sets Its Sights on Linux Software srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:59am
Story Review of PCLOS srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 6:24am
Story The Myth of Linux Security srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:39am
Story M$ Plans more Secure Browser :roll: srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:38am
Story Whoops: KDE fliccd Buffer Overflow Vulnerabilities srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 6:30am
Story Study Find Open Source More Secure srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:36am
Story Interview with Bill Gates srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:36am
Story Security Showdown: Back & Forth srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:35am

OSS and Linux Foundation Work

Filed under
OSS
  • Using Open Source Software to Speed Development and Gain Business Advantage

    Last week, we started by defining “Open Source” in common terms -- the first step for any organization that wants to realize, and optimize, the advantages of using open source software (OSS) in their products or services. In the next few articles, we will provide more details about each of the ways OSS adds up to a business advantage for organizations that use and contribute to open source. First, we’ll discuss why many organizations use OSS to speed up the delivery of software and hardware solutions.

  • Linux Foundation Creates New Platform for Network Automation
  • Tying together the many open source projects in networking

    There are a lot of pieces to the ongoing network transformation going up and down the stack. There's the shift away from proprietary hardware. There's the to need to manage complex network configurations. Add subscriber management and a wide range of other necessary functions. Add customer-facing services. All of those pieces need to fit together, integrate with each other, and interoperate.

    This was the topic of my conversation with Heather Kirksey, who heads up the Open Platform for Network Functions Virtualization (OPNFV) project when we caught up at the Open Source Leadership Summit in mid-February. OPNFV is a Linux Foundation Collaborative Project which focuses on the system integration effort needed to tie together the many other open source projects in this space, such as OpenDaylight.

    As Heather puts it: "Telecom operators are looking to rethink, reimagine, and transform their networks from things being built on proprietary boxes to dynamic cloud applications with a lot more being in software. [This lets them] provision services more quickly, allocate bandwidth more dynamically, and scale out and scale in more effectively."

  • Master the Open Cloud with Free, Community-Driven Guides

    One of the common criticisms of open source in general, especially when it comes to open cloud platforms such as OpenStack and ownCloud, is lack of truly top-notch documentation and training resources. The criticism is partly deserved, but there are some free documentation resources that benefit from lots of contributors.

    Community documentation and training contributors really can make a difference. In fact, in a recent interview, ClusterHQ’s Mohit Bhatnagar said: “Documentation is a classic example of where crowdsourcing wins. You just can’t beat the enthusiasm of hobbyist developers fixing a set of documentation resources because they are passionate about the topic.”

  • OpenStack Ocata Nova Cells Set to Improve Cloud Scalability

    Among the biggest things to land in the OpenStack Ocata cloud platform release this week is the Cells v2 code, which will help enable more scale and manageability in the core Nova compute project.

    Nova is one of the two original projects (along with Swift storage) that helped launch OpenStack in June 2010. The original Nova code, which was written by NASA, enables the management of virtualized server resources.

Sean Michael Kerner on the Linux Foundation's Projects

Filed under
Linux
  • MirageOS Unikernel Effort Moves Forward

    Linux Foundation backed Xen Project helps to advance the state of the MirageOS unikernel operating system with a new release that now supports the KVM hypervisor.
    The open-source MirageOS unikernel project reached a major milestone on Feb. 23, with the launch of MirageOS 3.0. The basic idea behind a unikernel is that it is a highly-optimized and purpose-built operating system that can help to enable efficient operation and delivery of applications.

    The MirageOS 1.0 release debuted back in December 2013 as an effort led by the Linux Foundation's Xen hypervisor virtualization project. With the new MirageOS 3.0 release, the unikernel is now expanding beyond the confines of the Xen hypervisor and now also supports the KVM and Bhyve hypervisors as well.

  • Linux Foundation Forms New Open Network Automation Project

    Today the Linux Foundation consolidated the ECOMP and OPEN-O project to form the new Open Network Automation Project (ONAP). ECOMP perhaps has had the shortest life-span of any Linux Foundation project, lasting barely a month. ECOMP only becamean official Linux Foundation project a few short weeks ago, after being donated by AT&T. The Enhanced Control, Orchestration, Management and Policy (ECOMP) is an effort that AT&T has been building for several years to help enable its network transformation for virtualization.

    OPEN-O on the other hand was announced a year ago, as the Open Orchestrator effort.

Red Hat on Programming

Filed under
Development
  • Top 3 machine learning libraries for Python

    You don't have to be a data scientist to be fascinated by the world of machine learning, but a few travel guides might help you navigate the vast universe that also includes big data, artificial intelligence, and deep learning, along with a large dose of statistics and analytics. ("Deep learning" and "machine learning" are often used interchangeably, so for a quick terminology primer that might help you understand the difference, read Nvidia's blog post, What's the Difference Between Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, and Deep Learning?)

    In this article, I'll look at three of the most popular machine learning libraries for Python.

  • Which is the best programming language for beginners?

    What is the best language for a budding programmer to get their start with? There are probably as many opinions about which language is best for beginners as there are languages to choose from. And the options change all of the time. When we asked this question two years ago, Python came out on top as the clear winner. But is it still the best choice today?

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Turns Out Lubuntu 17.04 Won't Ship with LXQt ISO Images as Initially Planned

Filed under
Ubuntu

Most of the official Ubuntu flavors received their first Beta release for the upcoming Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) operating system, including Lubuntu, which is still using the LXDE desktop environment.

Read more

Ubuntu Core Linux comes to i.MX6-powered IoT-friendly TS-4900 Computer On Module

Filed under
Ubuntu

One of the best things about the Linux kernel (and associated operating systems) is the ability to work on various hardware types, including ARM. Microsoft's operating systems, by comparison, are far more narrow. True, there is the lightweight Windows 10 IoT for ARM boards, but it is hardly a factor nowadays.

Today, Ubuntu Core comes to the i.MX6-based and ARM-powered TS-4900 Computer on Module. While Android and other Linux options were already available for the IoT-friendly CoM, Ubuntu Core is still a major win. Canonical's revolutionary snap packages should work beautifully here.

Read more

EP: Govt, science clouds should use open standards, source

Filed under
OSS

European cloud computing should be built on open standards and open source, says the European Parliament. Last week, the EP adopted its motion on the European Cloud Initiative, emphasising the importance of open standards and open source for security, data privacy, government openness, and for innovation.

Read more

RaspEX Linux Brings Ubuntu 16.10 with LXDE Desktop to Raspberry Pi 3 and 2 SBCs

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

GNU/Linux developer Arne Exton is back with a new release, and this time he managed to publish a new build of his RaspEX Linux project for Raspberry Pi 2 and Raspberry Pi 3 single-board computers.

Read more

Black Lab Linux 9 to Launch in June as Version 10 Is Planned for November 2017

Filed under
Linux

Softpedia was informed by Black Lab Software that the managed to publish an initial roadmap for the next point releases and major versions of the Ubuntu-based Black Lab Linux operating system in 2017.

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Slackware-Based Zenwalk Linux Gets New ISO Snapshot with GTK3 Build of Firefox

Filed under
Slack

The development team behind the Slackware-based Zenwalk GNU/Linux distribution have announced the release and general availability of a new ISO snapshot image with all the latest software versions and some exciting new features.

Read more

Ubuntu 17.04 Beta Released with Linux Kernel 4.10, Only for Opt-In Flavors

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical today released the first Beta of the upcoming Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) operating system, but only for the opt-in flavors, which include Kubuntu, Xubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu GNOME, Ubuntu Studio, Ubuntu Kylin, and Ubuntu Budgie.

Read more

Also: Ubuntu 17.04 "Zesty Zapus" Spins Do Their Beta Release

Review: Google Pixel is Android at its best (if a little boring)

Filed under
Android
Google
Reviews

The Pixel’s designs have been divisive ever since the first batch of leaks hit the interwebs, but I’ve grown quite fond of it. Maybe it’s the fact that my ‘Really Blue’ (provided to us by Verizon, thanks folks) model is in fact so incredibly blue, but really I just think the two tone look stands out. It’s instantly recognizable if you’ve seen the phone before.

Read more

What a Linux Desktop Does Better

Filed under
GNU
Linux

After I resolved to adopt Linux, my confidence grew slowly but surely. Security-oriented considerations were compelling enough to convince me to switch, but I soon discovered many more advantages to the Linux desktop.

For those still unsure about making the transition, or those who have done so but may not know everything their system can do, I'll showcase here some of the Linux desktop's advantages.

Read more

Leftovers: GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Profit From the Rising Importance of Linux Software

    You may have noticed that there’s no stock symbol next to Linux’s name. This important OS isn’t made by a public company… or even a company at all.

    Linux software is open source. In other words, it’s not a commercial product which anyone owns. Rather, it’s free software which is developed and improved pro bono by the programmers who use it.

    As a result of this democratized development process, Linux is more customizable than a commercial OS. Windows and MacOS both have proprietary designs with usage restrictions, but not so with Linux.

    This makes Linux software ideal for the advanced programmers and IT professionals who make cloud computing possible. They often like to tinker with hardware and software in order to optimize it for their purposes.

  • Kopano, openSUSE: Yes, we’re open!

    Kopano announced big news yesterday about being included in openSUSE’s factory codebase as development proceeds to be in openSUSE’s upcoming release, which was a big first step toward inclusion into openSUSE downstream.

    “We are straight on the path to be included with openSUSE Leap 42.3 already, which has started development just last December,” wrote Michael Kromer in a news release yesterday. “You can find the downstream requests from Factory to Leap 42.3 here: Core and WebApp.”

    Being one of the most popular Linux distros, Kopano expressed delight to be the first distribution to pick the communication solution.

  • Rebellin Linux 3.5 Released — Beginner-friendly, Fast, And Debian-based Linux Distro
  • Runtu XFCE 16.04.2 x64 - 20170222
  • New Zenwalk Current ISO for 22 feb 2017

    The main change is the comeback of Firefox, built with GTK3 and multithreading enabled by default : This build of Firefox starts and react nearly as fast as Chromium, and with many tabs opened : scales much better in terms of responsiveness and memory footprint. You will also notice some improvements around ffmpeg, and MPV which is from now the main media player in Zenwalk. Gstreamer has been dropped from ISO but is still available from Slackware repositories. Of course this ISO contains many updated packages (see changelog below).

  • Technologic Systems, Inc. Brings Ubuntu Core to the i.MX6 Based TS-4900

    Today, Technologic Systems, Inc. announced that it will be partnering with Canonical to make Ubuntu Core available for their TS-4900 Compute Module. The TS-4900 is a high-performance Computer on Module (CoM) based on the NXP i.MX6 CPU which implements the ARM® CortexTM A9 architecture clocked at 1 GHz.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Machine Learning Speech Recognition

    Keeping up my yearly blogging cadence, it’s about time I wrote to let people know what I’ve been up to for the last year or so at Mozilla. People keeping up would have heard of the sad news regarding the Connected Devices team here. While I’m sad for my colleagues and quite disappointed in how this transition period has been handled as a whole, thankfully this hasn’t adversely affected the Vaani project. We recently moved to the Emerging Technologies team and have refocused on the technical side of things, a side that I think most would agree is far more interesting, and also far more suited to Mozilla and our core competence.

  • Nuclear is a Multi-Source Desktop Music Player

    If you feel there’s a gap in your life for an Electron-based, cross-platform music player capable of streaming from multiple online sources, I’ve a plug for you.

    Nuclear is a (rather naughty) music streaming app that “pulls in content from free sources all over the internet”. In aim it’s somewhat similar to Tomahawk, but visually owes more to an ultra camp Spotify channeling its inner radioactive diva.

  • Qt 5.9 Alpha Released

    The Qt Company today announced the much-anticipated release of the Qt 5.9 Alpha.

  • Peruse Is a Neat Comic Book Reader for KDE Desktops

    Mcomix is my go-to comic book reader for Ubuntu, but for my KDE desktop I wanted something that feels more at home in the Plasma experience.

    After a bit of digging I came across Peruse.

  • The new Online Accounts & Printer panels (and other related news!)

    Greetings, GNOMErs!

    If you’re watching closely the GNOME Control Center iterations, you probably noticed it already has a bunch of new panels: Keyboard, Mouse & Touchpad, and other panels like Sharing, Privacy and Search that don’t need to be ported.

  • A new journey – GNOME Foundation Executive Director

    For those who haven’t heard, I’ve been appointed as the new Executive Director of the GNOME Foundation, and I started last week on the 15th February.

    It’s been an interesting week so far, mainly meeting lots of people and trying to get up to speed with what looks like an enormous job! However, I’m thoroughly excited by the opportunity and am very grateful for everyone’s warm words of welcome so far.

Linux 4.11, 4.9.12 and 4.4.51

Filed under
Linux

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
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More in Tux Machines

Using Open Source to Empower Students in Tanzania

Powering Potential Inc. (PPI) aims to enhance education opportunities for students in Tanzania with the help of the Raspberry Pi and open source technology. “I believe technology is a vital part of the modern human experience. It enlightens. It ties us together. It broadens our horizons and teaches us what we can be. I believe everyone deserves access to these resources,” says Janice Lathen, Founding Director and President of PPI. Read more

IoT gateway runs mainline Linux on i.MX7

Compulab’s “IOT-GATE-iMX7” gateway runs mainline Linux on its CL-SOM-iMX7 COM, and offers optional GbE, 3G, WiFi, BT, and ZigBee. Compulab has launched a Linux-driven Internet of Things gateway built around its CL-SOM-iMX7 COM, featuring NXP’s power-sipping i.MX7 SoC. The embedded world is awash in i.MX6-based IoT gateways, but this is the first i.MX7 based model we’ve seen. Read more

IP camera design offers triple 4K encoding, runs Android on hexa-core SoC

Intrinsyc’s Android-ready Open-Q 650 IP Camera Reference Design is built on a Snapdragon 650, and supports up to three 4K H.264/H.265 30fps streams. Intrinsyc Technologies has followed up on last year’s Open-Q 410 Wearable Camera Reference Design with a more powerful Open-Q 650 IP Camera Reference Design. Like the 410 model, the 650 IP version runs Android on a Qualcomm Snapdragon SoC. However, it features a faster, hexa-core Snapdragon 650 SoC in place of the quad-core, Cortex-A53 Snapdragon 410. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Manjaro ARM to shut down
    While the project is dying, the team has offered help to anyone who is willing to continue this project. The team will guide through all the process and even teach if needed. If anyone is interested in continuing this project, now is the time. Otherwise we all have to say goodbye to Manjaro-ARM.
  • Manjaro ARM Linux Distro Is Shutting Down, Lack Of Contributors Is The Reason
  • That Was The Week That Was (TWTWTW): Edition 2
    This is the second edition of TWTWTW, a weekly blog proclaiming noteworthy news in the open source world. It provides a concise distilled commentary of notable open source related news from a different perspective. For the second edition, we present a succinct catchup covering software, hardware, book releases, ending with a real Barry Bargain!