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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 25 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Repliessort icon Last Post
Story Opera 10.62 released srlinuxx 09/09/2010 - 4:55pm
Story Linux Mint 9 Xfce or LXDE? srlinuxx 09/09/2010 - 4:57pm
Story Whither with Ubuntu? srlinuxx 09/09/2010 - 6:55pm
Story $35 Indian Tablet, Reportedly Set for Early 2011 Launch srlinuxx 09/09/2010 - 6:57pm
Story Source code for Dell Streak unveiled srlinuxx 09/09/2010 - 7:02pm
Story Fact or Fiction? Top 8 Linux Myths Debunked srlinuxx 09/09/2010 - 7:04pm
Story Iron Man using KDE?! srlinuxx 09/09/2010 - 9:06pm
Story Mozilla Asks, ‘Are We Fast Yet?' srlinuxx 09/09/2010 - 9:10pm
Story 11 infamous software bugs srlinuxx 09/09/2010 - 9:12pm
Story Linux & MS srlinuxx 09/09/2010 - 9:15pm

Linux Security: A Big Edge Over Windows

Filed under
Linux

Linux is better at locking down a computer than Windows. The Linux OS uses configuration settings and user permissions to a much more efficient degree than the Windows administrator account.

Open Source Investment Rose 131% in 2006

Filed under
OSS

The amount of venture capital funding invested in the Linux and open source-related vendors tracked by Computer Business Review rose 131% in 2006, vastly outpacing the IT market as a whole.

Ghost in the machine

Brent Northcutt is something of a ghost in the machine. As a system programmer for I-Land, the 32-year-old Warrensburg resident works his magic in languages with names such as PHP, Perl, and C++. A dedicated adherent to what is known in the virtual realm as the open source movement, Mr. Northcutt is most at home in the Unix-based Linux operating system.

Linux and its closing window of opportunity with OEMs

Filed under
Linux

I am planning on changing the world with this article. I can’t do it on my own: I need your help. Despite what people say, Linux does not have a significant slice just yet. By “significant slice”, here I mean 20% to 30%. We are nowhere near it, in fact.

Review: Stratus ftServer 4300

Filed under
Reviews

Lots of companies sell Linux servers, but how many promise 99.999% uptime? Not very many, but Stratus Technologies sells systems that offer the kind of fault tolerance that will handle mission-critical applications and leave admins with peace of mind. I had a chance to test out one of the company's ftServer 4300 systems, and it's an impressive system.

Pulling a story about the company’s name out of Red Hat

Filed under
Linux

Ever wonder why Linux company Red Hat is called that? In an interview with Red Hat Magazine, co-founder BobYoung said that the red hat has long been a symbol of freedom, with revolutionaries in both America and France donning red caps during their uprisings.

Howtos and Tips, & tricks

Filed under
HowTos
  • Install Mplayer in Ubuntu

  • Compiling RPM From Source RPMs
  • Install and Configure Apache2 with PHP5 and SSL Support in Debian Etch
  • Basics for the command line - for newbies

Opera 9.10 Released

Filed under
Software

Opera 9.10 has been officially released this morning. Having appeared on mirrors several days ago, this release was announced just this morning. This update brings some important bug fixes such as no more crashes with Flash 9, smooth scrolling fixed, and fixes to the Fraud Protection feature.

Also: Install Opera Web Browser in Ubuntu

Various ways of detecting rootkits in GNU/Linux

Filed under
HowTos

Consider this scenario... Your machine running GNU/Linux has been penetrated by a hacker without your knowledge and he has swapped the passwd program which you use to change the user password with one of his own. His passwd program has the same name as the real passwd program and works flawlessly in all respects except for the fact that it will also gather data residing on your machine such as the user details each time it is run and transmit it to a remote location or it will open a back door for outsiders by providing easy root access and all the time, you will be impervious about its actions. This is an example of your machine getting rooted.

2006 Year in Review: Hits and Misses

Filed under
Misc

It was a year full of transitions and surprises, and the next year looks likely to bring more of the same. Here's a look at some of eWEEK's most interesting stories from 2006.

Who needs the command line? (Well, actually, we all do)

Filed under
Linux

As you might have guessed this is going to be a brazen and shameless plug for the command line. I write it to throw in my tuppence-worth after my own Linux experiences. I am also concerned about a new generation of users coming to GNU/Linux without a proper understanding of the underlying reasons for its superiority over Windows but this not a blow by blow comparison.

Game of the Day: Snakebite

Filed under
Gaming

Meet Snakebite. Now, you may not have heard of this "Snakebite" game for Linux. That's because it isn't a stand-alone game. Instead, it's a set of custom levels made for the classic game "Rocks n Diamonds". But, as you see from the screenshots, this is nothing like our old friend from Artsoft:

Growth of Linux

Filed under
Linux

A few years ago, the odds of switching on a personal computer and seeing Windows 95 boot were staggering. Linux was a whisper on the wind back in those days, as the skill level required to successfully administer it (not to mention installing!) in vanishingly short supply.

Enable WPA Wireless access point in Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

I have a Toshiba laptop at home, I was running “Edgy Eft” (Ubuntu Linux 6.10) But one of the important things about it was its inability to connect to WPA-encrypted Wifi access points. I am giving the procedure that worked for me to enable wpa in my toshiba laptop.

Also: Share your Ubuntu Desktop Using Remote Desktop

Software installation on Linux: Today, it sucks

Filed under
Linux

Unless an application is included with your Linux distribution of choice, installing that application on Linux is a nightmare compared to Windows. Here’s an example. To install Sun’s Java Studio Creator on Windows, I just click on the .exe. In contrast, on Linux, I click on the .bin, which downloads the file and.. up pops a text editor showing me a /bin/sh script.

The Perfect Setup - OpenSuSE 10.2 (32-bit)

Filed under
HowTos

This is a detailed description about how to set up an OpenSuSE 10.2 based server that offers all services needed by ISPs and hosters (web server (SSL-capable), mail server (with SMTP-AUTH and TLS!), DNS server, FTP server, MySQL server, POP3/IMAP, Quota, Firewall, etc.).

Novell Sends Coded Message to Red Hat

Filed under
SUSE

The company quoted DistroWatch.com as counting second-place openSUSE getting more hits in the last 30 days, narrowing Ubuntu's first-place lead and widening the gap between SUSE and third-place Fedora. OpenSUSE reportedly has 30,000 registered members.

Free OpenSuse 10.2 DVDs

Filed under
SUSE

I’ve started a mini-campaign to spread openSuse in Pakistan, I’ll be ’shipping’
100 DVDs intially and over a ... If you are in Pakistan and are interested in
trying out openSuse 10.2, please mail your address to freesuse at phantomos.org.

klik bundle of Opera 9.1

Filed under
Software

This evening I've created a new klik recipe, for Opera 9.1. It makes the klik client fetch from Opera's download site their current weekly snapshot of the upcoming 9.1 release and transform it into a typical "1 application == 1 file == 1 click to download+run" klik bundle.

Why Linux will always be better

Filed under
Linux

Yep that's right. Linux will always be better. Even the latest offering of windows vista still doesn't cut it against linux and the other *nix type operating systems. It (vista) is still a reaction and an attempt at catchup to the linux operating system. It is only due to corporate inertia and end user ignorance that it hasn't been relegated to the back benches that linux is sitting on now. This situation will not last long though.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Kernel News and Microsoft Breaks PowerShell

  • Coherent Accelerators, FPGAs, and PLD Microconference Accepted into 2016 Linux Plumbers Conference
    It has been more than a decade since CPU core clock frequencies stopped doubling every 18 months, which has shifted the search for performance from the "hardware free lunch" to concurrency and, more recently, hardware accelerators. Beyond accelerating computational offload, field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) and programmable logic devices (PLDs) have long been used in the embedded space to provide ways to offload I/O or to implement timing-sensitive algorithms as close as possible to the pin.
  • Linux's brilliant career, in pictures
    Aug. 25 marks the 25th anniversary of Linux, the free and open source operating system that's used around the globe in smarphones, tablets, desktop PCs, servers, supercomputers, and more. Though its beginnings were humble, Linux has become the world’s largest and most pervasive open source software project in history. How did it get here? Read on for a look at some of the notable events along the way.
  • Quarter Century of Innovation – aka Happy Birthday Linux!
    Happy birthday Linux. You’ve defined how we should be using and adoption technology. You’ve disrupted and continue to disrupt, industries all over the place. You’ve helped define what it means to share ideas openly and freely. You’ve shown what happens when we collaborate and work together. Free and Open Source is a win-win for all and Linux is the Gold Standard of that.
  • Microsoft Open Source Czar Takes Spotlight at LinuxCon [Ed: Microsoft paid for this]
  • Windows Update borks PowerShell – Microsoft won't fix it for a week
    You'd be forgiven for thinking Microsoft is actively trying to stop people using Windows 10 Anniversary Edition. A patch this week broke one of the key features of the OS: PowerShell.

Android Leftovers

  • Xiaomi Redmi Note 4 unveiled in China, priced at $135
    Xiaomi took the wraps off their latest smartphone offering, the Redmi Note 4, earlier today, and as is expected from the budget-friendly Redmi series, the device offers a premium look, specifications, and features, and more importantly, an ultra-affordable price tag. The Redmi Note 4 retains the premium full metal unibody construction that was introduced with its predecessor, but now comes with a brushed metal finish and chamfered edges that looks and feels even better. The design language is quite similar as well, with the Redmi Note 4 also coming with a fingerprint scanner on the back. Under the hood, the Redmi Note 4 comes with a 5.5-inch Full HD display that is covered with a 2.5D curved glass panel. The phone is powered by a MediaTek Helio X20 processor, that is backed by the Mali-T880MP4 GPU and 2 GB or 3 GB of RAM. 16 GB or 64 GB are the on-board storage options available, which also dictates how much RAM you get, and you also get expandable storage via microSD card to cover all your needs. Keeping everything running is a huge 4,100 mAh battery.
  • New study finds iPhones fail far more often than Android phones
    Apple customers are generally a shockingly loyal bunch. The company’s high repeat customer rate can be attributed to a combination of factors that concern iPhones themselves as well as Apple’s industry-leading customer service. Dealing with Apple’s customer care department has always been a pleasure compared to dealing with rival companies, and iPhones themselves have historically been very reliable, offering a consistently smooth user experience that people love.
  • Relax, Spire can now connect to Android phones
    Spire, the wearable that promises to help you with healthy breathing and mindfulness, was previously only available for iOS devices. But that should change with an update rolling out now.
  • Android 7.0 Nougat: Small changes that make a big difference in UX
    The seventh iteration of Android (Nougat) has finally been released by the mighty Google. If you happen to be the owner of a Nexus device, you might see this update very soon. Everyone else...you know the drill. So after an extended period of waiting for the update to trickle through your carrier and onto your device, what can you expect to happen to your Android device once its center has become a creamier shade of Nougat?
  • Two Nokia Android smartphones show up in benchmark
    Nokia is definitely coming out with a few Android smartphones later this year, but today's Nokia has little in common with the company that ruled the mobile phone industry for years. For starters, the devices that will be released this year, or the next, will be made by a third-party company. Nokia won't be manufacturing phones anymore and most likely it won't manage the way they are sold through retailers and authorized resellers.
  • Proxima bae, Instagram scams, Android goes full crypto: ICYMI
  • PayPal adds proper Nexus Imprint fingerprint login support on Android
  • Google Duo has been downloaded 5 million times on Android since its release

Comparison of the Samsung Z1 vs Z2 vs Z3 Tizen smartphones

Compare Samsung Z1, Z2, and Z3 Tizen Smartphones Lets do a quick history lesson: The first Tizen Smartphone was the Samsung Z1, then came the Z3, and yesterday was the turn of the 4G touting Z2 to take centre stage. On the whole the Z2 is very similar to the Z1 and can be thought of a Z1 2016 edition with the inclusion of 4G cellular connectivity and updated software with user requested features. Read more

25 things to love about Linux

Today marks 25 years of Linux, the most successful software ever. At LinuxCon this week, Jim Zemlin of the Linux Foundation spoke words of admiration, praise, and excitement from the keynote stage, saying "Linux at 25 is a big thing" and "You can better yourself while bettering others at the same time." To celebrate, we asked our readers what they love about Linux and rounded up 25 of their responses. Dive into the Linux love! Read more