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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 23 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Repliessort icon Last Post
Story Arch + XFCE: The perfect Desktop srlinuxx 24/07/2010 - 4:16pm
Story Peppermint Linux: An interesting approach srlinuxx 24/07/2010 - 4:17pm
Story Tech worker testifies of 'blue screen of death' on oil rig's computer srlinuxx 24/07/2010 - 4:20pm
Story Screen: A SysAdmin's PowerTool srlinuxx 24/07/2010 - 4:47pm
Story 5 Websites To Learn About GIMP Photo Editing srlinuxx 24/07/2010 - 4:49pm
Story Eight free open source books srlinuxx 24/07/2010 - 4:51pm
Story Using KDE 4 srlinuxx 24/07/2010 - 7:53pm
Story openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 133 out now srlinuxx 24/07/2010 - 7:55pm
Story Seven Ubuntu Derivatives worth Checking Out srlinuxx 24/07/2010 - 7:56pm
Story What’s happening in compizland? srlinuxx 24/07/2010 - 7:58pm

Gentoo Foundation reinstated, Gentoo Council goes out with a fizzle

Filed under
Gentoo

kloeri.livejournal: The Gentoo Foundation was filed and approved a few days ago, but unfortunately the Council has invalidated itself by the poor attendance yesterday.

Early adventures with Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

callum-macdonald.com: I’ve been thinking about switching from Fedora to Ubuntu. I downloaded the latest Ubuntu version a few weeks ago. Today I took the plunge and booted it up.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • yum vs. ZYpp speed / memory usage

  • Open source largest software industry: Alfresco CEO
  • Building a glossier front end for MythTV
  • Linux wins big in financial trading
  • What open source teaches publishers
  • Declare victory and go home
  • $7 Soc runs Linux
  • Linspire CNR adds Transgaming's Windows game emulator
  • Picasa Downlaod Album in Linux
  • Why Wireless is a Mess in Linux?
  • Video: Fedora Project leader on Fedora 9
  • Mandriva 2008.1 on Acer Aspire 3680-2622 Laptop

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Iptables: How to save and restore rules at boot & shutdown

  • Welcome to the Linux Command Line Interface Desktop
  • Getting started with awk
  • Extending the Gedit Text Editor with Plugins
  • Ubuntu Tip of The Week: Configuring Static IP Addressing
  • The /etc/default/rcS file
  • wget - Resume downloads, limit the speed and much
  • How To Replace ScreenCapture with KSnapshot

Windows coming on dual-boot OLPC

Filed under
OLPC
  • Windows coming on dual-boot OLPC

  • One Laptop - hello Windows, goodbye Linux
  • It’s finally official: XP is coming to the XO
  • Windows XP on the XO Laptop - Microsoft Buys Out OLPC
  • Microsoft Press Release

What’s wrong at OpenSolaris

Filed under
OS
  • What’s wrong at OpenSolaris

  • Linux shop adds Solaris for performance boost
  • OpenSolaris 2008.05, and other places the sun don't shine

Trouble in paradise?

Filed under
OSS

blogs.the451group: I may be wrong, but there appears to me to be a strengthening commitment in some quarters to the ideals of the Free Software Foundation in rejection of the commercial opportunities provided by the Open Source Initiative.

Six months with an Eee PC and Not Looking Back

Filed under
Hardware
  • Six months with an Eee PC and Not Looking Back

  • Asus' Atom-powered Eee PC 901 spied on web
  • Eee PC School: Add a Keyboard Backlight For Under $15
  • MSI Wind knocks EeePC off its feet

10 Must-Have Firefox Extensions

Filed under
Moz/FF

linuxjournal.com: The Mozilla Project's plugin-based architecture turns a solid application into a customizer's paradise. The projects available on the Mozilla Add-ons site now stretch into the thousands, which gives the end user the opposite problem of the no-choice straitjacket of certain other browsers. The embarrassment of riches means too much choice, and figuring out how to narrow it down is no mean task.

How did Ubuntu end up so popular?

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • How did Ubuntu end up so popular?

  • Distro Review: Ubuntu 8.04 Hardy Heron LTS
  • Ubuntu 8.04 KVM Benchmarks

Open-Source Security Idiots

Filed under
OSS

practical-tech.com: Sometimes, people do such stupid things that words almost fail me. That’s the case with a Debian ‘improvement’ to OpenSSL that rendered this network security program next to useless in Debian, Ubuntu and other related Linux distributions.

Planet exgentoo is live!

Filed under
Gentoo
Web

kloeri.livejourna: Due to a recent policy update on Planet Larry (a planet run by Steve Dibb for gentoo users) former gentoo developers are no longer allowed to be syndicated there. So to provide a central place for former gentoo developers to talk about gentoo and other things on their mind Alexander Færøy have now started Planet Exgentoo.

You Can Hack An OS But You Can't Hack People - part 7: Left Standing at the Altar

Filed under
OS

penguinpetes.com: Who's left standing at the altar? Windows users, that's who. Windows has now become the only proprietary operating system without a free-software or open-source equivalent. Apple has Darwin. Solaris has Open Solaris. Unix has Linux and BSD. And Windows has... nothing!

Mark Shuttleworth: Discussing free software syncronicity

Filed under
Linux

markshuttleworth.com: There’s been a flurry of discussion around the idea of syncronicity in free software projects. I’ll just contribute a few thoughts and responses to some of the commentary I’ve seen so far.

The Ultimate Guide to Linux Digital Photography Software - Introduction

Filed under
Software

maysville-linux-users-group.org: I had been using digikam for several years to manage my collection of digital photographs. With the recent purchase of a new DSLR (my first I might add), I was looking to see what else was out there in the terms of software, functionality, features, costs, etc. At the same time, while looking on the net to see what was available, I found many people looking for the same things as I. There was also a lot of mis-information out there. Due to the popularity of our Ultimate Linux Guides to ....I decided to create this one.

Dreamy Dreamlinux

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Dreamlinux is a Debian-based distribution that offers you a choice of GNOME or Xfce window managers as well as an extremely simple installation and scripts to install popular programs not found in the Debian repositories. Besides a few minor bugs that didn't cause any problems, my experience with Dreamlinux was entirely positive.

Give Me 3 Synths, Part 2

Filed under
Software

linuxjournal.com: In this second installment I'll profile Minicomputer, a subtractive synthesizer with some familiar aspects, unique characteristics, and terrific sounds. Let's take a look under its hood and see what makes the Minicomputer run.

Linux and the tax office: never the twain shall meet

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Why would a government body offer trial software for small and other businesses which use the GNU/Linux operating system, take it offline when the interest in it grows and keep quiet about it thereafter?

Nine Steps to Optimal GNU/Linux Desktop Setup

Filed under
Linux

earthweb.com: Configuring GNU/Linux does not end when the installation CD ejects, nor even after the post-install wizard runs. While installation leaves you with a basic system, it does not leave you with an optimized system in which all your preferences and requirements have been taken into account. To fill that gap, here are nine steps you should take after installing GNU/Linux.

OpenOffice.org vs. Microsoft Office vs. Moore's Law

Filed under
OOo

oooninja.com: Earlier we challenged Moore's Law with OpenOffice.org. Today we have a three-way match. In the first corner, we have heavyweight Microsoft Office; in the second, undefeated champion Moore's Law; in the third corner, underdog OpenOffice.org. Let's get ready to rumble!

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More in Tux Machines

Licensing: Facebook Responds to Licence Complaints, Cloud Native Open Source License Choices Analysed

  • Facebook relicenses several projects
    Facebook has announced that the React, Jest, Flow, and Immutable.js projects will be moving to the MIT license. This is, of course, a somewhat delayed reaction to the controversy over the "BSD+patent" license previously applied to those projects.
  • Relicensing React, Jest, Flow, and Immutable.js
    Next week, we are going to relicense our open source projects React, Jest, Flow, and Immutable.js under the MIT license. We're relicensing these projects because React is the foundation of a broad ecosystem of open source software for the web, and we don't want to hold back forward progress for nontechnical reasons. This decision comes after several weeks of disappointment and uncertainty for our community. Although we still believe our BSD + Patents license provides some benefits to users of our projects, we acknowledge that we failed to decisively convince this community.
  • Cloud Native Open Source License Choices
    One of the most common questions regarding open source licensing today concerns trajectories. Specifically, what are the current directions of travel both for specific licenses as well as license types more broadly. Or put more simply, what licenses are projects using today, and how is that changing? We’ve examined this data several times, most recently in this January look at the state of licensing based on Black Duck’s dataset. That data suggested major growth for permissive licenses, primarily at the expense of reciprocal alternatives. The Apache and MIT licenses, for example, were up 10% and 21% respectively, while the GPL was down 27%. All of this is on a relative share basis, of course: the “drop” doesn’t reflect relicensing of existing projects, but less usage relative to its peers. [...] One such community with enough of a sample size to be relevant is the one currently forming around the Cloud Native Computing Foundation. Founded in 2015 with the Kubernetes project as its first asset, the Foundation has added eleven more open source projects, all of which are licensed under the same Apache 2 license. But as a successful Foundation is only a part of the broader ecosystem, the real question is what are the licensing preferences of the Cloud Native projects and products outside of the CNCF itself. [...] Unsurprisingly, perhaps, given the influence of the CNCF itself, Apache strongly outperforms all other licenses, showing far greater relative adoption than it has in more generalized datasets such as the Black Duck survey. Overall in this dataset, approximately 64% of projects are covered by the Apache license. No other project has greater than a 12% share. The only other licenses above 10%, in fact, are the GPL at 12% and MIT at 11%. After that, the other projects are all 5% or less.

today's howtos

Games: Half-Life: C.A.G.E.D., Arcan 0.5.3, Wine Staging 2.17

  • Half-Life: C.A.G.E.D. from former Valve worker should hopefully come to Linux
    Half-Life: C.A.G.E.D. [Steam] is a mod from former Valve worker Cayle George, it's a short prison escape and it should be coming to Linux. Mr George actually worked on Team Fortress 2 and Portal 2 during his time at Valve, but he's also worked for other notable developers on titles like Horizon Zero Dawn.
  • Game Engine Powered Arcan Display Server With Durden Desktop Updated
    Arcan, the open-source display server powered by a game engine, is out with a new release. Its Durden desktop environment has also been updated. Arcan is a display server built off "the corpse of a game engine" and also integrates a multimedia framework and offers behavior controls via Lua. Arcan has been in development for a half-decade while its original code traces back more than a decade, as explained previously and has continued advancing since.
  • Arcan 0.5.3, Durden 0.3
    It’s just about time for a new release of Arcan, and way past due for a new release of the reference desktop environment, Durden. Going through some of the visible changes on a ‘one-clip or screenshot per feature’ basis:
  • Razer plans to release a mobile gaming and entertainment device soon
    NVIDIA, another big player in the gaming hardware and lifestyle space, released an Android-based portable gaming and entertainment console called the NVIDIA Shield that emphasized in-home streaming, and the Ouya console that Razer acquired (and discontinued) ran Android. But Razer decided to use Windows instead of Android on the Edge.
  • Wine Staging 2.17 is out with more Direct3D11 features fixing issues in The Witcher 3, Overwatch and more
    Wine Staging 2.17 is another exciting release, which includes more Direct3D11 features which fixes issues with The Witcher 3, Overwatch and more. As a reminder, Wine Staging is the testing area for future Wine development released, which will eventually be made into stable Wine releases.

KDE: Plasma 5.11 in Kubuntu 17.10, Krita 3.3, Randa and Evolution of Plasma Mobile

  • KDE Plasma 5.11 Desktop Will Be Coming to Kubuntu 17.10 Soon After Its Release
    KDE kicked off the development of the KDE Plasma 5.11 desktop environment a few months ago, and they've already published the Beta release, allowing users to get a first glimpse of what's coming in the final release next month. Canonical's Ubuntu Desktop team did a great job bringing the latest GNOME 3.26 desktop environment to the upcoming Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system, and it looks like the Kubuntu team also want to rebase the official flavor on the forthcoming KDE Plasma 5.11 desktop environment.
  • Krita 3.3 Digital Painting App Promises Better HiDPI Support on Linux & Windows
    Work on the next Krita 3.x point release has started, and a first Release Candidate (RC) milestone of the upcoming Krita 3.3 version is now ready for public testing, giving us a glimpse of what's coming in the new release. In the release announcement, Krita devs reveal the fact that they were forced to bump the version number from 3.2.x to 3.3.x because the upcoming Krita 3.3 release will be introducing some important changes for Windows platforms, such as support for the Windows 8 event API, thus supporting the n-trig pen in Surface laptops.
  • Randa-progress post-hoc
    So, back in Randa I was splitting my energies and attentions in many pieces. Some attention went to making pancakes and running the kitchen in the morning — which is stuff I take credit for, but it is really Grace, and Scarlett, and Thomas who did the heavy lifting, and Christian and Mario who make sure the whole thing can happen. And the attendees of the Randa meeting who pitch in for the dishes after lunch and dinner. The Randa meetings are more like a campground than a 5-star hotel, and we work together to make the experience enjoyable. So thanks to everyone who pitched in. Part of a good sprint is keeping the attendees healthy and attentive — otherwise those 16-hour hacking days really get to you, in spite of the fresh Swiss air. [...] You can read more of what the attendees in Randa achieved on planet KDE (e.g. kdenlive, snappy, kmymoney, marble, kube, Plasma mobile, kdepim, and kwin). I’d like to give a special shout out to Manuel, who taught me one gesture in Italian Sign Langauage — which is different from American or Dutch Sign Language, reminding me that there’s localization everywhere.
  • The Evolution of Plasma Mobile
    Back around 2006, when the Plasma project was started by Aaron Seigo and a group of brave hackers (among which, yours truly) we wanted to create a user interface that is future-proof. We didn’t want to create something that would only run on desktop devices (or laptops), but a code-base that grows with us into whatever the future would bring. Mobile devices were already getting more powerful, but would usually run entirely different software than desktop devices. We wondered why. The Linux kernel served as a wonderful example. Linux runs on a wide range of devices, from super computers to embedded systems, you would set it up for the target system and it would run largely without code changes. Linux architecture is in fact convergent. Could we do something similar at the user interface level?