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About Tux Machines

Friday, 24 Jun 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Repliessort icon Last Post
Story Arch + XFCE: The perfect Desktop srlinuxx 24/07/2010 - 4:16pm
Story Peppermint Linux: An interesting approach srlinuxx 24/07/2010 - 4:17pm
Story Tech worker testifies of 'blue screen of death' on oil rig's computer srlinuxx 24/07/2010 - 4:20pm
Story Screen: A SysAdmin's PowerTool srlinuxx 24/07/2010 - 4:47pm
Story 5 Websites To Learn About GIMP Photo Editing srlinuxx 24/07/2010 - 4:49pm
Story Eight free open source books srlinuxx 24/07/2010 - 4:51pm
Story Using KDE 4 srlinuxx 24/07/2010 - 7:53pm
Story openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 133 out now srlinuxx 24/07/2010 - 7:55pm
Story Seven Ubuntu Derivatives worth Checking Out srlinuxx 24/07/2010 - 7:56pm
Story What’s happening in compizland? srlinuxx 24/07/2010 - 7:58pm

Xen GUI In Fedora Core 6

Filed under
Software

The new version (6) of Fedora Core, which became available for download in November, shows that major Linux vendors see the importance of virtualisation and virtual private servers in years to come. Xen in Fedora Core 6 comes with a GUI named Virtual Machine Manager.

Review: Arch64, Archlinux for 64bit processors

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

I love Slackware, and at one time Arch Linux was my absolute favorite. I recently upgraded to an Athlon64 3200. I tried a variety of distros, only to run into problems I didn’t have time to fix. Fedora gave me a messed up Grub. Mandriva Free gave me problems with my video driver. Ubuntu Edgy has been fine. I saw that Arch Linux had a 64bit version and decided it was time to revisit it.

Influence scheduling priority with nice and renice

Filed under
HowTos

The "niceness" of a process is a numeric hint to the kernel about how the process should be treated in relation to other processes contending for the CPU. The strange name is derived from the fact that it determines how nice you are going to be to other users of the system. A high nice value means a low priority for your process: you are going to be nice. A low or negative value means high priority: you are not very nice. The range of allowable niceness values is -20 to +19.

Linux desktop auto start or launch programs

Filed under
HowTos

So how do you automatically start or launch program when you login into your KDE desktop system? For example if you would like to start program called xawtv (to watch tv) and mozilla-thunderbird mail client program.

Geronimo JNDI/Java resource connection pools, Part 1

Filed under
Linux

Java Naming and Directory Interface (JNDI) is an interface to connection pools in the Apache Geronimo application server. Through this interface, developers have access to all Java objects, including Enterprise Java Beans (EJBs). This article series provides concept-rich documentation on how to use JNDI to access connection pools for data sources, Java Messaging Services (JMS), mail sessions, and URL connections.

Install Automatix2 in Ubuntu,Kubuntu,Xubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

Automatix is a graphical interface for automating the installation of the most commonly requested applications in Debian based Linux operating systems.

LDAP Series Part V - Grtting a Grip on Directory Service Modeling

Filed under
HowTos

While Linux has garnered a major part of the UNIX market, it has not made much progress in the enterprise management field. Without directory services to create a serious model of an enterprise, Linux will continue to remain a great application server. Under Novell, Linux will become a nice kernel for the Netware proprietary stack.

MA Governor-Elect Names MS Anti-ODF Lobbyist to Technology Advisory Group

Filed under
OSS

In a case of strange political timing, governor-elect Deval Patrick announced 15 transition team working groups the day before Thanksgiving. Patrick named 200 people to a wide variety of advisory groups covering topics as diverse as healthcare and civic engagement. Most of the eight people on that group were not a surprise. Oh yes. And one person from a major, out of state software company. Say what?

Why Fedora Matters

Filed under
Linux

Recent blog postings here on the O’Reilly Network and articles on Slashdot (including a recent review of my book) have generated some really strong negative comments about the Fedora project. Does Fedora really matter?

Using OpenOffice.org master pages in the real world -- Combining more than just Writer text documents

Filed under
HowTos

I took a look at some of the big honkin' reports that the City of Largo puts together. The answer to combining documents in a single publication is usually master documents, which work by organizing Writer text documents. But guess what?

SETI@home launches a new initiative and needs some help

Filed under
Misc

I just got an email from Arthur C. Clarke, famous author and scientist. SETI is implementing a new method of data collection and is looking to update their equipment. For this they need both users and dollars. If you’re interested, you can read the email in it’s entirety after the jump.

The 10 Greatest Operating System Upgrades Ever

Filed under
OS

Herewith, my idiosyncratic, extremely subjective list of the top ten, in chronological order. (Note that rating upgrades isn't quite the same exercise as rating operating systems, period--for one thing, it sort of rules out 1.0 versions, although I include one anyhow.) I'm pretty sure this isn't exactly the same as your list...

How to set up an encrypted filesystem in several easy steps

Filed under
HowTos

There's been a lot of talk lately about encrypted partitions, and Debian is proud to offer a feature to easily create them in the etch installer since beta3. But what about existing systems? This guide walks you through setting up an encrypted partition using cryptsetup and LUKS.

WordPerfect to support both ODF and Open XML

Filed under
Software

Corel Corp. promised months ago that it would support the OpenOffice.org ODF (Open Document Format). Now, we know it will support both ODF and Microsoft's Open XML next year.

Mark Shuttleworth: Govoritye po Russki?

Filed under
Ubuntu

There are 347 languages with more than a million speakers. But even Ubuntu, which has amazing infrastructure for translation and a great community that actually does the work, is nowhere close to being fully translated in more than 10 or 15 languages.

Hold Those Linux Lawsuits: Patent Standoff Pending

Filed under
Misc

As much fun as it has been -- and it has been fun -- to hear Steve Ballmer verbally backhand Linux distributors with threats of patent lawsuits, to watch the whole Microsoft-Novell Linux deal dissolve faster than a Britney Spears marriage, we all might want to take a step back and pay attention to something very important that will start this week: The US Supreme Court is going to take a look at patents.

Test-driving Adobe's Flash Player 9 beta

Filed under
Software

The stable Flash Player plugin for Linux is crusty old version 7 -- trailing more than two calendar years, two major revisions, and one corporate buyout behind the Windows and Mac offerings. But now Adobe has finally unveiled a beta release of Flash Player 9 for Linux. Was it worth the wait? And should you install it now, or hold off a little longer for the official, stable product instead?

RIAA wants the Internet shut down

Filed under
Web

ONE OF THE lawyers involved in defending cases bought against people by the RIAA claims that if the music industry wins a crucial case, the Internet will have to be switched off.

Firefox extensions: fun and games

Filed under
Moz/FF

Firefox is more than just a web browser. It’s also a cross-platform arcade machine. No quarters necessary.

Step-by-Step IPP based Print Server using CUPS

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

This tutorial describes how to install a Linux print server with CUPS. It also covers the installation and configuration of printer drivers on the print server as well as the printer setup on a Windows 2000 client.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Installing Arch Linux. Part 1
    Arch Linux is often rather challenging or scary when it comes to a newbie's first Linux experience. Some reasons you may want to go with Arch would be the Pacman package handler, or the fact that it comes with no bloat software that will allow you to truly make it your own. In the installation process, there is no GUI or "Press Next to Continue" to hold your hand. This usually drives people away. I also found the forums to have lots of impatient people who expect you to magically know what you're doing. Here I will try to provide an in depth guide on how to install and setup your own Arch Linux computer.
  • openSUSE News: openSUSE Conference Day 2
    Frank Karlitschek, founder of Nextcloud and ownCloud, talked about the importance of federation infrastructure and reaching the critical mass. He pointed out that Free Open Source Software projects that offer similar applications to those that are proprietary fail to gain mainstream acceptance. One of the reasons he gave was trying to balance the balance between privacy and openness. He suggested that more projects should work with one another on a cloud-sharing standard and perhaps there should be a Global User Directory. Users could manage their privacy data that is shared or visible on a GUD as an answer to sharing personal cloud-based content with users running different applications or services.
  • DebCamp16 day 0
  • GSoC-Journey till Mid term
  • Debian/TeX Live 2016.20160623-1
    About one month has passed since we did release TeX Live 2016, and more than a month since the last Debian packages, so it is high time to ship out a new checkout of upstream. Nothing spectacular new here, just lots and lots of updates since the freeze.
  • Raspberry Pi Stays on Top in Survey of 81 Open-Spec SBCs

GNU/Linux on Servers and PS3

  • Nearly 1 in 3 Azure virtual machines now run Linux
  • What a Virtual Network Looks Like: Planning
    Network services don't spring up unbidden from the earth but rather they're coerced out of infrastructure in response to business and consumer opportunities. Every operations and management paradigm ever proposed for networking includes an explicit planning dimension to get the service-to-infrastructure and service-to-user relationships right. On the surface, virtualization would seem to help planning by reducing inertia, but don't you then have to plan for virtualization? How the planning difficulties and improvements balance out has a lot to do with how rapidly we can expect virtualization to evolve.
  • How DevOps Failed 60K Users
    Back in 2006, when I was an operations engineer at Slideshare, I was part of a team that launched a DevOps model to speed processes and stay ahead of our competition.
  • Democratizing Docker: Changing Containers' Competitive Landscape
    At DockerCon 16, approximately 4,000 attendees descended on the Washington State Convention Center in Seattle from June 19 to 21 to learn about and experience the phenomenon that is the Docker container ecosystem. The big news of the event came on the first day of the conference with the announcement of Docker 1.12 and its integrated orchestration system. In the keynote speeches and in multiple sessions that I attended, that new Swarm mode was a hot topic of technical and business discussion.
  • Apple Opens the iOS 10 Kernel, Sony Compensates Linux Users… [Tech News Digest]
  • Here's How Much You'll Get From Sony's PlayStation 3 Bungle
  • Sony Settles 'Other OS' PS3 Lawsuit
  • Did you install Linux on your PS3? Then Sony owes you $55
  • Sony Settlement Gives PS3 Owners $9 After Company Made Console Less Useful Via Firmware Update
    We've noted countless times how in the modern computing era, you don't really own what you think you own. You don't really own the music or books that can arbitrarily disappear on your devices, and you no longer really own a wide variety of hardware that can be dramatically changed (often for the worse) via firmware update months or years after purchase. If you're extra lucky, you'll shell out $300 for a piece of hardware that one year later simply won't work at all. With intelligent automobiles and the rise of the internet-of-not-so-smart things, that's more true now than ever. Case in point: back in 2010 we noted how Sony issued several firmware updates for its Playstation 3 gaming console that effectively made the console less useful. One specifically (PS3 software update 3.21) removed the console owner's ability to load alternative operating systems like Linux. But tinkerers being tinkerers, some users found ways to use the feature to expand the console's functionality in all kinds of creative ways. Fearing a loss of control and potential spike in piracy, Sony decided to make the console significantly less useful.

Leftovers: Software

  • Xen Project 4.7 Release Notes
  • Xen Project 4.7 Released
    Xen 4.7 features new security improvements, security hardening, live migration support, usability improvements, reboot-free live patching, improvements to the VMI subsystem, performance improvements, improved interrupt efficiency for Intel hardware, and more.
  • Xen Project Hypervisor 4.7 Brings Non-Disruptive Patching
  • Calibre 2.60 eBook Viewer Improves the Config Dialog for the Kobo Touch Driver
    Today, June 24, 2016, Calibre developer Kovid Goyal has been happy to announce the release and immediate availability for download of the Calibre 2.60.0 open-source ebook library management software for all supported platforms.
  • Pale Moon 26.3.0
    Pale Moon offers you a browsing experience in a browser completely built from its own, independently developed source that has been forked off from Firefox/Mozilla code, with carefully selected features and optimizations to improve the browser's speed, resource use, stability and user experience, while offering full customization and a growing collection of extensions and themes to make the browser truly your own.

today's howtos