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Friday, 22 Feb 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Repliessort icon Last Post
Blog entry Big rpm update Texstar 11/04/2005 - 3:16am
Story Will Nutch Nudge out Google? srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:17am
Story New Forum Open for Business srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:17am
Forum topic Thank You. srlinuxx 13/02/2005 - 5:10pm
Story Study Finds Linux Use May Continue to Grow srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:03am
Story World Expo Prez Predicts Future Growth for Linux srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:02am
Story Future of the GPL srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:02am
Story Government agencies adopt open source srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:02am
Story Desktop Linux Standardization srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:02am
Story Atari Plans New Matrix Title srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:01am

WWW and OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
Web
  • WWW = Woeful, er, winternet wendering? CERN browser rebuilt after 30 years barely recognizes modern web

    In preparation for next month's 30th anniversary of the proposal that gave us the world wide web, boffins at the behest of CERN have recreated the world's first web browser, and made it accessible as a modern web page.

    Created by Sir Tim Berners-Lee, the ur-browser, first called WorldWideWeb, and later Nexus, was built from Objective-C in 1990 on a NeXT workstation to display its maker's HyperText Markup Language.

    The browser's resurrection – click here to try it out – follows five days of hacking by an international team of nine developers, reunited after a previous effort to revive the original Line Mode Browser in 2013.

  • Web Design Survey Findings and Next Steps

    Now we need your help again! The main takeaway from the first survey was that developers and designers of every experience level want to better understand CSS issues like unexpected scrollbars and sizing. We’ve started researching and prototyping potential tool ideas for investigating specific types of CSS bugs, but we need your feedback to guide our work.

    Please take a moment with our quick single-page CSS Layout Debugging survey and help us rank the most time-consuming bugs. Your feedback will be immensely helpful in clarifying our plans in 2019 and beyond.

  • How donations helped LibreOffice and TDF in 2018

    Donations to The Document Foundation, the non-profity entity behind LibreOffice, help us to grow our community, share knowledge about the software (and its development), maintain our infrastructure, organise events and much more. The image below shows what was made possible in 2018, thanks to your generous donations – click for a larger version!

  • NomadBSD 1.2-RC2 released!

    The second release candidate of NomadBSD 1.2 is now available! We would like to thank all the RC1 testers who sent us feedback and bug reports. If you notice any problems, please let us know.

  • Mi 9 kernel source code available on launch day

    Xiaomi literally declared war against Samsung by setting the launch date of Mi 9 on the same day with Galaxy S10. The Chinese launch event by Xiaomi completed just now – Mi 9, Mi 9 Transparent Edition and Mi 9 SE are now official.

  • Bell Labs, Skunk Works, and the Crowd Sourcing of Innovation

    I’ve noticed that we hear a lot less from corporate research labs than we used to. They still exist, though. Sure, Bell Labs is owned by Nokia and there is still some hot research at IBM even though they quit publication of the fabled IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin in 1998. But today innovation is more likely to come from a small company attracting venture capital than from an established company investing in research. Why is that? And should it be that way?

Servers: Cockpit, SOA and Kubernetes

Filed under
Server
  • Cockpit 188

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 188.

  • Good news: Business automation is not about SOA

    This is not an article about service-oriented architecture (SOA); neither is it a business process management (BPM) article. This article is about how business automation can change the way you create software.

    At a first, developers and architects tend to associate the use of BPM suites (or business-oriented architecture) with SOA. This behavior immediately leads to an incorrect bias about the subject.

    C-suite executives understand: Transform—or be suppressed by new, disruptive, technology-driven startups. In 2019, business automation is a key transformation that executives will seek in order to improve business performance and lower costs. However, some technology teams are not very open to it. Why?

  • Is Kubernetes Serverless?

    If you take a look at where the IT industry is going, you will start to see a trend: a layer of complexity added to the relationship between applications and infrastructure. No longer can you draw a straight line from the application to the machine it runs on. Developers have been trying to get away from having to manage infrastructure for years. It’s no fun having to provision, manage, and patch a multitude of disparate servers, new and old.

    As a result, that layer of abstraction between the application and the underlying infrastructure has led to the invention of a number of technologies, one of them being Kubernetes. Not only can we ensure our application is going to run on a consistent Docker container image, no matter what environment, but we don’t have to manage the containers and keep track of where and how many are running at all times.

Events: Fedora at CLT 2019, LF's Open Networking Summit and Cloud Foundry Summit on Serverless, Knative, Microservices

Filed under
OSS
  • Fedora will be at CLT 2019

    The Fedora Project will be at the Chemnitzer Linux Tage 2019. So far, Robert Scheck and I will make it happen. As we pretty much did it for the last 10 years.

  • The Linux Foundation Announces the 2019 Open Networking Summit North America Speaking Schedule

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, has announced the keynote speakers and session line-up for Open Networking Summit North America (ONS), taking place April 3-5 in San Jose, Calif.

    The full lineup of sessions can be viewed here, and features speakers from AT&T, China Mobile, Ericsson, Google, Huawei, Intel, KPMG, Nokia, Red Hat, Target, and more.

    “The Open Networking Summit is a chance to bring together the entire open networking community – from telco providers to cloud providers – to share best practices and discuss how we can work together to advance networking technology,” said Arpit Joshipura, General Manager, Networking, Edge & IoT, the Linux Foundation. “Gathering the industry’s foremost innovators and technologists, ONS is a must-attend event for collaboration and knowledge sharing.”

  • 6 Must-Attend Talks at Cloud Foundry Summit on Serverless, Knative, Microservices

    That’s a lot of technical content, so make sure to also get your ideal ratio of business impact content and check out the User Stories track.

Graphics: TuxClocker and VK_EXT_depth_clip_enable

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • TuxClocker: Another GPU Overclocking GUI For Linux

    Adding to the list of third-party GPU overclocking utilities for Linux is TuxClocker, a Qt5-based user-interface currently with support for NVIDIA graphics cards and experimental support for AMD GPUs. 

    TuxClocker is a Qt5 overclocking tool that supports adjusting not only the memory/core frequencies but also the power limit, fan speed, and other tunables based upon the GPU/driver in use. There is also graph monitors to show the power and temperature limit, where supported, among other features. 

    TuxClocker offers similar functionality to other third-party, open-source Linux GPU overclocking software though where as most utilities focus just on NVIDIA or AMD hardware, TuxClocker is pursuing both. Currently their stable release supports just NVIDIA GPUs but the development code has AMD Radeon support in the works.

  • Intel Wires VK_EXT_depth_clip_enable Into Their Vulkan Driver, Helping DXVK

    Intel's open-source ANV Vulkan driver now supports the VK_EXT_depth_clip_enable that was designed in part to help the DXVK project for mapping Direct3D atop of the Vulkan API.

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • Packaging PyQt5 apps with fbs

    fbs is a cross-platform PyQt5 packaging system which supports building desktop applications for Windows, Mac and Linux (Ubuntu, Fedora and Arch). Built on top of PyInstaller it wraps some of the rough edges and defines a standard project structure which allows the build process to be entirely automated. The included resource API is particularly useful, simplifying the handling of external data files, images or third-party libraries — a common pain point when bundling apps.

  • Infrastructure monitoring: Defense against surprise downtime

    There are a number of tools available that can build a viable and strong monitoring system. The only decision to make is which to use; your answer lies in what you want to achieve with monitoring as well as various financial and business factors you must consider.

    While some monitoring tools are proprietary, many open source tools, either unmanaged or community-managed software, will do the job even better than the closed source options.

    In this article, I will focus on open source tools and how to use them to create a strong monitoring architecture.

  • GSlice considerations and possible improvements

    The paper Mesh: Compacting Memory Management for C/C++ Applications is about moving memory allocations for compaction, even though the memory pointers are exposed. The idea is to merge allocation blocks from different pages that are not overlapping at page offsets, and then letting multiple virtual page pointers point to the same physical page. Some have asked about the applicability to the GSlice allocator.

  • plprofiler – Getting a Handy Tool for Profiling Your PL/pgSQL Code
  • Reading and Writing Files in Python (Guide)
  • Today is a Good Day to Learn Python

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Wi-Fi ‘Hiding’ Inside USB Cable: A New Security Threat On The Rise?

    Today, the world has become heavily reliant on computers owing to the various advantages they offer. It has thus become imperative that we, as users, remain updated about the various threats that can compromise the security of our data and privacy.

    A recent report published by Hackaday details a new threat that might just compromise the integrity of devices. At first glance, the O.MG cable (Offensive MG Kit) looks like any other USB cable available in the market. It is what lurks within that is a cause for concern.

  • WiFi Hides Inside a USB Cable [Ed: There are far worse things, like USB devices that send a high-voltage payload to burn your whole motherboard. Do not use/insert untrusted devices from dodgy people.]
  • The Insights into Linux Security You May Be Surprised About

    Linux has a strong reputation for being the most secure operating system on the market. It’s been like that for many years, and it doesn’t seem like Windows or macOS are going to overtake it anytime soon. And while the operating system’s reputation is well-deserved, it can also be harmless experienced users.

    The problem is that some seem to put too much trust in the capabilities of Linux by default. As a result, they often don’t pay enough attention to the manual aspect of their security. Linux can help you automate your workflow to a large extent, but it still requires a manual touch to keep things going well. This is even truer when it comes to security.

  • One Identity Bolsters Unix Security with New Release of Authentication Services

    Unix systems (including Linux and Mac OS), by their very nature, have distinct challenges when it comes to security and administration. Because native Unix-based systems are not linked to one another, each server or OS instance requires its own source of authentication and authorization.

  • Book Review – Linux Basics for Hackers

    With countless job openings and growth with no end in sight, InfoSec is the place to be. Many pose the question, “Where do I start?” Over his years of training hackers and eventual security experts across a wide array of industries and occupations, the author ascertains that one of the biggest hurdles that many up-and-coming professional hackers face is the lack of a foundational knowledge or experience with Linux. In an effort to help new practitioners grow, he made the decision to pen a basic ‘How To’ manual, of sorts, to introduce foundational concepts, commands and tricks in order to provide instruction to ease their transition into the world of Linux. Out of this effort, “Linux Basics for Hackers” was born.

  • Security updates for Wednesday

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

HTTP Vs. HTTPS

Filed under
Linux

The internet runs on protocols. Rules and norm defined so that there is some form of standardization. One such protocol is the HyperText Transfer Protocol(HTTP).

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5 of the Best Linux Distros for Developers and Programmers

Filed under
Development
GNU
Linux

One of the reasons Linux is great is because of how flexible it is. For example, it can run on everything from servers to your old laptop to a Raspberry Pi. For this reason, it’s also a fantastic platform for developers.

Whether you’re a seasoned developer or just using Linux to learn to program, you still have to choose a distribution. You could just choose Ubuntu and run with it, but there are plenty of “other options available to you.”

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How To Automatically Change GNOME Background In Intervals Using BASH

Filed under
Linux

Have you ever wanted to have that automatic background switching feature on your GNOME Linux distro? I missed that feature after I switched from Cinnamon to GNOME Sad Searched for apps in the software center and alas there is none that I could find. However, today I’m happy to let you know that there is a workaround to this missing feature through the use of BASH scripting language.

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Arm-based IoT gateway runs on Moxa Industrial Linux

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Moxa announced a -40 to 85°C tolerant “UC-8200” IoT gateway that runs Moxa Industrial Linux on a dual-core, -A7 SoC and offers dual GbE, RS-232/422/485, and mini-PCIe links, plus a CAN port, WiFi/BT, and optional 4G LTE.

Moxa, which announced its Cortex-A8-based UC 2100 series of Industrial IoT gateways last April, partially unveiled a new IIoT gateway called the UC-8200. The system features an unnamed dual-core, Cortex-A7 SoC that “has been optimised for use in energy monitoring systems but is widely applicable to a variety of industrial solutions,” according to the PR-like Control Engineering story that announced the product along with a shorter Industrial Ethernet Book post.

Eventually, a product page should appear with missing details such as RAM and storage. Yet, even the product page for the similar UC-8100 series fails to describe the Cortex-A8 SoC. Other specs are complete, however, such as the earlier model’s 256MB to 512MB DDR3 and 8GB eMMC. (Update: LinuxGizmos reader Arnd Bergmann spotted the earlier UC-8100’s SoC family in the firmware image’s device tree. It’s a TI Sitara AM33x, perhaps one of the AM335x family, which runs on BeagelBone boards.)

Read more

Also: Arm Neoverse N1 & E1 Platforms Announced For Cloud To Edge Computing

OpenSUSE Leap 15.1 Beta

Filed under
SUSE
  • Leap 15.1 entering Beta phase

    Leap 15.1 entered the Beta phase with build 416.2 that reached the
    mirrors yesterday. Everyone is encouraged to download¹ the current
    builds and help testing. There are also live images to e.g. check
    hardware compatibility without installation.

    The Beta phase will last until mid April. Planned release is before
    the conference in May.

    Issues found need to be filed in Bugzilla². There is also a test
    plan³ to help coordinate the efforts. Feel free to fill in what you
    tested so we get an overview of what was covered already.

    Note that Leap 15.1 did not automatically sync with package versions
    in Factory. That is intentional as 15.1 is meant to be a minor
    update. Please submit any necessary bigger version updates the next
    two weeks to still have time for thorough testing. Please contact
    the release team⁴ in case of questions.

    Users of 42.3 please be aware that 42.3 reaches end of life a few
    weeks after the release of 15.1. In general an update to 15.1
    directly is possible. It's recommended to participate in beta
    testing to make sure your specific workload or use case still works
    after an upgrade.

    cu
    Ludwig

  • OpenSUSE Leap 15.1 Reaches Beta Milestone

Games: Engadget's FUD, Valve and Google Plans, More (and Improved) Gaming on GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming
  • Linux gaming is on a life-support system called Steam [Ed: Misleading. Frames Steam as the one and only platform for games; that's like saying FOSS is just GitHub (a common error).]

    In September 2013, Valve founder Gabe Newell gave a rare, 20-minute presentation at LinuxCon.

  • The number of Linux gamers on Steam continues to grow, according to Valve

    Recently, Engadget wrote an article about Linux gaming and apart from a bit of a silly title and information regular GOL readers will be aware of, they did have some interesting info from Valve.

    I don't put too much thought into the title they decided to give it, "Linux gaming is on a life-support system called Steam", since when you think about it that's actually quite close to the truth. Valve are the biggest pushers of Linux gaming and one of the only major forces doing so.

    While I've long said that the amount of Linux gamers using Steam will be increasing all the time, the actual market share of Linux on Steam hasn't really gone anywhere. At times, it has certainly looked like the amount of Linux gamers has decreased if you take the percentage at face value.

  • Valve is getting back to focusing on gaming, with non-gaming videos being retired

    Why is it not surprising? Well, it makes sense for multiple reasons. Did you ever buy and watch any movies (or other non-gaming videos) on Steam? I didn't, it's far easier to use a different service like Netflix, Google Play or practically any other where you could watch your content across pretty much any device and browser.

    On top of that, Valve's bread and butter is gaming and since they now have more competition actually focusing on that is obvious at this point.

  • Google Could Reveal Its Mystery ‘Online Gaming’ Project In March

    Google has scheduled an event next month at the Game Developers Conference (GDC) in San Francisco.

    This is reportedly where it could unveil its gaming project that has been under development for quite some time.

  • The huge Rocket League update is now out with cross-platform friends support and Season 10 has started

    Rocket League, the game that sucks away most of my gaming time has a fantastic update now out that allows you to party up with friends across different platforms.

    There's a whole new part of the interface to deal with this, the Friends List which is split into different sections covering friends from your current platform, RocketID to show friends on other platforms, a recent players list to reach out to people you've had a good game with and an alerts section to see notifications.

  • Gallium Nine With NIR Is Now Running Most D3D9 Games "Flawlessly"

    Towards the beginning of the month we reported on the Gallium Nine state tracker working on NIR support as an alternative to its original focus on the common TGSI intermediate representation to Gallium3D. That NIR-ified version of Gallium Nine is now working and beginning to run most Direct3D 9 games fine.

    Plumbing NIR support into Gallium Nine is being done for newer Gallium3D drivers that focus on NIR support rather than the aging TGSI. In particular, NIR support is needed for the new Intel Iris Gallium3D driver (though still yet to be mainlined), possibilities like running Gallium Nine atop Zink to in turn map to Vulkan drivers, and working for other NIR drivers like VC4/V3D or Freedreno.

It Soon May Be Easier Building Debian Packages On Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat
Debian
  • It Soon May Be Easier Building Debian Packages On Fedora

    While Fedora is deeply rooted around RPMs, the necessary components for building Debian binary packages may soon end up in the Fedora repository -- they're currently undergoing the package review process. Developer Dridi Boukelmoune was fed up with the current situation and took to improving the Debian packaging options for Fedora to make it easier spinning Debian packages there without resorting to VMs or other avenues. This can be useful in cases of commercial/internal software and other practices where you may be needing to build both RPMs and Debs and desire to do so from a single stack.

  • Ditch RPM in favor of DPKG

    I know how important RPM is to the Fedora Project, but it breaks everything downstream and we'd be better off using DPKG as we should have from day one. I'm calling this initiative fedpkg: Fedora Embraces DPKG. A bit of background here: I build both RPMs and DEBs for $DAYJOB and until recently my workflow was quite painful because I needed extra steps between git checkout and git push that involves a VM, because what we ship as apt is in reality apt-rpm. It finally got enough on my nerves to locally build the things I needed and after a month I have already amortized my efforts with the time I save not having to deal with needless extra hoops. In order to successfully build debs on Fedora I needed 4 packages that I'm now submitting for review: https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=gnu-config https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=strip-nondeterminism https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=sbuild https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=apt I need more than reviews here. Three of those packages are heavy on Perl code, and I'm not a Perl Monk. I tried to CC perl-sig as per the guidelines [1] (also tried with the mailing list address) but bugzilla replied kindly: CC: perl-sig did not match anything Apt is a mix of C, Perl and C++ code, so I would be reassured if I could have a C++ co-maintainer too. I'm only a C developer so if something goes wrong outside of the C realm that would be helpful. Two of those packages should be runtime dependencies of debhelper. The current apt package should be renamed to apt-rpm, I will look up the procedure for that to happen. I understand that when someone sees they should run "apt-get install foo" somewhere on the web it's helpful for non-savvy users that this JustWorks(tm) [2], but apt-rpm is dead upstream and it shouldn't be advertised as apt. I hope I CC'd everyone that should get this heads up, and hope to find help for the reviews and co-maintainership. The packaging does nothing fancy, there are quirks here and there but overall it was rather easy to put together. And of course I would be happy to help with reviews too in exchange. And thanks again to the mock developers, its design is so much better than either sbuild or pdebuild that I barely have pain points left when it comes to RPM packaging. Thanks, Dridi

The battle between real open source vs. faux open source heats up

Filed under
OSS

On February 19, Redis Labs, the home of Redis, the popular open-source in-memory data structure store, announced it has raised $60 million in new financing. Redis Labs CEO Ofer Bengal told Ars Technica that one reason for this was its new "open-source" Common Clause license. "The community now understands that the original concept of open source has to be fixed because it isn't suitable anymore to the modern era where cloud companies use their monopoly power to adopt any successful open-source project without contributing anything to it," Bengal said.

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Community release: PCLinuxOS LXQt 2019.02 ISO

Filed under
PCLOS

First of all, it is the fourth release with LXQt 0.14. As experimental are some locales as default installed. To set the languages use pcc>system>Manage localization for your system.
Log out/in to display your favorite language. It’s use the Kernel 4.20.10, and UEFI Support. Applications include falcon, qmplay2, phototonic, pavucontrol-qt, grub-customizer, qpdfview, featherpad, brasero, file-roller and much more inside…

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Essential System Tools: QDirStat – Excellent Qt-based directory statistics

Filed under
KDE

This is the latest in our series of articles highlighting essential system tools. These are small, indispensable utilities, useful for system administrators as well as regular users of Linux based systems. The series examines both graphical and text based open source utilities. For this article, we’ll look at QDirStat, a graphical application to show what’s devouring your disk space and help you tidy up the disorder. For details of all tools in this series, please check the table at the summary page of this article.

QDirStat is a continuation of the KDirStat utility. QDirStat is based on the latest Qt 5, and doesn’t need any KDE libraries or infrastructure.

If you come from a Windows background you’ve probably tried WinDirStat, a Windows port of KDirStat, the predecessor of QDirStat.

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KDE is adding Matrix to its instant messaging infrastructure

Filed under
KDE

KDE has been looking for a better way of chatting and live-sharing information for several years now. IRC has been a good solution for a long time, but it has centralized servers KDE cannot control. It is also insecure and lacks features users have come to expect from more modern IM services. Other alternatives, such as Telegram, Slack and Discord, although feature-rich, are centralized and built around closed-source technologies and offer even less control than IRC. This flies in the face of KDE's principles that require we use and support technologies based on Free software.

However, our search for a better solution has finally come to an end: as of today we are officially using Matrix for collaboration within KDE! Matrix is an open protocol and network for decentralised communication, backed by an open standard and open source reference implementations for servers, clients, client SDKs, bridges, bots and more. It provides all the features you’d expect from a modern chat system: infinite scrollback, file transfer, typing notifications, read receipts, presence, search, push notifications, stickers, VoIP calling and conferencing, etc. It even provides end-to-end encryption (based on Signal’s double ratchet algorithm) for when you want some privacy.

Read more

Also: KDE To Support Matrix Decentralized Instant Messaging

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More in Tux Machines

Security: Windows 'Fun' at Melbourne and Alleged Phishing by Venezuela’s Government

today's howtos

GCC 8.3 Released and GCC 9 Plans

  • GCC 8.3 Released
    The GNU Compiler Collection version 8.3 has been released. GCC 8.3 is a bug-fix release from the GCC 8 branch containing important fixes for regressions and serious bugs in GCC 8.2 with more than 153 bugs fixed since the previous release. This release is available from the FTP servers listed at: http://www.gnu.org/order/ftp.html Please do not contact me directly regarding questions or comments about this release. Instead, use the resources available from http://gcc.gnu.org. As always, a vast number of people contributed to this GCC release -- far too many to thank them individually!
  • GCC 8.3 Released With 153 Bug Fixes
    While the GCC 9 stable compiler release is a few weeks away in the form of GCC 9.1, the GNU Compiler Collection is up to version 8.3.0 today as their newest point release to last year's GCC 8 series.
  • GCC 9 Compiler Picks Up Official Support For The Arm Neoverse N1 + E1
    Earlier this week Arm announced their next-generation Neoverse N1 and E1 platforms with big performance potential and power efficiency improvements over current generation Cortex-A72 processor cores. The GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) ahead of the upcoming GCC9 release has picked up support for the Neoverse N1/E1. This newly-added Neoverse N1 and E1 CPU support for GCC9 isn't all that surprising even with the very short time since announcement and GCC9 being nearly out the door... Arm developers had already been working on (and landed) the Arm "Ares" CPU support, which is the codename for what is now the Neoverse platform.

Android Leftovers