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Friday, 22 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Repliessort icon Last Post
Blog entry Big rpm update Texstar 11/04/2005 - 3:16am
Story Will Nutch Nudge out Google? srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:17am
Story New Forum Open for Business srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:17am
Forum topic Thank You. srlinuxx 13/02/2005 - 5:10pm
Story Study Finds Linux Use May Continue to Grow srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:03am
Story World Expo Prez Predicts Future Growth for Linux srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:02am
Story Future of the GPL srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:02am
Story Government agencies adopt open source srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:02am
Story Desktop Linux Standardization srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:02am
Story Atari Plans New Matrix Title srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:01am

DeVeDe NG Review Create Video DVDs and CDs

Filed under
Linux

​Devede is an open source program that allows the creation of video CDs and DVDs from an MPEG, AVI and similar formats suitable for home DVD players. Devede uses Mplayer, Mencoder, DVDAuthor, and VCDimager, so you can use any video playable with Mplayer. It is available for multiple platforms including Windows and Linux.

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Pixelbook leak: Google's new high-end Chromebook expected October 4

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Google

According to Droid Life, on October 4, Google will release the first new retail version of the Chromebook Pixel since 2015, the Pixelbook.

The Chomebook Pixel was the Rolls-Royce of Chromebooks. It was faster, more powerful, and came with a better display than any other laptop in its day. Google, however, decided that, while the company would still release new Pixels for in-house use, it wouldn't sell them.

Thanks to Chromebook Pixel fans, Google has elected to start selling this luxury Chromebook again.

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5 fundamental differences between Windows 10 and Linux

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

This comparison really only scratches the surface. And don't get me wrong, there are areas where Windows 10 bests Linux (few, but they do exist). In the end, however, the choice is yours. Chances are you'll be making the choice based on which platform will allow you get more work done and do so with a certain level of efficiency and reliability. I would highly recommend, to anyone, if Linux can enable you to get your work done...give it a go and see if you don't find it more dependable and predictable.

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Firefly COM dual boots Android and Ubuntu on hexa-core RK3399

Filed under
Android
Ubuntu

GNOME developer Bastien Nocera talks in his latest blog post about the enhancements he managed to implement in the past few weeks to the Bluetooth stack of the Fedora Linux operating system.

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Games: Morphite, Mooseman, Arma, and PlayStation 4 DualShock Controller

Filed under
Gaming
  • Stylish FPS 'Morphite' released without Linux support, but it's coming

    Sadly, Morphite [Steam] has seen a delay with the Linux version. Thankfully, the developer was quick to respond and it's still coming.

  • The Mooseman, a short side-scrolling adventure just released for Linux

    In the mood for something a little out there? Well, The Mooseman [Steam] a short side-scroller might just hit the spot.

  • Arma 3 1.76 for Linux is planned, work on it to start "soon"

    Bohemia Interactive have announced in their latest "SITREP" that the Linux version of Arma 3 will be updated to the latest version of 1.76, work is set to start on it "soon".

  • Sony's PlayStation 4 DualShock Controller Now Supported in Fedora Linux, GNOME

    GNOME developer Bastien Nocera talks in his latest blog post about the enhancements he managed to implement in the past few weeks to the Bluetooth stack of the Fedora Linux operating system.

    The patches submitted by the developer to the Bluetooth packages in the latest Fedora Linux release promise to bring improvements to the way PlayStation 3 DualShock controllers are set up in the environment if you're using the GNOME desktop environment.

    Until now, to set up a DualShock 3 controller, users had to plug it in via USB, then disconnect it, and then press the "P" button on the joypad, which would have popped-up a dialog to confirm the Bluetooth connection. But this method had some quirks though.

Debian Development Reports

Filed under
Development
Debian
  • Free software log (July and August 2017)

    August was DebConf, which included a ton of Policy work thanks to Sean Whitton's energy and encouragement. During DebConf, we incorporated work from Hideki Yamane to convert Policy to reStructuredText, which has already made it far easier to maintain. (Thanks also to David Bremner for a lot of proofreading of the result.) We also did a massive bug triage and closed a ton of older bugs on which there had been no forward progress for many years.

    After DebConf, as expected, we flushed out various bugs in the reStructuredText conversion and build infrastructure. I fixed a variety of build and packaging issues and started doing some more formatting cleanup, including moving some footnotes to make the resulting document more readable.

  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, August 2017

    Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.

  • Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #125

    16 package reviews have been added, 99 have been updated and 92 have been removed in this week, adding to our knowledge about identified issues.

The GNOME Foundation Backs Librem 5

Filed under
GNOME
  • GNOME Foundation partners with Purism to support its efforts to build the Librem 5 smartphone

    The GNOME Foundation has provided their endorsement and support of Purism’s efforts to build the Librem 5, which if successful will be the world’s first free and open smartphone with end-to-end encryption and enhanced user protections. The Librem 5 is a hardware platform the Foundation is interested in advancing as a GNOME/GTK phone device. The GNOME Foundation is committed to partnering with Purism to create hackfests, tools, emulators, and build awareness that surround moving GNOME/GTK onto the Librem 5 phone.

    As part of the collaboration, if the campaign is successful the GNOME Foundation plans to enhance GNOME shell and general performance of the system with Purism to enable features on the Librem 5.

  • Now GNOME Foundation Wants to Support Purism's Privacy-Focused Linux Smartphone

    GNOME Foundation, the non-profit organization behind the popular GNOME desktop environment designed for Linux-based operating systems, announced on Wednesday that they plan on supporting Purism's Librem 5 smartphone.

    The announcement comes only a week after KDE unveiled their plans to work with Purism on an implementation of their Plasma Mobile interface into the security- and privacy-focused Librem 5 Linux smartphone, and now GNOME is interested in advancing the Librem 5 hardware platform as a GNOME/GTK+ phone device.

    "Having a Free/Libre and Open Source software stack on a mobile device is a dream-come-true for so many people, and Purism has the proven team to make this happen. We are very pleased to see Purism and the Librem 5 hardware be built to support GNOME," said Neil McGovern, Executive Director, GNOME Foundation.

  • GNOME Joins The Librem 5 Party, Still Needs To Raise One Million More Dollars

    One week after announcing KDE cooperation on the proposed Librem 5 smartphone with plans to get Plasma Mobile on the device if successful, the GNOME Foundation has sent out their official endorsement of Purism's smartphone dream.

    Purism had been planning to use GNOME from the start for their GNU/Linux-powered privacy-minded smartphone while as of today they have the official backing of the GNOME Foundation.

Wine Staging 2.17

Filed under
Software

7 Things You Should Know About… Open Source Projects in Education

Filed under
OSS

Halfway through the semester, Dr. Margaret Broadwater was excited by the progress her students were making in her course Open Source Software Development. Working with open source software projects and development communities gave her students hands-on experience with software development practices, technology frameworks, data structures, and product development. Students also completed installation exercises for open source projects from both developers’ and users’ perspectives, followed by finding and patching bugs in the software. Broadwater knew that her students were learning more than just how to work their way around code. In talking with students she emphasized that open source code was the heart of applications that had become ubiquitous in business and education, including Chrome and Firefox, and was the driver for software like the Apache web server, Fedora Linux, and OpenSSL. Moreover, open source had gained purchase in use by companies, organizations, and government agencies and was thus something they would need to know once they entered the workplace as software devel- opers and engineers. Broadwater knew that by working on open source projects in depth, her students were also learning about the ethos of building code in a community of developers—and, indeed, were becoming part of that community.

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A Quick Review Of PCLinuxOS

Filed under
Linux

Sometimes while I review distros I come across some cool distros that many persons don’t know about. PCLinuxOS is one of them. A user-friendly, stable and quite cool in features and app selection are the things that made me love this distro.

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more

Android/Linux Devices: Fire OS/Fire HD, Chromebook Pixel, Pixel 2 XL

Filed under
Android
Google
  • New Amazon Fire HD 10 adds full HD display, hands-free Alexa

    Amazon has made concessions to hit that price point, of course—mostly via the limitations of Fire OS—but let's start with the good stuff. The 10.1-inch, 1920×1200 pixel IPS screen is colourful, bright, and has excellent viewing angles. It's laminated to the glass, too, making it clear and easy to read. The shiny rear surface of the old Fire 10 has been given the shove, replaced with a hard-wearing, textured plastic that provides plenty of grip, without feeling cheap (or, at least more premium than the price tag suggests).

  • Meet the really cheap Google Home Mini and really expensive Chromebook Pixel 3

    Android fansite Droid Life is on fire today with a big series of leaks of Google's upcoming hardware launches. After showing off pictures and pricing for the Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL, the site has details on the new "Google Home Mini," a second smartphone-powered Daydream VR headset, and a new flagship Chromebook Pixel.

    First up is the new "Google Home Mini," a smaller version of the Google Home, which will retail for just $50. The colors here are "Chalk" (white/grey), "Charcoal" (black), and "Coral" (red). Like the Amazon Echo Dot, the Google Home Mini skips the thumping speaker setup for a smaller, cheaper form factor meant more for commands and Q&A sessions rather than for music.

  • The Pixel 2 XL price jumps $80, now starts at $849

Development: RTOS, LipidFinder, Github Threat, and Stack Overflow Survey

Filed under
Development
  • RTOS Primer, Part Two: Real Time Applications

    Employing Linux as an embedded RTOS has several advantages that make it highly attractive on a number of levels, specifically the most important concern these days, which seems to be cost. The second concern is security; Linux proves to be pretty secure in comparison to several common alternatives like Windows.

  • LipidFinder: An Open-Source Python Workflow for Novel Lipid Discovery

    Obtaining precise, high-quality lipidomic (or metabolomic) datasets comes with its challenges. One factor that I am sure comes to mind is the ability to minimize, or even better, eliminate those large numbers of artefacts that could otherwise hinder your mass spectrometry data analysis, to ensure accurate interpretation.

  • The Github threat

    The Github application belongs to a single entity, Github Inc, a US company which manage it alone. So, a unique company under US legislation manages the access to most of Free Software application code sources, which may be a problem with groups using it when a code source is no longer available, for political or technical reason.

  • Stack Overflow gives an even closer look at developer salaries

    Today, Stack Overflow announced a slightly more useful application for that same data, with the Stack Overflow Salary Calculator. Tell it where you live, how much experience and education you have, and what kind of developer you are, and it will tell you the salary range you should expect to make in five national markets (US, Canada, UK, France, Germany) and a handful of cities (New York, San Francisco, Seattle, Toronto, London, Paris, Berlin).

Security: Equifax, Kodi, Infrared, and Windows XP in 2017

Filed under
Security
  • Safer but not immune: Cloud lessons from the Equifax breach
  • Warning: If you are using this Kodi repository, you could be in danger

    Kodi is quite possibly the best media center software of all time. If you are looking to watch videos or listen to music, the open source solution provides an excellent overall experience. Thanks to its support for "addons," it has the potential to become better all the time. You see, developers can easily add new functionality by writing an addon for the platform. And yes, some addons can be used for piracy, but not all of them are. These addons, such as Exodus and Covenant, are normally added using a repository, which hosts them.

    [...]

    We do not know 100 percent if the person that re-registered the metalkettle name on GitHub is planning anything evil, but it is better to be safe than sorry.

  • Infrared signals in surveillance cameras let malware jump network air gaps

    The malware prototype could be a crucial ingredient for attacks that target some of the world's most sensitive networks. Militaries, energy producers, and other critical infrastructure providers frequently disconnect such networks from the Internet as a precaution. In the event malware is installed, there is no way for it to make contact with attacker-controlled servers that receive stolen data or issue new commands. Such airgaps are one of the most basic measures for securing highly sensitive information and networks.

    The proof-of-concept malware uses connected surveillance cameras to bridge such airgaps. Instead of trying to use the Internet to reach attacker-controlled servers, the malware weaves passwords, cryptographic keys, and other types of data into infrared signals and uses a camera's built-in infrared lights to transmit them. A nearby attacker then records the signals with a video camera and later decodes embedded secrets. The same nearby attackers can embed data into infrared signals and beam them to an infected camera, where they're intercepted and decoded by the network malware. The covert channel works best when attackers have a direct line of sight to the video camera, but non-line-of-sight communication is also possible in some cases.

  • Manchester police still relies on Windows XP

    England's second biggest police force has revealed that more than one in five of its computers were still running Windows XP as of July.
    Greater Manchester Police told the BBC that 1,518 of its PCs ran the ageing operating system, representing 20.3% of all the office computers it used.
    Microsoft ended nearly all support for the operating system in 2014. Experts say its use could pose a hacking risk.
    The figure was disclosed as part of a wider Freedom of Information request.
    "Even if security vulnerabilities are identified in XP, Microsoft won't distribute patches in the same way it does for later releases of Windows," said Dr Steven Murdoch, a cyber-security expert at University College London.

Flock 2017, Fedora 27, and New Fedora 26 (F26) ISO

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Flock 2017: How to make your application into a Flatpak?
  • Flock to Fedora 2017
  • Flock 2017 – A Marketing talk about a new era to come.

    I had two session at Flock this year, one done by me and another in support of Robert Mayr in the Mindshare one, if there were been any need for discussing.
    Here I’m talking about my session: Marketing – tasks and visions (I will push the report about the second one after Robert’s one, for completion).

    In order to fit the real target of a Flock conference (that is a contributor conference, not a show where people must demonstrate how much cool they are; we know it!) is to bring and show something new, whether ideas, software, changes and so on, and discuss with other contributors if they’re really innovative, useful and achievable.

  • F26-20170918 Updated Live isos released
  • GSoC2017 Final — Migrate Plinth to Fedora Server
  • Building Modules for Fedora 27

    Let me start with a wrong presumption that you have everything set up – you are a packager who knows what they want to achieve, you have a dist-git repository created, you have all the tooling installed. And of course, you know what Modularity is, and how and why do we use modulemd to define modular content. You know what Host, Platform, and Bootstrap modules are and how to use them.

Will Microsoft love Linux to death? Shuttleworth and Stallman on whether Windows 10 is free software's friend

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Richard Stallman is a free-software activist and creator of the GNU OS that forms part of the basis of modern GNU/Linux distros. He believes that Microsoft's decision to build a Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) amounts to an attempt to extinguish software that users are free to run, copy, distribute, study, change and improve.

"It certainly looks that way. But it won't be so easy to extinguish us, because our reasons for using and advancing free software are not limited to practical convenience," he said.

"We want freedom. As a way to use computers in freedom, Windows is a non-starter."

Read more

A look at some great Linux & SteamOS racing games available in 2017

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

We’ve come a long way since SuperTuxKart, here’s my little listicle of interesting racing games available for Linux & SteamOS. All titles have been tested either by me, or someone else on the GOL team.

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Linux Kernel 4.12 Reached End of Life, Users Are Urged to Move to Linux 4.13

Filed under
Linux

Greg Kroah-Hartman published on Wednesday new maintenance updates for various of the supported Linux kernel branches that he maintains, including the Linux 4.12 series, which appears to have reached end of life.

Read more

Also: Linux 4.9.51

Linux 4.13.3

Linux 4.12.14

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
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What Is DNF Package Manager And How To Use It

​A package file is an archive which contains the binaries and other resources that make software and the pre and post installation scripts. They also provide the information regarding dependencies and other packages required for the installation and running of the software. Read
more

FSFE: ‘German public sector a digital laggard’

With their lacklustre approach to free software, German public services remain behind other European member states, says the Free Software Foundation Europe (FSFE). When asked, the current governing parties’ say they support free software, but their statements are contradicted by the lack of action, the advocacy group says. In early September, the FSFE published its analysis of the free software policies put forward by the main political parties on the ballot, in preparation for Germany’s parliamentary elections on 24 September. This analysis (in German) is far more detailed than an earlier report generated by the Digital-O-Mat, a web portal set up to focus on political parties’ positions on 12 digital topics. Read more New release: ISA² interoperability test bed software v1.1.0

PocketBeagle: An Ultra-tiny, Open-source, Linux-powered Development Board

BeagleBoard.org has revealed its latest development board named PocketBeagle. It’s an ultra-tiny and open source USB-key-fob computer that’s crafted for DIYers, hobbyists, and educators. PocketBeagle is based on Octavo Systems OSD3358-SM 21mm x 21mm system-in-package, which gives it 512MB DDR3 RAM, 1-GHz ARM Cortex-A8 CPU, and 2x 200-MHz PRUs. It comes with integrated power/battery management as well. Read more

Security: SEC Breach, DNSSEC, FinFisher, CCleaner and CIA