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Sunday, 28 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Repliessort icon Last Post
Story Linux Kernel Security is Lacking? srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:42pm
Story Did SCO end up helping Linux? srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:42pm
Story Night that the Lights went Out in TN srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 12:46am
Story More Summit Notes srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:43pm
Story New Slack is Out srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 5:01pm
Story New O'Reilly Security Book Released srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:53pm
Story 97 bugs found in MySQL srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:54pm
Story Intel Has Been Busy Busy Busy srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:54pm
Story On the Redmond Front srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:55pm
Story M$ Continues its Attack srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:56pm

5 Strange Linux Distributions That Are Useful In Their Own Way

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Some of the weirder things you can find on the internet can be Linux distributions. Linux varies from tiny, 11mb terminals to eye candy leaking, feature packed desktop environments. It ranges from heavy metal 'buntu to super secure, containerized linux.

Because Linux is open source and free, anyone can edit it to their hearts content. Below are some of the more interesting edits, in descending order of usefulness to strangeness.

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KaOS Linux - One Of The Best KDE Distros

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

KaOS Linux remains one of the most aesthetically pleasing Linux distros around sporting the beautiful KDE desktop environment. A visit to the KaOS Linux homepage clearly informs on the focus the developers that have taken with this distro. They describe it as a lean KDE distribution built from scratch and focus on Qt and KDE. The developers pride themselves on the fact that all their efforts are focused on one DE (KDE), one toolkit (Qt) and the one architecture (x86_64).

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Lessons learned from using xmonad for a year

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Last year I switched to xmonad in the strive for a configurable yet minimalist environment. So far I am pretty satisfied with it. I’ve never experienced any crashes or slowdowns related to it, works easily for most of the tasks, and supports multi monitor setup. It is highly configurable and well documented, so it’s easy and fun to customize the whole environment to suit your unique workflows.

In fact, it’s so minimal by default, that my first task was to figure out how I would use my system and configure it configure accordingly.

I think it’s great to stop sometimes and rethink our tools and processes, explore different means to solve day-to-day problems and identify what could be improved. I like tinkering and seeking new stuff in my free time anyway, so starting with a minimalistic environment was very inspiring, because it forced me to rethink even some of the basic aspects of my workflows.

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12 biggest Android smartphone launches of August

Filed under
Android

Planning to buy a new smartphone? How about checking out some new launches?

The month of August saw smartphone manufacturers launching some great devices in the market, including three flagship devices.

So for those of you who are in the market for a new smartphone, here are 12 of the biggest launches (so far) to make things easier.

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KDE/Akademy

Filed under
KDE

Q4OS 1.6, Orion

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The significant Q4OS 1.6 'Orion' release receives the most recent Trinity R14.0.3 stable version. Trinity R14.0.3 is the third maintenance release of the R14 series, it is intended to promptly bring bug fixes to users, while preserving overall stability. The complete list and release notes you will find on the Trinity desktop environment website.

New Q4OS 1.6 release includes set of new features and fixes. The default desktop look has been slightly changed, Q4OS 'Bourbon' start menu and taskbar has been polished a bit and has got a few enhancements, for example the icons size varies proportionally to the system panel. Native Desktop profiler tool has got new, optimized 'software to install' list.

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Learning More About Explicit Fencing & Android's Sync Framework

Filed under
Android
Linux

With the sync validation framework leaving the staging area in Linux 4.9 and other work going on around the Android sync framework and explicit fencing, this functionality is becoming a reality that ultimately benefits the Linux desktop.

Collabora developer Gustavo Padovan presented at this week's LinuxCon 2016 conference about explicit fencing support in the mainline kernel with a "new era of graphics."

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Leftovers: Software Development

Filed under
Development
  • fakecloud
  • A new version of pristine-tar
  • Getting RSS feeds for news websites that don’t provide them

    On the technical side, this seems to be one of the most stable pieces of software I ever wrote. It never crashed or otherwise failed since I started running it, and fortunately I also didn’t have to update the HTML parsing code yet because of website changes.

    It’s written in Haskell, using the Scotty web framework, Cereal serialization library for storing the history of the past articles, http-conduit for fetching the websites, and html-conduit for parsing the HTML. Overall a very pleasant experience, thanks to the language being very convenient to write and preventing most silly mistakes at compile-time, and the high quality of the libraries.

  • Quick Highlight

    Martin Blanchard put together a new “quick highlight” plugin for Builder this last week. It was a great example of how to submit a new feature, so I just wanted to highlight it here. Post to bugzilla, attach a patch, and we will review quickly and help with any additional integration that might be necessary.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Linux Development and LinuxCon

Filed under
Linux
  • Linus Torvalds says GPL was defining factor in Linux's success

    Linus Torvalds and Dirk Hohndel, vice president and chief of open source at VMware, discussed the role that GNU GPL played in the success of Linux during a keynote conversation this week at LinuxCon NA in Toronto.

    Hohndel, who has been involved with the kernel for a very long time, said that during the past 25 years there have been many challenges, and one of the biggest challenges was the possibility of fragmentation. "How do we keep one single kernel?" he asked.

    "I used to be worried about fragmentation, and I used to think that it was inevitable at some point," said Torvalds. “Everyone was looking at the history of Linux and comparing it with UNIX. People would say that it’s going to fail because it's going to fragment. That's what happened before, so why even bother?"

    What made the difference was the license. "FSF [Free Software Foundation] and I don't have a loving relationship, but I love GPL v2," said Torvalds. "I really think the license has been one of the defining factors in the success of Linux because it enforced that you have to give back, which meant that the fragmentation has never been something that has been viable from a technical standpoint."

  • Making Use Of eBPF In The Mainline Linux Kernel

    One of the exciting innovations within the Linux kernel in the past few years has been extending the Berkeley Packet Filter (BPF) to become a more generalized in-kernel virtual machine. The eBPF work with recent versions of the Linux kernel allow it to be used by more than just networking so that these programs can be used for tracing, security, and more.

  • Linux turns 25 with a brilliant history

    Chances are, you use it every day. Linux runs every Android phone and tablet on Earth. And even if you’re on an iPhone or a Mac or a Windows machine, Linux is working behind the scenes, across the Internet, serving up most of the webpages you view and powering most of the apps you use. Facebook, Google, Pinterest, Wikipedia—it’s all running on Linux.

    Now, Linux is finding its way onto televisions, thermostats, and even cars. As software creeps into practically every aspect of our lives, so does the OS designed by Linus Torvalds.

  • Intel Lost Another Open-Source Driver Developer To Google Earlier This Summer

    There was another long-time Intel open-source Linux graphics driver developer that left the company earlier this summer and is now working at Google on the Chrome/Chromium OS graphics stack.

    Among the notable departures in the past few months from Intel's Open-Source Technology Center were Jesse Barnes, Wayland-founder Kristian Høgsberg, and Dirk Hohndel and apparently others that went under the radar or outside of our area of focus. Another graphics driver developer no longer at Intel is Chad Versace.

  • OpenGL ES 3.1 For Haswell Lands With Intel's Mesa Driver

Distro Development: Rescatux and Bodhi

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Rescatux 0.40 beta 9 released

    Many code in the grub side and in the windows registry side has been rewritten so that these new features could be rewritten. As a consequence it will be easier to maintain Rescapp.

    Finally the chntpw based options which modify the Windows registry now perform a backup of the Windows registry files in the unlikely case you want to undo some of the changes that Rescapp performs.

    I guess that in the future there will be a feature to be able to restore such backups from Rescapp itself, but, let’s focus on releasing an stable release. It’s been a while since the last one.

    UEFI feedback is still welcome. Specially if the Debian installation disks work for you but not the Rescatux ones.

  • Bodhi 4.0.0 Updates and July Donation Totals

    Late last month I posted a first alpha look at Bodhi 4.0.0. Work since then has been coming along slowly due to a few unpredictable issues and my own work schedule outside of Bodhi being hectic over the summer. Bodhi 4.0.0 will be happening, but likely not with a stable release until September. I am traveling again this weekend, but am hoping to get out a full alpha release with 32bit and non-PAE discs next week.

Devices and Android

Filed under
Android
Linux

Leftovers: BSD/LLVM

Filed under
Development
Graphics/Benchmarks
BSD

Emma A LightWeight Database Management Tool For Linux

Filed under
Linux

Today who does not interact with databases and if you're a programmer then the database management is your daily task. For database management, there is a very popular tool called, MySQL Workbench. It's a tool that ships with tonnes of functionalities. But not all of us as beginner programmers use all Workbench features. So here we also have a very lightweight database manager in Linux, Emma.

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LLVM Clang vs. GCC Compiler Benchmarks On FreeBSD 11.0

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

FreeBSD 11.0 continues to ship the LLVM Clang compiler by default (v3.8) while GCC is available via ports and pkg. For this benchmarking, I compared the Clang 3.8 performance to GCC 6.1, GCC 5.4, GCC 4.8.5m and GCC 4.6.4 as obtained via FreeBSD pkg. All of the tests were done on the same system and no other changes were made to the FreeBSD installation between switching out the used compiler.

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OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • First FSFE Summit Will Focus on Social Issues and Strategies

    Free Software advocates from all over Europe will be meeting in Berlin Sept. 2-4 at the first ever Free Software Foundation Europe's summit.

    This 2016 event, besides being long overdue, also marks 15 years since the creation of the FSFE. Throughout its history, the FSFE has had its fair share of landmark achievements. It has been instrumental in a successful antitrust-case against a big software corporation that intended to dominate the market of personal computers. It managed to keep software patents unenforceable in Europe, thereby avoiding a veritable apocalypse for European small and medium-sized tech companies. And, it worked alongside gpl-violations.org to get free licenses vindicated in German courts, setting ground-breaking precedents for the whole of the EU.

    One of the main missions of the Free Software community in general, and the FSFE in particular, is to put users back into the driver's seat, so that people control technology and not the other way around. This may seem like a lofty goal, but it would likely not be an exaggeration to say that the FSFE has transformed the foundations of IT in Europe and that it has had a deep impact on anybody who has used a computer, a smartphone, or a tablet in the last decade or so.

  • Facebook's computer vision tool, Linux at 25, and more news
  • Is energy industry ready to join open source world?

    Halliburton is moving to foster cooperation in processing of data

  • ‘Show-and-Tell’ Cool Maker Projects on Hangouts

    Wow! This live Hangout show looks a lot like a DIY version of one of the morning shows on over-the-air TV — and if there’s any doubt that the maker movement thrives on open source, the first guest’s project is all about Python and Arduino. Be sure to check out the cool Star Trek combadge. Beam us up, Mr. Shapiro!

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More in Tux Machines

Opera Data Breach, Security of Personal Data

  • Opera User? Your Stored Passwords May Have Been Stolen
    Barely a week passes without another well-known web company suffering a data breach or hack of some kind. This week it is Opera’s turn. Opera Software, the company behind the web-browser and recently sold to a Chinese consortium for $600 million, reported a ‘server breach incident’ on its blog this weekend.
  • When it comes to protecting personal data, security gurus make their own rules
    Marcin Kleczynski, CEO of a company devoted to protecting people from hackers, has safeguarded his Twitter account with a 14-character password and by turning on two-factor authentication, an extra precaution in case that password is cracked. But Cooper Quintin, a security researcher and chief technologist at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, doesn’t bother running an anti-virus program on his computer. And Bruce Schneier? The prominent cryptography expert and chief technology officer of IBM-owned security company Resilient Systems, won’t even risk talking about what he does to secure his devices and data.

Android Leftovers

FOSS and Linux Events

  • On speaking at community conferences
    Many people reading this have already suffered me talking to them about Prometheus. In personal conversation, or in the talks I gave at DebConf15 in Heidelberg, the Debian SunCamp in Lloret de Mar, BRMlab in Prague, and even at a talk on a different topic at the RABS in Cluj-Napoca.
  • TPM Microconference Accepted into LPC 2016
    Although trusted platform modules (TPMs) have been the subject of some controversy over the years, it is quite likely that they have important roles to play in preventing firmware-based attacks, protecting user keys, and so on. However, some work is required to enable TPMs to successfully play these roles, including getting TPM support into bootloaders, securely distributing known-good hashes, and providing robust and repeatable handling of upgrades. In short, given the ever-more-hostile environments that our systems must operate in, it seems quite likely that much help will be needed, including from TPMs. For more details, see the TPM Microconference wiki page.
  • More translations added to the SFD countdown
    Software Freedom Day is celebrated all around the world and as usual our community helps us to provide marketing materials in their specific languages. While the wiki is rather simple to translate, the Countdown remains a bit more complicated and time consuming to localize. One needs to edit the SVG file and generate roughly a 100 pictures, then upload them to the wiki. Still this doesn’t scare the SFD teams around the world and we are happy to announce three more languages are ready to be used: French, Chinese and German!

Second FreeBSD 11.0 Release Candidate Restores Support for 'nat global' in IPFW

Glen Barber from the FreeBSD project announced the availability of the second RC (Release Candidate) development build of the upcoming FreeBSD 11.0 operating system. Read more