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Monday, 24 Sep 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Repliessort icon Last Post
Story Linux Kernel Security is Lacking? srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:42pm
Story Did SCO end up helping Linux? srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:42pm
Story Night that the Lights went Out in TN srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 12:46am
Story More Summit Notes srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:43pm
Story New Slack is Out srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 5:01pm
Story New O'Reilly Security Book Released srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:53pm
Story 97 bugs found in MySQL srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:54pm
Story Intel Has Been Busy Busy Busy srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:54pm
Story On the Redmond Front srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:55pm
Story M$ Continues its Attack srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:56pm

Linux developers threaten to pull “kill switch”

Filed under
Development
Linux

Linux powers the internet, the Android in your pocket, and perhaps even some of your household appliances. A controversy over politics is now seeing some of its developers threatening to withdraw the license to all of their code, potentially destroying or making the whole Linux kernel unusable for a very long time.

Read more

Games: SC Controller, PlayOnLinux, OpenRA, Galaxy in Turmoil

Filed under
Gaming

DXVK 0.80 Released

Filed under
Software
  • DXVK 0.80 Released With Initial State Cache, Direct3D 11.1 Feature Level

    Development on DXVK for mapping Direct3D (primarily D3D11) atop Vulkan continues speeding along for boosting Windows gaming on Wine / Steam Play (Proton). Ending out the weekend is the release of DXVK 0.80.

    The DXVK 0.80 features the initial pipeline state cache, which can help reduce stuttering within games on subsequent runs (once the pipeline state has been cached) and all around improve the experience. DXVK also now supports Direct3D Feature Level 11_1, has minor reductions in CPU usage overhead, and has some fixes affecting APU systems, Assetto Corsa, and Project Cars 2.

  • DXVK 0.80 is out with a new cache to reduce stutter and further CPU overhead improvements

    DXVK [GitHub], which provides a Vulkan-based D3D11 and D3D10 implementation for use in Wine has a new build out. The pace of development on this continues to absolutely mesmerise me, with each release bringing something really interesting. Reminder: See my interview with the creator of DXVK here.

KDE: Latest on Usability & Productivity

Filed under
KDE

Linux 4.19-rc5

Filed under
Linux

As almost everyone knows, it's been an "interesting" week from a social
point-of-view. But from the technical side, -rc5 looks totally normal.

The diffstat is a bit higher than previous -rc5's, but the number of
trees pulled is lower, so overall, pretty much all is on track. I'm not
seeing any major "these bugs are not being fixed!" type of reports, so I
can hope that the initial churn that -rc1 threw at everyone is under
control.

The majority size-wise of changes here are with more tests being added
and fixed up, but there is also the usual networking, x86, sound, drm,
ppc, and other fixes. Full details are in the shortlog below.

Read more

Also: Greg Kroah-Hartman Releases Linux 4.19-RC5 Following An "Interesting" Week

The Next Linux Kernel To Support Creative Sound BlasterX AE-5 Sound Cards

Filed under
Linux

The next major Linux kernel cycle whether it is called Linux 4.20 or ends up being called Linux 5.0 as expected is now slated to carry support for the high-end Creative Labs' Sound BlasterX AE-5 sound card.

Earlier this week I reported on Linux patches for the Sound BlasterX AE-5 coming from a contributor. The AE-5 is a ~$150 PCI Express sound card with SABRE32 Ultra Class DAC, BlasterX Acoustic Engine, and other high-end audio features and for suiting to gamers/enthusiasts also has an RGB lighting controller onboard.

Read more

The Reiser4 File-System Is Now Available For The Linux 4.18 Kernel

Filed under
Linux

It took several weeks past the initial stable debut of the Linux 4.18 kernel, but the Reiser4 file-system has now been updated to work with this new kernel build.

Read more

Security: 0-Days and Back Doors

Filed under
Security

OpenShot Video Editor Released 2.4.3 – Here’s What’s New

Filed under
Linux

OpenShot is a cross platform video editor available in Linux, Windows and Mac. This beginner’s friendly to advanced users’ video editor comes with huge set to of tools to create your videos, edit videos, cut, add sliding transitions and many more. The free and open source video editor OpenShot lands with latest release with improvements.

Read more

Ubuntu Studio 18.10 Wallpaper Contest Winners

Filed under
Ubuntu

We would like to thank everyone who participated in our wallpaper contest for Ubuntu Studio 18.10! With 487 votes, the top 5 submissions were chosen. The winners can be found at this link.

Additionally, we’d like to announce the new default wallpaper for 18.10, designed by Ubuntu Studio developer Eylul Dogruel, and is pictured to the right.

Read more

Folding@Home Performance Is Looking Good On The GeForce RTX 2080 Ti

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Yesterday I published a number of CUDA and OpenCL benchmarks for the NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti graphics card that happened to show the very strong GPU compote potential for this new Turing GPU. Another workload with promising potential for this powerful but pricey graphics card is Folding@Home.

Folding@Home was accidentally left out of yesterday's RTX 2080 Ti CUDA/OpenCL comparison with simply forgetting to add the FAHBench test profile to the run queue. But as there is often interest in seeing the FAHBench performance on new GPUs by at least a few of the premium enablers, I ran some extra tests just looking at the Folding@Home performance and here are those results today.

Read more

Games: Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation, Humble Monthly and DXVK Updates

Filed under
Gaming

FOSS, standard essential patents and FRAND in the European Union

Filed under
OSS
Legal

As part of the research project on “The Interaction between Open Source Software and FRAND licensing in Standardisation”, a workshop was organised by the European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC) in collaboration with Directorate General Communications Networks, Content and Technology (CONNECT) to present and discuss the intermediate results to date. The workshop took place in Brussels on September 18, 2018. I presented a set of observations from the research on the case studies performed as part of the project that are outlined below. Other speakers where Catharina Maracke on the issue of legal compliance between Open Source and FRAND licenses, Bruce Perens on “Community Dynamics in Open Source”, and Andy Updegrove on “Dynamics in Standardisation”.

You may ask what the relevance of this debate is for the wider Free and Open Source Software community. The obvious answer is that to distribute software “without restriction”, the user needs all the usage rights associated with the program. While most FOSS contributors assume that this is naturally the central motivation for anybody to contribute in the first place, there is a long history of attempts to maintain some sort of exclusive control over a piece of FOSS code, possibly using other rights than copyright.

Read more

Graphics: AMDGPU, SVGA and Sway/Wayland

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • In-Progress AMDGPU Updates For Linux 4.20~5.0 Have DC Update, New Polaris ID

    -
    Last week AMD sent in their big feature pull request of AMDGPU driver changes to DRM-Next for the Linux 4.20 (or what will likely be Linux 5.0) and since then more changes have been queuing in their work-in-progress branch.

    That last pull request was a big one with AMD Raven2 support, AMD Picasso APU enablement, more Vega 20 upbringing work including initial xGMI support, AMDKFD merging into AMDGPU, VCN JPEG engine support, GPUVM virtual memory improvements, and various other changes as outlined in the aforelinked article.

  • VMware's SVGA Gallium3D Driver Enables OpenGL 3.3 Compatibility Profile Support

    In preparation for the upcoming VMware Fusion 11 and VMware Workstation 15 releases, their Mesa/Gallium3D-based driver stack for Linux guest GPU acceleration has been seeing a variety of updates.

    Earlier this month was a big code push including many new features to its "SVGA" Gallium3D driver like MSAA, a various assortment of new OpenGL extensions, and other changes in step with their latest "VMWGFX" Linux kernel DRM drivers.

  • Sway 1.0 Alpha 6 Released, Now Supports Moving/Resizing Tiled Windows With The Mouse

    Released on Friday was the sixth alpha release of the upcoming Sway 1.0 Wayland compositor release that still strives for compatibility with the i3 window manager workflow.

    Sway 1.0 has already added a ton of new functionality like using the new wlroots Wayland library, output rotation, fractional scaling, daisy-changed DisplayPort monitors, better HiDPI support, DMA-BUF additions for screenshot capture and real-time video capturing, atomic additions, floating window improvements, better multi-GPU support, virtual keyboard protocol support, and a heck of a lot more.

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Zynq UltraScale+ module runs Linux at industrial temperatures

iWave’s “iW-RainboW-G30M” compute module runs Linux on a quad -A53 Zynq UltraScale+ SoC with 192K to 504K FPGA logic cells. The module ships with 6GB DDR4 and 8GB eMMC and supports -40 to 85°C temperatures. iWave has posted details on a computer-on-module built around Xilinx’s 64-bit, hybrid Arm/FPGA based Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoC. Unlike the SODIMM-style iW-RainboW-G28M that iWave shipped earlier this year based on the dual Cortex-A9 Zynq-7000 FPGA SoC, the new iW-RainboW-G30M is a larger, 95 x 75mm module with dual 240-pin board-to-board interfaces. There’s an optional Zynq Ultrascale+ Development Kit, but no details were available. Read more

Desktops You Don't Control Anymore

  • We’re inching closer to DaaS Windows
    Today’s Windows isn’t your dad’s Windows. Microsoft is finally acknowledging that IT professionals are fed up with Windows 10’s binannual major release cadence. So, to address this, it has come up with several new ideas, one of which comes straight out of the Ubuntu Linux desktop playbook.
  • Windows update problems: Microsoft reveals why recent patches broke some PCs
    Microsoft is preparing to rerelease a two-year old update for Windows 7 that's necessary to avoid 'error 0x8000FFFF' when installing its latest security updates. If your organization's Windows 7 PCs failed to install Microsoft's two most recent monthly rollup updates or the September security-only update, it's because the affected systems were missing a servicing stack update (SSU) that Microsoft released in October 2016.

Ubuntu 18.10 Performance Is Looking Up, But Clear Linux Still Leads In Many Tests

With less than one month until Ubuntu 18.10 "Cosmic Cuttlefish" releases, I have begun my usual benchmarking dance in checking out how the Ubuntu performance is looking to its current release, in this case the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS "Bionic Beaver". Our first performance look at Ubuntu 18.10 is with a mix of seven Intel and AMD desktop systems while using Ubuntu 18.04 LTS with all updates, Ubuntu 18.10 in its current near-final form, and using Intel's Clear Linux as a gold standard reference with it generally offering the leading out-of-the-box Linux x86_64 performance of major distributions. Read more Also: Ethereum Crypto Mining Performance Benchmarks On The GeForce RTX 2080 Ti