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Tuesday, 27 Jun 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Repliessort icon Last Post
Story Linux Kernel Security is Lacking? srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:42pm
Story Did SCO end up helping Linux? srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:42pm
Story Night that the Lights went Out in TN srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 12:46am
Story More Summit Notes srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:43pm
Story New Slack is Out srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 5:01pm
Story New O'Reilly Security Book Released srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:53pm
Story 97 bugs found in MySQL srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:54pm
Story Intel Has Been Busy Busy Busy srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:54pm
Story On the Redmond Front srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:55pm
Story M$ Continues its Attack srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:56pm

Sony's unorthodox take on AI is now open source

Filed under
OSS
  • Sony's unorthodox take on AI is now open source
  • Sony's AI software to become open source

    Sony will break from tradition among Japanese tech peers by making its artificial intelligence software freely available, as the company seeks to expand its presence in the field through outside collaboration with other businesses and research institutions.

    The Japanese electronics company has developed AI independently since the 1990s but has decided to open-source its deep learning software known as a neural network library. The software, which learns by mimicking the neural networks in human brains, can be used in products.

    Sony's software can be used for face and voice recognition based on deep learning abilities. The technology has been applied to predict the contract price of real estate transactions, for instance, and it is expected to be used in the development of home appliances and robots by third parties.

10 Most important open source networking projects

Filed under
OSS

There’s an open source insurgence happening in the networking industry.

Increasing demands on the network to scale to unprecedented levels and at the same time become more customized to specific use cases has led to the emergence of open source projects to support them.

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OnePlus 5 review: This mid-range Android phone is speedy inside, but stale outside

Filed under
Android
Reviews

There are certain things you can usually count on in a OnePlus phone: great performance, an awesome price, and a touch of originality. But with the OnePlus 5, you’re only getting the first two parts of the three-part equation.

The OnePlus 5 is packed with the latest components on the inside, but its display is nothing special. It’s still a good deal cheaper than other premium phones, but even at a starting price of $479, it’s not quite a killer bargain. And its design, while nice-looking, is derivative of both previous OnePlus phones as well as Apple’s aging iPhone 7 Plus.

This time around, OnePlus’s new flagship isn’t about being different. It’s about fitting in. Indeed, OnePlus’s marketing slogan may be “Never Settle,” but it feels like we’re doing an awful lot of settling with the OnePlus 5.

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Nokia 3 review: Nokia plus Android is a winning combination

Filed under
Android
Reviews

Comebacks are a very hard nut to crack. Expectations run high -- fans and loyalists who have waited years for their beloved brand or team or product to come back are mostly met with disappointment when the second coming cannot match up to past success. That is always the risk for the brand Nokia, which is making a comeback in the phone market using Android via the Finnish company HMD Global. The first Nokia smartphone that HMD Global has launched in India is Nokia 3. And expectations from it are running very high.

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Open Source Raspberry Pi Tablet Hits Kickstarter (video)

Filed under
Linux
OSS

A new open source Raspberry Pi tablet has this week been launched via Kickstarter called the Diskio Pi, thanks to developer Guillaume Debray based in France.

The Diskio Pi has been specifically designed to provide a versatile open source tablet which is compatible with Raspberry Pi hardware and Odroid to provide users with a scalable touch terminal. Watch the demonstration video below to learn more about the Diskio Pi tablet which you build yourself to your exact specifications.

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How to turn a Raspberry Pi into an eBook server

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

Recently Calibre 3.0 was released which enables users to read books in the browser! Note that Raspbian's repositories have not yet been updated yet (as of this writing).

eBooks are a great way for teachers, librarians, and others to share books, classroom materials, or other documents with students—provided you have ready and reliable access to broadband. But even if you have low or no connectivity, there's an easy solution: Create an eBook server with the open source Calibre eBook management software running on a Raspberry Pi 3. Here's how I did it—and you can, too.

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Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat

Security: British Dependence on Microsoft and Ransom

Filed under
Security
  • Cyberattack on UK parliament exploited weak email passwords
  • UK energy industry cyber-attack fears are 'off the scale'

     

    One obvious target is the smart meters that are being installed in every home by the end of 2020, to automate meter readings. The Capita-run body set up to handle the data, the DCC, is being treated as critical national infrastructure and the company’s chief technology officer insists the data is safe.

  • HMS Queen Elizabeth is 'running outdated Windows XP', raising cyber attack fears [Ed:  All versions of Windows are not secure. By design! iophk: "nearly all of the Wannacry victims were Vista 7 users, this article is pure disinformation"]

    Fears have been raised that Britain’s largest ever warship could be vulnerable to cyber attacks after it emerged it appears to be running the outdated Microsoft Windows XP.

    As HMS Queen Elizabeth left its dockyard for the first time to begin sea trials, it was revealed the £3.5billion aircraft carrier is apparently using the same software that left the NHS exposed.

  • Paying only encourages criminals, ransomware victims told

     

    Security company Kaspersky Lab has urged victims of ransomware not to pay when they are caught with their files encrypted by an attack. In a report on the ransomware scourge, the company said paying up would make one a bigger target the next time around.  

Vulkan vs. OpenGL Linux Game CPU Core Scaling

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

After carrying out the P-State/CPUFreq governor comparison with a focus on OpenGL and Vulkan Linux games, next I ran some fresh numbers seeing how well modern OpenGL/Vulkan Linux games are scaling across multiple CPU cores.

For games sporting both a Vulkan and OpenGL renderer, I tested them while adjusting the HT/core count via the motherboard BIOS of the MSI C236A WORKSTATION board used for testing. The CPU was the Intel Xeon E3-1280 v5 and it was tested in its stock configuration of 8 threads (4 cores + HT), 4 cores, 3 cores, 2 cores, and then finally a single CPU core. Each time the various OpenGL/Vulkan Linux games were run with the OpenGL and Vulkan renderers, all automated via the Phoronix Test Suite benchmarking software.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Manjaro Linux 17.0.2 Arch-based operating system is here with GNOME, KDE, and Xfce

    Many Linux snobs push the Arch operating system as the greatest thing since sliced bread. In fact, some members of the Arch community (not all of them) can be downright mean and unpleasant to non-users. Not using Arch? Ugh. Peasant! In reality, while Arch is a fine OS (stable and fast), it can be very hard to install and set up, and quite frankly, often not worth the hassle. People have lives to live, and sometimes it is easy to forget that an operating system and associated computer are tools -- not a religion.

  • [Older] Friends, syslog-ng, Package Hub, ARM: openSUSE conference 2017

    Being a long-time openSUSE user, I visit the openSUSE conference not only to present on one of its components – syslog-ng – but also to meet friends and learn about new technologies and the plans for the upcoming year. Some talks, like those about Package Hub, were very interesting and important also from a syslog-ng perspective. Of course, I also joined a few talks for my personal interest, like the one on the new ARM devices supported by openSUSE.

  • UK Army to Use Red Hat OS, Automation Platform for Private Cloud Needs
  • Linux-ready PC/104 board runs on 6 to 7 Watts

    Win Enterprises announced a “MB-83310” PC/104 SBC with a Vortex DX3 SoC, GbE, Fast Ethernet, SATA, M.2, and a -20 to 70°C operating range.

  • [Older] The Turtlebot 3 has launched

    If you’re familiar with ROS (Robot Operating System), chances are you’re also familiar with the Turtlebot. The first version of the Turtlebot was created back in 2010 to serve as an inexpensive platform for learning ROS. This was followed in 2012 by the Turtlebot 2, which has since become the reference platform for learning ROS. We have a number of them here at Canonical, and we love them, although we have one issue with them: they’re just a tad too big. Taking them on a plane requires one to decide what one loves more, one’s belongings, or the Turtlebot, and to check the other.

  • Ubuntu ranked as 2nd most used IoT OS by Eclipse Foundation survey
  • Conjure-up dev summary: Week 25

    We recently switched over to using a bundled LXD and with that change came a few hiccups in deployments. We've been monitoring the error reports coming in and have made several fixes to improve that journey. If you are one of the ones unable to deploy spells please give this release another go and get in touch with us if you still run into problems.

  • We're looking for Ubuntu 17.10 wallpapers right now!

    Submissions will be handled via Flickr at the Ubuntu 17.10 Free Culture Showcase - Wallpapers group, and the submission window begins now and ends on July 3rd.

  • Atollic TrueSTUDIO, the leading commercial GNU/Eclipse IDE for ARM devices is now available for use on Linux workstations

    Atollic TrueSTUDIO IDE has rapidly become the preferred Eclipse™/GDB/GCC-based software development environment for developers working with ARM-based devices. The Linux hosting announcement is expected to widely increase the popularity of this tool.

  •  

  • Security-Focused Purism Librem 13 & 15 Linux Laptops Go Mainstream with Qubes OS

    Purism, the social purpose corporation focused on designing and manufacturing privacy-conscious hardware and software products, announced the general availability of their security-focused Purism Librem 13 and 15 laptops.

    Until recently, both Purism Librem 13 and Librem 15 laptops were available only as made-to-order, which means that those who wanted to purchase either model would have to order it first and then wait a few months until the device arrived. And now, the company finally managed to scale the production to hold inventory of the laptops.

Newly-Built Software for Slackware

Filed under
Slack
  • What if gcc 7 gives you headaches?

    In Slackware-current we use version 7.1.0 of the gcc compiler suite. These advanced compilers can sometimes be quite a bit more strict about what they accept as valid code. As a consequence, you will regularly run into compilation issues with software. Not just the software made with the scripts on slackbuilds.org, but also some of the software in the Slackware core distribution requires patches in order to get them to compile.

    Until now, I have been lucky to find the patches I needed in the repositories of other distributions, or else developers patched their software themselves. But there will be corner cases where solutions and patches are not readily found, or the developers will simply not support gcc 7. Pale Moon is such a piece of software where the developers recommend compiling with gcc 4.x or as a last resort, gcc 5.

  • Plasma 5 for Slackware – June release

    Slackware64 14.2 users will have to wait another day, but I have uploaded my latest set of Plasma 5 packages for Slackware-current to the ‘ktown’ repository. KDE 5_17.06 contains: KDE Frameworks 5.35.0, Plasma 5.10.2 and Applications 17.04.2. I based this new release on Qt 5.9.0 (at least for Slackware-current… for 14.2 I will stick to Qt 5.7.1).
    NOTE: I will no longer be releasing Plasma 5 packages for 32bit Slackware 14.2.

  • LibreOffice 5.3.4 packages for -current

    When looking for package updates in preparation for a new Slackware Live PLASMA5 edition, I noticed that the Document Foundation had released LibreOffice 5.3.4 without updating their blog with the news – it’s only mentioned on the download page.
    I have built and uploaded Slackware-current packages for libreoffice-5.3.4. If you are on Slackware 14.2 you will probably have to skip this one, as I will not have time for compiling packages the coming weeks (allocates one virtual machine for one day per build, since I can only check on progress in the evenings).
    The package for -current needed to be (re-)built anyway because of the library issue with Slackware’s updated libGLEW which prevented Impress to start.

Tizen and More Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android
Linux

OSS: FOSS in Mappano, Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP), Blender in Class, Kodi Jobs, Innersource

Filed under
OSS
  • Italian municipality calls for sharing of IT solutions

    The council of Mappano (Italy) is calling for public administrations to share their IT solutions. The Mappano municipality is starting from scratch, and the new council has decided to build its IT infrastructure, and offer its eGovernment services, using free and open source software.

  • Windstream joins Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) project to accelerate adoption of open standards for SDN/NFV automation
  • Locks in the classroom – 2017

    For the fifth year now, our grade nine students have been doing 3D modeling using Blender. Our students finished up their first assignments over a month ago, but it’s taken this long for me to get the top models together. So, with no further delay, here are the top models from each of the three grade nine classes (click on the pictures for Full HD renders).

  • Set the WABAC to 1984: Henry Spencer getopt, and the roots of open source

    I excavated a bit of hacker history from old memories today. Not dead history either, but an important beginning of some large good things.

    Here’s how it happened. I got email from a person requesting me to identify a source for the following allegedly famous quote: “All operating systems eventually turn into Unix

  • Traveling “Kodi Repair Men” Are Apparently a Thing Now

    With all the chaos and upheaval in the Kodi addon scene recently, many 'pirate' devices have stopped performing as they did before. This is a problem for the thousands of people who bought their devices ready configured, since they have no idea how they work. Enter the traveling 'Kodi repair men,' who will fix your box in the pub or even your own home.

  • [Older] Does Valve really own Dota? A jury will decide

    The case could also take an interesting open source-based turn thanks to a September 23, 2004 forum post that could be seen as Eul giving up his claim on any rights to Dota. "From this point forward, Dota is now open source," he wrote. "Whoever wishes to release a version of Dota may without my consent, I just ask for a nod in the credits to your map."

    This post "might mean that anyone had permission to build their own versions of Dota on any platform—and to sell their versions of Eul’s creation," as Breyer puts it. Or it might simply mean that Eul was just granting a "limited license" intended for other mod-makers, not for standalone games based on Dota.

  • Innersource: A Guide to the What, Why, and How

    In a nutshell, ‘innersource’ refers to bringing the core principles of open source and community collaboration within the walls of an organization. This involves building an internal community, collaborative engineering workflow, and culture.

  • PDP-8/e Replicated — Introduction

    I am creating a replica of the DEC PDP-8/e architecture in an FPGA from schematics of the original hardware. So how did I end up with a project like this?

    The story begins with me wanting to have a computer with one of those front panels that have many, many lights where you can really see, in real time, what the computer is doing while it is executing code. Not because I am nostalgic for a prior experience with any of those — I was born a bit too late for that and my first computer as a kid was a Commodore 64.

  • [Older] PyCon Pune 2017
  • [Older] My lightning talk in Django Girls PyCon

    In the weekend before PyCon US, we had a Django Girls PyCon workshop in Portland on 12th-13th May. On 12th there were a few lightning talks, and installation before the actual workshop started on 13th.

  • Dreams don’t cost a penny, mumma’s boy Smile

    In the dream, I am going to a Debconf, get bursary and the conference is being held somewhere in Europe, maybe Paris...

  • First Round Talks of Fedora + GNOME at UPN

    Today our local group has traveled many miles to the north of Lima to present our lately work by using Fedora and GNOME as users and developers. Thanks to the organizers of the IT Forum to invite us and support our job as Linux volunteers and very nice potential contributors to GNOME and Fedora and the group we have formed.

Programming: LLVM/Clang, anytime, and Go

Filed under
Development
  • LLVM/Clang Picks Up Support For The Ananas Operating System

    The LLVM Clang compiler toolchain now has mainline support for the Ananas platform.

    Ananas? It's pronounced as "Pineapple" and is self-described as "[consisting] of a kernel, a loader, assorted builds scripts and a standard C library (which is based on the Public Domain C Library, PDCLib). Ananas has a clear goal: technology-wise to be the easiest-to-understand operating system in existance, and license-wise to be the most free operating system imaginable." Ananas is under the liberal Beer-Ware License.

  • anytime 0.3.0
  • an early look at p4 for software networking

    As you know at work we have been trying to find ways to apply compilers technology to the networking space. We will compile high-level configurations into low-level network processing graphs, search algorithms into lookup routines optimized for the target data structures, packet filters into code ready to be further trace-compiled, or hash functions into parallel AVX2 code.

  • A C++ developer looks at Go (the programming language), Part 1: Simple Features

    I’m reading “The Go Programming Language” by Brian Kernighan and Alan Donovan. It is a perfect programming language introduction, clearly written and perfectly structured, with nicely chosen examples. It contains no hand-waving – it’s aware of other languages and briefly acknowledges the choices made in the language design without lengthy discussion.

    As an enthusiastic C++ developer, and a Java developer, I’m not a big fan of the overall language. It seems like an incremental improvement on C, and I’d rather use it than C, but I still yearn for the expressiveness of C++. I also suspect that Go cannot achieve the raw performance of C or C++ due to its safety features, though that maybe depends on compiler optimization. But it’s perfectly valid to knowingly choose safety over performance, particularly if you get more safety and more performance than with Java.

Walmart takes its Amazon battle to the clouds

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

When Amazon moved into brick and mortar with its Whole Foods purchase, many people assumed the battle between Amazon and Walmart for your retail dollar would move to the streets of America. The conflict will be fought there with drones, self-driving delivery trucks, and no-touch stores, but it will also be fought in Amazon's stronghold: The cloud.

While everyone knows about Amazon Web Services (AWS) cloud, Walmart hasn't been neglecting the cloud either. Years ago, Walmart invested in the OpenStack cloud.

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SolydXK 9 Linux Distributions Enter Beta Based on Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch"

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The developers of the Debian-based SolydX and SolydK GNU/Linux distributions announced today that the upcoming SolydXK 9 stable release entered Beta phase with Live ISO images available now for public testing.

Based on the recently released Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system, SolydXK 9 promises to add a new look and feel to both SolydX and SolydK variants by implementing light or dark themes that users can choose during first boot or afterward.

For SolydXK 9, the developers worked on a graphical user interface for the in-house built Solydxk Systems tool, which now lets users encrypt their partitions, select the closest repositories to their location, hold back packages from upgrade, localize or cleanup their system.

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Linux Kernels 4.4.74 LTS and 3.18.58 Fix Memory Leaks and Add More Improvements

Filed under
Linux

Only two days after releasing the Linux 4.11.7 and 4.9.34 LTS kernel updates, Greg Kroah-Hartman is today announcing the availability of new maintenance releases for the long-term supported Linux 4.4 and 3.18 kernel series.

Linux kernels 4.4.74 LTS and 3.18.58 are now available, shipping more than a week after their previous point releases to add various improvements and stability fixes to supported drivers, architectures, and filesystems. According to their appended shortlogs (here and here), a total of 50 files were changed in Linux kernel 4.4.74 LTS, with 253 insertions and 228 deletions, and Linux kernel 3.18.58 changes a total of 53 files, with 353 insertions and 271 deletions.

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Graphics and Displays: 46-inch Touchscreen, OpenGL/Vulkan Benchmarks, Freedreno Development and Mesa

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • 46-inch touchscreen AiO has optional mirror view for augmented reality

    Advantech’s “UTC-542” AiO PC runs Ubuntu or Android on Skylake, and offers hot-swap SATA and a 42.6-inch, IP65 touchscreen with optional mirror coating. Advantech announced a 42.6-inch, 16:9 aspect ratio, all-in-one (AiO) HD touchscreen computer designed for interactive display applications.

  • Intel Kabylake OpenGL/Vulkan Performance With Serious Sam 3 BFE 2017 Update

    This weekend I posted a comparison of OpenGL/Vulkan performance for Radeon and NVIDIA GPUs with Serious Sam 3: BFE now that it's updated to the Vulkan-enabled "Fusion" 2017 update. For those curious about the Intel HD Graphics gaming potential for this game, here are some results.

  • P-State/CPUFreq Governor Tests With Linux 4.12 For OpenGL/Vulkan Games

    For those wondering about the impact on gaming of the different CPUFreq vs. P-State CPU frequency scaling drivers and their different governors, here are some fresh tests using an Intel Skylake CPU with Radeon RX Polaris graphics when using the latest Linux 4.12 kernel and Mesa 17.2-dev.

    We routinely run these CPUFreq/P-State comparisons and overall have found the Intel P-State CPU frequency scaling driver to be maturing, but still not yet in a 100% ideal state. Each kernel release though does seem to improve P-State for helping modern Intel CPUs perform more admirably, especially with many Linux distributions defaulting to the Intel P-State Powersave combination for Sandy Bridge hardware and newer.

    For this testing today are Linux gaming benchmarks with P-State's powersave and performance governors and then switching over to ACPI CPUFreq and testing ondemand, performance, schedutil, and conservative. All other settings remained the same throughout the entire testing process.

  • [Freedreno] long overdue update

    Since it has been a while since the last update, I guess it is a good time to post an update on some of the progress that has been happening with freedreno and upstream support for snapdragon boards.

  • Freedreno Continues Stacking On New Features For Open-Source Adreno
  • The Mesa OpenGL threaded dispatch code seems to now use a whitelist, improving some games performance

    It seems the OpenGL threaded dispatch code to speed up some games in Mesa now uses a whitelist, with a few games now able to make use of it. As a quick reminder, the OpenGL threaded dispatch code aims to reduce the CPU overhead of Mesa, resulting in better performance for some games.

    They seem to have gone for a whitelist, since not all games work with it. In fact, some games regress with it, so it's a safer approach to allow it for games that are known to work better with it.

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More in Tux Machines

Development Functional Programming in JavaScript and Learning to Code

  • An introduction to functional programming in JavaScript
    When Brendan Eich created JavaScript in 1995, he intended to do Scheme in the browser. Scheme, being a dialect of Lisp, is a functional programming language. Things changed when Eich was told that the new language should be the scripting language companion to Java. Eich eventually settled on a language that has a C-style syntax (as does Java), yet has first-class functions. Java technically did not have first-class functions until version 8, however you could simulate first-class functions using anonymous classes. Those first-class functions are what makes functional programming possible in JavaScript. JavaScript is a multi-paradigm language that allows you to freely mix and match object-oriented, procedural, and functional paradigms. Recently there has been a growing trend toward functional programming. In frameworks such as Angular and React, you'll actually get a performance boost by using immutable data structures. Immutability is a core tenet of functional programming. It, along with pure functions, makes it easier to reason about and debug your programs. Replacing procedural loops with functions can increase the readability of your program and make it more elegant. Overall, there are many advantages to functional programming.
  • Learning to Code in One’s Own Language
    I recently published a paper with Sayamindu Dasgupta that provides evidence in support of the idea that kids can learn to code more quickly when they are programming in their own language. Millions of young people from around the world are learning to code. Often, during their learning experiences, these youth are using visual block-based programming languages like Scratch, App Inventor, and Code.org Studio. In block-based programming languages, coders manipulate visual, snap-together blocks that represent code constructs instead of textual symbols and commands that are found in more traditional programming languages.
  • [Older] RcppArmadillo 0.7.900.2.0

Intel Core i7 7740X Preliminary Benchmarks On Linux

For those not yet well briefed on the Core-X series since the embargo expiry last week, the i7-7740X has four cores plus Hyper Threading. It has a 4.3GHz base frequency with 4.5GHz turbo frequency and an 8MB cache. The i7-7740X has a 112 Watt TDP, natively supports DDR4-2666 of dual-channel memory, and foregoes any integrated graphics. Read more

Security: Another Massive, Worldwide Ransom Attack on Microsoft Windows, Security News About GNU/Linux

  • NSA-linked tools help power second global ransomware outbreak [Ed: And neglecting to mention it targets Microsoft Windows. Why?]
  • Hacker Behind Massive Ransomware Outbreak Can't Get Emails from Victims Who Paid
    On Tuesday, a new, worldwide ransomware outbreak took off, infecting targets in Ukraine, France, Spain, and elsewhere. The hackers hit everything from international law firms to media companies. The ransom note demands victims send bitcoin to a predefined address and contact the hacker via email to allegedly have their files decrypted.
  • Digital signatures in package management
    Serious distributions try to protect their repositories cryptographically against tampering and transmission errors. Arch Linux, Debian, Fedora, openSUSE, and Ubuntu all take different, complex, but conceptually similar approaches. Many distributions develop, test, build, and distribute their software via a heterogeneous zoo of servers, mirrors, and workstations that make central management and protection of the end product almost impossible. In terms of personnel, distributions also depend on the collaboration of a severely limited number of international helpers. This technical and human diversity creates a massive door for external and internal attackers who seek to infect popular distribution packages with malware. During updates, then, hundreds of thousands of Linux machines download and install poisoned software with root privileges. The damage could hardly be greater. The danger is less abstract than some might think. Repeatedly in the past, projects have had to take down one or more servers after hacker attacks. The motivation of (at least) all the major distributions to protect themselves from planted packages is correspondingly large and boils down to two actions: one simple and one cryptographic.
  • This Windows Defender bug was so gaping its PoC exploit had to be encrypted
    Microsoft recently patched a critical vulnerability in its ubiquitous built-in antivirus engine. The vulnerability could have allowed attackers to execute malicious code by luring users to a booby-trapped website or attaching a booby-trapped file to an e-mail or instant message.
  • [Older] Reproducible Builds: week 110 in Stretch cycle
  • [Older] Free Market Security
    I think there are many of us in security who keep waiting for demand to appear for more security. We keep watching and waiting, any day now everyone will see why this matters! It's not going to happen though. We do need security more and more each day. The way everything is heading, things aren't looking great. I'd like to think we won't have to wait for the security equivalent of a river catching on fire, but I'm pretty sure that's what it will take.
  • Linux Systems in the Hackers' Cross Hairs [Ed: This is a rewrite of a press release below. Phil Muncaster could certainly have done better than this.]
  • New Research Shows Cybersecurity Battleground Shifting to Linux and Web Servers
    "This new Firebox Feed data allows us to feel the pulse of the latest network attacks and malware trends in order to identify patterns that influence the constantly evolving threat landscape," said Corey Nachreiner, chief technology officer at WatchGuard Technologies. "The Q1 report findings continue to reinforce the importance and effectiveness of basic security policies, layered defenses and advanced malware prevention. We urge readers to examine the report's key takeways and best practices, and bring them to the forefront of information security efforts within their organizations."

Ubuntu Kylin, a Linux Distribution with a Microsoft Windows Experience

Ubuntu Kylin is an open-source Linux distribution based on Ubuntu since 2013, mainly developed by a Chinese team alongside dozens of Linux developers all over the world. It contains the basic features you would expect from Ubuntu, plus features a desktop environment and applications. As far as we know, Ubuntu Kylin is one of the most suitable Linux distributions for users who are farmiliar with Microsoft Windows, including its desktop environment, office suite and various applications. Read more