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Thursday, 24 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Repliessort icon Last Post
Story Linux Kernel Security is Lacking? srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:42pm
Story Did SCO end up helping Linux? srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:42pm
Story Night that the Lights went Out in TN srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 12:46am
Story More Summit Notes srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:43pm
Story New Slack is Out srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 5:01pm
Story New O'Reilly Security Book Released srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:53pm
Story 97 bugs found in MySQL srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:54pm
Story Intel Has Been Busy Busy Busy srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:54pm
Story On the Redmond Front srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:55pm
Story M$ Continues its Attack srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:56pm

TrueOS: A Simple BSD Distribution for the Desktop Users

Filed under
Reviews
BSD

When you think of It’s FOSS you probably think mainly of Linux. It’s true that we cover mostly Linux-related news and tutorials. But today we are going to do something different.We are going to look at TrueOS BSD distribution.

Linux and BSD, both fall into Unix-like operating system domain. The main difference lies at the core i.e. the kernel as both Linux and BSD have their own kernel implementation.

Read more

Also: “FreeBSD Mastery: Jails” Sponsorships, and writing schedule changes

Games: RPCS3, Web Games, Poly Towns, Rifter and More

Filed under
Gaming

Qt 5.11 released

Filed under
Development
  • Qt 5.11 released

    Slightly ahead of our planned schedule, we have released Qt 5.11 today. As always, Qt 5.11 comes with quite a few new features as well as many bug fixes to existing functionality. Let’s have a look at some of the cool new features.

  • Qt 5.11 Released With A Big Arsenal Of Updates

    The Qt Company has managed to release Qt 5.11 one week ahead of schedule compared to its original road-map, which is quite a feat considering some of the past Qt5 release delays. Beyond that, Qt 5.11.0 is offering a big slab of improvements.

Software: Discourse and More

Filed under
Software
  • Discourse – A Modern Forum for Community Discussion

    Discourse is a free, open source, modern, feature-rich and remarkable community-oriented forum software. It’s a powerful, reliable, and flexible platform that comes with a wide range of tools for community discussions.

    It is designed for building community discussion platforms, mailing list or chat room for your team, customers, fans, patrons, audience, users, advocates, supporters, or friends and most importantly, it seamlessly integrates with the rest of your established online platforms.

  • 4 Markdown-powered slide generators

    Imagine you've been tapped to give a presentation. As you're preparing your talk, you think, "I should whip up a few slides."

    Maybe you prefer the simplicity of plain text, or maybe you think software like LibreOffice Writer is overkill for what you need to do. Or perhaps you just want to embrace your inner geek.

    It's easy to turn files formatted with Markdown into attractive presentation slides. Here are four tools that can do help you do the job.

  • Faster Audio Decoding/Encoding Coming To Ogg & FLAC

    FLAC and Ogg now have faster audio encoding and decoding capabilities thanks to recent code improvements.

    Robert Kausch of the fre:ac audio converter project wrote in to inform us about recent changes he made to FLAC and Ogg for yielding faster performance. Kausch updated the CRC checks within FLAC and Ogg to a faster algorithm and those patches have now been accepted upstream.

Cooking With Linux and EzeeLinux Shows

Filed under
Interviews

Red Hat Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • RPKG guide from Tito user

    Since the beginning of the rpkg project, it was known as a client tool for DistGit. Times changed and a new era for rpkg is here. It was enhanced with project management features, so we can safely label it as a tito alternative.

    A features review, pros and cons and user guide is a theme for a whole new article. In this short post, I, as a long-time tito user, want to show rpkg alternatives for the tito commands, that I frequently use.

  • All-Flash Platform-as-a-Service: Pure Storage and Red Hat OpenShift Reference Architecture

    Pure Storage® is excited to announce a reference architecture for Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, using both Pure Storage FlashArray and FlashBlade™ to provide all the underlying storage requirements.

  • Red Hat OpenStack Platform 13 Delivers Long-Term Support

    The Red Hat OpenStack Platform 13 release was officially announced here on May 21, bringing along with it new features and expanded support for the open-source cloud platform.

    In a video interview with eWEEK, Mark McLoughlin, senior director of engineering for OpenStack at Red Hat, details what's new in the release and what is set to come in the next release. Red Hat OpenStack Platform 13 is based on the upstream OpenStack Queens release that first became generally available on Feb. 28.

    "The key thing for the OpenStack Platform 13 release is that it is a long life release," McLoughlin said.

  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) stock remained among YTD Quarterly with rise of 12.54%
  • 10 tasks for running containers on Atomic Host

    Unlike a virtual machine, which includes an entire operating system, a container is meant to hold only the software needed to run an application. Therefore, to run a container efficiently and securely, you need an operating system that provides secure container services and acts as a foundation for running containers. One operating system developed for that task is Atomic Host.

    Think of Atomic Host as a secure, specialized version of Fedora, CentOS, or Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL). Its best use is to provide a reliable and easily upgradable operating system for running containers. Different formats of Atomic Host are available to run on anything from bare metal to a variety of cloud environments. With an Atomic Host system installed, you can use the docker command as you would on other container-enabled systems. However, Atomic Host also comes with an additional command called atomic, which expands what you can do with containers.

Security: Firefox Accounts, 'DevSecOps', VPNFilter, PassProtect, Reproducible Builds

Filed under
Security
  • Two-step authentication in Firefox Accounts
  • Firefox Finally Offers Two Factor Auth to Protect Your Passwords

    Mozilla is rolling out two factor authentication for Firefox accounts and if you sync passwords using Firefox Sync you should enable it immediately.

    The option for two factor authentication should show up in your Firefox account settings in a few weeks, but you can skip the wait by clicking this link. Do that and you should see the option for two-factor authentication, as shown above.

  • Now Make Your Firefox Account Safer With New Two Factor Authentication

    It seems that tech giants, finally, are gearing up to make portals more secure. In an announcement made yesterday, Mozilla has announced two-factor authentication for Firefox accounts. It is an optional security feature that will require inserting authentication code after signing in your Firefox account with your credentials.

    The newly introduced two-step verification feature is based on the commonly used Time-based One-Time Password (TOTP)-based standard. Currently, the feature is available with Duo, Google Authenticator, and Authy. Users will need to install these apps to receive the authentication code.

  • Navigating the container security ecosystem

    SJ Technologies partnered with Sonatype for the DevSecOps Community 2018 Survey. The survey was wildly popular, receiving answers from more than 2,000 respondents representing a wide range of industries, development practices, and responsibilities. One-third of respondents (33%) came from the technology industry, and banking and financial services was the second most represented group (15%). 70% of all respondents were using a container registry. With so many respondents utilizing containers, a deeper dive into container security is in order.

  • New VPNFilter malware targets at least 500K networking devices worldwide
  • 500,000 Routers Are Infected With Malware and Potentially Spying On Users
  • 500,000 Routers In 54 Countries Hacked To Create Massive Botnet Army
  • PassProtect Tells You If Your Password Is Compromised

    A compromised password can’t protect you. PassProtect is a Chrome extension that notifies you whenever a password you enter is exposed, giving you the chance to change it.

    Data breaches happen all the time, and the result is usually a bunch of usernames and password floating around the web. Attackers use these lists to access accounts, so it’s important to change your passwords after a breach. Most users can’t keep track of it all, however.

    Which is where PassProtect come in. Using data from Have I Been Pwned, Troy Hunt’s database of compromised passwords, PassProtect lets you know when a password you use was part of a recent breach.

  • PassProtect warns Chrome users when their username or passwords get pwned

    Data breaches happen all the time. When they do, it’s invariably bad, with countless people ensnared. The MySpace breach, for example, impacted nearly 360 million. LinkedIn impacted 165 million more. One tool helping to mitigate the aftermath is Okta’s new Chrome plugin, PassProtect.

  • Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #160

    This week’s edition was written by Bernhard M. Wiedemann, Chris Lamb, Levente Polyak and Mattia Rizzolo & reviewed by a bunch of Reproducible Builds folks on IRC & the mailing lists.

GNOME Development

Filed under
GNOME
  • GLib gets MinGW32 continuous integration and code coverage

    Thanks to the work of Christoph Reiter, GLib has had continuous integration builds on Windows (using MinGW32/MSYS2) for a week or two now. Furthermore, he’s added code coverage support, so we can easily see how our code coverage is changing over time. Thanks Christoph!

  • Automatically shutting down a daemon on inactivity

    Automatically shutting down daemons when not in use is in vogue, and a good way of saving resources quite easily (if the service’s startup/shutdown costs are low).

  • Moving clang out of process

    For the past couple of weeks, Builder from git-master has come with a new gnome-builder-clang subprocess. Instead of including libclang in the UI process, we now proxy all of that work to the subprocess. This should have very positive effect on memory usage within the UI process. It will also simplify the process of using valgrind/ASAN and obtaining useful results. In the future, we’ll teach the subprocess supervisor to recycle subprocesses if they consume too much memory.

Linux Mint tools - That which makes the distro unique

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Creating Linux distro spins is relatively easy. A few string replacements, some branding, and you're done. Creating unique, independent and self-sufficient projects, that's another matter entirely. The latter category is reserved to only a small number of distros that manage to balance their parenthood and individual identity while still providing users with a sensible and meaningful setup for work and fun. Linux Mint is one of such rare examples.

For many years, Mint has successfully paddles its gray-green look and feel, topped with good and easy access to everyday needs. This hasn't always been easy, as Ubuntu changes a lot, and this has often affected Mint in unpredictable ways. Still, overall, it managed to retain an edge of worth that goes beyond being yet another bland clone. Staying with the LTS releases as the baseline is one such manifest. A set of unique tools is another. We explore.

Read more

Graphics: ROCm, Vulkan, RADV and More

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • ROCm 1.9 Compute Components To Support Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

    For those wanting to use the open-source ROCm Radeon Open Compute stack on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, it will be supported by the next release.

    The ROCm compute stack with OpenCL support will officially support Ubuntu 18.04 LTS with the upcoming ROCm 1.9 release. Gregory Stoner of AMD's compute team c

  • The Vulkan Open-Source Ecosystem Grows: Now More Than 2,100 GitHub Projects

    Just over one month after there were 2,000 Vulkan-mentioning projects on GitHub, the 2,100 project milestone has been breached.

  • RADV Gets Fix For DXVK With World of Warcraft & Other Games

    If you have been experiencing rendering issues with the Vulkan-over-Direct3D "DXVK" layer while playing games on Wine and are using the RADV Vulkan driver, you may want to upgrade to the latest Git.

  • Libinput 1.11 Is Bringing With It Many Linux Input Improvements

    Within the libinput world, the 1.11 development cycle has been going on long with Libinput 1.10 having debuted in January. But this long development cycle is bringing with it many changes.

    Peter Hutterer of Red Hat who started the libinput project today announced the first release candidate of the upcoming libinput 1.11.

  • Mesa 18.2 Due For Release In August

    While Mesa 18.1 just officially shipped last week, Mesa 18.2 as next quarter's open-source 3D OpenGL/Vulkan graphics driver stack update is scheduled for release in mid-August.

    The tentative Mesa 18.2 release schedule puts the official Mesa 18.2.0 release for 10 August or potentially 17 August depending upon if a fourth release candidate is needed or any other release delays.

Schedutil CPU Frequency Scaling Governor Improvements Coming To Linux 4.18

Filed under
Linux

Adding to the list of changes coming to Linux 4.18 are updates to CPUFreq's "Schedutil" CPU frequency scaling governor.

Schedutil is the newest CPUFreq governor introduced back during Linux 4.7 as an alternative to ondemand, performance, and others. What makes Schedutil different and interesting is that it makes use of CPU scheduler utilization data for its decisions about CPU frequency control.

Read more

Security: Updates, Kernel Mitigation (CPU Flaws) and FBI

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Wednesday
  • ARM64 Mitigation Posted For Spectre 4 / SSBD

    Following the Intel/AMD Spectre Variant 4 mitigation landing yesterday with "Speculative Store Bypass Disable" (SSBD) and then the POWER CPU mitigation landing today, ARM developers have posted their set of patches for 64-bit ARM CPUs to mitigate against this latest Spectre vulnerability around speculative execution.

  • Linux 4.9, 4.14, 4.16 Point Releases Bring SSBD For Spectre V4

    Greg Kroah-Hartman has today released the Linux 4.9.102, 4.14.43, and 4.16.11 kernels. Most notable about these stable release updates is Spectre Variant Four mitigation.

    Today's 4.9/4.14/4.16 point releases carry the Intel/AMD mitigation for Spectre V4 albeit the Intel support is dependent upon to-be-released microcode updates and is vulnerable by default while for AMD processors there is SSB disabled via prctl and seccomp.

  • An Initial Look At Spectre V4 "Speculative Store Bypass" With AMD On Linux

    Yesterday the latest Spectre vulnerability was disclosed as Spectre Variant 4 also known as "Speculative Store Bypass" as well as the less talked about Spectre Variant 3A "Rogue System Register Read". Here are my initial tests of a patched Linux kernel on AMD hardware for Spectre V4.

    Landing yesterday into Linux 4.17 Git was Speculative Store Bypass Disable (SSBD) as the Linux-based mitigation on Intel/AMD x86 CPUs. Since then has also been the POWER CPU SSBD implementation and pending patches for ARM64 CPUs.

  • Exclusive: FBI Seizes Control of Russian Botnet

    FBI agents armed with a court order have seized control of a key server in the Kremlin’s global botnet of 500,000 hacked routers, The Daily Beast has learned. The move positions the bureau to build a comprehensive list of victims of the attack, and short-circuits Moscow’s ability to reinfect its targets.

    The FBI counter-operation goes after “VPN Filter,” a piece of sophisticated malware linked to the same Russian hacking group, known as Fancy Bear, that breached the Democratic National Committee and the Hillary Clinton campaign during the 2016 election. On Wednesday security researchers at Cisco and Symantec separately provided new details on the malware, which has turned up in 54 countries including the United States.

Containers & Events

Filed under
Server
  • Video: Containers Should Contain... Right?

    Here's a presentation video from the very recent OpenStack Summit Vancouver 2018. The topic repeats what Dan Walsh was saying a couple of years ago. Again, this is talking about application containers using traditional kernel features like namespaces and cgroups... because as we all know, in the Linux kernel, containers are NOT a REAL thing.

    Just to be clear, OpenVZ... which is a mature out-of-tree patch for system containers that has been around and maintained for well over 13 years... does contain... but the hype is all around application containers like Docker and its work-alikes.

  • Updates in container isolation

    At KubeCon + CloudNativeCon Europe 2018, several talks explored the topic of container isolation and security. The last year saw the release of Kata Containers which, combined with the CRI-O project, provided strong isolation guarantees for containers using a hypervisor. During the conference, Google released its own hypervisor called gVisor, adding yet another possible solution for this problem. Those new developments prompted the community to work on integrating the concept of "secure containers" (or "sandboxed containers") deeper into Kubernetes. This work is now coming to fruition; it prompts us to look again at how Kubernetes tries to keep the bad guys from wreaking havoc once they break into a container.

  • Autoscaling for Kubernetes workloads

    Technologies like containers, clusters, and Kubernetes offer the prospect of rapidly scaling the available computing resources to match variable demands placed on the system. Actually implementing that scaling can be a challenge, though. During KubeCon + CloudNativeCon Europe 2018, Frederic Branczyk from CoreOS (now part of Red Hat) held a packed session to introduce a standard and officially recommended way to scale workloads automatically in Kubernetes clusters.

    Kubernetes has had an autoscaler since the early days, but only recently did the community implement a more flexible and extensible mechanism to make decisions on when to add more resources to fulfill workload requirements. The new API integrates not only the Prometheus project, which is popular in Kubernetes deployments, but also any arbitrary monitoring system that implements the standardized APIs.

  • An introduction to MQTT

    A few years ago, I was asked to put temperature monitoring in a customer's server room and to integrate it with their existing monitoring and notification software. We ended up buying a rack-mountable temperature monitor, for nearly £200, that ran its own web server for propagating temperature data. Although the device ostensibly published data in XML, that turned out to be so painful to parse that we ended up screen-scraping the human-readable web pages to get the data. Temperature sensors are fairly cheap, but by the time you've wrapped them in a case with a power supply, an Ethernet port, a web server, enough of an OS to drive the above, and volatile and non-volatile storage for the same, they get expensive. I was sure that somewhere there must be physically-lightweight sensors with simple power, simple networking, and a lightweight protocol that allowed them to squirt their data down the network with a minimum of overhead. So my interest was piqued when Jan-Piet Mens spoke at FLOSS UK's Spring Conference on "Small Things for Monitoring". Once he started passing working demonstration systems around the room without interrupting the demonstration, it was clear that this was what I'd been looking for.

Ubuntu: Ubuntu Unleashed, Technical Board, 'Edge', Xubuntu and More

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Unleashed 2019 and other books presale discount
  • Call for nominations for the Technical Board

    The current 2-year term of the Technical Board is over, and it’s time for electing a new one. For the next two weeks (until 6 June 2018) we are collecting nominations, then our SABDFL will shortlist the candidates and confirm their candidacy with them, and finally the shortlist will be put to a vote by ~ubuntu-dev.

    Anyone from the Ubuntu community can nominate someone.

  • Decreasing the complexity of IoT adoption with Edge as a Service model

    Last week, much of the IoT industry descended on Santa Clara, California, for the annual IoT World trade show. One of the exhibitors present were Rigado who Canonical partnered with earlier this year to deploy Ubuntu Core on their IoT gateways primarily targeted at commercial applications such as smart lighting and asset tracking. Rigado used IoT World as an opportunity to discuss the launch of Cascade, their new ‘Edge as a Service’ proposition, for commercial IoT.

    Cascade, which is offered as a simple monthly subscription, enables companies to focus on their business and what generates revenue rather than expending effort and resource dedicated to managing the infrastructure behind it. With many organisations looking at ways they can benefit from adopting IoT while removing perceived barriers, Cascade offers a low-risk, low-cost entry which in turn enables project teams to benefit from reduced development, support and no upfront hardware costs. The end result is a quicker path to IoT deployment and resulting ROI.

  • Xubuntu: New Wiki pages for Testers

    During the last few weeks of the 18.04 (Bionic Beaver) cycle, we had 2 people drop by in our development channel trying to respond to the call for testers from the Development and QA Teams.

    It quickly became apparent to me that I was having to repeat myself in order to make it “basic” enough for someone who had never tested for us, to understand what I was trying to put across.

    After pointing to the various resources we have, and other flavours use – it transpired that they both would have preferred something a bit easier to start with.

    So I asked them to write it for us all.

  • How to install Ubuntu Server 18.04
  • How To Install Firefox Beta in Ubuntu & Linux Mint

Kernel Coverage at LWN

Filed under
Linux
  • XFS online filesystem scrubbing and repair

    In a filesystem track session at the 2018 Linux Storage, Filesystem, and Memory-Management Summit (LSFMM), Darrick Wong talked about the online scrubbing and repair features he has been working on. His target has mostly been XFS, but he has concurrently been working on scrubbing for ext4. Part of what he wanted to discuss was the possibility of standardizing some of these interfaces across different filesystem types.

    Filesystem scrubbing is typically an ongoing activity to try to find corrupted data by periodically reading the data on the disk. Online repair attempts to fix the problems found by using redundant information (or metadata that can be calculated from other information) stored elsewhere in the filesystem. As described in Wong's patch series, both scrubbing and repair are largely concerned with filesystem metadata, though scrubbing data extents (and repairing them if possible) is also supported. Wong said that XFS now has online scrubbing support, but does not quite have the online repair piece yet.

  • Supporting multi-actuator drives

    In a combined filesystem and storage session at the 2018 Linux Storage, Filesystem, and Memory-Management Summit (LSFMM), Tim Walker asked for help in designing the interface to some new storage hardware. He wanted some feedback on how a multi-actuator drive should present itself to the system. These drives have two (or, eventually, more) sets of read/write heads and other hardware that can all operate in parallel.

    He noted that his employer, Seagate, had invested in a few different technologies, including host-aware shingled magnetic recording (SMR) devices, that did not pan out. Instead of repeating those missteps, Seagate wants to get early feedback before the interfaces are set in stone. He was not necessarily looking for immediate feedback in the session (though he got plenty), but wanted to introduce the topic before discussing it on the mailing lists. Basically, Seagate would like to ensure that what it does with these devices works well for its customers, who mostly use Linux.

  • Using user-space tracepoints with BPF

    Much has been written on LWN about dynamically instrumenting kernel code. These features are also available to user-space code with a special kind of probe known as a User Statically-Defined Tracing (USDT) probe. These probes provide a low-overhead way of instrumenting user-space code and provide a convenient way to debug applications running in production. In this final article of the BPF and BCC series we'll look at where USDT probes come from and how you can use them to understand the behavior of your own applications.

    The origins of USDT probes can be found in Sun's DTrace utility. While DTrace can't claim to have invented static tracepoints (various implementations are described in the "related work" section of the original DTrace paper), it certainly made them much more popular. With the emergence of DTrace, many applications began adding USDT probes to important functions to aid with tracing and diagnosing run-time behavior. Given that, it's perhaps not surprising that these probes are usually enabled (as part of configuring the build) with the --enable-dtrace switch.

Wine: VKD3D and DXVK

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Software
  • Wine's VKD3D 1.0 Released For Running Direct3D 12 Over Vulkan

    The Wine project has announced the release of VKD3D 1.0, the first official release of this Direct3D 12 over Vulkan layer primarily developed at CodeWeavers. VKD3D is the approach Wine is pursuing for getting Direct3D 12 games from Windows working on Wine under Linux or also under macOS when paired with MoltenVK.

    For the VKD3D 1.0 release there are D3D12 demos now working but features are known to be missing and bugs are expected. Geometry and tessellation shaders are among the big ticket items still left to be implemented in future releases.

  • DXVK 0.52 Brings More improvements For Direct3D 11 Over Vulkan

    While VKD3D 1.0 is out today for Direct3D 12 mapped over Vulkan, the DXVK project for running Direct3D 11 over Vulkan is also out with a new release today.

    Most prominent to the new DXVK 0.52 release is initial support for DXGI 1.2, the updated Microsoft DirectX Graphics Infrastructure that brings various updates for drivers. The initial DXGI 1.2 support in the process fixes at least Bioshock 2 Remastered as well as Frostpunk.

  • Vkd3d 1.0 Released

    This is the first release of vkd3d. A lot of Direct3D 12 features are still missing and bugs are expected. The current version was tested mainly with demo applications. A number of features that are being worked on have been deferred to the next development cycle. This includes in particular geometry and tessellation shaders support, various shader translation improvements, as well as various improvements for core Direct3D 12 methods.

  • vkd3d for Direct3D 12 to Vulkan in Wine has released the first stable version

    Today, the Wine developers officially announced that vkd3d for translating Direct3D 12 to Vulkan in Wine has reached 1.0.

Python Language Summit: Coverage by LWN

Filed under
Development
  • The 2018 Python Language Summit

    Over the past three years, LWN and its readers have gotten a yearly treat in the form of coverage of the Python Language Summit; this year is no exception. The summit is a yearly gathering of around 40 or 50 developers from CPython, other Python implementations, and related projects. It is held on the first day of PyCon, which is two days before the main PyCon talk tracks begin. This year, the summit was held on May 9 in Cleveland, Ohio.

  • A Gilectomy update

    In a rather short session at the 2018 Python Language Summit, Larry Hastings updated attendees on the status of his Gilectomy project. The aim of that effort is to remove the global interpreter lock (GIL) from CPython. Since his status report at last year's summit, little has happened, which is part of why the session was so short. He hasn't given up on the overall idea, but it needs a new approach.

    Gilectomy has been "untouched for a year", Hastings said. He worked on it at the PyCon sprints after last year's summit, but got tired of it at that point. He is "out of bullets" at least with that approach. With his complicated buffered-reference-count approach he was able to get his "gilectomized" interpreter to reach performance parity with CPython—except that his interpreter was running on around seven cores to keep up with CPython on one.

  • Modifying the Python object model

    At the 2018 Python Language Summit, Carl Shapiro described some of the experiments that he and others at Instagram did to look at ways to improve the performance of the CPython interpreter. The talk was somewhat academic in tone and built on what has been learned in other dynamic languages over the years. By modifying the Python object model fairly substantially, they were able to roughly double the performance of the "classic" Richards benchmark.

    Shapiro said that Instagram is a big user of Python and has been looking for ways to improve the performance of the CPython interpreter for its workloads. So the company started looking at the representation of data in the interpreter to see if there were gains to be made there. It wanted to stick with CPython in order to preserve the existing API, ecosystem, and developer experience

  • Subinterpreter support for Python

    Eric Snow kicked off the 2018 edition of the Python Language Summit with a look at getting a better story for multicore Python by way of subinterpreters. Back in 2015, we looked at his efforts at that point; things have been progressing since. There is more to do, of course, so he is hoping to attract more developers to work on the project.

    Snow has been a core developer since 2012 and has "seen some interesting stuff" over that time. He has been working on the subinterpreters scheme for four years or so.

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Graphics: XWayland and Mesa

  • XWayland Gets Patches For Better EGLStreams Handling
    While the recently released X.Org Server 1.20 has initial support for XWayland with EGLStreams so X11 applications/games on Wayland can still benefit from hardware acceleration, in its current state it doesn't integrate too well with Wayland desktop compositors wishing to support it. That's changing with a new patch series.
  • Intel Mesa Driver Finally Supports Threaded OpenGL
    Based off the Gallium3D "mesa_glthread" work for threaded OpenGL that can provide a measurable win in some scenarios, the Intel i965 Mesa driver has implemented this support now too. Following the work squared away last year led in the RadeonSI driver, the Intel i965 OpenGL driver supports threaded OpenGL when the mesa_glthread=true environment variable is set.
  • Geometry & Tessellation Shaders For Mesa's OpenGL Compatibility Context
    With the recent Mesa 18.1 release there is OpenGL 3.1 support with the ARB_compatibility context for the key Gallium3D drivers, but Marek Olšák at AMD continues working on extending that functionality under the OpenGL compatibility context mode.
  • Mesa Begins Its Transition To Gitlab
    Following the news from earlier this month that FreeDesktop.org would move its infrastructure to Gitlab, the Mesa3D project has begun the process of adopting this Git-centered software.

Welcome to Ubuntu 18.04: Make yourself at GNOME. Cup of data-slurping dispute, anyone?

Comment Ubuntu 18.04, launched last month, included a new Welcome application that runs the first time you boot into your new install. The Welcome app does several things, including offering to opt you out of Canonical's new data collection tool. The tool also provides a quick overview of the new GNOME interface, and offers to set up Livepatch (for kernel patching without a reboot). In my review I called the opt-out a ham-fisted decision, but did note that if Canonical wanted to actually gather data, opt-out was probably the best choice. Read more

How CERN Is Using Linux and Open Source

CERN really needs no introduction. Among other things, the European Organization for Nuclear Research created the World Wide Web and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the world’s largest particle accelerator, which was used in discovery of the Higgs boson. Tim Bell, who is responsible for the organization’s IT Operating Systems and Infrastructure group, says the goal of his team is “to provide the compute facility for 13,000 physicists around the world to analyze those collisions, understand what the universe is made of and how it works.” Read more