Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Saturday, 20 Apr 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Repliessort icon Last Post
Story Diamonds are a girl's best friend srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:45pm
Story AMD not out of the Race yet srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:53pm
Story techiemoe rants: srlinuxx 10/08/2009 - 7:01pm
Story More BS from the Evil One. srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:27pm
Story Doom3 for those with little or no PC! srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 12:49am
Story Linux leaders at open-source summit srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:35pm
Story This months Cosmo srlinuxx 06/02/2005 - 4:03am
Story Mandrake's Clustering Again srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:58pm
Story No Case - No Problem srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 5:35am
Story ATI has released 64-Bit drivers srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:38pm

Devices: Security, Microsoft, ASRock and QNAP

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • The Cybersecurity Weakest Link – Linux and IOT

    Linux is not only the backbone of the internet and the Android operating system, it is now expanding into domestic appliances, motor vehicles and pretty much anything else that requires a minimal operating system to run dedicated software. The Internet of Things is very much The Internet of Things Powered by Linux.

    But when Chrysler announced a recall of 1.4 million vehicles back in 2016 after a pair of hackers demonstrated a remote hijack of a Jeep’s digital systems, the risks involved with hacking IoT devices were dramatically illustrated.

    So what does the rise of Linux and IoT mean for Cybersecurity in the Enterprise? Let’s take a look.

  • Microsoft buys Express Logic, adds a third operating system to its IoT range [Ed: Microsoft Peter on Microsoft swallowing another Linux company because Windows is unfit for purpose]

    Not content with having a Windows-based Internet of Things platform (Windows 10 IoT) and a Linux-based Internet of Things platform (Azure Sphere), Microsoft has added a third option. The company has announced that it has bought Express Logic and its ThreadX real-time operating system for an undisclosed sum.

    [...]

    Linux can be built with various options to offer more predictable behavior and so can address some similar scenarios. But ThreadX has another big advantage up its sleeve: it's tiny. A minimal ThreadX installation takes 2,000 bytes of storage and needs 1KB of RAM, far less than Linux can use. By way of comparison, Microsoft's Sphere hardware (which uses a custom-designed ARM processor with various security features embedded) has 4MB of RAM for applications and 16MB of storage. There are an estimated 6.2 billion deployments of ThreadX running on several dozen different kinds of processor or microcontroller.

  • World’s first AMD-based NUC mini-PC showcases Ryzen R1000

    ASRock Linux-ready “iBox-R1000” industrial PC and “NUC-R1000” mainboard provide the new AMD Ryzen Embedded R1000 SoC in a 4×4 NUC form-factor with up to 32GB DDR4, 2x GbE, 3x USB 3.1, triple 4K displays, and 2x M.2 slots.

    In a renewed rivalry with Intel reignited by the success of its Ryzen line of processors, AMD has started to get a bit cheeky with its larger rival. Its latest provocation is the launch (via partner ASRock Industrial) of the first 4×4 (also called 4″x4″) NUC form-factor mini-PC based on an AMD processor. As noted in the Tom’s Hardware story that alerted us to the iBox-R1000 and the board-level NUC-R1000, the NUC label “isn’t technically accurate” since it’s an Intel brand that defines a certain class of mini-PC that uses Intel processors.

    [...]

    The ASRock product page notes only Windows 10, support, but the announcement also says it supports Linux kernel 4.18 and above.

  • QNAP Linux Station Supports Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

    QNAP® Systems, Inc. today announced that Linux Station is fully integrated with Ubuntu® 18.04 LTS, allowing users to enjoy the brand-new GNOME GUI desktop with higher security and easily install apps (including LibreOffice 6.0, Inkscape, and multimedia applications) from the Software Center.

    Linux Station provides one-click installation of multiple versions of Ubuntu, and brings a streamlined NAS and Ubuntu PC experience when using an HDMI-equipped QNAP NAS with a keyboard and mouse. Linux Station also supports remote desktop connection with audio output. As QNAP is dedicated to leverage open-source software for a better user experience, Linux Station also adds support for Ubuntu Kylin - the official Chinese version of Ubuntu.

    “QNAP exclusively incorporates Ubuntu into NAS applications to give users multiple benefits from using QTS and Ubuntu applications,” said Judy Chen, Product Manager of QNAP, adding “The increasingly diverse applications in Linux Station allows users to freely utilize cross-platform, open-source software, such as multimedia applications and Inkscape.”

GNU Spotlight with Mike Gerwitz and Meetup With the FSF's John Sullivan and Donald Robertson

Filed under
GNU
  • GNU Spotlight with Mike Gerwitz: 13 new GNU releases!

    coreutils-8.31
    ddrescue-1.24
    dr-geo-19.2
    gnuhealth-3.4.1
    gnupg-2.2.15
    help2man-1.47.10
    librejs-7.19
    linux-libre-5.0-gnu
    mit-scheme-10.1.6
    nano-4.0
    octave-5.1.0
    parallel-20190322
    unifont-12.0.01

  • Meetup - with the FSF's John Sullivan and Donald Robertson, III (Bellingham, WA)

    Free Software Foundation (FSF) executive director John Sullivan and licensing & compliance engineer Donald Robertson, III, will be hosting a meetup in Bellingham, WA, to show appreciation for your support of the FSF's work and to provide you with an opportunity to meet other FSF members and supporters. They will give a brief update on what the FSF is currently working on and will be curious to hear your thoughts, as well as answer any questions you may have.

Programming: imapautofiler, Red Hat Decision Manager, AiC, Python-moa, WebAssembly/Python

Filed under
Development
  • imapautofiler 1.8.0

    imapautofiler applies user-defined rules to automatically organize messages on an IMAP server.

  • Modern business logic tooling workshop, lab 3: Create a domain model

    Since starting to update my free online rules and process automation workshops that showcase how to get started using modern business logic tooling, we’ve come a long way with process automation. The updates started with moving from JBoss BPM to Red Hat Decision Manager and from JBoss BPM Suite to Red Hat Process Automation Manager.

    The first lab update showed how to install Red Hat Decision Manager on your laptop, and the second lab showed how to create a new project. This article highlights the newest lab update for Red Hat Process Automation Manager, where you’ll learn how to create a domain model.

  • AiC: Adventures in consensus

    In the talk I gave at Rust LATAM, I said that the Rust project has always emphasized finding the best solution, rather than winning the argument. I think this is one of our deepest values. It’s also one of the hardest for us to uphold.

    Let’s face it – when you’re having a conversation, it’s easy to get attached to specific proposals. It’s easy to have those proposals change from “Option A” vs “Option B” to “my option” and “their option”. Once this happens, it can be very hard to let them “win” – even if you know that both options are quite reasonable.

    This is a problem I’ve been thinking a lot about lately. So I wanted to start an irregular series of blog posts entitled “Adventures in consensus”, or AiC for short. These posts are my way of exploring the topic, and hopefully getting some feedback from all of you while I’m at it.

    This first post dives into what a phrase like “finding the best solution” even means (is there a best?) as well as the mechanics of how one might go about deciding if you really have the “best” solution. Along the way, we’ll see a few places where I think our current process could do better.

  • Quansight Labs Blog: MOA: a theory for composable and verifiable tensor computations

    Python-moa (mathematics of arrays) is an approach to a high level tensor compiler that is based on the work of Lenore Mullins and her dissertation. A high level compiler is necessary because there are many optimizations that a low level compiler such as gcc will miss. It is trying to solve many of the same problems as other technologies such as the taco compiler and the xla compiler. However, it takes a much different approach than others guided by the following principles.

  • The Human in Devops

    This week a mild epiphany came to me right after a somewhat heated and tense meeting with a team of developers plus project owner of a web project. They were angry and they were not afraid to show it. They were somewhat miffed about the fact that the head wrote them an email pretty much forcing them to participate to make our DevOps initiative a success. All kinds of expletive words were running through my head in relation to describing this team of flabby, tired looking individuals in front of me, which belied the cool demeanour and composure that I was trying so hard to maintain.

    It happened. In the spur of the moment I too got engulfed in a sea of negativity and for a few minutes lost site of what is the most important component or pillar in a successful DevOps initiative. The people.

    "What a bunch of mule heads !" I thought. It's as plain as day, once this initiative is a success everybody can go home earlier and everything will be more predictable and we can do much much more than we could before. "Why are you fighting this ?!" I was ready to throw my hands up in defeat when it finally dawned on me.

  • Python Bytes: #126 WebAssembly comes to Python

Graphics: AMDGPU and X.Org Elections

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • amdgpu drm-next-5.2
  • AMDGPU Has Another Round Of Updates Ahead Of Linux 5.2

    Feature work on DRM-Next for the Linux 5.2 kernel cycle is winding down while today AMD has sent in what could be their last round of AMDGPU feature updates for this next kernel release.

    Building off their earlier Linux 5.2 feature work are more updates. That earlier round brought new SMU11 enablement code for Vega 20, various other Vega 20 features, HMM preparations, and other code changes.

  • 2019 Election Round 2 voting OPEN

    To all X.Org Foundation Members:

    The round 2 of X.Org Foundation's annual election is now open and will remain open until 23:59 UTC on 2 May 2019.

    Four of the eight director seats are open during this election, with the four nominees receiving the highest vote totals serving as directors for two year terms.

    There were six candidates nominated. For a complete list of the candidates and their personal statements, please visit the 2019 X.Org Elections page at https://www.x.org/wiki/BoardOfDirectors/Elections/2019/

    The new bylaw changes were approved in the first round of voting.

    Here are some instructions on how to cast your vote:

    Login to the membership system at: https://members.x.org/

    If you do not remember your password, you can click on the "lost password" button and enter your user name. An e-mail will be sent to you with your password. If you have problems with the membership system, please e-mail membership at x.org.

    When you login you will see an "Active Ballots" section with the "X.Org 2019 Elections Round 2" ballot. When you click on that you will be presented with a page describing the ballot. At the bottom you will find a number of dropdowns that let you rank your candidates by order of preference.

    For the election: There is a pull-down selection box for 1st choice, 2nd, choice, and so on. Pick your candidates top to bottom in order of preference, avoiding duplicates.

    After you have completed your ballot, click the "Cast vote" button. Note that once you click this button, your votes will be cast and you will not be able to make further changes, so please make sure you are satisfied with your votes before clicking the "Cast vote" button.

    After you click the "Vote" button, the system will verify that you have completed a valid ballot. If your ballot is invalid (e.g., you duplicated a selection or did not answer the By-laws approval question), it will return you to the previous voting page. If your ballot is valid, your votes will be recorded and the system will show you a notice that your votes were cast.

    Note that the election will close at 23:59 UTC on 2 May 2019. At that time, the election committee will count the votes and present the results to the current board for validation. After the current board validates the results, the election committee will present the results to the Members.

    Harry, on behalf of the X.Org elections committee

  • It's Time To Re-Vote Following The Botched 2019 X.Org Elections

    While there were the recent X.Org Foundation board elections, a do-over was needed as their new custom-written voting software wasn't properly recording votes... So here's now your reminder to re-vote in these X.Org elections.

    At least with the initial round of voting they reached a super majority and the ballot question of whether the X.Org Foundation should formally fold FreeDesktop.org into its umbrella worked and that X.Org + FreeDesktop.org hook-up passed so all is well on that front. But for the Board of Directors elections, that's where re-voting is needed with the voting software that now correctly records the votes.

Games: Lutris and More

Filed under
Gaming
  • Epic Games Store Now On Linux Thanks To Lutris

    While the Epic Games Store itself is not officially supported by the open source Linux operating system, a third-party gaming client has now made sure that you can access the store and launcher on your own distro.

    The Epic Games Store is now accessible on Linux via the Lutris Gaming client. The client is available to all Linux users, who in the past has provided the same users a way to play PC games without the need to have Windows installed in their machines.

    Although Linux is not necessarily the go-to platform when it comes to PC gaming, there is a very niche audience dedicated to making the platform work in favor of open-source and to counteract what could be perceived as a heavily Windows-biased PC gaming community. Linux gaming is somewhat tedious to the relatively casual or normal user, although there are some within the Linux community that advertise and try to foster its growth in terms of gaming, as there are some games that can run better on the operating system. That is to say, if you have a lot of patience to try and make it work.

  • You Died but a Necromancer revived you is good fun in a small package

    Sometimes, simplicity is what makes a game and in the case of You Died BaNRY that's very true. The game has little depth to it but makes up for that in just how frantic and fun it can be. The entire gameplay is just you (or you and friends) attempting to cross a small level filled with platforms, spikes and all sorts of crazy traps. It's ridiculously easy to get into as well, since the controls are so basic all you need to worry about is your movement.

  • Forager is a weirdly addictive casual grinding game that has mined into my heart

    I'm not usually one for games that have you endlessly wander around, collect resources, build a little and repeat but Forager is so ridiculously charming it's lovely.

  • DragonRuby Game Toolkit, a cross-platform way to make games with Ruby

    Now for something a little different! Ryan "Icculus" Gordon, a name known for many Linux ports and SDL2 teamed up with indie developer Amir Rajan to create a new cross-platform toolkit.

    Why was it created? Well, in a nutshell they both "hate the complexity of today's engines" and this toolkit was actually made to help ship A Dark Room for the Nintendo Switch, which shows how versatile it is.

10+ Open Source Software Writing Tools That Every Writer Should Know

Filed under
OSS

Being a professional writer requires two key things to help ensure success: commitment and support. The former comes from the writer, and the latter comes from the tools he (or she) uses to get the job done. Below is a list of 11 great and lesser-known writing tools or apps, many of which are free and open-source, that can help improve the quality of your writing and make you a more productive and successful writer.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Newer isn't always better when performance is critical

    Some years before I formalised my engineering education, I was working as an instrument technician on a seismic survey vessel mapping an area off West Africa. These ships map the geology under the sea bed as the first stage of marine oil exploration. In full production, a single vessel will generate a revenue of several hundred thousand dollars a day. So you need to have a good excuse for when the recording system fails and you leave a hole in the survey coverage, especially when you have an ex-military Norwegian built like the proverbial Viking as party manager.

    The recording system was crashing; no error warnings, no smoke or fire. It just stopped recording. Repeatedly. The survey was looking like a cartoon Swiss cheese that had been attacked by hungry mice. What had changed? To save money the company had developed its own recording system, replacing Old Faithful with New Unreliable. I had my reservations when the prototype was tested in parallel with Old Faithful leading to my tearing out the connection between the two systems with under a minute to the start of a production line to go. I was younger then and could handle the excitement.

  • Minikube: 5 ways IT teams can use it

    As far as tool names go, Minikube is a pretty good reflection of what it does: It takes the vast cloud-scale of Kubernetes and shrinks it down so that it fits on your laptop.

    Don’t mistake that for a lack of power or functionality, though: You can do plenty with Minikube. And while developers, DevOps engineers, and the like might be the most likely to run it on a regular basis, IT leaders and the C-suite can use it, too. That’s part of the beauty.

    “With just a few installation commands, anyone can have a fully functioning Kubernetes cluster, ready for learning or supporting development efforts,” says Chris Ciborowski, CEO and cofounder at Nebulaworks.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S12E02 – Light Force

    This week we have been upgrading disk drives (again) and playing Elite Dangerous. We discuss Mark’s homebrew Raspberry Pi based streaming box, bring you some command line love and go over your feedback.

    It’s Season 12 Episode 02 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

  • Altered, a sweet looking puzzle game where you're part of the puzzle is coming to Linux

    Releasing sometime this Summer, Altered looks like a rather sweet take on the puzzle genre as you're a block that forms part of a puzzle.

    The developer, Glitchheart, describes it as a "meditative" puzzle game that mixes difficult puzzles in with a "soothing atmosphere". The description made me chuckle a little, as you can make it seem as soothing as you want but if the puzzles really do get difficult you can't stop players getting frustrated. Still, solving puzzles doesn't need to make you sweat which is more the point here as it seems there's no set time limits and no dangers.

  • How To Navigate Directories Faster In Linux

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • 8 Best Kodi Sports Addons For Streaming Live Sports In 2019

    Kodi media player is a boon for cord cutters. In an era where subscription-based streaming services are popping left and right, Kodi presents an easy method to watch movies free online. By installing some of the best Kodi addons and top Kodi repositories, you can access hundreds of millions of movies and TV shows.

  • NVMe Driver Now Available

    Due to the awesome work by long-time developer waddlesplash, nightly images after hrev53079 have read/write NVMe support built-in.

    What is NVMe? For those not keeping up with the latest advances in tech, NVMe is a M.2 form-factor flash-based storage device which attaches directly to the system’s PCI Express bus. These flash devices are present in modern desktops and laptops and offer transfer speeds of several GiB/s.

    These devices now show up in /dev/disk/nvme/ and are fully useable by Haiku.

  • Haiku OS Picks Up An NVMe Storage Driver

    Back during the BeOS days of the 90's, NVM Express solid-state storage obviously wasn't a thing but the open-source Haiku OS inspired by it now has an NVMe driver.

    Haiku that aims to be an open-source OS based off BeOS now has support for NVMe SSDs. This driver didn't make last September's Haiku R1 beta but now being found within the latest development code is for NVMe SSD hardware.

  • Join Us In New York City

    OSI Board Directors have broad backgrounds and experience, working in a variety of roles—Chief Open Source Officer, Chief Information Office, Chief Technology Officer, Open Source Program Manager, Community Manager, Developer, Architect, Engineer, Attorney—for both corporations and communities—Clojure Community, Cloud Native Computing Foundation, Debian Project, Free Software Foundation, Github, Google, Kubernetes Community, Microsoft, One Laptop Per Child, Open edX, Oracle, Python Software Foundation, Red Hat, Salesforce, Sun Microsystems , The Document Foundation, Wikimedia, Zalando... and many, many, more.

  • Mozilla Localization (L10N): L10n report: April edition

    The deadline to ship localization updates in Firefox 67 is quickly approaching (April 30). Firefox 68 is going to be an ESR version, so it’s particularly important to ship the best localization possible. The deadline for that will be June 25.

  • Why Companies Open Source Their Software?

    When a company releases its code as open source and contribute it to foundations like CNCF, it literally loses control over the project. What benefit is there in doing so? Why would you want to lose control over the very project you created? Dan Lahl of SAP has an answer: that’s the beauty of Open Source.

  • Avalanche Noise Generator Notes

    I’ll probably go through another iteration of tweaking before final integration, but afaik this is the smallest, lowest power open-source avalanche noise generator to date (slightly smaller than this one).

Software: LibreOffice, X-Gimp, COPR and Tauon Music Box

Filed under
Software
  • [LibreOffice] menubar updates [updated]
  • X-Gimp 2.10.10 [rev25]

    Image editors are ten-a-penny nowadays, so anything which wants attention from a divided audience needs to offer something quite special. X-Gimp is the portable version of GIMP (or the GNU Image Manipulation Program), which is one of the most powerful free image editors available and is frequently described as being a free alternative to the likes of Photoshop.
    This is a highly versatile tool which can be used as a basic drawing program but can also be employed to edit digital photographs to a professional level. Despite being free of charge, opting to use GIMP does not mean having to compromise on features. Layers, masks, channels, filters and special effects, in addition to the usual range of editing tools, are all on hand to make image editing as easy as possible.
    Powerful tools such as the correction mode which allows for the correction of barrel distortion and perspective problems are usually only found in expensive packages but are included here for anyone to try out. Whether you are an amateur digital photographer or a professional graphic artist, GIMP has something to offer you.

  • Fedora Magazine: 4 cool new projects to try in COPR for April 2019

    COPR is a collection of personal repositories for software that isn’t carried in Fedora. Some software doesn’t conform to standards that allow easy packaging. Or it may not meet other Fedora standards, despite being free and open source. COPR can offer these projects outside the Fedora set of packages. Software in COPR isn’t supported by Fedora infrastructure or signed by the project. However, it can be a neat way to try new or experimental software.

    Here’s a set of new and interesting projects in COPR.

  • Tauon Music Box – Excellent desktop music player

    Over the past few months I’ve covered scores of open source graphical music players. They’ve been a mixed bag. Some are genuinely excellent, others falling short of my (fairly) modest requirements. The music players I’ve mostly reviewed include ncmpy, ncmpc, and Cantata. I’ve also reviewed Nulloy, Museeks, Pragha Music Player, Yarock, qoob, aux.app, MellowPlayer, Kaku, Strawberry, Headset, Qmmp, and the truly sublime musikcube. The vast majority of the music players are GUI software.

    Continuing my series, here’s a further graphical music player. Bearing the moniker Tauon Music Box (Tauon), it’s based around disposable playlists and the assumption that folders are albums. They are also intended to function as a kind of workspace or to keep different music collections separate.

    The project instructs users to ensure they have an organized and structured music library, ideally with each album in its own folder. Sound advice.

    The software is written in the Python programming language. It uses Advanced Linux Sound Architecture (ALSA), not PulseAudio.

COBOL, C, C++ all due for updates in early 2020s

Filed under
Development

You have never heard of Chris Tandy, a Toronto-based programmer for IBM since 1985, but his work in standardizing computer programming languages is vital to everything you do as a software developer.

Tandy chairs the American INCITS PL22 group and is an officer in the global ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 22 committee, which are the primary standards bodies responsible not only for pivotal languages such as COBOL, C, and C++, but also for historic ones like Ada, APL (famously named as "A Programming Language"), and Fortran. They also deal in esoterica—try your hand at coding in PL/1 or REXX.

Future versions of the COBOL standard are now entirely in ISO hands, while before it was mostly an American project, Tandy explained. The ISO working group members intend to have the next version, known as an FDIS (final draft international standard), done in 2020.

Read more

Also: GNU patch another_hunk Function Double-Free Vulnerability [CVE-2018-6952]

Kdenlive Video Editor 19.04 Arrives with Major Changes in Tow

Filed under
KDE
Software
Movies

A major update to the Kdenlive video editor is now available for download.

Kdenlive 19.04 ships as part of KDE Applications 19.04, released on April 19.

This is the vaunted “refactoring” release we’ve written lots about, as the release announcement explains further:

“Kdenlive has gone through an extensive re-write of its core code as more than 60% of its internals has changed, improving its overall architecture.”

Read more

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

10 Best Linux Password Managers

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

Password managers are applications created to enable users to keep their passwords in a single place and absolve themselves of the need to remember every single one of their passwords.

They, in turn, encourage clients to use passwords that are as complex as possible and remember a single master password. Modern password managers even go an extra mile to keep other information such as card details, files, receipts, etc. safely locked away from prying eyes.

You might be wondering which password manager app will work best on your Linux machine and I am here to answer your question with my list of the 10 best Linux password managers.

Read more

Qt 6 Might Drop Their Short-Lived Universal Windows Platform Support

Filed under
Development
Microsoft

While the Universal Windows Platform (UWP) is needed for targeting the Xbox One, Microsoft HoloLens, and IoT, The Qt Company is thinking about gutting out their UWP support in the big Qt 6 tool-kit update.

The Qt Company is busy brainstorming changes for Qt 6, which is expected to see its maiden release in late 2020 barring any delays. One of those fundamental changes being tossed around is eliminating the Universal Windows Platform coverage with Qt 6.0.

Read more

Direct: Qt 6 Planning: Consideration of dropping support for UWP applications

Graphics and Hardware: NVIDIA Jetson Nano Developer Kit, Mesa, VirGL and Xeon Platinum

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • NVIDIA Jetson Nano Developer Kit - Introduction

    Let me introduce the brand new NVIDIA Jetson Nano Developer Kit, which is basically a quad-core 64bit ARM Cortex-A57 CPU with 128 GPU cores - suitable for all kinds of maker ideas: AI, Robotics, and of course for running Docker Containers…

  • Mesa's Vulkan Drivers See More Extension Work Ahead Of The 19.1 Branching

    Mesa 19.1 is due to be released at the end of May and for that to be the feature freeze is in two weeks followed by the weekly release candidates. With the feature development ending soon for this next quarterly Mesa release, the Radeon "RADV" and Intel "ANV" Vulkan driver developers in particular have been quite busy on their remaining feature work.

    On the RADV front, this morning brought VK_EXT_inline_uniform_block support. This is the Vulkan extension to let uniform blocks be backed directly with descriptor sets.

  • VIRTIO 1.1 Released With 2D Graphics Support, Evdev Input Device

    The Virtual I/O Device standard has christened its VIRTIO 1.1 specification this month. This is the virtualization standard around network/storage/graphics/other-hardware in mind for cross-hypervisor compatibility.

    VIRTIO 1.1 brings a GPU device type at this stage providing 2D acceleration that pairs with the VirGL efforts.

  • Running Intel MKL-DNN On 2 x Xeon Platinum 8280 CPUs With GCC 9 "Cascadelake" Tuning

    On the dual Xeon Platinum 8280 server built on a Gigabyte Xeon Scalable barebones setup while running Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, I did some quick tests of this initial MKL-DNN profile while using the current GCC 9.0.1 compiler. The GCC9 compiler will debut as stable in the next few weeks in the form of "GCC 9.1" as the first stable release and with this annual GNU compiler update is the initial "cascadelake" target that includes enabling AVX-512 VNNI support over the existing "skylake-avx512" target that is used for 1st Gen Xeon Scalable CPUs. I ran MKL-DNN benchmarks both when built by GCC9's skylake-avx512 target and then again with cascadelake while "-O3" was also part of the CFLAGS/CXXFLAGS. 

WWW: Indie Web Server, Administrating Nextcloud and Project Spotlight on Drupal

Filed under
Web
  • Indie Web Server 8.1.1: Reverse proxy (local mode)
  • This site now runs on Indie Web Server

    In the interests of eating my own hamster food1, I just switched this site from nginx to Indie Web Server.

    The only complication in the process was that I had to update the hostname of the server to match the domain name.

  • Administrating Nextcloud as a Snap

    As I’ve described in both my Linux in Action book and Linux in Motion course, Nextcloud is a powerful way to build a file sharing and collaboration service using only open source software running on your own secure infrastructure. It’s DropBox, Skype, and Google Docs all rolled into one, but without the vendor lock-in, security, and privacy fears.
    While the platform is certainly well-designed and polished, the initial installation can be tricky. Looking for proof? Try manually installing Nextcloud on an Ubuntu 18.04 server using any one of the detailed instructions available around the internet. Sometimes everything goes smoothly, but not always. You might encounter packages no longer supported by the official upstream repositories or changed dependencies. Don’t blame the people who wrote those guides: blame the pace of change in official Linux software repositories.

  • FOSS Project Spotlight: Drupal

    Drupal is a content management framework, and it's used to make many of the websites and applications you use every day. Drupal has great standard features, easy content authoring, reliable performance and excellent security. What sets Drupal apart is its flexibility; modularity is one of its core principles. Its tools help you build the versatile, structured content that ambitious web experiences need. With Drupal, you can build almost any integrated experience you can imagine.

  • Carlos Soriano: DrupalCon

    Last week I went to DrupalCon in the lovely city of Seattle invited by Tim, the executive director of Drupal.

    Our plan was to have a panel discussion about the tooling we use in FOSS organization such as GNOME, Debian, Drupal, etc. Specially since we recently transitioned to GitLab. The panel discussion was between Tim himself, Alex Wirt from Debian, Eliran Mesika and Tina Sturgis from GitLab and me. We were 5 out of 9 featured speakers!

BSD: FreeBSD Development News and BSD Now 294

Filed under
BSD
  • CFT for FreeBSD + ZoL

    We're pleased to make available images allowing testing of FreeBSD using ZFS on Linux. During this development cycle, the ZoL code has been made portable, and available in the ports tree as sysutils/zol and sysutils/zol-kmod, for userland/kernel bits respectively. While some have used these for testing, we felt it necessary to generate some installation images which are an easier method of getting up and started using ZoL. These images are built against FreeBSD 12-stable and 13-HEAD and will install a world / kernel with the base system ZFS disabled and the sysutils/zol ports pre-installed.

    It is possible to these with both UFS or ZFS on root, and we're looking for feedback on any stability issues or other regressions that you see vs the legacy ZFS in base.

  • FreeBSD Images Reworked With ZFS On Linux Code Up For Testing

    Last year FreeBSD developers decided to re-base their ZFS file-system code based on the "ZFS On Linux" port rather than the Illumos source tree where they originally had been acquiring the support for this BSD. There's now FreeBSD 12 and FreeBSD 13/Head images available for testing of this re-worked ZFS file-system support.

    Kris Moore of iXsystems has been involved in this large undertaking to get the FreeBSD ZFS code re-based over ZoL. They are still working on this big effort but have now spun some FreeBSD 12-STABLE and 13-HEAD installation images for those easily wanting to test out this ZoL'ed FreeBSD.

  • The SSH Tarpit | BSD Now 294

    A PI-powered Plan 9 cluster, an SSH tarpit, rdist for when Ansible is too much, falling in love with OpenBSD again, how I created my first FreeBSD port, the Tilde Institute of OpenBSD education and more.

Kipi Plugins 5.9.1 Released

Filed under
KDE

Kipi Plugins is a set of app plugins for manipulating images. They use libkipi which is released as part of KDE Applications. It used to get standalone releases and was then moved to be part of Digikam releases. Since Digikam 6 they have been deprecated by Digikam in favour of their new plugin framework DPlugins. While in KDE Frameworks the Purpose Framework is another newer project covering similar features.

However Kipi Plugins are still supported by KDE apps KPhotoAlbum, Gwenview, Spectacle so they shouldn’t disappear yet.

I’ve made a new release available for download now.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Graphics: AMDGPU and X.Org Elections

  • amdgpu drm-next-5.2
  • AMDGPU Has Another Round Of Updates Ahead Of Linux 5.2
    Feature work on DRM-Next for the Linux 5.2 kernel cycle is winding down while today AMD has sent in what could be their last round of AMDGPU feature updates for this next kernel release. Building off their earlier Linux 5.2 feature work are more updates. That earlier round brought new SMU11 enablement code for Vega 20, various other Vega 20 features, HMM preparations, and other code changes.
  • 2019 Election Round 2 voting OPEN
    To all X.Org Foundation Members: The round 2 of X.Org Foundation's annual election is now open and will remain open until 23:59 UTC on 2 May 2019. Four of the eight director seats are open during this election, with the four nominees receiving the highest vote totals serving as directors for two year terms. There were six candidates nominated. For a complete list of the candidates and their personal statements, please visit the 2019 X.Org Elections page at https://www.x.org/wiki/BoardOfDirectors/Elections/2019/ The new bylaw changes were approved in the first round of voting. Here are some instructions on how to cast your vote: Login to the membership system at: https://members.x.org/ If you do not remember your password, you can click on the "lost password" button and enter your user name. An e-mail will be sent to you with your password. If you have problems with the membership system, please e-mail membership at x.org. When you login you will see an "Active Ballots" section with the "X.Org 2019 Elections Round 2" ballot. When you click on that you will be presented with a page describing the ballot. At the bottom you will find a number of dropdowns that let you rank your candidates by order of preference. For the election: There is a pull-down selection box for 1st choice, 2nd, choice, and so on. Pick your candidates top to bottom in order of preference, avoiding duplicates. After you have completed your ballot, click the "Cast vote" button. Note that once you click this button, your votes will be cast and you will not be able to make further changes, so please make sure you are satisfied with your votes before clicking the "Cast vote" button. After you click the "Vote" button, the system will verify that you have completed a valid ballot. If your ballot is invalid (e.g., you duplicated a selection or did not answer the By-laws approval question), it will return you to the previous voting page. If your ballot is valid, your votes will be recorded and the system will show you a notice that your votes were cast. Note that the election will close at 23:59 UTC on 2 May 2019. At that time, the election committee will count the votes and present the results to the current board for validation. After the current board validates the results, the election committee will present the results to the Members. Harry, on behalf of the X.Org elections committee
  • It's Time To Re-Vote Following The Botched 2019 X.Org Elections
    While there were the recent X.Org Foundation board elections, a do-over was needed as their new custom-written voting software wasn't properly recording votes... So here's now your reminder to re-vote in these X.Org elections. At least with the initial round of voting they reached a super majority and the ballot question of whether the X.Org Foundation should formally fold FreeDesktop.org into its umbrella worked and that X.Org + FreeDesktop.org hook-up passed so all is well on that front. But for the Board of Directors elections, that's where re-voting is needed with the voting software that now correctly records the votes.

today's howtos

Games: Lutris and More

  • Epic Games Store Now On Linux Thanks To Lutris
    While the Epic Games Store itself is not officially supported by the open source Linux operating system, a third-party gaming client has now made sure that you can access the store and launcher on your own distro. The Epic Games Store is now accessible on Linux via the Lutris Gaming client. The client is available to all Linux users, who in the past has provided the same users a way to play PC games without the need to have Windows installed in their machines. Although Linux is not necessarily the go-to platform when it comes to PC gaming, there is a very niche audience dedicated to making the platform work in favor of open-source and to counteract what could be perceived as a heavily Windows-biased PC gaming community. Linux gaming is somewhat tedious to the relatively casual or normal user, although there are some within the Linux community that advertise and try to foster its growth in terms of gaming, as there are some games that can run better on the operating system. That is to say, if you have a lot of patience to try and make it work.
  • You Died but a Necromancer revived you is good fun in a small package
    Sometimes, simplicity is what makes a game and in the case of You Died BaNRY that's very true. The game has little depth to it but makes up for that in just how frantic and fun it can be. The entire gameplay is just you (or you and friends) attempting to cross a small level filled with platforms, spikes and all sorts of crazy traps. It's ridiculously easy to get into as well, since the controls are so basic all you need to worry about is your movement.
  • Forager is a weirdly addictive casual grinding game that has mined into my heart
    I'm not usually one for games that have you endlessly wander around, collect resources, build a little and repeat but Forager is so ridiculously charming it's lovely.
  • DragonRuby Game Toolkit, a cross-platform way to make games with Ruby
    Now for something a little different! Ryan "Icculus" Gordon, a name known for many Linux ports and SDL2 teamed up with indie developer Amir Rajan to create a new cross-platform toolkit. Why was it created? Well, in a nutshell they both "hate the complexity of today's engines" and this toolkit was actually made to help ship A Dark Room for the Nintendo Switch, which shows how versatile it is.

10+ Open Source Software Writing Tools That Every Writer Should Know

Being a professional writer requires two key things to help ensure success: commitment and support. The former comes from the writer, and the latter comes from the tools he (or she) uses to get the job done. Below is a list of 11 great and lesser-known writing tools or apps, many of which are free and open-source, that can help improve the quality of your writing and make you a more productive and successful writer. Read more