Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Investors to commercialize open source

Filed under
OSS

An investment venture will try to replicate the model of Gluecode, an open-source start-up acquired by IBM, with a fund dedicated solely to open-source software.

The venture, called Simula Labs, will take open-source development projects and seek to create businesses around them. That approach was employed at Gluecode, a company founded in 2001, which was bought by IBM earlier this month.

Simula Labs, which intends to announce its formation Monday, has gotten commitments from Redpoint Ventures and Mission Ventures to put in $10 million to $15 million for six to eight start-ups during the next three years. Winston Damarillo, who founded Gluecode and was chairman when it was sold, will act as CEO of Simula Labs.

Increasingly, entrepreneurs and venture capitalists are using open-source software and a subscription-pricing model to build new companies. In particular, the area of open-source infrastructure software, which is typically an expensive purchase for customers, has seen a great deal of activity.

One of the first ventures will be the creation of a company called LogicBlaze, which will be built around an open-source project called ActiveMQ, Damarillo said. The ActiveMQ software is an open-source version of standardized Java-based messaging software for sharing data between applications.

Simula also created a company called Mergere around Java-based software development life cycle tools.

Other areas Simula is looking at include directories and identity management, Damarillo said.

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

FreeOffice 2018 Release is Seamlessly Compatible With MS Office on Linux

FreeOffice 2018 has just been released and it provides even better support for Microsoft Office documents on Linux. Read more

Android Leftovers

today's howtos

Doxyqml 0.4.0

After almost two years, here comes a new version of Doxyqml, the QML filter for Doxygen. This new version adds a new command-line option: --namespace to wrap the generated C++ in a namespace, and makes the parser more robust. Nothing ground-breaking, but some nice changes nevertheless. What's interesting with this project is that I don't use it these days, but it still receives contributions from time to time. This puts me in the unusual position (for me) where most of my contributions to the project are reviewing code, cleaning things, a bit of infrastructure (I just added code coverage checks: 88%, not too bad) and release management. Surprisingly, I like doing this, I am happy to see this little tool remains useful enough that others keep it alive. Read more