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KDE Leftovers

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KDE
  • Mycroft Plasmoid Gets An Update

    Mycroft is your own Open Source personal digital assistant you can use your voice or the keyboard to ask questions (“what’s the weather in Tokyo? / Calculate Pi to 50 Digits”), set reminders, launch apps and even search your plasma desktop for files and recent documents, you could also start using mycroft for shouting instructions like “Create a new activity” or “Lock this computer” or “Switch Users” or “Send an SMS” at your computer on a regular basis.. The Mycroft Plasmoid is the GUI front-end for Mycroft on the Plasma Desktop.

  • [Krita] Interview with Sonia Bennett

    I want to thank the people who worked so hard to create Krita and keep making it better and better. Thank you for this opportunity to show my work here and I appreciate all the encouragement and support I have received from my friends and family. I hope my art can encourage more people to paint with Krita and develop their talent and creativity. If there is any way I can contribute to making Krita better, I would be most happy to help!

  • Kubuntu Podcast 21
  • Women Tech Makers with Qt

    And that day would not pass in blank here in Rio de Janeiro, so the Google Development Group of Rio organized a Women Tech Makers Rio meetup. And on that meetup I made my second version of my presentation: Qt – Your Toolkit for C++ and Python with the real write once deploy everywhere.

  • Cutelyst 1.5.0 released, I18N and HTTPS built-in

    Cutelyst the C++/Qt web framework just got a new stable release.

    Right after last release Matthias Fehring made another important contribution adding support for internationalization in Cutelyst, you can now have your Grantlee templates properly translated depending on user setting.

  • Almost perfect HiDPI experience on Linux (Xorg)

    In 2013 I bought a Macbook Pro 13” which came with a HiDPI display (also known as retina display). Already back then the support for a single HiDPI display was quite alright with KDE4 and a few tweaks here and there. Months later Qt5 got native HiDPI support and most applications switched from GTK2 to GTK3 and finally the outliers (chromium based apps, godot, arduino…) got support for higher DPIs as well.

More in Tux Machines

KDE Leftovers: digikam, KDevelop, Kate, GSoC, and Akademy

  • [digikam] Call to Test the Pre-Release of 5.6.0
    Once again a lot has been going on behind the scenes since the last release. The HTML gallery tool is back, database shrinking (e.g. purging stale thumbnails) is also supported on MySQL, grouping has been improved and additional sidecars can now be specified. Therefore the release of 5.6.0 will be (is already) delayed, as we would like to invite you to test all these features. As usual they are available in the pre-release bundles or obviously directly from the git repository. Please report any dysfunctions, unexpected behaviour or suggestions for improvement to our bug tracker.
  • KDevelop runtimes: Docker and Flatpak integration
    On my last blog post I discussed about how some assumptions such as the platform developed on can affect our development. We need to minimize it by empowering the developers with good tools so that they can develop properly. To that end, I introduced runtimes in our IDE to abstract platforms (much like on Gnome’s Builder or Qt Creator).
  • Kate 17.04.1 available for Windows
  • GSoC - Community Bonding Period with Krita
  • First month report: my feelings about gsoc
  • My Akademy Plans
    The Akademy programme (saturday, sunday) is actually pretty long; the conference days stretch into feels-like-evening to me. Of course, the Dutch are infamous for being “6pm at the dinner table, and eat potatoes” so my notion of evening may not match what works on the Mediterranean coast. Actually, I know it doesn’t since way back when at a Ubuntu Developer Summit in Sevilla it took some internal-clock-resetting to adjust to dinner closer to midnight than 18:00.

Gaming News: Shogun, SteamOS, Dawn Of War III

Galicia continues promotion of free software

The government of the autonomous region of Galicia (Spain) will continue to encourage the use of free and open source software solutions in the public and private sector. This week, the government published the ‘Free Software Plan 2017’, outlining 110 actions. In its ‘Plan de acción software libre 2017’, Galicia announces new initiatives to promote sharing and reuse of ICT solutions. The government is to share new software solutions, but will also emphasise the reuse of existing tools, pointing to Mancomún, the region’s software repository, the catalogue maintained by the Spanish central government’s Centre for Technology Transfer, and to the European Commission’s Joinup eGovernment portal. Read more

Linux Devices: Raspberry Pi, PIC32, Lime Micro

  • Apollo Lake COM Express module has onboard microSD and eMMC
    The COM Express Compact Type 6 “MSC C6C-AL” taps Intel’s Apollo Lake and offers up to 16GB DDR3L, microSD and optional eMMC, plus support for 5x PCIe slots.
  • How to create an Internet-in-a-Box on a Raspberry Pi
    If you're a homeschool parent or a teacher with a limited budget, Internet-in-a-Box might be just what you've been looking for. Its hardware requirements are very modest—a Raspberry Pi 3, a 64GB microSD card, and a power supply—but it provides access to a wealth of educational resources, even to students without internet access in the most remote areas of the world.
  • Squeeze Pi: Adventures in home audio
    The Squeezebox Touch provided a family-friendly interface to access our music library, either directly on the device or via a range of mobile applications. Logitech discontinued its development in 2012, but I was happy as they open sourced the Squeezebox's server software as Logitech Media Server and supplied the open source code used on the physical Squeezebox devices.
  • Evaluating PIC32 for Hardware Experiments
    PIC32 uses the MIPS32 instruction set. Since MIPS has been around for a very long time, and since the architecture was prominent in workstations, servers and even games consoles in the late 1980s and 1990s, remaining in widespread use in more constrained products such as routers as this century has progressed, the GNU toolchain (GCC, binutils) has had a long time to comfortably support MIPS. Although the computer you are using is not particularly likely to be MIPS-based, cross-compiling versions of these tools can be built to run on, say, x86 or x86-64 while generating MIPS32 executable programs.
  • Want a Raspberry Pi-powered PC? This $50 case turns the Pi into a desktop
    As long as you keep your expectations in check, it's perfectly feasible to run the latest Raspberry Pi as a desktop computer. However, the base Raspberry Pi 3 is a bare bones board, so anyone wanting to set it up as a desktop PC will need to buy their own case and other add-ons.
  • Open source LimeNET SDR computers run Ubuntu Core on Intel Core
    Lime Micro has launched three open source “LimeNET” SDR systems that run Ubuntu Core on Intel Core CPUs, including one with a new LimeSDR QPCIe board. Lime Microsystems has gone to Crowd Supply to launch three fully open source LimeNET computers for software defined radio (SDR) applications. The systems run Ubuntu “Snappy” Core Linux on Intel’s Core processors, enabling access to an open, community-based LimeSDR App Store using the Ubuntu Core snap packaging and update technology. The SDR processing is handled by three variations on last year’s open source LimeSDR board, which run Intel’s (Altera) Cyclone IV FPGA.