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Linux on Servers and Networks

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  • Parity Check: Expectations Around Monitoring Have Changed

    Monitoring software company BigPanda recently published its second annual State of Monitoring report, which provides data and a few answers. It is based on responses from over 1,500 IT pros. When comparing the 2017 and 2016 reports we found that many things have not changed. The top IT concerns are about security and downtime. The top IT monitoring challenges are quick remediation of service disruptions, getting money to buy monitoring tools and reducing the number of unimportant alerts being generated. Interestingly, even the top performance key performance indicators (KPIs) are the same, with customer satisfaction cited by 73 percent, followed service level agreements (SLAs) compliance, incident volume and mean time to repair (MTTR).

  • IT Automation Best Practices for Network Engineers and Architects

    Software-defined networking (SDN) for L2 and L3 (layer two and three) networking and network function virtualization (NFV) for L4-L7 network services have remained elusive for many IT departments due to the lack of maturation of the technology or specialized skills needed to implement them. But, network automation doesn’t have to be an all or nothing proposition. Software-defined approaches for application and networking services combined with scripting and orchestration tools such as Ansible are enabling practical approaches to network automation that doesn’t require boiling the ocean. In this article, I’ll examine some best practices for network automation in L4-L7 services that can drive immediate improvements in your network.

  • Serverless: Redefining DevOps

    There is a dramatic shift underway in how many in house, and commercial, DevOps tools are being created and used

    The growth in interest in serverless computing continues at pace, and for many organisations serverless technologies such as AWS Lambda, Azure Functions or Google Cloud Functions are becoming an essential part of their development and operations toolkit.

  • IT Workers Say Their Companies Are Migrating to Virtual Infrastructures, Study Says

    An overwhelming 86 percent of respondents to a Chef survey of IT practitioners have completed or are in the progress of migrating from a physical infrastructure to a virtual one.

    Chef interviewed more than 1,500 global IT workers that use Chef servers and found that many emerging and legacy technologies are being rebuilt around the needs of developers. In addition, companies are piloting and adapting new technologies like cloud, containers, and microservices in search of speed.

  • ARM Antes Up For An HPC Software Stack

    The HPC community is trying to solve the critical compute challenges of next generation high performance computing and ARM considers itself well-positioned to act as a catalyst in this regard. Applications like machine learning and scientific computing are driving demands for orders of magnitude improvements in capacity, capability and efficiency to achieve exascale computing for next generation deployments.

    ARM has been taking a co-design approach with the ecosystem from silicon to system design to application development to provide innovative solutions that address this challenge. The recent Allinea acquisition is one example of ARM’s commitment to HPC, but ARM has worked with the HPC community to develop compilers, libraries, and other key tools that are now available for ARM HPC deployments in 2017.

  • Mesosphere Extends Data Services Reach

    In general, Hsu says, IT organizations are making it clear that they need platforms that go well beyond merely orchestrating containers and images. Applications running in production environments require access to a full range of services that IT operations teams need to be able to manage at scale, he says. Container orchestration engines such as Kubernetes may meet the requirements of an individual developer, but most IT operations teams are looking manage multiple applications accessing hundreds of services that all need to be centrally managed, says Hsu.

More in Tux Machines

Games: The Spicy Meatball Saves The Day, Uebergame, DwarfCorp

Android Leftovers

Baidu puts open source deep learning into smartphones

A year after it open sourced its PaddlePaddle deep learning suite, Baidu has dropped another piece of AI tech into the public domain – a project to put AI on smartphones. Mobile Deep Learning (MDL) landed at GitHub under the MIT license a day ago, along with the exhortation “Be all eagerness to see it”. MDL is a convolution-based neural network designed to fit on a mobile device. Baidu said it is suitable for applications such as recognising objects in an image using a smartphone's camera. Read more

AMD and Linux Kernel

  • Ataribox runs Linux on AMD chip and will cost at least $250
    Atari released more details about its Ataribox game console today, disclosing for the first time that the machine will run Linux on an Advanced Micro Devices processor and cost $250 to $300. In an exclusive interview last week with GamesBeat, Ataribox creator and general manager Feargal Mac (short for Mac Conuladh) said Atari will begin a crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo this fall and launch the Ataribox in the spring of 2018. The Ataribox will launch with a large back catalog of the publisher’s classic games. The idea is to create a box that makes people feel nostalgic about the past, but it’s also capable of running the independent games they want to play today, like Minecraft or Terraria.
  • Linux 4.14 + ROCm Might End Up Working Out For Kaveri & Carrizo APUs
    It looks like the upstream Linux 4.14 kernel may end up playing nicely with the ROCm OpenCL compute stack, if you are on a Kaveri or Carrizo system. While ROCm is promising as AMD's open-source compute stack complete with OpenCL 1.2+ support, its downside is that for now not all of the necessary changes to the Linux kernel drivers, LLVM Clang compiler infrastructure, and other components are yet living in their upstream repositories. So for now it can be a bit hairy to setup ROCm compute on your own system, especially if running a distribution without official ROCm packages. AMD developers are working to get all their changes upstreamed in each of the respective sources, but it's not something that will happen overnight and given the nature of Linux kernel development, etc, is something that will still take months longer to complete.
  • Latest Linux kernel release candidate was a sticky mess
    Linus Torvalds is not noted as having the most even of tempers, but after a weekend spent scuba diving a glitch in the latest Linux kernel release candidate saw the Linux overlord merely label the mess "nasty". The release cycle was following its usual cadence when Torvalds announced Linux 4.14 release candidate 2, just after 5:00PM on Sunday, September 24th.
  • Linus Torvalds Announces the Second Release Candidate of Linux Kernel 4.14 LTS
    Development of the Linux 4.14 kernel series continues with the second Release Candidate (RC) milestone, which Linus Torvalds himself announces this past weekend. The update brings more updated drivers and various improvements. Linus Torvalds kicked off the development of Linux kernel 4.14 last week when he announced the first Release Candidate, and now the second RC is available packed full of goodies. These include updated networking, GPU, and RDMA drivers, improvements to the x86, ARM, PowerPC, PA-RISC, MIPS, and s390 hardware architectures, various core networking, filesystem, and documentation changes.