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Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • Gnome Encfs Manager – An Ease way to Create a Encrypted Directory in Linux

    Gnome Encfs Manager (short name is GEncfsM) is a tool to manage EncFS filesystems in Linux whihc is best alternative for Cryptkeeper and has lots of unique features. It’s very useful when you use EncFS with cloud sync / storage services such as Dropbox, etc.,

    GEncfsM is an easy to use manager and mounter for encfs stashes featuring per-stash configuration, Gnome Keyring support (standard authentication mechanism). Tray menu is inspired by Cryptkeeper. You have a option to mount the directory automatically on login.

  • `PB For Desktop`: Cross-Platform Desktop App For Pushbullet (Supports Android Notification Mirroring On Linux Desktops)

    KDE Connect (with KDE Connect Indicator for Unity and other desktops that support AppIndicators) is great for integrating Android devices with your desktop. However, KDE Connect depends on quite a few KDE packages, which some users don't want to install on their GTK-based desktops.

    An alternative to KDE Connect is Pushbullet. While the free version has some limitations and it doesn't offer all the features available with KDE Connect, it does provide options to send files up to 25MB, send messages from your desktop (limited to 100/month in the free version, and a storage cap of 2GB) and most importantly, it can mirror your phone's notifications on the desktop.

  • Oracle Releases VirtualBox 5.1.18 & 5.0.36 with Improvements for Shared Folders

    Oracle announced the availability of two new maintenance updates for the 5.1 and 5.0 stable branches of the open-source and cross-platform Virtualbox virtualization software for all supported platforms.

    VirtualBox 5.1.18 is now the newest and most advanced version of the 5.1 series, bringing improvements for Shared Folders by addressing two regressions discovered in the previous point release. Specifically, it fixes an issue with access to long paths and case-insensitive filename access, but only for Windows guests.

  • PC Building Simulator for Windows and Linux

    PC Building Simulator is a game for Windows and Linux devices in which you simulate the building of desktop computer systems.

  • PC Building Simulator pre-alpha game released (free)

    This week a new Sim game has been released in alpha testing stage and free to donwload for those interested in the topic. The PC Building Simulator v0.01 is available to download now for Windows and Linux users.

  • Chrome Could Start Using Native Notifications on Linux

    Google Chrome could soon use native notifications on Linux desktops. A bug report asking for the browser to use a Linux desktop environment’s notification system was filed late last year but recently become active again. Google Chrome (and Chromium) currently use the Chrome Notification API to show alerts from websites, extensions and Chrome Apps on Windows, macOS and Linux.

  • Firefox Goes PulseAudio Only, Leaves ALSA Users With No Sound

    If you’re a Linux user who upgraded to Firefox 52 only to find that the browser no longer plays sound, you’re not alone.

    Firefox 52 saw release last week and it makes PulseAudio a hard dependency — meaning ALSA only desktops are no longer supported.

    Ubuntu uses PulseAudio by default (as most modern Linux distributions do) so the switch won’t affect most — but some Linux users and distros do prefer, for various reasons, to use ALSA, which is part of the Linux kernel.

  • GNU Guile 2.2.0 released

    We are pleased to announce GNU Guile 2.2.0, the first of a new stable release series. More than 6 years in the making, Guile 2.2 includes a new optimizing compiler and high-performance register virtual machine. Compared to the old 2.0 series, real-world programs often show a speedup of 30% or more with Guile 2.2.

    Besides bringing the compiler and virtual machine, Guile 2.2 removes limitations on you and your programs by lowering memory usage, speeding up the "eval" interpreter, providing better support for multi-core programming, and last but not least, removing any fixed stack size limit. With Guile 2.2, you can recurse to your heart's content!

More in Tux Machines

Games: The Spicy Meatball Saves The Day, Uebergame, DwarfCorp

Android Leftovers

Baidu puts open source deep learning into smartphones

A year after it open sourced its PaddlePaddle deep learning suite, Baidu has dropped another piece of AI tech into the public domain – a project to put AI on smartphones. Mobile Deep Learning (MDL) landed at GitHub under the MIT license a day ago, along with the exhortation “Be all eagerness to see it”. MDL is a convolution-based neural network designed to fit on a mobile device. Baidu said it is suitable for applications such as recognising objects in an image using a smartphone's camera. Read more

AMD and Linux Kernel

  • Ataribox runs Linux on AMD chip and will cost at least $250
    Atari released more details about its Ataribox game console today, disclosing for the first time that the machine will run Linux on an Advanced Micro Devices processor and cost $250 to $300. In an exclusive interview last week with GamesBeat, Ataribox creator and general manager Feargal Mac (short for Mac Conuladh) said Atari will begin a crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo this fall and launch the Ataribox in the spring of 2018. The Ataribox will launch with a large back catalog of the publisher’s classic games. The idea is to create a box that makes people feel nostalgic about the past, but it’s also capable of running the independent games they want to play today, like Minecraft or Terraria.
  • Linux 4.14 + ROCm Might End Up Working Out For Kaveri & Carrizo APUs
    It looks like the upstream Linux 4.14 kernel may end up playing nicely with the ROCm OpenCL compute stack, if you are on a Kaveri or Carrizo system. While ROCm is promising as AMD's open-source compute stack complete with OpenCL 1.2+ support, its downside is that for now not all of the necessary changes to the Linux kernel drivers, LLVM Clang compiler infrastructure, and other components are yet living in their upstream repositories. So for now it can be a bit hairy to setup ROCm compute on your own system, especially if running a distribution without official ROCm packages. AMD developers are working to get all their changes upstreamed in each of the respective sources, but it's not something that will happen overnight and given the nature of Linux kernel development, etc, is something that will still take months longer to complete.
  • Latest Linux kernel release candidate was a sticky mess
    Linus Torvalds is not noted as having the most even of tempers, but after a weekend spent scuba diving a glitch in the latest Linux kernel release candidate saw the Linux overlord merely label the mess "nasty". The release cycle was following its usual cadence when Torvalds announced Linux 4.14 release candidate 2, just after 5:00PM on Sunday, September 24th.
  • Linus Torvalds Announces the Second Release Candidate of Linux Kernel 4.14 LTS
    Development of the Linux 4.14 kernel series continues with the second Release Candidate (RC) milestone, which Linus Torvalds himself announces this past weekend. The update brings more updated drivers and various improvements. Linus Torvalds kicked off the development of Linux kernel 4.14 last week when he announced the first Release Candidate, and now the second RC is available packed full of goodies. These include updated networking, GPU, and RDMA drivers, improvements to the x86, ARM, PowerPC, PA-RISC, MIPS, and s390 hardware architectures, various core networking, filesystem, and documentation changes.