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Linux and FOSS Events

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  • Linux Plumbers Conference Call for Refereed Presentations

    We are pleased to announce the Call for Refereed Presentation
    Proposals for the 2017 edition of the Linux Plumbers Conference, which
    will be held in Los Angeles, CA, USA on 13-15 September in conjunction
    with The Linux Foundation Open Source Summit.

    Refereed Presentations are 45 minutes in length and should focus on a
    specific aspect of the “plumbing” in the Linux system. Examples of
    Linux plumbing include core kernel subsystems, core libraries,
    windowing systems, management tools, device support, media
    creation/playback, and so on. The best presentations are not about
    finished work, but rather problems, proposals, or proof-of-concept
    solutions that require face-to-face discussions and debate.

  • Bosch Connected Experience: Eclipse Hono and MsgFlo

    Since this is a hackathon, there is a competition on projects make in this event. To make the Hono-to-MsgFlo connectivity, and Flowhub visual programming capabilities more demoable, I ended up hacking together a quick example project — a Bosch XDK controlled air theremin.

  • Codes of Conduct

    These days, most large FLOSS communities have a "Code of Conduct"; a document that outlines the acceptable (and possibly not acceptable) behaviour that contributors to the community should or should not exhibit. By writing such a document, a community can arm itself more strongly in the fight against trolls, harassment, and other forms of antisocial behaviour that is rampant on the anonymous medium that the Internet still is.

    Writing a good code of conduct is no easy matter, however. I should know -- I've been involved in such a process twice; once for Debian, and once for FOSDEM. While I was the primary author for the Debian code of conduct, the same is not true for the FOSDEM one; I was involved, and I did comment on a few early drafts, but the core of FOSDEM's current code was written by another author. I had wanted to write a draft myself, but then this one arrived and I didn't feel like I could improve it, so it remained.

  • Keynote: Building and Motivating Engineering Teams - Camille Fournier, Senior Thinker and Raconteur

    Maintaining respect is key to building a successful team, according to Camille Fournier, at the Open Source Leadership Summit in February.

  • Keynote: An Exploration of Citrix Delivery Networks by Danny Phillips
  • Growing Up Node by Trevor Livingston, HomeAway

    Trevor Livingston, principal architect at HomeAway, offers insight on how to introduce Node into companies at Node.js Interactive.

More in Tux Machines

Thunderbolt 3 in Fedora 28

  • The state of Thunderbolt 3 in Fedora 28
    Fedora 28 is around the corner and I wanted to highlight what we did to make the Thunderbolt 3 experience as smooth as possible. Although this post focuses on Fedora 28 for what is currently packaged and shipping, all changes are of course available upstream and should hit other distributions in the future.
  • Thunderbolt 3 Support Is In Great Shape For Fedora 28
    Red Hat developers have managed to deliver on their goals around improving Thunderbolt support on the Linux desktop with the upcoming Fedora 28 distribution update. This has been part of their goal of having secure Thunderbolt support where users can authorize devices and/or restrict access to certain capabilities on a per-device basis, which is part of Red Hat's Bolt project and currently has UI elements for the GNOME desktop.

New Heptio Announcements

Android Leftovers

New Terminal App in Chome OS Hints at Upcoming Support for Linux Applications

According to a Reddit thread, a Chromebook user recently spotted a new Terminal app added to the app drawer when running on the latest Chrome OS Dev channel. Clicking the icon would apparently prompt the user to install the Terminal app, which requires about 200 MB of disk space. The installation prompt notes the fact that the Terminal app can be used to develop on your Chromebook. It also suggests that users will be able to run native apps and command-line tools seamlessly and securely. Considering the fact that Chrome OS is powered by the Linux kernel, this can only mean one thing. Read more