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Linux and FOSS Events

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  • Linux Plumbers Conference Call for Refereed Presentations

    We are pleased to announce the Call for Refereed Presentation
    Proposals for the 2017 edition of the Linux Plumbers Conference, which
    will be held in Los Angeles, CA, USA on 13-15 September in conjunction
    with The Linux Foundation Open Source Summit.

    Refereed Presentations are 45 minutes in length and should focus on a
    specific aspect of the “plumbing” in the Linux system. Examples of
    Linux plumbing include core kernel subsystems, core libraries,
    windowing systems, management tools, device support, media
    creation/playback, and so on. The best presentations are not about
    finished work, but rather problems, proposals, or proof-of-concept
    solutions that require face-to-face discussions and debate.

  • Bosch Connected Experience: Eclipse Hono and MsgFlo

    Since this is a hackathon, there is a competition on projects make in this event. To make the Hono-to-MsgFlo connectivity, and Flowhub visual programming capabilities more demoable, I ended up hacking together a quick example project — a Bosch XDK controlled air theremin.

  • Codes of Conduct

    These days, most large FLOSS communities have a "Code of Conduct"; a document that outlines the acceptable (and possibly not acceptable) behaviour that contributors to the community should or should not exhibit. By writing such a document, a community can arm itself more strongly in the fight against trolls, harassment, and other forms of antisocial behaviour that is rampant on the anonymous medium that the Internet still is.

    Writing a good code of conduct is no easy matter, however. I should know -- I've been involved in such a process twice; once for Debian, and once for FOSDEM. While I was the primary author for the Debian code of conduct, the same is not true for the FOSDEM one; I was involved, and I did comment on a few early drafts, but the core of FOSDEM's current code was written by another author. I had wanted to write a draft myself, but then this one arrived and I didn't feel like I could improve it, so it remained.

  • Keynote: Building and Motivating Engineering Teams - Camille Fournier, Senior Thinker and Raconteur

    Maintaining respect is key to building a successful team, according to Camille Fournier, at the Open Source Leadership Summit in February.

  • Keynote: An Exploration of Citrix Delivery Networks by Danny Phillips
  • Growing Up Node by Trevor Livingston, HomeAway

    Trevor Livingston, principal architect at HomeAway, offers insight on how to introduce Node into companies at Node.js Interactive.

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

GNOME: Mutter, gresg, and GTK

  • Mutter 3.25.2 Has Bug Fixes, Some Performance Work
    Florian Müllner has pushed out an updated Mutter 3.25.2 window manager / compositor release in time for the GNOME 3.25.2 milestone in the road to this September's GNOME 3.26 release. Mutter 3.25.2 has a number of fixes ranging from fixing frame updates in certain scenarios, accessible screen coordinates on X11, some build issues, and more.
  • gresg – an XML resources generator
    For me, create GTK+ custom widgets is a very common task. Using templates for them, too.
  • Free Ideas for UI Frameworks, or How To Achieve Polished UI
    Ever since the original iPhone came out, I’ve had several ideas about how they managed to achieve such fluidity with relatively mediocre hardware. I mean, it was good at the time, but Android still struggles on hardware that makes that look like a 486… It’s absolutely my fault that none of these have been implemented in any open-source framework I’m aware of, so instead of sitting on these ideas and trotting them out at the pub every few months as we reminisce over what could have been, I’m writing about them here. I’m hoping that either someone takes them and runs with them, or that they get thoroughly debunked and I’m made to look like an idiot. The third option is of course that they’re ignored, which I think would be a shame, but given I’ve not managed to get the opportunity to implement them over the last decade, that would hardly be surprising. I feel I should clarify that these aren’t all my ideas, but include a mix of observation of and conjecture about contemporary software. This somewhat follows on from the post I made 6 years ago(!) So let’s begin.

Distro News: Alpine, Devuan, and openSUSE

OSS Leftovers