Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux Graphics and Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Pipeline Statistics Queries Wired Up For Intel ANV Vulkan Driver

    Pipeline statistics queries is the latest Vulkan capability being added to the Intel "ANV" Mesa Vulkan driver.

    Pipeline statistics queries allow applications to query a set of Vulkan pipeline counters. Developers interested in learning more about the feature can see the Vulkan documentation.

  • SUSE Developers Publish Radeon GCN Backend Code For GCC Compiler

    While the AMDGPU "GCN" compiler support in LLVM is quite mature now, the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) hasn't yet received a full-fledged GCN compiler back-end for AMD GPUs. SUSE developers have been working on that for AMD and today they have published their code branch. This GCN back-end for GCC is primarily focused on compute capabilities rather than compiling graphics shaders.

  • xf86-video-ati 7.9 / xf86-video-amdgpu 1.3 DDX Driver Updates
  • Trying Out The New OpenGL Threaded Dispatch In Mesa 17.1

    At the beginning of today, OpenGL threaded dispatch landed in Mesa as work that's existed in patch form for years but was recently revived for Mesa Git due to the potential for significant performance gains in select scenarios.

  • Open Source Radeon & AMDGPU Linux Drivers Updated for AMD GPUs with Improvements

    Michel Dänzer announced today the general availability of new maintenance updates for the open source AMDGPU (xf86-video-amdgpu) and Radeon (xf86-video-ati) graphics drivers.

    xf86-video-ati 7.9.0 and xf86-video-amdgpu 1.3.0 are now available for download and they are coming soon to a GNU/Linux distro near you to improve your gaming experience if you're using an AMD Radeon graphics card.

    Both releases come with the ability to use DRM render nodes for DRI3 clients if they are available, and allow the TearFree option to be toggled at runtime by using a RandR output property called "TearFree."

  • NVIDIA might have more open drivers in future on Linux

    Here’s an interesting one, a developer from NVIDIA noted on the Linux Kernel Mailing List that NVIDIA has been designing some new open source drivers. So I did some digging and got an interesting response.

  • Hammering The AMD Ryzen 7 1800X With An Intense, Threaded Workload

    Today I got around to running a very heavy/demanding, very real-world workload on the AMD Ryzen 7 1800X that I've been meaning to test with this Zen CPU.

    The workload I've been running on the Ryzen 7 1800X the past few hours is that of Open Porous Media, the open-source OPM project is a growing initiative around research and simulators for modeling and simulation of porous media processes, including a reservoir simulator and permeability upscaling. This sort of workload has relevance in areas like oil and natural gas industries.

More in Tux Machines

Thunderbolt 3 in Fedora 28

  • The state of Thunderbolt 3 in Fedora 28
    Fedora 28 is around the corner and I wanted to highlight what we did to make the Thunderbolt 3 experience as smooth as possible. Although this post focuses on Fedora 28 for what is currently packaged and shipping, all changes are of course available upstream and should hit other distributions in the future.
  • Thunderbolt 3 Support Is In Great Shape For Fedora 28
    Red Hat developers have managed to deliver on their goals around improving Thunderbolt support on the Linux desktop with the upcoming Fedora 28 distribution update. This has been part of their goal of having secure Thunderbolt support where users can authorize devices and/or restrict access to certain capabilities on a per-device basis, which is part of Red Hat's Bolt project and currently has UI elements for the GNOME desktop.

New Heptio Announcements

Android Leftovers

New Terminal App in Chome OS Hints at Upcoming Support for Linux Applications

According to a Reddit thread, a Chromebook user recently spotted a new Terminal app added to the app drawer when running on the latest Chrome OS Dev channel. Clicking the icon would apparently prompt the user to install the Terminal app, which requires about 200 MB of disk space. The installation prompt notes the fact that the Terminal app can be used to develop on your Chromebook. It also suggests that users will be able to run native apps and command-line tools seamlessly and securely. Considering the fact that Chrome OS is powered by the Linux kernel, this can only mean one thing. Read more