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Security Leftovers

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Security

  • Security updates for Thursday
  • Dormant Linux kernel vulnerability finally slayed

    A recently resolved vulnerability in the Linux kernel that had the potential to allow an attacker to gain privilege escalation or cause denial of service went undiscovered for seven years.

    Positive Technologies expert, Alexander Popov, found a race condition in the n_hdlc driver that leads to double-freeing of kernel memory. This Linux kernel flaw might be exploited for privilege escalation in the operating system. The (CVE-2017-2636) bug was evaluated as dangerous with a CVSS v3 score of 7.8, towards the higher end of the scale which runs from 1-10.

  • Another Years-Old Flaw Fixed in the Linux Kernel

    The Linux team has patched a "dangerous" vulnerability in the Linux kernel that allowed attackers to elevate their access rights and crash affected systems.

    The security issue, tracked as CVE-2017-2636, existed in the Linux kernel for the past seven years, after being introduced in the code in 2009.

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Android Leftovers

Ryzen 7 2700X CPUFreq Scaling Governor Benchmarks On Ubuntu Linux

With this week's Ryzen 5 2600X + Ryzen 7 2700X benchmarks some thought the CPUFreq scaling driver or rather its governors may have been limiting the performance of these Zen+ CPUs, so I ran some additional benchmarks this weekend. Those launch-day Ryzen 5 2600X / Ryzen 7 2700X Ubuntu Linux benchmarks were using the "performance" governor, but some have alleged that the performance governor may now actually hurt AMD systems... Ondemand, of course, is the default CPUFreq governor on Ubuntu and most other Linux distributions. Some also have said the "schedutil" governor that makes use of the kernel's scheduler utilization data may do better on AMD. So I ran some extra benchmarks while changing between CPUFreq's ondemand (default), performance (normally the best for performance, and what was used in our CPU tests), schedutil (the newest option), and powersave (if you really just care about conserving power). Read more