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  • How to build an IoT project with Mongoose OS

    It could be a small single-board computer like the Raspberry Pi, which costs around US $30, BeagleBone for approximately US $60, Intel Edison for US $70, or other similar devices. These computers usually run Linux. These are suitable for some tasks, like being a gateway device, but again they are quite large, very power hungry, and too expensive to run on things like sensors, wearables, and small appliances.

  • A Look at MINIBIAN: A Minimalist Image for Raspberry Pi

    My way of celebrating Pi Day (March 14th = 3.14) was to take a look at an awesome little image for the Raspberry Pi called Minibian. A new edition of Minibian was released on 12 March 2017, updating the image with support for the latest RPi 3B and other improvements.

    Minibian is based on and fully compatible with the official Raspbian “Jesse” software. It is meant to be used for embedded linux and server type situations, and that is great for IoT scenarios. There is no desktop environment and much effort has gone to providing a minimalist operating system that conserves system resources. The 12 March release of Minibian boasts a 15 second boot time, 31 MB of RAM usage, 477 MB of disk space usage, and is small enough to fit on a 1GB SD card. My test install and inspection of Minibian shows that these claims are indeed correct.

  • Tough, 84 x 55mm Intel Atom COM offers soldered memory

    Eurotech’s rugged, Linux-friendly “CPU-163-15” is an 84 x 55mm COM Express Type 10 Mini module with Bay Trail Atoms and soldered ECC and eMMC.

    Eurotech’s Intel Atom E3800 “Bay Trail” based CPU-163-15 COM Express Type 10 Mini module continues the Amaro, Italy based company’s tradition of offering rugged embedded boards with support for its cloud-based Everyware Software Framework (ESF) IoT platform. Other recent Intel-based COM Express modules from Eurotech include the CPU-161-18, a headless COM Express Type 6 Compact module with a 12-core Xeon-D1500 from the Broadwell generation.

  • BQ Deutschland releases Android 7.1.1 OTA for the Aquaris X5 Plus (while most of us still haven't received 7.0)

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

GNOME: Mutter, gresg, and GTK

  • Mutter 3.25.2 Has Bug Fixes, Some Performance Work
    Florian Müllner has pushed out an updated Mutter 3.25.2 window manager / compositor release in time for the GNOME 3.25.2 milestone in the road to this September's GNOME 3.26 release. Mutter 3.25.2 has a number of fixes ranging from fixing frame updates in certain scenarios, accessible screen coordinates on X11, some build issues, and more.
  • gresg – an XML resources generator
    For me, create GTK+ custom widgets is a very common task. Using templates for them, too.
  • Free Ideas for UI Frameworks, or How To Achieve Polished UI
    Ever since the original iPhone came out, I’ve had several ideas about how they managed to achieve such fluidity with relatively mediocre hardware. I mean, it was good at the time, but Android still struggles on hardware that makes that look like a 486… It’s absolutely my fault that none of these have been implemented in any open-source framework I’m aware of, so instead of sitting on these ideas and trotting them out at the pub every few months as we reminisce over what could have been, I’m writing about them here. I’m hoping that either someone takes them and runs with them, or that they get thoroughly debunked and I’m made to look like an idiot. The third option is of course that they’re ignored, which I think would be a shame, but given I’ve not managed to get the opportunity to implement them over the last decade, that would hardly be surprising. I feel I should clarify that these aren’t all my ideas, but include a mix of observation of and conjecture about contemporary software. This somewhat follows on from the post I made 6 years ago(!) So let’s begin.

Distro News: Alpine, Devuan, and openSUSE

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