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How To Use Your Oven To Surf The Web

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Sci/Tech

A new broadband networking scheme could have Web surfers plugging their computers into the oven.

San Diego-based startup Nethercomm says it has developed a technology it calls broadband-in-gas, which sends a wireless signal down existing natural gas pipelines to homes.

"It's kind of like those old ships where you used to talk into a pipe, and they'd hear the message at the other end," says Chief Executive Pat Nunally. "This is a cheap way to distribute broadband to everyone, without necessarily having to invest a whole lot of money."

It might sound crazy, yet alternative forms of broadband communication--like sending a signal down a gas pipe or power line, or beaming it from a floating blimp--are increasingly being touted as the solution to the "last mile" problem of how to get high-speed data connections from local hubs directly into homes.

You've got to give the providers credit for creative thinking.

Full Story.

Tried it

I tried to plug in my modem but the spark .. KABOOM!

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