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Linux Foundation Executive Director's Statement on Immigration Ban

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The Linux operating system underlies nearly every piece of technology in modern life, from phones to satellites to web searches to your car. For the Linux Foundation, openness is both a part of our core principles and also a matter of practicality. Linux, the largest cooperatively developed software project in history, is created by thousands of people from around the world and made available to anyone to use for free. The Linux Foundation also hosts dozens of other open source projects covering security, networking, cloud, automotive, blockchain and other areas. Last year, the Linux Foundation hosted over 20,000 people from 85 countries at more than 150 events. Open source is a fundamentally global activity but America has always served as the hub for innovation and collaboration. Linux’s creator, Linux Foundation Fellow Linus Torvalds, immigrated to America from Finland and became a citizen. The Administration's policy on immigration restrictions is antithetical to the values of openness and community that have enabled open source to succeed. I oppose the immigration ban.

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Is there no end to this stupidity?

I don't know any American that is opposed to immigration, including President Trump. We are all the progeny of immigrants. However, we are a nation of laws, including immigration laws, which our ancestors followed when coming to this country with the intent of becoming an American. Learning and accepting our culture as their own, learning our constitution and agreeing to abide by it and all of the other laws of this nation. Learning to speak our language and striving to become one of us.

They didn't sneak across the border with the sole purpose of exploiting the good will of the American people. They didn't come here pretending to need asylum while planning to implement sharia law and subvert our constitutional republic.

There is a stark difference between an immigrant and an illegal immigrant. I wonder which category Linus falls under.

An illegal immigrant is a criminal by virtue of just being in our country without our permission. It is against our law and they should be deported along with their families. They have no right to be here just as I have no right to be in their country illegally. And by the way, their country would not tolerate my doing so.

America didn't accidentally elect President Trump. Americans have had enough of the progressive socialist agenda and said "enough." We took our country back.

As someone who once thought he was something special once said, I think around 2008, "we won, get over it."

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